Sample records for latitude tilt radiation

  1. A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

  2. Fluid observers and tilting cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; S. Hervik; W. C. Lim

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter $\\gamma$ in which there are two naturally defined time-like congruences, a geometrically defined geodesic congruence and a non-geodesic fluid congruence. We establish an appropriate set of boost formulae relating the physical variables, and consequently the observed quantities, in the two frames. We study expanding spatially homogeneous tilted perfect fluid models, with an emphasis on future evolution with extreme tilt. We show that for ultra-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma>4/3$), generically the tilt becomes extreme at late times and the fluid observers will reach infinite expansion within a finite proper time and experience a singularity similar to that of the big rip. In addition, we show that for sub-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma < 4/3$), the tilt can become extreme at late times and give rise to an effective quintessential equation of state. To establish the connection with phantom cosmology and quintessence, we calculate the effective equation of state in the models under consideration and we determine the future asymptotic behaviour of the tilting models in the fluid frame variables using the boost formulae. We also discuss spatially inhomogeneous models and tilting spatially homogeneous models with a cosmological constant.

  3. The Tilt Intonation Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Paul

    The tilt intonation model facilitates automatic analysis and synthesis of intonation. The analysis algorithm detects intonational events in F0 contours and parameterises them in terms of the continuously varying parameters. ...

  4. Tilted-mirror semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, J.; Lang, R.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad-area GaAs heterostructure lasers with a tilted mirror were demonstrated for the first time, with the tilted mirror fabricated by etching. These lasers operate in a smooth and stable single lateral mode with a high degree of spatial coherence. The suppression of filamentation manifests itself in a high degree of reproducibility in the near-field pattern.

  5. TILT STABILITY, UNIFORM QUADRATIC GROWTH, AND STRONG ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Tilt stability, variational analysis, subdifferentials, quadratic growth, strong metric .... Some convex analysis. ..... Example 3.5 (Failure of subdifferential continuity).

  6. Notes 16. Analysis of tilting pad bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NOTES 16. STATIC AND DYNAMIC FORCED PERFORMANCE OF TILTING PAD BEARINGS: ANALYSIS INCLUDING PIVOT STIFFNESS Dr. Luis San Andr?s Mast-Childs Professor August 2010 SUMMARY Work in progress ? still a lot of be done Introduction... Figure 1 shows a tilting pad journal bearing comprised of four pads. Each pad tilts about its pivot making a hydrodynamic film that generates a pressure reacting to the static load applied on the spinning journal. This type of bearing is typically...

  7. BEAM TILTED CORRELATIONS Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    from the modules, module temperature, ambient temperature, wind speed, incident solar radiation under standardized operation conditions (25 Celsius and 1000 watts/meter2 incident solar radiation and comprehensive solar radiation data. Specifically, these models were designed to use the National Solar Radiation

  8. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  9. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  10. Solar: monthly latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south...

  11. 3, 10811107, 2003 Mid-latitude ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 3, 1081­1107, 2003 Mid-latitude ozone changes in a 3D CTM M. P. Chipperfield Title Page-dimensional model study of long-term mid-high latitude lower stratosphere ozone changes M. P. Chipperfield School­1107, 2003 Mid-latitude ozone changes in a 3D CTM M. P. Chipperfield Title Page Abstract Introduction

  12. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahmen, Tim [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany] [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G [ORNL] [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kubel, Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Leopoldshafen, Germany] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Leopoldshafen, Germany; Slusallek, Phillip [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany] [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany; De Jonge, Niels [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  13. Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

  14. The cost of noise reduction in commercial tilt rotor aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, Henry B.

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between direct operating cost and departure noise annoyance was developed for commercial tilt rotor aircraft. This was accomplished by generating a series of tilt rotor aircraft designs to meet various ...

  15. An Analysis of Source Tilting and Sub-cell Opacity Sampling for IMC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatsch, Todd J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wollaber, Allan B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Densmore, Jeffery D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) is a stochastic method for solving the radiative transfer equations for multiphysics application with the material in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The IMC method employs a fictitious scattering term that is computed from an implicit discretization of the material temperature equation. Unfortunately, the original histogram representation of the temperature and opacity with respect to the spatial domain leads to nonphysically fast propagation of radiation waves through optically thick material. In the past, heuristic source tilting schemes have been used to mitigate the numerical teleportation error of the radiation particles in IMC that cause this overly rapid radiation wave propagation. While improving the material temperature profile throughout the time duration, these tilting schemes alone do not generally alleviate the teleportation error to suitable levels. Another means of potentially reducing teleportation error in IMC is implementing continuous sub-cell opacities based on sub-cell temperature profiles. We present here an analysis of source tilting and continuous sub-cell opacity sampling applied to various discretizations of the temperature equation. Through this analysis, we demonstrate that applying both heuristics does not necessarily yield more accurate results if the discretization of the material equation is inconsistent with the Monte Carlo sub-cell transport.

  16. Ram pressure stripping of tilted galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jachym, P; Palous, J; Combes, F

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ram pressure stripping of galaxies in clusters can yield gas deficient disks. Previous numerical simulations based on various approaches suggested that, except for near edge-on disk orientations, the amount of stripping depends very little on the inclination angle. Following our previous study of face-on stripping, we extend the set of parameters with the disk tilt angle and explore in detail the effects of the ram pressure on the interstellar content (ISM) of tilted galaxies that orbit in various environments of clusters, with compact or extended distributions of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). We further study how results of numerical simulations could be estimated analytically. A grid of numerical simulations with varying parameters is produced using the tree/SPH code GADGET with a modified method for calculating the ISM-ICM interaction. These SPH calculations extend the set of existing results obtained from different codes using various numerical techniques. The simulations confirm the general trend of le...

  17. Prediction of tilted capillary barrier performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W.; McCord, J.T.; Dwyer, S.F.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capillary barriers, consisting of tilted fine-over-coarse layers under unsaturated conditions, have been suggested as landfill covers to divert water infiltration away from sensitive underground regions, especially for arid and semi-arid regions. The Hydrological Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer code is an evaluation tool for landfill covers used by designers and regulators. HELP is a quasi-two-dimensional model that predicts moisture movement into and through the underground soil and waste layers. Processes modeled within HELP include precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration, unsaturated vertical drainage, saturated lateral drainage, and leakage through liners. Unfortunately, multidimensional unsaturated flow phenomena that are necessary for evaluating tilted capillary barriers are not included in HELP. Differences between the predictions of the HELP and those from a multidimensional unsaturated flow code are presented to assess the two different approaches. Comparisons are presented for the landfill covers including capillary barrier configurations at the Alternative Landfill Cover Demonstration (ALCD) being conducted at Sandia.

  18. Stabilizing windings for tilting and shifting modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jardin, Stephen C. (Princeton, NJ); Christensen, Uffe R. (Princeton, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to passive conducting loops for stabilizing a plasma ring against unstable tilting and/or shifting modes. To this end, for example, plasma ring in a spheromak is stabilized by a set of four figure-8 shaped loops having one pair on one side of the plasma and one pair on the other side with each pair comprising two loops whose axes are transverse to each other.

  19. Impact of rising greenhouse gases on mid-latitude storm tracks and associated hydroclimate variability and change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, Richard

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Summary This project aimed to advance physical understanding of how and why the mid-latitude jet streams and storm tracks shift in intensity and latitude in response to changes in radiative forcing with an especial focus on rising greenhouse gases. The motivation, and much of the work, stemmed from the importance that these mean and transient atmospheric circulation systems have for hydroclimate. In particular drying and expansion of the subtropical dry zones has been related to a poleward shift of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks. The work involved integrated assessment of observation and model projections as well as targeted model simulations.

  20. ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Schiminovich, David, E-mail: jegpeek@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study the properties and effects of high Galactic latitude dust, we present an analysis of 373,303 galaxies selected from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer All-Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Explorer All-Sky Data Release. By examining the variation in aggregate ultraviolet colors and number density of these galaxies, we measure the extinction curve at high latitude. We additionally consider a population of spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure extinction in the optical. We find that dust at high latitude is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively consistent with standard reddening laws. Extinction in the FUV and NUV is {approx}10% and {approx}35% higher than expected, with significant variation across the sky. We find that no single R{sub V} parameter fits both the optical and ultraviolet extinction at high latitude, and that while both show detectable variation across the sky, these variations are not related. We propose that the overall trends we detect likely stem from an increase in very small silicate grains in the interstellar medium.

  1. Dual-frequency terahertz emission from splitting filaments induced by lens tilting in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhelin; Chen, Yanping, E-mail: yanping.chen@sjtu.edu.cn; Yang, Liu; Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Xu, Jianqiu; Zhang, Jie [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Sheng, Zhengming [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual-frequency terahertz radiation from air-plasma filaments produced with two-color lasers in air has been demonstrated experimentally. When a focusing lens is tilted for a few degrees, it is shown that the laser filament evolves from a single one to two sub-filaments. Two independent terahertz sources emitted from the sub-filaments with different frequencies and polarizations are identified, where the frequency of terahertz waves from the trailing sub-filament is higher than that from the leading sub-filament.

  2. Summertime total ozone variations over middle and polar latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Summertime total ozone variations over middle and polar latitudes 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 467342 $7D425BE27B725CE9393BE647 #12;Summertime total ozone variations over middle and polar latitudes and summertime ozone over middle and polar latitudes is analyzed using zonally averaged total ozone data. Short

  3. Analysis and synthesis of intonation using the tilt model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Paul

    This paper introduces the Tilt intonational model and describes how this model can be used to automatically analyze and synthesize intonation. In the model, intonation is represented as a linear sequence of events, which ...

  4. Geometric Model of a Narrow Tilting CAR using Robotics formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of an Electrical narrow tilting car instead of a large gasoline car should dramatically decrease traffic congestion are the terminal links. Each body Cj is connected to its antecedent Ci (i=a (j)) with a joint that represents

  5. A Neural Network Model of Visual Tilt Aftereffects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RF-LISSOM, a self-organizing model of laterally connected orientation maps in the primary visual cortex, was used to study the psychological phenomenon known as the tilt aftereffect. The same self-organizing processes that are responsible for the long-term development of the map and its lateral connections are shown to result in tilt aftereffects over short time scales in the adult. The model allows observing large numbers of neurons and connections simultaneously, making it possible to relate higher-level phenomenato low-level events, which is difficult to do experimentally. The results give computational support for the idea that direct tilt aftereffects arise from adaptive lateral interactions between feature detectors, as has long been surmised. They also suggest that indirect effects could result from the conservation of synaptic resourcesduring this process. The model thus provides a unified computational explanation of self-organization and both direct and indirect tilt aftereff...

  6. TILT POUR TRIALS AND ANALYSIS Bob Bryant1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    TILT POUR TRIALS AND ANALYSIS Bob Bryant1 , Kent D. Carlson2 , Shouzhu Ou2 , Christoph Beckermann2 reduce inclusion severity, compared to standard techniques. Bryant, R., Carlson, K.D., Ou, S

  7. Revisiting the question: Does high-latitude solar activity lead low-latitude solar activity in time phase?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, D. F.; Qu, Z. N. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Guo, Q. L., E-mail: kdf@ynao.ac.cn [College of Mathematics Physics and Information Engineering, Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314001 (China)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are used to investigate whether high-latitude solar activity leads low-latitude solar activity in time phase or not, using the data of the Carte Synoptique solar filaments archive from 1919 March to 1989 December. From the cross-correlation analysis, high-latitude solar filaments have a time lead of 12 Carrington solar rotations with respect to low-latitude ones. Both the cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence indicate that high-latitude solar filaments lead low-latitude ones in time phase. Furthermore, low-latitude solar activity is better correlated with high-latitude solar activity of the previous cycle than with that of the following cycle, which is statistically significant. Thus, the present study confirms that high-latitude solar activity in the polar regions is indeed better correlated with the low-latitude solar activity of the following cycle than with that of the previous cycle, namely, leading in time phase.

  8. Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Davies; S. Rabien; C. Lidman; M. Le Louarn; M. Kasper; N. M. Forster Schreiber; V. Roccatagliata; N. Ageorges; P. Amico; C. Dumas; F. Mannucci

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

  9. Method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, John D. (Albuquerque, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal requires only two lithographic exposures and does not require mask repositioning between exposures. The mask and photoresist-coated substrate are spaced a fixed and constant distance apart using a spacer and the stack is clamped together. The stack is then tilted at a crystallographic symmetry angle (e.g., 45 degrees) relative to the X-ray beam and rotated about the surface normal until the mask is aligned with the X-ray beam. The stack is then rotated in plane by a small stitching angle and exposed to the X-ray beam to pattern the first half of the structure. The stack is then rotated by 180.degree. about the normal and a second exposure patterns the remaining half of the structure. The method can use commercially available DXRL scanner technology and LIGA processes to fabricate large-area, high-quality tilted logpile photonic crystals.

  10. Tilted accretion discs in cataclysmic variables: tidal instabilities and superhumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Murray; P. J. Armitage

    1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the growth of tidal instabilities in accretion discs in a binary star potential, using three dimensional numerical simulations. As expected from analytic work, the disc is prone to an eccentric instability provided that it is large enough to extend to the 3:1 resonance. The eccentric disc leads to positive superhumps in the light curve. It has been proposed that negative superhumps might arise from a tilted disc, but we find no evidence that the companion gravitational tilt instability can grow fast enough in a fluid disc to create a measurable inclination. The origin of negative superhumps in the light curves of cataclysmic variables remains a puzzle.

  11. Early structure formation from primordial density fluctuations with a blue-tilted power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirano, Shingo; Yoshida, Naoki; Spergel, David; Yorke, Harold W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While observations of large-scale structure and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide strong constraints on the amplitude of the primordial power spectrum (PPS) on scales larger than 10 Mpc, the amplitude of the power spectrum on sub-galactic length scales is much more poorly constrained. We study early structure formation in a cosmological model with a blue-tilted PPS. We assume that the standard scale-invariant PPS is modified at small length scales as $P(k) \\sim k^{m_{\\rm s}}$ with $m_{\\rm s} > 1$. We run a series of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to examine the dependence of the formation epoch and the characteristic mass of primordial stars on the tilt of the PPS. In models with $m_{\\rm s} > 1$, star-forming gas clouds are formed at $z > 100$, when formation of hydrogen molecules is inefficient because the intense CMB radiation destroys chemical intermediates. Without efficient coolant, the gas clouds gravitationally contract while keeping a high temperature. The protostars formed in such ...

  12. Rotordynamic and thermal analyses of compliant flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Kyu-Ho

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotordynamic and thermal analyses of compliant flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings were performed. First, compliant flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings with pad radial compliance (CFTPBs) were introduced and designed for high-speed oil...

  13. The cost of noise reduction for departure and arrival operations of commercial tilt rotor aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, Henry B.

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between direct operating cost (DOC) and noise annoyance due to a departure and an arrival operation was developed for commercial tilt rotor aircraft. This was accomplished by generating a series of tilt ...

  14. A new southern high-latitude index P. Ballatore1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -aligned currents at the poleward auroral rim both in¯uence geomagnetic perturbations at polar latitudes and feed a new regional geomagnetic index AES-80, de®ned similarly to the classical auroral electrojet AE index, using data from ®ve Antarctic stations located at corrected geomagnetic latitudes about 80 °S. Because

  15. Temporal variations of solar rotation rate at high latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

    2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency splitting coefficients from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) observations covering the period 1995--2001 are used to study temporal variations in the solar rotation rate at high latitudes. The torsional oscillation pattern in the Sun is known to penetrate to a depth of about $0.1R_\\odot$ with alternate bands of faster and slower rotating plasma. At lower latitudes the bands move towards equator with time. At higher latitudes, however, the bands appear to move towards the poles. This is similar to the observed pole-ward movement of large scale magnetic fields at high latitudes. This also supports theoretical results of pole-ward moving bands at high latitudes in some mean field dynamo models. The polar rotation rate is found to decrease between 1995 and 1999 after which it has started increasing.

  16. On the first Hochschild cohomology group of a cluster-tilted algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the first Hochschild cohomology group of a cluster-tilted algebra Ibrahim Assem, Mar´ia Julia Redondo and Ralf Schiffler Abstract Given a cluster-tilted algebra B, we study its first Hochschild cohomol- ogy group HH1 (B) with coefficients in the B-B-bimodule B. If C is a tilted algebra such that B

  17. Atick-Witten Hagedorn Conjecture, near scale-invariant matter and blue-tilted gravity power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tirthabir Biswas; Tomi Koivisto; Anupam Mazumdar

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We will provide an interesting new mechanism to generate almost scale invariant seed density perturbations with a red spectrum, while keeping the gravitational wave spectrum blue-tilted in a stringy thermal contracting phase at temperatures beyond the Hagedorn temperature. This phase is often referred to as the Hagedorn phase where the free energy has been conjectured by Atick and Witten to grow more slowly than ordinary radiation. The primordial fluctuations are created by the statistical thermal fluctuations determined by the partition function, rather than quantum vacuum driven fluid dynamical fluctuations. In order for our mechanism to work we require a non-singular bouncing cosmology.

  18. EIS-0039: Motor Gasoline Deregulation and the Gasoline Tilt

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration developed this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts, including social and economic impacts, that may result from either of two proposed regulatory changes: (1) the exemption of motor gasoline from the Department of Energy's Mandatory Petroleum Price and Allocation Regulations, and (2) the adoption of the gasoline tilt, a proposed regulation that would allow refiners to recover an additional amount of their total increased costs on gasoline.

  19. Splay and tilt energy of bipolar lipid membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timur R. Galimzyanov; Peter I. Kuzmin; Peter Pohl; Sergey A. Akimov

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Archaea organisms are able to survive in extremely aggressive environment. It is thought that such resistance, at least, in part is sustained by unique properties of archaea membrane. The membrane consists of so called bolalipids, which has two polar heads joined by two hydrocarbon chains. Thus bolalipids can exist in two conformations: i) polar heads are located at different sides of bolalipid layer, so called, O-shape; ii) polar heads are located at the same side of the layer, so called, U-shape. Both polar heads and chains are chemically different from those for conventional lipids. In the present study we develop basis for theory of elasticity of bolalipid membranes. Deformations of splay, tilt and Gaussian curvature are considered. We show that energetic contributions of tilt deformation from two surfaces of bolalipid layer are additive, as well as Gaussian curvature, while splay deformations yield a cross-term. The presence of U-shapes is taken into account in terms of the layer spontaneous curvature. Estimation of tilt modulus and possible experiments allowing to measure splay moduli are described.

  20. Tilting the Primordial Power Spectrum with Bulk Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Lidsey

    1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the context of the cold dark matter model, current observations suggest that inflationary models which generate a tilted primordial power spectrum with negligible gravitational waves provide the most promising mechanism for explaining large scale clustering. The general form of the inflationary potential which produces such a spectrum is a hyperbolic function and is interpreted physically as a bulk viscous stress contribution to the energy-momentum of a perfect baryotropic fluid. This is equivalent to expanding the equation of state as a truncated Taylor series. Particle physics models which lead to such a potential are discussed.

  1. The effects of gantry tilt on breast dose and image noise in cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Stevens, Grant M. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)] [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Foley, W. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study investigated the effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on image noise and glandular breast dose in females during cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Reducing the dose to glandular breast tissue is important due to its high radiosensitivity and limited diagnostic significance in cardiac CT scans.Methods: Tilted-gantry acquisition was investigated through computer simulations and experimental measurements. Upon IRB approval, eight voxelized phantoms were constructed from previously acquired cardiac CT datasets. Monte Carlo simulations quantified the dose deposited in glandular breast tissue over a range of tilt angles. The effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on breast dose were measured on a clinical CT scanner (CT750HD, GE Healthcare) using an anthropomorphic phantom with MOSFET dosimeters in the breast regions. In both simulations and experiments, scans were performed at gantry tilt angles of 0°–30°, in 5° increments. The percent change in breast dose was calculated relative to the nontilted scan for all tilt angles. The percent change in noise standard deviation due to gantry tilt was calculated in all reconstructed simulated and experimental images.Results: Tilting the gantry reduced the breast dose in all simulated and experimental phantoms, with generally greater dose reduction at increased gantry tilts. For example, at 30° gantry tilt, the dosimeters located in the superior, middle, and inferior breast regions measured dose reductions of 74%, 61%, and 9%, respectively. The simulations estimated 0%–30% total breast dose reduction across the eight phantoms and range of tilt angles. However, tilted-gantry acquisition also increased the noise standard deviation in the simulated phantoms by 2%–50% due to increased pathlength through the iodine-filled heart. The experimental phantom, which did not contain iodine in the blood, demonstrated decreased breast dose and decreased noise at all gantry tilt angles.Conclusions: Tilting the gantry reduced the dose to the breast, while also increasing noise standard deviation. Overall, the noise increase outweighed the dose reduction for the eight voxelized phantoms, suggesting that tilted gantry acquisition may not be beneficial for reducing breast dose while maintaining image quality.

  2. Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies due several new features, including: the incorporation of an artificial horizon that prevents reflected ground radiation from striking the tilted sensors, and a routine that corrects the spectral response of photovoltaic-type sensors used...

  3. Evolution of the contact network during tilting cycles of a granular pile under gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staron, Lydie

    Evolution of the contact network during tilting cycles of a granular pile under gravity S. Deboeuf of a granular pile undergoing quasi-static tilting cycles in the gravity field. The volumic deformation of granular piles during continuous load in the gravity field (Staron, Vilotte, & Radjai 2002). Far before

  4. Escape configuration lattice near the nematic-isotropic transition: Tilt analogue of blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buddhapriya Chakrabarti; Yashodhan Hatwalne; N. V. Madhusudana

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We predict the possible existence of a new phase of liquid crystals near the nematic-isotropic ($ NI $) transition. This phase is an achiral, tilt-analogue of the blue phase and is composed of a lattice of {\\em double-tilt}, escape-configuration cylinders. We discuss the structure and the stability of this phase and provide an estimate of the lattice parameter.

  5. Self-Optimization of Antenna Tilt and Pilot Power for Dedicated Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Self-Optimization of Antenna Tilt and Pilot Power for Dedicated Channels Abstract-- In Radio Access Networks (RAN), fixed configurations result in poor network efficiency. This sub- optimal performance present a framework for a self-optimizing RAN, which adapts Antenna Tilt and Pilot Power according

  6. FORECASTING SOLAR RADIATION PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF AN APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    FORECASTING SOLAR RADIATION -- PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF AN APPROACH BASED UPON THE NATIONAL, and undertake a preliminary evaluation of, a simple solar radiation forecast model using sky cover predictions forecasts is 0.05o in latitude and longitude. Solar Radiation model: The model presented in this paper

  7. Conjugate High Latitude Measurements along the 40 Magnetic Meridian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    ­ 12 Volt system · Six 40 Wae Solar Panels · Sixteen 100 Ah AGM sealed leadConjugate High Latitude Measurements along the 40º Magnetic Meridian: Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power the 2014 season marked as red squares. #12;Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument

  8. Reliable performance Do not compromise on performance. The Latitude 3000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    (Emerging Market), all 64 Bit Windows 7 Home Premium, Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Home Basic (Emerging, the Latitude 3000 Series offers a smart choice for an easy to manage environment. · Dell Data Protection l Market), 32 & 64 Bit Ubuntu 12.04 Long Term Support (LTS

  9. Inspired Design The slim, light Latitude 6430u is simply beautiful from every

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    laptops ever. All systems are BFR/PVC- free2 , EPEAT registered3 , ENERGY STAR 5.2 qualified and offer of Latitude E-family laptops, the Latitude 6430u is amongst the most environmentally- responsible Latitude. Available with a 14.0" HD or 14.0" HD+ display4 and HDMI and VGA ports, it enables versatile usage

  10. WIND-DRIVEN NEAR INERTIAL OCEAN RESPONSE AND MIXING AT THE CRITICAL LATITUDE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoqian

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ? latitude. Near 30? latitude, the maximum oceanic response to sea breeze moves offshore slowly because of the near-zero group speed of Poincare waves at this latitude. The lateral energy flux convergence plus the energy input from the wind is maximum near...

  11. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salmon, Joseph Thaddeus (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G'=(I-X(X.sup.T X).sup.-1 X.sup.T)G(I-A)

  12. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salmon, J.T.

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation are disclosed, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G{prime} = (I{minus}X(X{sup T} X){sup {minus}1}X{sup T})G(I{minus}A). 3 figs.

  13. 'Tilting' the Universe with the Landscape Multiverse: The 'Dark' Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Mersini-Houghton; R. Holman

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory for the selection of the initial state of the universe from the landscape multiverse predicts superhorizon inhomogeneities induced by nonlocal entanglement of our Hubble volume with modes and domains beyond the horizon. Here we show these naturally give rise to a bulk flow with correlation length of order horizon size. The modification to the gravitational potential has a characteristic scale $L_{1} \\simeq 10^{3} H^{-1}$, and it originates from the preinflationary remnants of the landscape. The 'tilt' in the potential induces power to the lowest CMB multipoles, with the dominant contribution being the dipole and next, the quadrupole. The induced multipoles $l \\le 2$ are aligned with an axis normal to their alignment plane being oriented along the preferred frame determined by the dipole. The preferred direction is displayed by the velocity field of the bulk flow relative to the expansion frame of the universe. The parameters are tightly constrained thus the derived modifications lead to robust predictions for testing our theory. The 'dark' flow was recently discovered by Kashlinsky et al. to be about $700 km/s$ which seems in good agreement with our predictions for the induced dipole of order $3 \\mu K$. Placed in this context, the discovery of the bulk flow by Kashlinsky et al. becomes even more interesting as it may provide a probe of the preinflationary physics and a window onto the landscape multiverse.

  14. Phonon thermal transport through tilt grain boundaries in strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zexi; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Shengfeng; Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Deng, Bowen; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we perform nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study phonon scattering at two tilt grain boundaries (GBs) in SrTiO{sub 3}. Mode-wise energy transmission coefficients are obtained based on phonon wave-packet dynamics simulations. The Kapitza conductance is then quantified using a lattice dynamics approach. The obtained results of the Kapitza conductance of both GBs compare well with those obtained by the direct method, except for the temperature dependence. Contrary to common belief, the results of this work show that the optical modes in SrTiO{sub 3} contribute significantly to phonon thermal transport, accounting for over 50% of the Kapitza conductance. To understand the effect of the GB structural disorder on phonon transport, we compare the local phonon density of states of the atoms in the GB region with that in the single crystalline grain region. Our results show that the excess vibrational modes introduced by the structural disorder do not have a significant effect on phonon scattering at the GBs, but the absence of certain modes in the GB region appears to be responsible for phonon reflections at GBs. This work has also demonstrated phonon mode conversion and simultaneous generation of new modes. Some of the new modes have the same frequency as the initial wave packet, while some have the same wave vector but lower frequencies.

  15. Tilted CDM versus WDM in the Subgalactic Scuffle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Bullock

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the currently favored cold dark matter plus cosmological constant model (LCDM) has proven to be remarkably successful on large scales, on subgalactic scales it faces some potentially fatal difficulties; these include over-producing dwarf satellite galaxies and predicting excessive central densities in dark halos. Among the most natural cosmological solutions to these problems is to replace cold dark matter with a warm species (LWDM). The warm component acts to reduce the small-scale power, resulting in fewer galactic subhalos and lower halo central densities. An alternative model with a mild ``tilt'' in the inflationary power spectrum (TLCDM; n =0.9) similarly reduces the central densities of dark halos, although the substructure abundance remains relatively high. Here I argue that because dwarf galaxy formation should be suppressed in the presence of a strong ionizing background, favored LWDM models will generally under-predict the observed abundance of dwarf galaxies. The satellite count for TLCDM fairs much better, as long as the photoionization effect is taken into account. TLCDM provides a more successful alternative to LWDM on subgalactic scales with the added attraction that it relies on only a minor, natural adjustment to the standard framework of CDM.

  16. Tilt-up concrete panels : an investigation of flexural stresses and punching shear during lifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bono, Matthew P. (Matthew Paul)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tilt-up construction is becoming more popular in the United States due to its ease of construction, reliability, and relatively low construction and maintenance costs. In its most typical form, a concrete panel is cast on ...

  17. Analysis of flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings with different damper configurations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimpel, Aaron Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings (FPTPGBs) can enable successful operation of oil-free microturbomachinery. This work presents the experimental and analytical study of such bearings with different damper configurations. A test rig...

  18. A Novel Computational Model for Tilting Pad Journal Bearings with Soft Pivot Stiffnesses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Yujiao 1988-

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel tilting pad journal bearing model including pivot flexibility as well as temporal fluid inertia effects on the thin film fluid flow aims to accurately predict the bearing forced performance. The predictive model also accounts for the thermal...

  19. Measurements of static loading characteristics of a Flexurepivot Tilt Pad Hydrodynamic Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Nicholas Van Edward

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation examining the static loading characteristics of a four-pad, KMC FLEXUREPIVOT Tilt Pad Hydrodynamic Bearing is presented. Tests are conducted on the TRACE Fluid Film Bearing Element Test Rig for journal speeds ranging...

  20. Design and characterization of a planar mechanism for passive tilt-compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Justin Yi-Shen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigated the design and testing of a planar mechanism for passively compensating tilt between two flat surfaces brought into close proximity. The proposed design uses flexural components which eliminate ...

  1. K'-Theory of a Cohen-Macaulay Local Ring with n-Cluster Tilting Object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navkal, Viraj

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Categories and K-theory Definition 4.1. An exact category isLocalizations in K-Theory Definition 8.11. Let R be a ringdefinition of n-cluster tilting comes from invariant theory.

  2. Construction techniques and costs of tilt-up concrete farm structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winsett, Ivan Lane

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 25 2S Ths warehouse with all Panels . 'honed and ths Pilaster Focal in Place Awaiting the Costing of ths Pilastars. . . . 29 14. Detail of Corner Pilaster~ Pilaster Fora, snd Footing Used in ths Concrete Tilt-Up w'arehouse . ~ . . ~ ~. . . . . 30... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 46 26. Detail of Zaproesd Corner Pilaster, Pilaster Rora, and Footing Used in the Concrete Tilt4p Anginal Shelter ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 48 27. The Antnal shelter heady for (hating the ConcNts Posts and PDa sts...

  3. MEASUREMENTS OF THE SUN'S HIGH-LATITUDE MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rightmire-Upton, Lisa [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Hathaway, David H. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kosak, Katie, E-mail: lar0009@uah.edu, E-mail: david.hathaway@nasa.gov, E-mail: mkosak2011@my.fit.edu [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The meridional circulation at high latitudes is crucial to the buildup and reversal of the Sun's polar magnetic fields. Here, we characterize the axisymmetric flows by applying a magnetic feature cross-correlation procedure to high-resolution magnetograms obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We focus on Carrington rotations 2096-2107 (2010 April to 2011 March)-the overlap interval between HMI and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI). HMI magnetograms averaged over 720 s are first mapped into heliographic coordinates. Strips from these maps are then cross-correlated to determine the distances in latitude and longitude that the magnetic element pattern has moved, thus providing meridional flow and differential rotation velocities for each rotation of the Sun. Flow velocities were averaged for the overlap interval and compared to results obtained from MDI data. This comparison indicates that these HMI images are rotated counterclockwise by 0.{sup 0}075 with respect to the Sun's rotation axis. The profiles indicate that HMI data can be used to reliably measure these axisymmetric flow velocities to at least within 5 Degree-Sign of the poles. Unlike the noisier MDI measurements, no evidence of a meridional flow counter-cell is seen in either hemisphere with the HMI measurements: poleward flow continues all the way to the poles. Slight north-south asymmetries are observed in the meridional flow. These asymmetries should contribute to the observed asymmetries in the polar fields and the timing of their reversals.

  4. A high galactic latitude survey of far ultraviolet excess objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, J.V.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two closely related efforts in astrophysical instrumentation and observation are described with the objective of performing a high galactic latitude survey of faint objects in the far ultraviolet. The avenues of research possible with data obtained from space based ultraviolet surveys are discussed and a summary of past, present and planned instruments capable of such survey work presented. The Faust telescope, an eight degree field of view imaging instrument with peak sensitivity at 1700A, designed for survey work is described. An imaging, active readout detector and associated ground support equipment were designed, constructed, and calibrated to replace the original photographic detector. The present state of observational data relevant to determining the atmospheric parameters of subdwarf B and O stars, and their mid-Galactic plane density and scale height was reviewed. Theoretical explanations of their evolutionary status were proposed. The optical observations and spectral reductions performed on objects included in a catalog of far ultraviolet bright, high galactic latitude objects are described. These observations provide a sample of subdwarf O and B stars free of brightness and temperature selection effects. A model atmospheres analysis was performed on the subdwarf sample to determine the temperature, gravity and helium to hydrogen ratio of the individual objects. The results show a smooth distribution of objects on the gravity versus temperature diagram near the theoretical location of the extended horizontal branch.

  5. Blue-tilted Tensor Spectrum and Thermal History of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Tomo Takahashi; Shuichiro Yokoyama

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate constraints on the spectral index of primordial gravitational waves (GWs), paying particular attention to a blue-tilted spectrum. Such constraints can be used to test a certain class of models of the early Universe. We investigate observational bounds from LIGO+Virgo, pulsar timing and big bang nucleosynthesis, taking into account the suppression of the amplitude at high frequencies due to reheating after inflation and also late-time entropy production. Constraints on the spectral index are presented by changing values of parameters such as reheating temperatures and the amount of entropy produced at late time. We also consider constraints under the general modeling approach which can approximately describe various scenarios of the early Universe. We show that the constraints on the blue spectral tilt strongly depend on the underlying assumption and, in some cases, a highly blue-tilted spectrum can still be allowed.

  6. No evidence for the blue-tilted power spectrum of relic gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Qing-Guo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we constrain the tilt of the power spectrum of relic gravitational waves by combining the data from BICEP2/Keck array and Planck (BKP) and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Waves Observatory (LIGO). From the data of BKP B-modes, the constraint on the tensor tilt is $n_t=0.66^{+1.83}_{-1.44}$ at the $68%$ confidence level. By further adding the LIGO upper limit on the energy density of gravitational waves, the constraint becomes $n_t=-0.76^{+1.37}_{-0.52}$ at the $68%$ confidence level. We conclude that there is no evidence for a blue-tilted power spectrum of relic gravitational waves and either sign of the index of tensor power spectrum is compatible with the data.

  7. No evidence for the blue-tilted power spectrum of relic gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing-Guo Huang; Sai Wang

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we constrain the tilt of the power spectrum of relic gravitational waves by combining the data from BICEP2/Keck array and Planck (BKP) and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Waves Observatory (LIGO). From the data of BKP B-modes, the constraint on the tensor tilt is $n_t=0.66^{+1.83}_{-1.44}$ at the $68%$ confidence level. By further adding the LIGO upper limit on the energy density of gravitational waves, the constraint becomes $n_t=-0.76^{+1.37}_{-0.52}$ at the $68%$ confidence level. We conclude that there is no evidence for a blue-tilted power spectrum of relic gravitational waves and either sign of the index of tensor power spectrum is compatible with the data.

  8. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O’Toole, A., E-mail: amandajotoole@gmail.com, E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Peña Arellano, F. E. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Rodionov, A. V.; Kim, C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Shaner, M.; Asadoor, M. [Mayfield Senior School, 500 Bellefontaine Street Pasadena, California 91105 (United States); Sobacchi, E. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R., E-mail: amandajotoole@gmail.com, E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-36, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bhawal, A. [Arcadia High School, 180 Campus Drive, Arcadia, California 91007 (United States); Gong, P. [Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lottarini, A. [Department of Computer Science, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Minenkov, Y. [Sezione INFN Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientfica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Murphy, C. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.

  9. Numerical relativity simulations of thick accretion disks around tilted Kerr black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassilios Mewes; José A. Font; Filippo Galeazzi; Pedro J. Montero; Nikolaos Stergioulas

    2015-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present 3D numerical relativity simulations of thick accretion disks around {\\it tilted} Kerr black holes. We investigate the evolution of three different initial disk models with a range of initial black hole spin magnitudes and tilt angles. For all the disk-to-black hole mass ratios considered ($0.044-0.16$) we observe significant black hole precession and nutation during the evolution. This indicates that for such mass ratios, neglecting the self-gravity of the disks by evolving them in a fixed background black hole spacetime is not justified. We find that the two more massive models are unstable against the Papaloizou-Pringle (PP) instability and that those PP-unstable models remain unstable for all initial spins and tilt angles considered, showing that the development of the instability is a very robust feature of such PP-unstable disks. The tilt between the black hole spin and the disk is strongly modulated during the growth of the PP instability, causing a partial global realignment of black hole spin and disk angular momentum in the most massive model with constant specific angular momentum $l$. For the model with non-constant $l$-profile we observe a long-lived $m=1$ non-axisymmetric structure which shows strong oscillations of the tilt angle in the inner regions of the disk. We attribute this effect to the development of Kozai-Lidov oscillations. Our simulations also confirm earlier findings that the development of the PP instability causes the long-term emission of large amplitude gravitational waves, predominantly for the $l=m=2$ multipole mode. The imprint of the BH precession on the gravitational waves from tilted BH-torus systems remains an interesting open issue that would require significantly longer simulations than those presented in this work.

  10. Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /SLAC; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Padua U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Pisa /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U.; /more authors..

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess {gamma}-ray emission {ge}1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called 'EGRET GeV excess'). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10{sup o} {le} |b| {le} 20{sup o}. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess.

  11. The Structure of the Homunculus: I. Shape and Latitude Dependence from H2 and [Fe II] Velocity Maps of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution long-slit spectra obtained with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini South provide our most accurate probe of the three dimensional structure of the Homunculus around eta Car. The new near-infrared spectra dramatically confirm the double-shell structure inferred previously from thermal dust emission, resolving the nebula into a very thin outer shell seen in H2 21218, and a warmer, thicker inner layer seen in [Fe II] 16435. The thin H2 skin hints that the most important mass loss during the 19th century eruption had a very short duration of less than 5 yr. H2 emission traces the majority of the mass in the nebula, and has an average density of order 10^6.5 cm-3. This emission, in turn, yields our first definitive picture of the exact shape of the nebula, plus a distance of 2350pm50 pc and an inclination angle of 41deg (the polar axis is tilted 49deg from the plane of the sky). The distribution of the H2 emission provides the first measure of the latitude dependence of the speed, mass loss, and kinetic energy associated with eta Car's 19th century explosion. Almost 75 percent of the total mass and more than 90 percent of the kinetic energy in the ejecta were released at high latitudes. This rules out a model for the bipolar shape wherein an otherwise spherical explosion was pinched at the waist by a circumstellar torus. Also, the ejecta could not have been deflected toward polar trajectories by a companion star, since the kinetic energy of the polar ejecta is greater than the binding energy of the putative binary system. Instead, most of the mass appears to have been directed poleward by the explosion itself. [abridged

  12. Volume 177, number 2 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 15 February 1991 Cu titration of tilted CO on a MO( 110) surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    to the surface normal. Upon subsequent deposition of = 0.9 ML Cu at 95 Kfollowed by heating, infrared, in a weakening of the C-O bond [ l-41. The tilted CO can either dissociate into atomic C and 0 upon heating to z) surface. In this Letter, we present the results of studies on tilted CO on MO( 110) using infrared

  13. PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan1 , Ilya Tsvankin2 , Mike Batzle3 , Kasper van Wijk4 , and Matthew Haney5 ABSTRACT Mode-converted PS-waves can- and PS- waves can be inverted for the parameters of a horizontal TI layer with a tilted symmetry axis

  14. Tilted Micro Air Jet for Flow Control Julien Malapert*, Rda Yahiaoui, Rabah Zeggari and Jean-Franois Manceau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tilted Micro Air Jet for Flow Control Julien Malapert*, Réda Yahiaoui°, Rabah Zeggari and Jean: In this paper, we present an interesting method to microfabricate a tilted micro air jet generator. We used a double side etching. For aircraft and cars, micro air jets will take an important place for fluid control

  15. First Flight Tests for a Quadrotor UAV with Tilting Propellers Markus Ryll, Heinrich H. Bulthoff, and Paolo Robuffo Giordano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ]. For these latter platforms, only the Cartesian position and yaw angle of their body frame w.r.t. an inertial frame directions. As quadrotor UAVs are being more and more exploited as autonomous flying service robots [3], [4: ducted-fan designs [5], tilt-wing mechanisms [6], [7], or tilt-rotor actuations [8], [9]. Along similar

  16. Properties of localized, high latitude, dayside aurora H. U. Frey,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Properties of localized, high latitude, dayside aurora H. U. Frey,1 T. J. Immel,1 G. Lu,2 J different type of high latitude aurora, which does not show any signature of precipitating protons. It also causes the aurora. We interpret this aurora as the optical signature of electron precipitation

  17. Very low latitude (L = 1.08) whistlers Rajesh Singh,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    currents of whistler-producing lightning, which demonstrate a cutoff at 30 kA. Citation: Singh, R., M. B is much larger in a duct propagation than in non-ducted. At low latitudes (geomagnetic latitude the transmission cone. On the other hand, earlier studies utilized direction finding measurements to investigate

  18. Seasonal persistence of northern low-and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases #12;Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases 10 July 2008; accepted 23 July 2008; published 11 November 2008. [1] Analysis of observed ozone

  19. High-latitude dayside energetic precipitation and IMF BZ rotations N. stgaard,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . Owing to the high latitudes it is unlikely that these electrons were energized on the nightside by the solar wind. The precipitation appears at $77­79° magnetic latitude and coincides with a northward Ionosphere: Auroral ionosphere (2704); 2784 Magnetospheric Physics: Solar wind/magnetosphere interactions

  20. Beta diversity and latitude in North American mammals: testing the hypothesis of covariation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad

    Beta diversity and latitude in North American mammals: testing the hypothesis of covariation Pilar Rodri´guez and He´ctor T. Arita Rodri´guez, P. and Arita, H. T. 2004. Beta diversity and latitude of the pattern remain insufficiently explored, including the effect of scales and the role of beta diversity

  1. Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude Darin by the intensity of energetic cosmic-ray nucleons, which changes rapidly with elevation. An incomplete knowledge, and that there has been an incomplete mapping of nucleon fluxes at high RC (low geomagnetic latitude). We report new

  2. METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic-Scale Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic- Scale Dynamics Fall 2012 Instructor Dr and Thurs, 11:30 am ­ 12:45 pm Required Texts Bluestein, H., 1992: Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology in Mid-Latitudes, Volume I: Principles of Kinematics and Dynamics. Oxford Univ. Press, 431pp. Bluestein, H., 1993: Synoptic-Dynamic

  3. Friction in (im-)miscible polymer brush systems and the role of transverse polymer-tilting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueser, Martin

    Friction in (im-)miscible polymer brush systems and the role of transverse polymer-tilting Sissi de preferred solvent, leading to low friction and low wear rates. Here, we demonstrate, using molecular systems also show smaller friction than miscible systems, although the friction reduction is less than

  4. TILTED LAYER-BASED MODELING FOR ENHANCED LIGHT-FIELD PROCESSING AND IMAGE BASED RENDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    TILTED LAYER-BASED MODELING FOR ENHANCED LIGHT-FIELD PROCESSING AND IMAGE BASED RENDERING James, UK {j.pearson09, marcovs, mike.brookes, p.dragotti}@imperial.ac.uk ABSTRACT Image based rendering- torealistic results. However for successful rendering, geometric pri- ors about the structure of the scene

  5. Atomistic simulations of structures and mechanical properties of polycrystalline diamond: Symmetrical S001< tilt grain boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Donald W.

    Atomistic simulations of structures and mechanical properties of polycrystalline diamond for diamond to deposit as a polycrystalline film with a high density of grain boundaries and related defects structures and energies of symmetrical 001 tilt grain boundaries GB's in diamond have been calculated over

  6. Tilt Aftereffects in a Self-Organizing Model of the Primary Visual Cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RF-LISSOM, a self-organizing model of laterally connected orientation maps in the primary visual cortex, was used to study the psychological phenomenon known as the tilt aftereffect. The same self-organizing processes that are responsible for the long-term development of the map are shown to result in tilt aftereffects over short time scales in the adult. The model permits simultaneous observation of large numbers of neurons and connections, making it possible to relate high-level phenomena to low-level events, which is difficult to do experimentally. The results give detailed computational support for the long-standing conjecture that the direct tilt aftereffect arises from adaptive lateral interactions between feature detectors. They also make a new prediction that the indirect effect results from the normalization of synaptic efficacies during this process. The model thus provides a unified computational explanation of self-organization and both the direct and indirect tilt aftereffect in the primary visual cortex.

  7. Tilting mirror strips in a linear Fresnel reector Gang Xiao (University of Nice, France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tilting mirror strips in a linear Fresnel reector Gang Xiao (University of Nice, France) February 29, 2012 Abstract When a linear Fresnel reector solar concentrator is installed in a site with high of the linear Fresnel reector. Technical restrictions and diculties of this method are also discussed

  8. Evidence of a tilted columnar structure for mesomorphic phases of benzene-hexa-n-alkanoates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1285 Evidence of a tilted columnar structure for mesomorphic phases of benzene-hexa-n-alkanoates F. 2014 Optical observations on the mesomorphs of benzene-hexa-n-alkanoates, and their admixtures with benzene, show that the planes of these discotic molecules are not perpendicular to the columns in which

  9. PERSPECTIVE www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Effects of solar UV radiation on aquatic ecosystems and interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    species and aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, rivers, marshes, oceans). Solar UV radiation penetrates and high to mid latitudes have aroused concern about the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation of low temperatures.7 Exposure to solar UV radiation can reduce productivity, affect reproduction

  10. Evaluation of Clouds and Their Radiative Effects Simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model CAM2 Against Satellite Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretherton, Chris

    Evaluation of Clouds and Their Radiative Effects Simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model-4738 (Accepted) #12;1 ABSTRACT Cloud climatology and the cloud radiative forcing at the top cloud radiative forcing at the TOA at different latitudes. The differences of cloud vertical structures

  11. Diffuse Galactic Light in the Field of the Translucent High Galactic Latitude Cloud MBM32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ienaka, N; Matsuoka, Y; Sameshima, H; Oyabu, S; Tsujimoto, T; Peterson, B A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted B, g, V, and R-band imaging in a 45x40 arcmin^2 field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S_\

  12. Alfven field line resonances at low latitudes (L = 1.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, A.W.; Worthington, E.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Baransky, L.N.; Fedorov, E.N.; Kurneva, N.A.; Pilipenko, V.A.; Shvetzov, D.N. [Institute of the Physics of the Earth, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bektemirov, A.A.; Philipov, G.V. [Institute of Seismology of Kyrgyzian Academy of Science, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here the authors present preliminary analysis of measurements of the spatial structure of ULF waves in the low latitude ionosphere. They used a gradient analysis method to demonstrate that Pc3 Alfven field line resonances do exist at L=1.5. The authors recorded resonance frequencies, resonance widths, and radial gradients of Alfven frequencies. The widths are found to increase with decreasing latitude, which is attributed to increased ionospheric damping.

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Wintering forest birds roost in areas of higher sun radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    with taller trees more exposed to solar radiation to enhance winter habitat suitability for birdsORIGINAL PAPER Wintering forest birds roost in areas of higher sun radiation Sara Villén latitudes of cold winter climate, birds should spend the night in areas of low altitudes, higher

  14. An experimental investigation of a tilt rotor aircraft wake in ground effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Michael Louis

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were taken at several disk loadings and various model to ground plane distances. The data collected was used to evaluate the horizontal wake component's effect on people by re- lating the experimental velocity profiles to an equivalent uniform... Flow Measurement Equipment. Wake Velocity Versus Distance from Tilt Rotor Wake Velocity Versus Disk Loading Tuft Flow Visualization ? H=3D, 3, 000 RPM Tuft Flow Visualization ? H=2D, 9, 000 RPM Flow Direction Measurement Results ? H=1D 14 20 22...

  15. Measurement of rotordynamic coefficients for a high-speed flexure pivot tilting-pad bearing(load between pad) configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghasem, Adnan Mahmoud

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the dynamic and static forced performance of a flexure-pivot tilting-pad bearing load between pad (LBP) configuration for different rotor speeds and bearing unit loadings. The bearing has the following design parameters: 4 pads...

  16. Measured and Predicted Rotor-Pad Transfer Functions for a Rocker-Pivot Tilting-Pad Journal Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, Jason Christopher

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Many researchers have compared predicted stiffness and damping coefficients for tilting-pad journal bearings (TPJBs) to measurements. Most have found that direct damping is consistently overpredicted. The thrust of this research is to explain...

  17. Effects of head-up tilt on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and regional cardiac output distribution in aging rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael Wiechmann

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Many senescent individuals demonstrate an inability to regulate mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to standing or head-up tilt; however, whether this aging effect is the result of depressed cardiac function or an ...

  18. Red and blue tilted tensor spectrum from Gibbons-Hawking temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhendra Mohanty; Akhilesh Nautiyal

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The scale invariant scalar and tensor perturbations, which are predicted from inflation, are eigenmodes in the conformal coordinates. The 'out' observer in the de Sitter space observes a thermal spectrum with a Gibbons-Hawking temperature $H/2\\pi$ of these 'Bunch-Davies' particles. The tensor power spectrum observed in experiments can have an imprint of the Gibbons-Hawking thermal distribution due to the mode mixing between 'in' state conformal coordinates and the coordinate frame of the observer. We find that the the Bunch-Davies modes appear as thermal modes to the asymptotic Minkowski observer in the future and the power spectrum of the gravitational waves is blue-tilted with a spectral index $n_T \\sim 1$ even in the standard slow-roll inflation. On the other hand if the coordinate frame of the observer is taken to be static coordinates, the tensor spectrum is red-tilted with $n_T\\sim -1$. A likelihood analysis shows and find the best fit values of the slow-roll parameters for both cases. We find that the blue-tilted tensor gives a better fit and reconciles the PLANCK upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r <0.11$ with BICEP2 measurement of $r=0.2$. This supports the idea of particle production due to the mode mixing between the initial Bunch-Davies vacuum modes and the asymptotic Minkowski vacuum of the post-inflation universe.

  19. Hybrid monitor for both beam position and tilt of pulsed high-current beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, J., E-mail: jpang-caep@foxmail.com; He, X.; Ma, C.; Zhao, L.; Li, Q.; Dai, Z. [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-106, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Hybrid beam monitor, integrated with both azimuthal and axial B-dot probes, was designed for simultaneous measurement of both beam position and beam angle for pulsed high-current beams at the same location in beam pipe. The output signals of axial B-dot probes were found to be mixed with signals caused by transverse position deviation. In order to eliminate the unwanted signals, an elimination method was developed and its feasibility tested on a 50-? coaxial line test stand. By this method, a waveform, shape-like to that of input current and proportional to the tilt angle, was simulated and processed by following integration step to achieve the tilt angle. The tests showed that the measurement error of displacement and tilt angle less than 0.3 mm and 1.5 mrad, respectively. The latter error could be reduced with improved probes by reducing the inductance of the axial B-dot probe, but the improvement reached a limit due to some unknown systemic mechanism.

  20. Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

  1. DIFFUSE GALACTIC LIGHT IN THE FIELD OF THE TRANSLUCENT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE CLOUD MBM32

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ienaka, N.; Kawara, K. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Matsuoka, Y.; Oyabu, S. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Sameshima, H. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8501 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8501 (Japan); Tsujimoto, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Peterson, B. A., E-mail: ienaka@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted B-, g-, V-, and R-band imaging in a 45' Multiplication-Sign 40' field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S{sub {nu}}({lambda}) with that of 100 {mu}m emission S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m). A {chi}{sup 2} minimum analysis is applied to fit a linear function to the measured correlation and derive the slope parameter b({lambda}) = {Delta}S{sub {nu}}({lambda})/{Delta}S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) of the best-fit linear function. Compiling a sample by combining our b({lambda}) and published ones, we show that the b({lambda}) strength varies from cloud to cloud by a factor of four. Finding that b({lambda}) decreases as S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) increases in the sample, we suggest that a nonlinear correlation including a quadratic term of S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m){sup 2} should be fitted to the measured correlation. The variation of optical depth, which is A{sub V} = 0.16-2.0 in the sample, can change b({lambda}) by a factor of 2-3. There would be some contribution to the large b({lambda}) variation from the forward-scattering characteristic of dust grains which is coupled to the non-isotropic interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Models of the scattering of diffuse Galactic light (DGL) underestimate the b({lambda}) values by a factor of two. This could be reconciled by deficiency in UV photons in the ISRF or by a moderate increase in dust albedo. Our b({lambda}) spectrum favors a contribution from extended red emission (ERE) to the diffuse optical light; b({lambda}) rises from B to V faster than the models, seems to peak around 6000 A and decreases toward long wavelengths. Such a characteristic is expected from the models in which the DGL is combined with ERE.

  2. Ferroelectric and octahedral tilt twin disorder and the lead-free piezoelectric, sodium potassium niobate system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiemer, Jason [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Withers, Ray L., E-mail: withers@rsc.anu.edu.au [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Liu, Yun; Yi, Zhiguo [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using electron diffraction, trends in the local structural behaviour of the K{sub x}Na{sub 1-x}NbO{sub 3} (KNN x) 'solid solution' system are investigated and interpreted using an order/disorder based theoretical framework. At room temperature, electron diffraction shows a single plane of transverse polarised, diffuse intensity perpendicular to [0 1 0]{sub p} Low-Asterisk (p for parent sub-structure) across the entire phase diagram, indicative of ferroelectric disorder along the [0 1 0]{sub p} direction co-existing with long range ferroelectric order along the orthogonal [1 0 0]{sub p} and [0 0 1]{sub p} directions. An additional characteristic pattern of diffuse scattering is also observed, involving rods of diffuse intensity running along the [1 0 0]{sub p}* and [0 0 1]{sub p}* directions of the perovskite sub-structure and indicative of octahedral tilt disorder about the [1 0 0]{sub p} and [0 0 1]{sub p} axes co-existing with long range ordered octahedral tilting around the [0 1 0]{sub p} direction. A possible crystal chemical explanation for the existence of this latter octahedral tilt disorder is explored through bond valence sum calculations. The possible influence of both types of disorder on the previously refined, room temperature space group/s and average crystal structure/s is examined. - Graphical abstract: [-3,0.-1]p zone axis EDP of K{sub 0.46}Na{sub 0.54}NbO{sub 3} indexed according to both the relevant Pcm21 space groups (no subscripts) and the parent perovskite subcell (denoted by a subscript p). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterises ferroelectric and octahedral tilt disorder in the KNN solid solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the possible driving forces for this disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the implications of this disorder for physical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the effects of this disorder on powder diffraction data.

  3. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayashida, Misa [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray F. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6H 2E1 (Canada); Bergen, Michael; Li, Peng [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton T6G 2M9 (Canada)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  4. The Tilt of the Fundamental Plane: Three-quarters Structural Nonhomology, One-quarter Stellar Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Trujillo; A. Burkert; Eric. F. Bell

    2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation of the mass-to-light ratios M/L of early type galaxies as function of their luminosities L is investigated. It is shown that the tilt beta=0.27 (in the B--band) of the fundamental plane relation M/L ~ L^{beta} can be understood as a combination of two effects: about one-quarter (i.e. dbeta =0.07) is a result of systematic variations of the stellar population properties with increasing luminosity. The remaining three-quarters (i.e. dbeta =0.2) can be completely attributed to nonhomology effects that lead to a systematic change of the surface brightness profiles with increasing luminosity. Consequently, the observed tilt in the K-band (beta=0.17) where stellar population effects are negligible, is explained by nonhomology effects alone. After correcting for nonhomology, the mean value of the mass-to-light ratio of elliptical galaxies (M/L_B) is 7.1+-2.8 (1 sigma scatter).

  5. Mechanical and charge transport properties of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au (111) surface: The Role of Molecular Tilt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulleregan, Alice; Qi, Yabing; Ratera, Imma; Park, Jeong Y.; Ashby, Paul D.; Quek, Su Ying; Neaton, J. B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between charge transport and mechanical properties of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on Au(111) films has been investigated using an atomic force microscope with a conductive tip. Molecular tilts induced by the pressure applied by the tip cause stepwise increases in film conductivity. A decay constant {beta} = 0.57 {+-} 0.03 {angstrom}{sup -1} was found for the current passing through the film as a function of tip-substrate separation due to this molecular tilt. This is significantly smaller than the value of {approx} 1 {angstrom}{sup -1} found when the separation is changed by changing the length of the alkanethiol molecules. Calculations indicate that for isolated dithiol molecules S-bonded to hollow sites, the junction conductance does not vary significantly as a function of molecular tilt. The impact of S-Au bonding on SAM conductance is discussed.

  6. LOCATION AND MAGNETOSPHERIC MAPPING OF SATURN'S MID-LATITUDE INFRARED AURORAL OVAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stallard, Tom; Melin, Henrik; Cowley, Stanley W. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Miller, Steve [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lystrup, Makenzie B., E-mail: tss@ion.le.ac.u [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, CO 80303-7814 (United States)

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous observations of Saturn's infrared aurorae have shown that a mid-latitude aurora exists significantly equatorward of the main auroral oval. Here, we present new results using data from four separate observing runs in 1998, 2003, 2008, and 2010. When combined, these provide a view of the mid-latitude aurora under a considerable range of viewing conditions, allowing the first calculation of the latitudinal position of this aurora to be made. This has shown that the mid-latitude aurora is located at the magnetic footprint of the region within the magnetosphere where the initial breakdown in corotation occurs, between 3 R {sub S} and the orbit of Enceladus ({approx}3.95 R {sub S}). We also confirm that this aurora is a continuous stable feature over a period of more than a decade and that an oval morphology is likely. When combined, these results indicate that the mid-latitude auroral oval is formed by currents driven by the breakdown process within the magnetosphere, in turn caused by mass loading from the torus of Enceladus, analogous with the volcanic moon Io's dominant role in the formation of Jupiter's main auroral oval.

  7. Eastward propagation of transient field-aligned currents and Pi 2 pulsations at auroral latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, D.J.; Samson, J.C.; Rostoker, G. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient field-aligned currents associated with the substorm expansive phase produce the damped, quasisinusoidal, geomagnetic pulsations called Pi 2's. Mid-latitude and auroral latitude measurements of the fields of these pulsations have indicated that they are produced, for the most part, by westward propagating field-aligned currents at auroral latitudes, although some studies have shown hints of eastward propagation, particularly far to the east of the longitude of the onset of the expansive phase. This study uses data from the University of Alberta magnetometer array to identify the characteristics of the eastward propagating mode at high latitudes by measuring polarizations and apparent group and phase velocities in regions far to the east of the expansive phase. The results show that eastward propagating Pi 2's have very high phase velocities (typically 40 km/s) which are comparable with those of the westward propagating mode. The polarizations and field configurations are compatible with a field-aligned and ionospheric current model which is very similar to that for the westward propagating component. These current models suggest that Pi 2's may be caused by shear Alfven waves produced by an azimuthally expanding, fast mode wave. The shear Alfven waves are reflected from the auroral ionosphere to produce the latitudinally localized field-aligned and ionospheric currents in the eastward (and westward) propagating modes.

  8. High latitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave receiver systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    High latitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave induced current (GIC) in the Scottish power system in southern Scotland, during a storm event, and exhibit significantly different amplitude characteristics. Finally, we compared in detail the geomagnetic

  9. Friction in Mid-latitude Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Friction in Mid-latitude Cyclones Ian Boutle Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown #12;Motivation · Many studies have shown the significance of friction in formation and dissipation of cyclones Dt = + × . F . Diabatic Term: · Surface heat fluxes · Latent heat fluxes Frictional Term

  10. On the paucity of Fast Radio Bursts at low Galactic latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macquart, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the effect of Galactic diffractive interstellar scintillation as a means of explaining the reported deficit of Fast Radio Burst (FRB) detections at low Galactic latitude. We model the unknown underlying FRB flux density distribution as a power law with a rate scaling as $S_\

  11. LOOKING FOR VARIATIONS WITH LATITUDE OF THE BASE OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Mário João

    819 LOOKING FOR VARIATIONS WITH LATITUDE OF THE BASE OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE M Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary & Westfield College, Mile End Road, London El 4 successfully in determining the basic characteristics of the base of the solar convec- tive region (e

  12. Role of latitude of source region in Solar Energetic Particle events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanahuja, Blai

    PR1 2HE, UK Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland Abstract. Solar up to near- relativistic energies. Some of these particles can escape the solar atmosphere and travelRole of latitude of source region in Solar Energetic Particle events S. Dalla and N. Agueda1

  13. THE ROTATION PROFILE OF SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS BETWEEN {+-}60 Degree-Sign LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L., E-mail: shixiangjun@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields from Carrington Rotation Nos. 1625 to 2129 (from 1975 February to 2012 October), the sidereal rotation rates of solar magnetic fields between {+-}60 Degree-Sign latitudes are investigated. It seems that the temporal variation of rotation rates should be related to the solar cycle phase. The rotation profile of magnetic fields is obtained: the sidereal rotation rates decrease from the equator to mid-latitude and reach their minimum values of about 13.16 deg day{sup -1} (13.17 deg day{sup -1}) at 53 Degree-Sign (54 Degree-Sign ) latitude in the northern (southern) hemisphere, then increase toward higher latitudes. This rotation profile is different from the differential rotation law obtained by Snodgrass from a cross-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms, in which the rotation rates show a steep decrease from the equator to the poles. However, it is much closer to the quasi-rigid rotation law derived by Stenflo from an auto-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms. Some possible interpretations are discussed for the resulting rotation profile.

  14. Discovery of Eight Recycled Pulsars - The Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. T. Edwards

    1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a pulsar survey of intermediate Galactic latitudes (15deg 0.57 Mo and > 1.2 Mo), while anotherhas a low mass (~0.2 Mo) companion in a 23.3-d orbit, residing the well-known orbital period ``gap''.

  15. A LARGE-AREA SURVEY FOR RADIO PULSARS AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacoby, B. A.; Kulkarni, S. R. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bailes, M.; Ord, S. M. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 31122 (Australia); Edwards, R. T. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)], E-mail: baj@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: srk@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: mbailes@swin.edu.au, E-mail: ord@physics.usyd.edu.au, E-mail: Russell.Edwards@csiro.au

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have completed a survey for pulsars at high Galactic latitudes with the 64 m Parkes radio telescope. Observing with the 13 beam multibeam receiver at a frequency of 1374 MHz, we covered {approx}4150 square degrees in the region -100 deg. {<=} l {<=} 50 deg., 15 deg. {<=} |b| {<=} 30 deg. with 7232 pointings of 265 s each, thus extending the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey a further 15 deg. on either side of the Galactic plane. The signal from each beam was processed by a 96 channel x 3 MHz x 2 polarization filterbank, with the detected power in the two polarizations of each frequency channel summed and digitized with 1 bit sampling every 125 {mu}s, giving good sensitivity to millisecond pulsars with low or moderate dispersion measure. The resulting 2.4 TB data set was processed using standard pulsar search techniques with the workstation cluster at the Swinburne Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing. This survey resulted in the discovery of 26 new pulsars including seven binary and/or millisecond pulsars, and redetected 36 previously known pulsars. We describe the survey methodology and results, and present timing solutions for the 19 newly discovered slow pulsars, as well as for nine slow pulsars discovered the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey that had no previous timing solutions. Even with a small sampling interval, 1374 MHz center frequency, and a large mid-latitude survey volume we failed to detect any very rapidly spinning pulsars. Evidently, such 'submillisecond' pulsars are rare.

  16. High-power, low-lateral divergence broad area quantum cascade lasers with a tilted front facet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, Sangil, E-mail: sangil.ahn@tuwien.ac.at; Schwarzer, Clemens; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald C.; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron M.; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried [Institute for Solid State Electronics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a simple technique to improve the beam quality of broad area quantum cascade lasers. Moderately tilted front facets of the laser provide suppression of higher order lateral waveguide modes. A device with a width of 60??m and a front facet angle of 17° shows a nearly diffraction limited beam profile. In addition, the peak output power and the slope efficiency of the device are increased since most of the light inside the cavity is emitted through the tilted front facet by an asymmetric light intensity distribution along the cavity.

  17. Seasonal dependence of localized, high-latitude dayside aurora H. U. Frey, N. stgaard, and T. J. Immel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Seasonal dependence of localized, high-latitude dayside aurora (HiLDA) H. U. Frey, N. Østgaard frequently observes intense ultraviolet (UV) emissions from a localized High Latitude Dayside Aurora (HiLDA) poleward of the general auroral oval location [Frey et al., 2003a]. It has been shown that this aurora

  18. Polarization-resolved sensing with tilted fiber Bragg gratings: theory and limits of detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bialiayeu, Aliaksandr; Albert, Jacques

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarization based sensing with tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) sensors is analysed theoretically by two alternative approaches. The first method is based on tracking the grating transmission for two orthogonal states of linear polarized light that are extracted from the measured Jones matrix or Stokes vectors of the TFBG transmission spectra. The second method is based on the measurements along the system principle axes and polarization dependent loss (PDL) parameter, also calculated from measured data. It is shown that the frequent crossing of the Jones matrix eigenvalues as a function of wavelength leads to a non-physical interchange of the calculated principal axes; a method to remove this unwanted mathematical artefact and to restore the order of the system eigenvalues and the corresponding principal axes is provided. A comparison of the two approaches reveals that the PDL method provides a smaller standard deviation and therefore lower limit of detection in refractometric sensing. Furthermore, the pol...

  19. Three-dimensional microelectromechanical tilting platform operated by gear-driven racks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klody, Kelly A.; Habbit Jr., Robert D.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) tiltable-platform apparatus is disclosed which utilizes a light-reflective platform (i.e. a micromirror) which is supported above a substrate by flexures which can be bent upwards to tilt the platform in any direction over an angle of generally .+-.10 degrees using a gear-driven rack attached to each flexure. Each rack is driven by a rotary microengine (i.e. a micromotor); and an optional thermal actuator can be used in combination with each microengine for initially an initial uplifting of the platform away from the substrate. The MEM apparatus has applications for optical switching (e.g. between a pair of optical fibers) or for optical beam scanning.

  20. Design, Fabrication, and Test of a Superconducting Dipole Magnet Based on Tilted Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Ferracin, P.; Finney, N. R.; Fuery, M. J.; Gourlay, S. A.; Hafalia, A. R.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It can be shown that, by superposing two solenoid-like thin windings that are oppositely skewed (tilted) with respect to the bore axis, the combined current density on the surface is 'cos-theta' like and the resulting magnetic field in the bore is a pure dipole. As a proof of principle, such a magnet was designed, built and tested as part of a summer undergraduate intern project. The measured field in the 25mm bore, 4 single strand layers using NbTi superconductor, exceeded 1 T. The simplicity of this high field quality design, void of typical wedges end-spacers and coil assembly, is especially suitable for insert-coils using High Temperature Superconducting wire as well as for low cost superconducting accelerator magnets for High Energy Physics. Details of the design, construction and test are reported.

  1. Tilt and running of cosmological observables in generalized single-field inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino [Dipartimento di Fisica ''G. Galilei'', Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Fasiello, Matteo [Dipartimento di Fisica ''G. Occhialini'', Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Riotto, Antonio, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: matteo.fasiello@mib.infn.it, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it, E-mail: riotto@mail.cern.ch [INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing an effective field theory approach to inflationary perturbations, we analyze in detail the effect of curvature-generated Lagrangian operators on various observables, focusing on their running with scales. At quadratic order, we solve the equation of motion at next-to-leading leading order in a generalized slow-roll approximation for a very general theory of single-field inflation. We derive the resulting power spectrum, its tilt and running. We then focus on the contribution to the primordial non-Gaussianity amplitude f{sub NL} sourced by a specific interaction term. We show that the running of f{sub NL} can be substantially larger than what dictated by the slow-roll parameters.

  2. Examining the Impact of Pad Flexibility on the Rotordynamic Coefficients of Rocker-Pivot-Pad Tilting-Pad Journal Bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Measured and predicted static and dynamic load characteristics are provided for a three-pad, rocker-pivot, tilting-pad journal bearing in the load-between-pad orientation. The bearing has the following characteristics: 3 pads, .50 pad pivot offset...

  3. Rotordynamic coefficients for a load-between-pad, flexible-pivot tilting pad bearing at high loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensley, John Eric

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic and static performance of a flexure-pivot tilting pad bearing is presented at a load between pad configuration for various load and speed combinations. A similar work performed on the same bearing at lower loads ranging from 0-1 MPa (0...

  4. Dynamic and Static Characteristics of a Rocker-Pivot, Tilting-Pad Bearing with 50% and 60% Offsets.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulhanek, Chris David

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Static performance and rotordynamic coefficients are provided for a rocker-pivot, tilting-pad journal bearing with 50 and 60 percent offset pads in a load-between-pad configuration. The bearing uses leading-edge-groove lubrication and has...

  5. Tilted Brownian Ratchet for DNA Analysis Lotien Richard Huang, Edward C. Cox, Robert H. Austin,*, and James C. Sturm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilted Brownian Ratchet for DNA Analysis Lotien Richard Huang, Edward C. Cox, Robert H. Austin of fractionation of 100-kb DNA molecules in Brownian ratchet arrays. In our device, the electrophoretic flow a higher fraction of the diffusing molecules is "ratcheted" at each step in the array. Molecules of lengths

  6. Influence of a longitudinal and tilted vibration on stability and dewetting of a liquid film S. Shklyaev,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khenner, Mikhail

    that the viscosity is important only in a thin boundary layer near the rigid wall 5,6 . This approximation works well or a tilted vibration. Using a multiscale technique we split the film motion into the oscillatory essential for the oscillatory motion. Applying the lubrication approximation for the averaged motion we

  7. Danger radiations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

  8. A study of mid-latitude tropopause characteristics over eastern North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Ben Howard

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    50 40 30 20 10 MO BUP PLT GSO 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 Latitude (degrees north) Figure l. Occurrence of multiple tropopauses during summer 120 IJ III 0 0 0 E 0 0 '0 N 4J 0 A N 0 100 80 60 40 20 E I CI CI -20 60 55 50 45... 40 35 30 25 Latitude (degrees north) Figure 2. Profile of mean zonal wind during summer 21 70 C 4I 0 o e e o, o o IU O N lJ o e W m 0 o 4J 4J C m Ol v 6 u Ol CI 60 50 40 30 20 10 PH NO BUF 0 SO P T 60 55 50 45 40 35...

  9. Multi-Year Lags between Forest Browning and Soil Respiration at High Northern Latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bunn, Andrew G.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High-latitude northern ecosystems are experiencing rapid climate changes, and represent a large potential climate feedback because of their high soil carbon densities and shifting disturbance regimes. A significant carbon flow from these ecosystems is soil respiration (RS, the flow of carbon dioxide, generated by plant roots and soil fauna, from the soil surface to atmosphere), and any change in the high-latitude carbon cycle might thus be reflected in RS observed in the field. This study used two variants of a machine-learning algorithm and least squares regression to examine how remotely-sensed canopy greenness (NDVI), climate, and other variables are coupled to annual RS based on 105 observations from 64 circumpolar sites in a global database. The addition of NDVI roughly doubled model performance, with the best-performing models explaining ~62% of observed RS variability

  10. An analysis on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth using transionospheric VHF signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juang, Zhen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roussel-dupre, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis was perfonned on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth (Fcoh) using transionospheric VHF signal data. The data include 1062 events spanning from November 1997 to June 2002. Each event records FORTE satellite received VHF signals from LAPP located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fcohs were derived to study scintillation characteristics on diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as changes due to solar and geomagnetic activities. Comparisons to the VHFIUHF coherence frequency bandwidth studies previously reported at equatorial and mid-latitude regions are made using a 4th power frequency dependence relationship. Furthennore, a wideband ionospheric scintillation model, WBMOD, was used to estimate Fcohs and compared with our VHF Fcoh values. Our analysis indicates mid-latitude scintillation characteristics that are not previously revealed. At the VHF bottom frequency range (3035 MHz), distinguished smaller Fcohs are found in time period from sunset to midnight, in wann season from May to August, and in low solar activity years. The effects of geomagnetic storm activity on Fcoh are characterized by a sudden transition at a Kp index of 50-60. Comparisons with median Fcohs estimated from other studies validated our VHF Fcohs for daytime while an order of magnitude larger Fcohs are found for nighttime, implying a time-dependent issue in applying the 4th order power relationship. Furthermore, comparisons with WBMOD-estimated Fcohs indicated generally matched median scintillation level estimates while differences do exist for those events undergoing high geomagnetic stonn activity which may imply underestimates of scintillation level by the WBMOD in the mid-latitude regions.

  11. Low-latitude Western North Atlantic climate variability during the past millennium : insights from proxies and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saenger, Casey Pearce

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of natural climate variability during the past millennium provide a frame of reference in which to assess the significance of recent changes. This thesis investigates new methods of reconstructing low-latitude ...

  12. Uncertainty analysis of vegetation distribution in the northern high latitudes during the 21st century with a dynamic vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yueyang

    This study aims to assess how high-latitude vegetation may respond under various climate scenarios during the 21st century with a focus on analyzing model parameters induced uncertainty and how this uncertainty compares ...

  13. Development and testing of an aerosol/stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes. Year 3 technical progress report, November 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidenweis, S.M.; Cotton, W.R.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, general circulation models (GCMs) poorly represent clouds, to the extent that they cannot be relied upon to simulate the climatic effects of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, or of anthropogenic perturbations to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The net radiative forcing of clouds varies strongly with latitude. Poleward of 30 degrees in both hemispheres, low-level clouds create a net cooling effect corresponding to radiative divergences of {minus}50 to {minus}100 W/m{sup 2}. It is likely that a combination of fogs, boundary-layer stratocumulus, and stratus clouds are the main contributors to this forcing. Models of the response of the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds to changes in aerosol abundance, for a variety of large-scale meteorological forcings, are important additions to GCMs used for the study of the role of Arctic systems in global climate. The overall objective of this research is the development of an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary-layer clouds which responds to variations in CCN and IN. The parameterization is to be designed for ultimate use in GCM simulations as a tool in understanding the role of CCN, IN, and Arctic clouds in radiation budgets. Several versions of the CSU RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) will be used during the course of this work. The parameterizations developed in this research are intended for application in a single-column cloud model, designed as an adaptive grid model which can interface into a GCM vertical grid through distinct layers of the troposphere where the presence of layer clouds is expected.

  14. Experimental frequency-dependent rotordynamic coefficients for a load-on-pad, high-speed, flexible-pivot tilting-pad bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Colmenares, Luis Emigdio

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis provides experimental frequency dependent stiffness and damping coefficient results for a high-speed, lightly loaded, flexible-pivot tilting-pad bearing, with a load-on-pad configuration. Test conditions include four shaft speeds (6000...

  15. Static characteristics and rotordynamic coefficients of a four-pad tilting-pad journal bearing with ball-in-socket pivots in load-between-pad configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Joel Mark

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Static characteristics and rotordynamic coefficients were experimentally determined for a four-pad tilting-pad journal bearing with ball-in-socket pivots in loadbetween- pad configuration. A frequency-independent [M]-[C]-[K] model fit...

  16. vy physical work). Some white-collar jobs may share these characteris-tics, but these factors overwhelmingly tilt toward blue-collar occupations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    overwhelmingly tilt toward blue-collar occupations. Often blue-collar jobs tend to be dirty, dangerous, and of a confiscated driver's license. Loaning money and covering for behav- ioral problems are also not uncommon. Some

  17. Unique determination of the -CN group tilt angle in Langmuir monolayers using sum-frequency polarization null angle and phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative phase and amplitude ratio between the ssp and ppp polarization combinations of the vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) response can be uniquely and accurately determined by the polarization null angle (PNA) method. In this report we show that PNA measurements of the -CN vibration in the 4-n pentyl-4'-cyanoterphenyl (5CT) Langmuir monolayer at the air/water interface yields ssp and ppp response of the same phase, while those in the 4-n-octyl-4'cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir monolayer have the opposite phase. Accordingly, the -CN group in the 5CT monolayer is tilted around 25+/-2 from the interface normal, while that in the 8CB is tilted around 57+/-2, consistent with the significant differences in the phase diagrams and hydrogen bonding SFG spectra of the two Langmuir monolayers as reported in the literature. These results also demonstrate that in SFG studies the relative phase information of the different polarization combinations, especially for the ssp and ppp, is important in the unique determination of the tilt angle and conformation of a molecular group at the interface.

  18. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 184101 (2012) Octahedral tilting in strained LaVO3 thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Zentrum Berlin f¨ur Materialien und Energie GmbH, BESSY, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin, Germany rotations in a LaVO3 thin film is investigated using synchrotron radiation. First, we find that the film

  19. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  20. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  1. Simulations of dislocation pile-ups at assymetric tilt boundaries in aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valone, Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Jian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoagland, Richard C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials deformation processes are increasingly approachable through the both conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics. In one deformation process, dislocation pile-up at a grain boundary, a greater understanding is required as to how dislocations transmit through grain boundaries, causing plastic deformation, or reflect and reconstruct the grain boundary, but with no macroscopic deformation. Here dislocation pile-ups in an alwninum bicrystal with an asymmetric tilt grain boundary are simulated atomistically, introducing effects of dislocation interactions beyond linear elastic ones. The observed responses as functions of the number of explicitly modeled dislocations and the magnitude of the applied stress are discussed. Typical conditions for the simulations consist of thermal relaxation room temperature, five active dislocations inserted within a 6.5-million-atom cell, and an additional fourteen dislocations represented within the atomistic simulation by their elastic strain fields. The dislocations are initially distributed according to linear elastic estimates of their positions in a double-ended pile-up from a chosen far-field stress. The whole cell is allowed to relax according to a procedure to be described. In the ensuing simulations, the system is propagated for some substantial period of time (lOs of ps), followed by small increments of strain. After a number of such increments, we observe all of the anticipated events. Usually several of the closest dislocations are absorbed into the grain boundary, resulting in varying amounts of reconstruction. Reflections from the boundary are common and show a strong dependence on sample thickness. Transmission events are seen on both slip systems in the other grain. The particulars of these events will be described as well.

  2. Birkeland currents and charged particles in the high-latitude prenoon region: A new interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bythrow, P.F.; Potemra, T.A.; Erlandson, R.E.; Zanetti, L.J.; Klumpar, D.M.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous, conjugate measurements of magnetic fields and charged particles at low altitude in the high-latitude prenoon sector and the magnetosheath were made with the DMSP F7, HILAT, and Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) CCE satellites on November 1, 1984. These data show that the low-latitude portion of the traditional ''cusp'' particle signature is coincident with the prenoon region 1 current system in both hemispheres and for both northward and southward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF). The traditional ''cusp'' Birkeland currents are associated with the dispersion region of cusp ions when the IMF is directed southward and with electron fluxes that are slightly enhanced over polar rain intensities. Finally, electron spectra measured by AMPTE CCE in the magnetosheath near 1000 MLT are similar in shape and energy to those acquired at low altitude by both DMSP F7 and HILAT. These observations indicate that for both northward and southward IMF, the traditional ''cusp particle'' signature is coincident with the region 1 Birkeland current system and maps to low altitude along field lines that thread the dayside boundary layer. The traditional ''cusp'' Birkeland current system flows along field lines that lie poleward of the region of cusp particles and the region 1 current system. These field lines thread the plasma mantle. Thus, we suggest that the traditional ''cusp'' current system might be appropriately renamed the ''mantle'' Birkeland current system. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  3. The Local Interstellar Ultraviolet Radiation Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Conn Henry

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    I have used the Hipparcos Input Catalog, together with Kurucz model stellar atmospheres, and information on the strength of the interstellar extinction, to create a model of the expected intensity and spectral distribution of the local interstellar ultraviolet radiation field, under various assumptions concerning the albedo a of the interstellar grains. (This ultraviolet radiation field is of particular interest because of the fact that ultraviolet radiation is capable of profoundly affecting the chemistry of the interstellar medium.) By comparing my models with the observations, I am able to conclude that the albedo a of the interstellar grains in the far ultraviolet is very low, perhaps a = 0.1. I also advance arguments that my present determination of this albedo is much more reliable than any of the many previous (and conflicting) ultraviolet interstellar grain albedo determinations. Beyond this, I show that the ultraviolet background radiation that is observed at high galactic latitudes must be extragalactic in origin, as it cannot be backscatter of the interstellar radiation field.

  4. RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. OVERVIEW OF REGULATIONS, PROTECTION STANDARDS, AND RADIATION SAFETY ORGANIZATION.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 V. BASIC RADIATION PROTECTION PRINCIPLES

  5. Radiation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The Federal Regulation

  6. THE HIGH-LATITUDE BRANCH OF THE SOLAR TORSIONAL OSCILLATION IN THE RISING PHASE OF CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Christensen-Dalsgaard, J. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ny Munkegade 120, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hill, F.; Komm, R. [National Solar Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Larson, T. P.; Schou, J. [HEPL Solar Physics, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Rempel, M.; Thompson, M. J., E-mail: rhowe@nso.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use global heliseismic data from the Global Oscillation Network Group, the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, to examine the behavior, during the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24, of the migrating zonal flow pattern known as the torsional oscillation. Although the high-latitude part of the pattern appears to be absent in the new cycle when the flows are derived by subtracting a mean across a full solar cycle, it can be seen if we subtract the mean over a shorter period in the rising phase of each cycle, and these two mean rotation profiles differ significantly at high latitudes. This indicates that the underlying high-latitude rotation has changed; we speculate that this is in response to weaker polar fields, as suggested by a recent model.

  7. Uranium vacancy mobility at the sigma 5 symmetric tilt grain boundary in UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An important consequence of the fissioning process occurring during burnup is the formation of fission products. These fission products alter the thermo-mechanical properties of the fuel. They also lead to macroscopic changes in the fuel structure, including the formation of bubbles that are connected to swelling of the fuel. Subsequent release of fission gases increase the pressure in the plenum and can cause changes in the properties of the fuel pin itself. It is thus imperative to understand how fission products, and fission gases in particular, behave within the fuel in order to predict the performance of the fuel under operating conditions. Fission gas redistribution within the fuel is governed by mass transport and the presence of sinks such as impurities, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Thus, to understand how the distribution of fission gases evolves in the fuel, we must understand the underlying transport mechanisms, tied to the concentrations and mobilities of defects within the material, and how these gases interact with microstructural features that might act as sinks. Both of these issues have been addressed in previous work under NEAMS. However, once a fission product has reached a sink, such as a grain boundary, its mobility may be different there than in the grain interior and predicting how, for example, bubbles nucleate within grain boundaries necessitates an understanding of how fission gases diffuse within boundaries. That is the goal of the present work. In this report, we describe atomic level simulations of uranium vacancy diffusion in the pressence of a {Sigma}5 symmetric tilt boundary in urania (UO{sub 2}). This boundary was chosen as it is the simplest of the boundaries we considered in previous work on segregation and serves as a starting point for understanding defect mobility at boundaries. We use a combination of molecular statics calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to determine how the mobility of uranium vacancies is altered at this particular grain boundary. Given that the diffusion of fission gases such as Xe are tied to the mobility of uranium vacancies, these results given insight into how fission gas mobility differs at grain boundaries compared to bulk urania.

  8. Petrology of a dredged cumulate-textured gabboric complex from the mid-Atlantic ridge, latitude 26?N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiezzi, Lawrence James

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETROLOGY OF A DREDGED CUNULATE- '"EXTURED GABI3ROIC COMPLEX FROM THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE, LATITUDE 26 N 0 A Thesis LAWRENCE JAMES Ti'ZZI Submitted to the Graduate Ccilec;e of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Majo- Subject: Geology PETROLOGY OF A DREDGED CUNULATE- TEXTURED GABBROIC CONPLEX FROM o THE NID-ATLANTIC RIDGE, LATITUDE 26 N A Thesis by LAWRENCE JAMES TIEZZI Approved as to style and content by...

  9. GHIGLS: HI mapping at intermediate Galactic latitude using the Green Bank Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, P G; Goncalves, D Pinheiro; Lockman, Felix J; Boothroyd, A I; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Joncas, G; Stephan, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the data cubes from GHIGLS, our deep Green Bank Telescope surveys of the 21-cm line emission of HI in targeted fields at intermediate Galactic latitude. The GHIGLS fields together cover over 800 square degrees at 9.55' spatial resolution. The HI spectra have an effective velocity resolution about 1.0 km/s and cover at least -450 power spectra of maps of the column density, NHI. For our featured representative field, centered on the North Ecliptic Pole, the scaling exponents in power-law representations of the power spectra of NHI maps for low, intermediate, and high velocity gas components (LVC, IVC, and HVC) are -2.90 +/- 0.03, -2.55 +/- 0.04, and -2.66 +/- 0.06, respectively. After Gaussian decomposition of the line profiles, NHI maps were also made corresponding to the broad and narrow line components in the LVC...

  10. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Kollias, Pavlos [McGill University; Giangrande, Scott

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  11. Climatic response to high-latitude volcanic eruptions Luke Oman, Alan Robock, and Georgiy Stenchikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    a decrease in the Asian monsoon circulation with significant decreases of up to 10% in cloud cover of El Chicho´n. Graf and Timmreck [2001] simu- lated the aerosol radiative effects of the Laacher See injected. This causes their largest radiative forcing to be extratropical, and the climate response should

  12. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  13. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  14. Gravitational Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard F Schutz

    2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity is one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and it is the dominant force in most astronomical systems. In common with all other phenomena, gravity must obey the principles of special relativity. In particular, gravitational forces must not be transmitted or communicated faster than light. This means that when the gravitational field of an object changes, the changes ripple outwards through space and take a finite time to reach other objects. These ripples are called gravitational radiation or gravitational waves. This article gives a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational radiation, including technical material suitable for non-specialist scientists.

  15. What is this MCMS? MCMS stands for the MAP Climatology of Mid-latitude Storminess dataset (see

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    arguments. Cyclone tracking is treated as a separate process and product (not shown here for brevity) depression around a mid-latitude baroclinic cyclone (or just cyclone). MCMS rests on two operations: 1) finding and tracking cyclones and 2) objectively delineating the area under each cyclones influence

  16. Latitude, seed predation and seed mass A. T. Moles* and M. Westoby Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moles, Angela

    of species from around the world. We also aimed to quantify the slope and predictive power expected that herbivory and predation might be more sustained threats there. Considerable evidence supports winter browsing intensity and latitude across six species of woody plants (Swihart & Bryant, 2001

  17. Operational taxonomy and (paleo-)autecology of round, brown, spiny dinoflagellate cysts from the Quaternary of high northern latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Operational taxonomy and (paleo-)autecology of round, brown, spiny dinoflagellate cysts from determination key taxonomy paleoecology Round brown spiny dinoflagellate cysts from high latitudes a synthesis of descriptions with remarks on the mor- phology, taxonomy, nomenclature and ecology of cysts from

  18. SOLAR WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE AS A FUNCTION OF SPEED AND HELIOGRAPHIC LATITUDE: VARIATION THROUGH A SOLAR CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    SOLAR WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE AS A FUNCTION OF SPEED AND HELIOGRAPHIC LATITUDE: VARIATION THROUGH of the variation of the relative abundance of helium to hydrogen in the solar wind as a function of solar wind theoretical work in which enhancements of coronal helium lead to stagnation of the escaping proton flux

  19. Putting plant resistance traits on the map: a test of the idea that plants are better defended at lower latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at lower latitudes Angela T. Moles1,2,3,4 , Ian R. Wallis3 , William J. Foley3 , David I. Warton5 , James C Biology, James Cook University, PO Box 6811,Cairns, Australia; 12 NationalEnvironmental Research InstituteSciences, University of Zambia, PO Box 32379, Lusaka 10101, Zambia;18 School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook

  20. A jet streak circulation associated with a low-latitude jet in the Southern Hemisphere over Africa.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Sharon E.

    A jet streak circulation associated with a low-latitude jet in the Southern Hemisphere over Africa 2007 #12;2 Abstract In the Southern Hemisphere over Africa a mid-tropospheric easterly jet stream exists during some months that is analogous to the African Easterly Jet over West Africa. In this note

  1. Determination of the optimum inclination of a flat solar collector in function of latitude and local climatic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    569 Determination of the optimum inclination of a flat solar collector in function of latitude of a solar collector, it is necessary to reduce its size to a minimum for a given collected energy of equations described in this work were developed to determine the inclination angle of a . flat solar

  2. Reconciliation of local and long range tilt correlations in underdoped La??xBaxCuO? (0 ? x ? 0.155)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bozin, Emil S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhong, Ruidan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Knox, Kevin R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gu, Genda [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, John P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Billinge, Simon J. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long standing puzzle regarding the disparity of local and long range CuO? octahedral tilt correlations in the underdoped regime of La??xBaxCuO? is addressed by utilizing complementary neutron powder diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) approaches. Long-range and static CuO? tilt order with orthogonally inequivalent Cu-O bonds in the CuO? planes in the low temperature tetragonal (LTT) phase is succeeded on warming through the low-temperature transition by one with orthogonally equivalent bonds in the low temperature orthorhombic (LTO) phase. In contrast, the signatures of LTT-type tilts in the instantaneous local atomic structure persist on heating throughout the LTO crystallographic phase on the nanoscale, although becoming weaker as temperature increases. Analysis of the INS spectra for the x = 1/8 composition reveals the dynamic nature of the LTT-like tilt fluctuations within the LTO phase and their 3D character. The doping dependence of relevant structural parameters indicates that the magnitude of the Cu-O bond anisotropy has a maximum at x = 1/8 doping where bulk superconductivity is most strongly suppressed, suggesting that the structural anisotropy might be influenced by electron-phonon coupling and the particular stability of the stripe-ordered phase at this composition. The bond-length modulation that pins stripe order is found to be remarkably subtle, with no anomalous bond length disorder at low temperature, placing an upper limit on any in-plane Cu-O bondlength anisotropy. The results further reveal that although appreciable octahedral tilts persist through the high-temperature transition and into the high temperature tetragonal (HTT) phase, there is no significant preference between different tilt directions in the HTT regime. This study also exemplifies the importance of a systematic approach using complementary techniques when investigating systems exhibiting a large degree of complexity and subtle structural responses.

  3. Reconciliation of local and long range tilt correlations in underdoped La??xBaxCuO? (0 ? x ? 0.155)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bozin, Emil S.; Zhong, Ruidan; Knox, Kevin R.; Gu, Genda; Hill, John P.; Tranquada, John M.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long standing puzzle regarding the disparity of local and long range CuO? octahedral tilt correlations in the underdoped regime of La??xBaxCuO? is addressed by utilizing complementary neutron powder diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) approaches. Long-range and static CuO? tilt order with orthogonally inequivalent Cu-O bonds in the CuO? planes in the low temperature tetragonal (LTT) phase is succeeded on warming through the low-temperature transition by one with orthogonally equivalent bonds in the low temperature orthorhombic (LTO) phase. In contrast, the signatures of LTT-type tilts in the instantaneous local atomic structure persist on heating throughout the LTO crystallographic phasemore »on the nanoscale, although becoming weaker as temperature increases. Analysis of the INS spectra for the x = 1/8 composition reveals the dynamic nature of the LTT-like tilt fluctuations within the LTO phase and their 3D character. The doping dependence of relevant structural parameters indicates that the magnitude of the Cu-O bond anisotropy has a maximum at x = 1/8 doping where bulk superconductivity is most strongly suppressed, suggesting that the structural anisotropy might be influenced by electron-phonon coupling and the particular stability of the stripe-ordered phase at this composition. The bond-length modulation that pins stripe order is found to be remarkably subtle, with no anomalous bond length disorder at low temperature, placing an upper limit on any in-plane Cu-O bondlength anisotropy. The results further reveal that although appreciable octahedral tilts persist through the high-temperature transition and into the high temperature tetragonal (HTT) phase, there is no significant preference between different tilt directions in the HTT regime. This study also exemplifies the importance of a systematic approach using complementary techniques when investigating systems exhibiting a large degree of complexity and subtle structural responses.« less

  4. Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

  5. Three dimensional SPH simulations of radiation-driven warped accretion discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen B. Foulkes; Carole A. Haswell; James R. Murray

    2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present three dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) calculations of warped accretion discs in X-ray binary systems. Geometrically thin, optically thick accretion discs are illuminated by a central radiation source. This illumination exerts a non-axisymmetric radiation pressure on the surface of the disc resulting in a torque that acts on the disc to induce a twist or warp. Initially planar discs are unstable to warping driven by the radiation torque and in general the warps also precess in a retrograde direction relative to the orbital flow. We simulate a number of X-ray binary systems which have different mass ratios using a number of different luminosities for each. Radiation-driven warping occurs for all systems simulated. For mass ratios q ~ 0.1 a moderate warp occurs in the inner disc while the outer disc remains in the orbital plane (c.f. X 1916-053). For less extreme mass ratios the entire disc tilts out of the orbital plane (c.f. Her X-1). For discs that are tilted out of the orbital plane in which the outer edge material of the disc is precessing in a prograde direction we obtain both positive and negative superhumps simultaneously in the dissipation light curve (c.f. V603 Aql).

  6. Symmetries of migration related segments of all [001] coincidence site lattice tilt boundaries in (001) projections for all holohedral cubic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeck, Peter; York, Bryant W.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing bicrystallography in two dimensions (2D), the symmetries of migration related segments of Coincidence Site Lattice (CSL) boundaries are derived for projections along their [001] tilt axis in grain boundaries of crystalline materials that possess the holohedral point symmetry of the cubic system (i.e. m3m). These kinds of “edge-on” projections are typical for atomic resolution imaging of such tilt boundaries with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEM). This fact facilitates the visual confirmation of our predictions by recently published Zcontrast scanning TEM investigations [H. Yang et al., Phil. Mag. 93 (2013) 1219] and many other TEM studies.

  7. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimum tilt of a solar collector, Solar & Wind Technology.and orientation for solar collector in Brunei Darussalam,Optimum tilt angle for solar collectors, Energy Sources.

  8. High Latitude, Translucent Molecular Clouds as Probes of Local Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, R D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the gamma-ray emission from 9 high latitude, translucent molecular clouds taken with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) between 250 MeV and 10 GeV. Observations of gamma-rays allow us to probe the density and spectrum of cosmic rays in the solar neighborhood. The clouds studied lie within $\\sim\\!$270 pc from the Sun and are selected from the Planck all-sky CO map. Gamma-rays in this energy range mostly result from cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium, which is traced with three components: HI, CO, and dark gas. Every cloud is detected and shows significant, extended gamma-ray emission from molecular gas. The gamma-ray emission is dominated by the CO-emitting gas in some clouds, but by the CO-dark gas in others. The average emissivity and gamma-ray power law index from HI above 1 GeV shows no evidence of a systematic variation. The CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor shows no variation between clouds over this small spatial range, but shows significant variations within each cloud. The a...

  9. Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The; Gurney, Kevin R [Arizona State University; Burnside, Todd [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

  10. Study of the interaction of solutes with ?5 (013) tilt grain boundaries in iron using density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Hao; Militzer, Matthias [Centre for Metallurgical Process Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Elfimov, Ilya [Quantum Matter Institute, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Substitutional alloying elements significantly affect the recrystallization and austenite-ferrite phase transformation rates in steels. The atomistic mechanisms of their interaction with the interfaces are still largely unexplored. Using density functional theory, we determine the segregation energies between commonly used alloying elements and the ?5 (013) tilt grain boundary in bcc iron. We find a strong solute-grain boundary interaction for Nb, Mo, and Ti that is consistent with experimental observations of the effects of these alloying elements on delaying recrystallization and the austenite-to-ferrite transformation in low-carbon steels. In addition, we compute the solute-solute interactions as a function of solute pair distance in the grain boundary, which suggest co-segregation for these large solutes at intermediate distances in striking contrast to the bulk.

  11. The sensitivity enhancement of tilted fibre Bragg grating sensors with polarization dependent resonant nano-scale coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bialiayeu, Aliaksandr

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibre Bragg grating sensors have emerged as a simple, inexpensive, accurate, sensitive and reliable platform, a viable alternative to the traditional bulkier optical sensor platforms. In this work we present an extensive theoretical analysis of the tilted fibre Bragg grating sensor (TFBG) with a particular focus on its polarization-dependent properties. We have developed a highly efficient computer model capable of providing the full characterization of the TFBG device in less then $3$~minutes for a given state of incident light polarization. As a result, the polarization-dependent spectral response, the field distribution at the sensor surface as well as the fine structure of particular resonances have become accessible for theoretical analysis. As a part of this computer model we have developed a blazingly fast full-vector complex mode solver, capable of handling cylindrical waveguides of an arbitrary complex refractive index profile. Along with the theoretical study we have investigated optical properties ...

  12. Crystallographically tilted and partially strain relaxed GaN grown on inclined (111) facets etched on Si(100) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansah Antwi, K. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Soh, C. B. [Singapore Institute of Technology, 10 Dover Drive, Singapore 138683 (Singapore); Wee, Q. [Singapore-MIT Alliance, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Tan, Rayson J. N.; Tan, H. R. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Yang, P. [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source, National University of Singapore, 5 Research Link, 117603 Singapore (Singapore); Sun, L. F.; Shen, Z. X. [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, SPMS-03-01, 21 Nanyang Link (Singapore); Chua, S. J., E-mail: elecsj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Singapore-MIT Alliance, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution X-ray diffractometry (HR-XRD), Photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, and Transmission electron microscope measurements are reported for GaN deposited on a conventional Si(111) substrate and on the (111) facets etched on a Si(100) substrate. HR-XRD reciprocal space mappings showed that the GaN(0002) plane is tilted by about 0.63°?±?0.02° away from the exposed Si(111) growth surface for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate, while no observable tilt existed between the GaN(0002) and Si(111) planes for GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The ratio of integrated intensities of the yellow to near band edge (NBE) luminescence (I{sub YL}/I{sub NBE}) was determined to be about one order of magnitude lower in the case of GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate compared with GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The Raman E{sub 2}(high) optical phonon mode at 565.224?±?0.001?cm{sup ?1} with a narrow full width at half maximum of 1.526?±?0.002?cm{sup ?1} was measured, for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) indicating high material quality. GaN deposition within the trench etched on the Si(100) substrate occurred via diffusion and mass-transport limited mechanism. This resulted in a differential GaN layer thickness from the top (i.e., 1.8??m) of the trench to the bottom (i.e., 0.3??m) of the trench. Mixed-type dislocation constituted about 80% of the total dislocations in the GaN grown on the inclined Si(111) surface etched on Si(100)

  13. Cluster characters II: A multiplication formula Let C be a Hom-finite triangulated 2-CalabiYau category with a cluster tilting object. Under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Cluster characters II: A multiplication formula Yann Palu Abstract Let C be a Hom categories of modules over a preprojective algebra of Dynkin type, we prove a multiplication formula for the cluster character associated with any cluster tilting object. This formula generalizes those obtained

  14. PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan and Ilya Tsvankin , Center for Wave Phenomena, Colorado School of Mines (CSM),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan and Ilya Tsvankin , Center for Wave Phenomena, Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Mike Batzle, Center for Rock Abuse, CSM, Kasper van Wijk, Physical Acoustics Laboratory, CSM, and Matt Haney, Center for Wave Phenomena

  15. Measurements Versus Predictions for the Static and Dynamic Characteristics of a Four-pad Rocker-pivot, Tilting-pad Journal Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschoepe, David 1987-

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Measured and predicted static and dynamic characteristics are provided for a four-pad, rocker-pivot, tilting-pad journal bearing in the load-on-pad and load-between-pad orientations. The bearing has the following characteristics: 4 pads, .57 pad...

  16. Measured and predicted rotordynamic coefficients and static performance of a rocker-pivot, tilt pad bearing in load-on-pad and load-between-pad configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Clint Ryan

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the static and dynamic performance data for a 5 pad tilting pad bearing in both the load-on-pad (LOP) and the load-between-pad (LBP) configurations over a variety of different loads and speeds. The bearing tested was an Orion...

  17. Solar Schools Assessment and Implementation Project: Financing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the annual solar resource data for different latitudes. 5 To maximize the annual energy production at a location of 40 north latitude, the optimal tilt varies from 30...

  18. Vertical profiles of radar reflectivity of convective cells in tropical and mid-latitude mesoscale convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Kurt Reed

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meteorological phenomenon of particular interest to forecasters is the mesoscale convective system (MCS). Chappell (1986) defines an MCS as "any multicellular storm or group of interacting storms that suggests some organization in its forcing". An MCS...VERTICAL PROFILES OF RADAR REFLECTIVITY OF CONVECTIVE CELLS IN TROPICAL AND MID-LATITUDE MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS A Thesis by KURT REED LUTZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  19. An analysis of modified convective available potential energy and Richardson number in mid-latitude squall line environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stricherz, James Nicholas

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modified convective available potential energy (MCAPE) and Richardson number (MRI) were computed for each upper air sounding in a synoptic ? scale data network. The resulting fields were contoured and compared to the development, growth and decay of mid... ? latitude squall lines in several cases studies. The results indicate that, though the squall lines remained in the vicinity of MCAPE maxima and MRI minima there was no quantitative association. The squall lines also appeared to avoid these regions...

  20. Water vapor, cloud liquid water paths, and rain rates over northern high latitude open seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    longwave radiation caused by differences in cloud cover can produce an JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL-level stratus con- tribute the most to the total Arctic cloud cover of any cloud type according to surface presence during summertime but otherwise the Wentz internal sea-ice screening appears effective

  1. Realistic analytic model for the prompt and high latitude emission in GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Genet; J. Granot

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite show an early rapid decay phase (RDP) in their X-ray lightcurve, which is usually a smooth continuation of the prompt gamma-ray emission, strongly suggesting that it is its tail. However, the mechanism behind it is still not clear. The most popular model for this RDP is High Latitude Emission (HLE). While HLE is expected in many models for the prompt GRB emission, such as the popular internal shocks model, there are models in which it is not expected, such as sporadic magnetic reconnection events. Therefore, testing whether the RDP is consistent with HLE can help distinguish between different prompt emission models. We address this question by modeling the prompt emission as the sum of its individual pulses with their HLE tails. Analytic expressions for the observed flux density are obtained for power-law and Band function emission spectra. For internal shocks the observed instantaneous spectrum is very close to the emitted one, and should be well described by a Band function also during the RDP. Our model naturally produces, the observed spectral softening and steepening of the flux decay. The observed flux during the RDP is initially dominated by the tail of the last pulse, but the tails of one or more earlier pulses can become dominant later on. Moreover, modeling several overlapping pulses as a single wider pulse would over-predict the emission tail. Thus, one should be very careful when testing the predictions of HLE and do a combined temporal and spectral fit of the prompt GRB emission and the RDP.

  2. Solar and Photovoltaic Data from the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory (UO SRML)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The UO SRML is a regional solar radiation data center whose goal is to provide sound solar resource data for planning, design, deployment, and operation of solar electric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. The laboratory has been in operation since 1975. Solar data includes solar resource maps, cumulative summary data, daily totals, monthly averages, single element profile data, parsed TMY2 data, and select multifilter radiometer data. A data plotting program and other software tools are also provided. Shade analysis information and contour plots showing the effect of tilt and orientation on annual solar electric system perfomance make up a large part of the photovoltaics data.(Specialized Interface)

  3. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  4. Radiation dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoelsher, James W. (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  5. Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

  6. environmental management radiation protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    EHS environmental management biosafety radiation protection industrial hygiene safety Working: Biosafety, Environmental Management, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection and Safety. Each specialized Management Program, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection Program, and the Safety Program. (http

  7. DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (NewSons, Inc. from "Radiation Detection and Measurement," G. F.

  8. Courses on Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

  9. Solar radiation resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

  10. Radiation Control (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

  11. Final Report for High Latitude Climate Modeling: ARM Takes Us Beyond Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Lynn M [Scripps/UCSD; Lubin, Dan [Scripps/UCSD

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The main thrust of this project was to devise a method by which the majority of North Slope of Alaska (NSA) meteorological and radiometric data, collected on a daily basis, could be used to evaluate and improve global climate model (GCM) simulations and their parameterizations, particularly for cloud microphysics. Although the standard ARM Program sensors for a less complete suite of instruments for cloud and aerosol studies than the instruments on an intensive field program such as the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), the advantage they offer lies in the long time base and large volume of data that covers a wide range of meteorological and climatological conditions. The challenge has been devising a method to interpret the NSA data in a practical way, so that a wide variety of meteorological conditions in all seasons can be examined with climate models. If successful, climate modelers would have a robust alternative to the usual “case study” approach (i.e., from intensive field programs only) for testing and evaluating their parameterizations’ performance. Understanding climate change on regional scales requires a broad scientific consideration of anthropogenic influences that goes beyond greenhouse gas emissions to also include aerosol-induced changes in cloud properties. For instance, it is now clear that on small scales, human-induced aerosol plumes can exert microclimatic radiative and hydrologic forcing that rivals that of greenhouse gas–forced warming. This project has made significant scientific progress by investigating what causes successive versions of climate models continue to exhibit errors in cloud amount, cloud microphysical and radiative properties, precipitation, and radiation balance, as compared with observations and, in particular, in Arctic regions. To find out what is going wrong, we have tested the models' cloud representation over the full range of meteorological conditions found in the Arctic using the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) data.

  12. Strain Accommodation By Facile WO6 Octahedral Distortion and Tilting During WO3 Heteroepitaxy on SrTiO3(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Gu, Meng; Varga, Tamas; Wang, Chong M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we show that compared to other BO6 octahedra in ABO3 structured perovskite oxides, the WO6 octahedra in tungsten trioxide (WO3) can withstand a much larger degree of distortion and tilting to accommodate interfacial strain, which in turn strongly impact the nucleation, structure, and defect formation during the epitaxial growth of WO3 on SrTiO3(001). A meta-stable tetragonal phase can be stabilized by epitaxy and a thickness dependent phase transition (tetragonal to monoclinic) is observed. In contrast to misfit dislocations to accommodate the interfacial stain, the facial WO6 octahedral distortion and tilting give rise to three types of planar defects that affect more than 15 monolayers from the interface. These atomically resolved, unusual interfacial defects may significantly alter the electronic, electrochromic, and mechanical properties of the epitaxial films.

  13. Magnetoresistivity and acoustoelectronic effects in a tilted magnetic field in p-Si/SiGe/Si structures with an anisotropic g factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drichko, I. L., E-mail: Irina.L.Drichko@mail.ioffe.ru; Smirnov, I. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Suslov, A. V. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (United States); Mironov, O. A. [University of Warwick Science Park, Warwick SEMINANO R and D Centre (United Kingdom); Leadley, D. R. [University of Warwick Science Park, Department of Physics (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetoresistivity {rho}{sub xx} and {rho}{sub xy} and the acoustoelectronic effects are measured in p-Si/SiGe/Si with an impurity concentration p = 1.99 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} in the temperature range 0.3-2.0 K and an tilted magnetic field up to 18 T. The dependence of the effective g factor on the angle of magnetic field tilt {theta} to the normal to the plane of a two-dimensional p-Si/SiGe/Si channel is determined. A first-order ferromagnet-paramagnet phase transition is observed in the magnetic fields corresponding to a filling factor {nu} = 2 at {theta} {approx} 59{sup o}-60{sup o}.

  14. Magnetoresistivity in a tilted magnetic field in p-Si/SiGe/Si heterostructures with an anisotropic g-factor. Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drichko, I. L.; Smirnov, I. Yu., E-mail: ivan.smirnov@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Suslov, A. V. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (United States); Mironov, O. A. [University of Warwick Science Park, Warwick SEMINANO R and D Centre (United Kingdom); Leadley, D. R. [University of Warwick, Department of Physics (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetoresistance components {rho}xx and {rho}xy are measured in two p-Si/SiGe/Si quantum wells that have an anisotropic g-factor in a tilted magnetic field as a function of the temperature, field, and tilt angle. Activation energy measurements demonstrate the existence of a ferromagnetic-paramagnetic (F-P) transition for the sample with the hole density p = 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. This transition is due to the crossing of the 0{up_arrow} and 1{down_arrow} Landau levels. However, in another sample with p = 7.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}, the 0{up_arrow} and 1{down_arrow} Landau levels coincide for angles {theta} = 0-70 Degree-Sign . Only for {theta} > 70 Degree-Sign do the levels start to diverge which, in turn, results in the energy gap opening.

  15. Automatic recovery of missing amplitudes and phases in tilt-limited electron crystallography of two-dimensional crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gipson, Bryant R.; Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and Nano Analytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University Basel, WRO-1058 Mattenstrasse 26, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Masiel, Daniel J.; Browning, Nigel D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Sciences, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Spence, John [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Mitsuoka, Kaoru [Biomedicinal Information Research Center (BIRC), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-3-26, Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron crystallography of 2D protein crystals provides a powerful tool for the determination of membrane protein structure. In this method, data is acquired in the Fourier domain as randomly sampled, uncoupled, amplitudes and phases. Due to physical constraints on specimen tilting, those Fourier data show a vast un-sampled ''missing cone'' of information, producing resolution loss in the direction perpendicular to the membrane plane. Based on the flexible language of projection onto sets, we provide a full solution for these problems with a projective constraint optimization algorithm that, for sufficiently oversampled data, produces complete recovery of unmeasured data in the missing cone. We apply this method to an experimental data set of Bacteriorhodopsin and show that, in addition to producing superior results compared to traditional reconstruction methods, full, reproducible, recovery of the missing cone from noisy data is possible. Finally, we present an automatic implementation of the refinement routine as open source, freely distributed, software that will be included in our 2dx software package.

  16. Investigation of Copper Segregation to the S5(310)/[001] Symmetric Tilt Grain Boundary (STGB) in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plitzko, J.M.; Campbell, G.H.; King, W.E.; Foiles, S.M.

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The {Sigma}5 (310)/[001] symmetric tilt grain boundary (STGB) in the face centered cubic (FCC) metal aluminum with 1at% copper has been studied. The model grain boundary has been fabricated by ultra-high vacuum diffusion bonding of alloy single crystals. The segregation of the copper has been encouraged by annealing the sample after bonding at 200 C. TEM samples of this FCC-material were prepared with a new low voltage ion mill under very low angles. The atomic structure of the {Sigma}5 (310)/[001] STGB for this system was modeled with electronic structure calculations. These theoretical calculations of this interface structure indicate that the Cu atoms segregate to distinct sites at the interface. High resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM) and analytical electron microscopy including electron energy spectroscopic imaging and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry have been used to explore the segregation to the grain boundary. The HRTEM images and the analytical measurements were performed using different kinds of microscopes, including a Philips CM300 FEG equipped with an imaging energy filter. The amount of the segregated species at the interface was quantified in a preliminary way. To determine the atomic positions of the segregated atoms at the interface, HRTEM coupled with image simulation and a first attempt of a holographic reconstruction from a through-focal series have been used.

  17. The effects of coronal mass ejection on galactic cosmic rays in the high latitude heliosphere: Observations from Ulysses` first orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bothmer, V.; Heber, B.; Kunow, H.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Wibberenz, G. [Univ. of Kiel (Germany). Institut fuer Kernphysik; Gosling, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Balogh, A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Raviart, A. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d`Astrophysique; Paizis, C. [Univ. di Milano (Italy). Istituto di Fisica Cosmica CNR

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During its first solar orbit the Ulysses spacecraft detected several coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at high heliographic latitudes. The authors present first observations on the effects of these high latitude CMEs on galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) using measurements from the Kiel Electron Telescope (KET) which is part of the Cosmic Ray and Solar Particle Investigation (COSPIN) experiment, the Los Alamos SWOOPS (Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun) experiment and the magnetic field experiments. They find the passage of these CMEs over the spacecraft to be associated with short term decreases of GCR intensities The relatively weak shocks in these events, driven by the CMEs` over-expansion, had no strong influence on the GCRs. The intensity minimums of GCRs occurred on closed magnetic field lines inside the CMEs themselves as indicated by bidirectional fluxes of suprathermal electrons. Short episodes of intensity increases of GCRs inside CMEs at times when the bidirectional fluxes of suprathermal electrons disappeared, can be interpreted as evidence that GCRs can easily access the interior of those CMEs in which open magnetic field lines are embedded.

  18. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  19. Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Tom Dunkley; Bown, Paul R.; Pearson, Paul N.; Wade, Bridget S.; Coxall, Helen K.; Lear, Caroline H.

    Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production Tom Dunkley Jones, 1 Paul R. Bown, 2 Paul N. Pearson, 3 Bridget S. Wade, 4 Helen K... carbonate primary production at the onset of global cooling, and (3) a significant increase in nutrient availability in the low-latitude surface ocean through the EOT. Citation: Dunkley Jones, T., P. R. Bown, P. N. Pearson, B. S. Wade, H. K. Coxall, and C. H...

  20. Radiation Protection Guidance Hospital Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Page 1 Radiation Protection Guidance For Hospital Staff Prepared for Stanford ..................................................................................................................... 17 The Basic Principles of Radiation Protection........................................................... 17 Protection against Radiation Exposure

  1. A COMPANION AS THE CAUSE OF LATITUDE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS IN THE WIND OF ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groh, J. H. [Geneva Observatory, Geneva University, Chemin des Maillettes 51, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Madura, T. I.; Weigelt, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hillier, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Kruip, C. J. H., E-mail: jose.groh@unige.ch [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of the Eta Carinae binary system obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/STIS. Eta Car is enshrouded by the dusty Homunculus nebula, which scatters light emitted by the central binary and provides a unique opportunity to study a massive binary system from different vantage points. We investigate the latitudinal and azimuthal dependence of H{alpha} line profiles caused by the presence of a wind-wind collision (WWC) cavity created by the companion star. Using two-dimensional radiative transfer models, we find that the wind cavity can qualitatively explain the observed line profiles around apastron. Regions of the Homunculus which scatter light that propagated through the WWC cavity show weaker or no H{alpha} absorption. Regions scattering light that propagated through a significant portion of the primary wind show stronger P Cygni absorption. Our models overestimate the H{alpha} absorption formed in the primary wind, which we attribute to photoionization by the companion, not presently included in the models. We can qualitatively explain the latitudinal changes that occur during periastron, shedding light on the nature of Eta Car's spectroscopic events. Our models support the idea that during the brief period of time around periastron when the primary wind flows unimpeded toward the observer, H{alpha} absorption occurs in directions toward the central object and Homunculus SE pole, but not toward equatorial regions close to the Weigelt blobs. We suggest that observed latitudinal and azimuthal variations are dominated by the companion star via the WWC cavity, rather than by rapid rotation of the primary star.

  2. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus in the pilot radiation observation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.; Young, S.A.; Manson, P.; Patterson, G.R. [CSIRO, Victoria (Australia)] [and others

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a sensitive filter radiometer for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been reported. The aim was to develop a reliable and fast instrument that could be used alongside a lidar to obtain near realtime optical properties of clouds, particularly high ice clouds, as they drifted over an ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site allowing calculation of the radiation divergence in the atmosphere over the site. Obtaining cloud optical properties by the lidar/radiometer, or LIRAD, method was described by Platt et al.; the latter paper also describes a year`s data on mid-latitude cirrus. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus (i.e., cirrus within a few degrees of the equator) have hardly been studied at all. The same is true of tropical cirrus, although a few observations have been reported by Davis and Platt et al.This paper describes obersvations performed on cirrus clouds, analysis methods used, and results.

  3. Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

  4. WI Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

  5. Radiation protection at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

  6. RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2002 D. Delacroix* J. P. Guerre** P. Leblanc'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

  7. Radiation Processing -an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of radiation · Facilities ­ Gamma ­ electrons ­ X-ray ­ Safety · Sterilisation of medical devices · Food irradiation · Material modification #12;3 Content ­ Part 2 · Environmental applications · Other applications Radiation · Energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles Irradiation · Exposure to radiation

  8. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  9. TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Emily B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

  10. Spread-F during the magnetic storm of 22 January 2004 at low latitudes: Effect of IMF-Bz in relation to local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, Janardhan

    measurements at an electrojet station Thumba. This phenomenon is found to occur during geomagnetic quiet of the orthogonal horizontal electric field and the geomagnetic field gives rise to several distinct features Electrojet (EEJ), a band of intense daytime eastward current in the ionosphere (100 km) within ± 3 latitudes

  11. Neogene Low-latitude Seasonal Environmental Variations: Stable Isotopic and Trace Elemental Records in Mollusks from the Florida Platform and the Central American Isthmus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Kai

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Ph.D. dissertation integrates stable isotope and trace element geochemistry in modern and fossil gastropod shells to study low-latitude marine paleoenvironments. First, stable isotopes (delta18O and delta13C) and Sr/Ca ratios are used...

  12. Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

  13. Northern mid-latitude glaciation in the Late Amazonian period of Mars: Criteria for the recognition of debris-covered glacier and valley glacier landsystem deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    in talus pile pore space caused lubrication and flow during an earlier climatic regime. A number of factors have remained uncertain, however, including the detailed structure and texture of LDA analogs, to assess the characteristics of LDA/LVF in the northern mid-latitudes of Mars. We find evidence

  14. Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

  15. The Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen,W.; Jensen,M.; Genio, A. D.; Giangrande, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Heymsfield, G.; Hou, A.; Kollias, P.; Orr, B.; Rutledge, S.; Schwaller, M.; Zipser, E.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April-May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radition Measurement Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation program. The Intensive Observation Period leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall observations over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective processes tangible to the convective parameterization problem are targeted such as, pre-convective environment and convective initiation, updraft / downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, influence on the environment and radiation and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing. MC3E will use a new multi-scale observing strategy with the participation of a network of distributed sensors (both passive and active). The approach is to document in 3-D not only the full spectrum of precipitation rates, but also clouds, winds and moisture in an attempt to provide a holistic view of convective clouds and their feedback with the environment. A goal is to measure cloud and precipitation transitions and environmental quantities that are important for satellite retrieval algorithms, convective parameterization in large-scale models and cloud-resolving model simulations. This will be accomplished through the deployment of several different elements that complement the existing (and soon to become available) ARM facilities: a network of radiosonde stations, NASA scanning multi-frequency/parameter radar systems at three different frequencies (Ka/Ku/S), high-altitude remote sensing and in situ aircraft, wind profilers and a network of surface disdrometers. In addition to these special MC3E instruments, there will be important new instrumentation deployed by DOE at the ARM site including: 3 networked scanning X-band radar systems, a C-band scanning radar, a dual wavelength (Ka/W) scanning cloud radar, a Doppler lidar and upgraded vertically pointing millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) and micropulse lidar (MPL).To fully describe the properties of precipitating cloud systems, both in situ and remote sensing airborne observations are necessary. The NASA GPM-funded University of North Dakota (UND) Citation will provide in situ observations of precipitation-sized particles, ice freezing nuclei and aerosol concentrations. As a complement to the UND Citation's in situ observations, the NASA ER-2 will provide a high altitude satellite simulator platform that carrying a Ka/Ku band radar and passive microwave radiometers (10-183 GHZ).

  16. Testing three 90Whr Dell Batteries for Latitude E6410 I have been able, for complicated reasons, to test three batteries sold as 9cell 90Whr batteries for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloman, Aaron

    Testing three 90Whr Dell Batteries for Latitude E6410 I have been able, for complicated reasons, to test three batteries sold as 9cell 90Whr batteries for the Dell Latitude E6410 computer, one made battery was fully charged then allowed to discharge while the laptop was on, and not doing very much

  17. A Geochemical and Sedimentary Record of High Southern Latitude Holocene Climate Evolution from Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moy, C M; Dunbar, R B; Guilderson, T P; Waldmann, N; Mucciarone, D A; Recasens, C; Austin, J A; Anselmetti, F S

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Situated at the southern margin of the hemispheric westerly wind belt and immediately north of the Antarctic Polar Frontal zone, Tierra del Fuego is well-positioned to monitor coupled changes in the ocean-atmosphere system of the high southern latitudes. Here we describe a Holocene paleoclimate record from sediment cores obtained from Lago Fagnano, a large lake in southern Tierra del Fuego at 55{sup o}S, to investigate past changes in climate related to these two important features of the global climate system. We use an AMS radiocarbon chronology for the last 8,000 years based on pollen concentrates, thereby avoiding contamination from bedrock-derived lignite. Our chronology is consistent with a tephrochronologic age date for deposits from the middle Holocene Volcan Hudson eruption. Combining bulk organic isotopic ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N) and elemental (C and N) parameters with physical sediment properties allow us to better understand sediment provenance and transport mechanisms and to interpret Holocene climate and tectonic change during the last 8,000 years. Co-variability and long-term trends in C/N ratio, carbon accumulation rate, and magnetic susceptibility reflect an overall Holocene increase in the delivery of terrestrial organic and lithogenic material to the deep eastern basin. We attribute this variability to westerly wind-derived precipitation. Increased wind strength and precipitation in the late Holocene drives the Nothofagus forest eastward and enhances run-off and terrigenous inputs to the lake. Superimposed on the long-term trend are a series of abrupt 9 negative departures in C/N ratio, which constrain the presence of seismically-driven mass flow events in the record. We identify an increase in bulk {delta}{sup 13}C between 7,000 and 5,000 cal yr BP that we attribute to enhanced aquatic productivity driven by warmer summer temperatures. The Lago Fagnano {delta}{sup 13}C record shows similarities with Holocene records of sea surface temperature from the mid-latitude Chilean continental shelf and Antarctic air temperatures from the Taylor Dome ice core record in East Antarctica. Mid-Holocene warming occurred simultaneously across the Antarctic Frontal Zone, and in particular, in locations currently influenced by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  18. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  19. Solar radiation intensity calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

  20. Climatology of Mid-latitude Ionospheric Disturbances from the Very Large Array Low-frequency Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmboldt, J F; Cotton, W D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a climatological study of ionospheric disturbances derived from observations of cosmic sources from the Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) are presented. We have used the ionospheric corrections applied to the 74 MHz interferometric data within the VLSS imaging process to obtain fluctuation spectra for the total electron content (TEC) gradient on spatial scales from a few to hundreds of kilometers and temporal scales from less than one minute to nearly an hour. The observations sample nearly all times of day and all seasons. They also span latitudes and longitudes from 28 deg. N to 40 deg. N and 95 deg. W to 114 deg. W, respectively. We have binned and averaged the fluctuation spectra according to time of day, season, and geomagnetic (Kp index) and solar (F10.7) activity. These spectra provide a detailed, multi-scale account of seasonal and intraday variations in ionospheric activity with wavelike structures detected at wavelengths between about 35 and 250 km. In some cases,...

  1. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upton, NY 11973, USA Abstract Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) effects in bunch compressors are analyzed. Schemes for reducing the CSR effects are presented. 1 INTRODUCTION...

  2. Atomic Radiation (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

  3. Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

  4. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Brent J. (West Richland, WA); Coomes, Edmund P. (West Richland, WA)

    1988-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  5. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  6. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    for increased protection from ionizing radiation for declared pregnant radiation workers. The radiation doseCOLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212 regulations of the Rules of the City of New York, Article 175, Radiation Control, there is a requirement

  7. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  8. Nonclassicality of Thermal Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars M. Johansen

    2004-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that thermal radiation of small occupation number is strongly nonclassical. This includes most forms of naturally occurring radiation. Nonclassicality can be observed as a negative weak value of a positive observable. It is related to negative values of the Margenau-Hill quasi-probability distribution.

  9. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  10. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  11. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  12. Breaking the Crowther Limit: Combining Depth-Sectioning and Tilt Tomography for High-Resolution, Wide-Field 3D Reconstructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hovden, Robert; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruna, Hector D; Elser, Veit; Muller, David A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, high-resolution ( 6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over one hundred dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability.

  13. Observational evidence for a changing tilt of the accretion disk with respect to the orbital plane in Her X-1 over its 35 day cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Klochkov; N. Shakura; K. Postnov; R. Staubert; J. Wilms; N. Ketsaris

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis and interpretation of the Her X-1 X-ray light curve obtained with the ASM onbord RXTE over the period 1996 February to 2004 September is presented. We report that the features found previously in the averaged X-ray lightcurve are confirmed by the new RXTE/ASM data. In particular, anomalous dips and post-eclipse recoveries in two successive orbits in the short-on state are found to be prominent and stable details of the light curve. We argue that a change of the tilt of the accretion disk over the 35-day period is necessary to account for these features and show that our numerical model can explain such a behavior of the disk and reproduce the observed details of the light curve.

  14. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  15. RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR RADIATION PROTECTION AT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY................................................................................................................I-1 B. Radiation Protection Program...............................................................................I-3 D. Radiation Safety Management

  16. Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Aihua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeV. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeapproximation for solar radiation in the NCAR Community

  17. Anderson-Gregory; Constable-Steven; Orcutt-John; Staudigel-Hubert; Tolstoy-Maya; Wyatt-Frank-K, Observing seafloor tilt on Axial Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    -Frank-K, Observing seafloor tilt on Axial Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union de Fuca Ridge. Geophysical Research Letters.22; 2, Pages 147-150. 1995. Baker-Edward-T; Fox eruption of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Geophysical Research Letters.26; 23, Pages 3445-3448. 1999

  18. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C1, supplgment au no2, Tome 40,fgvrier 1979,page C1-295 POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS OF TWO He I TRANSITIONS USING BEAM-TILTED-FOIL EXCITATION*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    these measure- ments, for at least two transitions, to try to establish a trend through as large a foil tilt be rotated by a step- ping motor with reproducibility of axis position of 0.1'. The entrance and exit slits acquisition and experimental control have been previously described.' Nominally 5 ug/cm2 carbon foils were

  19. Simulation of high-latitude hydrological processes in the TorneKalix basin: PILPS Phase 2(e)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    (1979­1998) were provided to the 21 participating modeling groups for 218 1/4j grid cells, underestimation of true precipitation and the necessity to estimate incoming solar radiation were the primary data of a three-part paper: (1) calibration­validation runs--calibration of model parameters using observed

  20. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212 Psychiatric Institute Radiation Safety Office (Please complete this form within 24 hours and send a copy to your supervisor and The Radiation Safety Office) Your Name

  1. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212: _______________ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Radiation Safety Office Approval: ______________________ Date: ________________________ Waste containers in place: Yes ___ No ___ Radiation signage on door: Yes ___ No ___ Room monitoring: Dates

  2. Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    to Workers; Inspections 27 10 CFR Part 20Standards for Protection Against Radiation 28 10 CFR Part 35Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated December 2012 Stanford University, Stanford California #12; #12; Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated

  3. Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

  4. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  5. The Intense Radiation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

  6. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  7. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  8. Response of five tropical plant species to natural solar ultraviolet-B radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searles, P.S.; Caldwell, M.M. (Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)); Winter, K. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa (Panama))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tropical latitudes currently receive high solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm) even without ozone depletion. Thus, the influence of natural, present-day UV-B irradiance was examined for three native rainforest tree species and two economically important species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama (9[degrees] N). Solar UV-B radiation conditions were obtained using a UV-B excluding plastic film or a near-ambient UV-B transmitting film over potted plants in a small clearing. Significant differences were often exhibited as increased foliar UV-B absorbing compounds, increased leaf mass pre area, and reduced leaf blade length for plants receiving solar UV-B radiation. Plant height was typically reduced under solar UV-B, but some variation among species in response was seen. Biomass and photosystem II function were generally unaffected. The results provide evidence that tropical vegetation responds to the present level of Solar UV-B radiation. This suggests even a small increase in UV-B radiation with ozone depletion may have biological implications.

  9. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  10. The Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Ignatov

    2001-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An example of discontinuity of the energy-momentum tensor moving at superluminal velocity is discussed. It is shown that the gravitational Mach cone is formed. The power spectrum of the corresponding Cherenkov radiation is evaluated.

  11. Radiation from Accelerated Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohab Abou-Zeid; Miguel S. Costa

    2000-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

  12. Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

  13. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  14. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  15. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  16. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of x-ray producing

  17. Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    of External and Internal Doses E. Reports and Notices to Workers Chapter VII: Radiation ProtectionRadiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL For Columbia University NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital New York State Psychiatric Institute Barnard College December 2012 #12;Radiation Safety Manual

  18. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  19. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The form factors for the radiative transitions between charmonium mesons are investigated. We employ an anisotropic lattice using a Wilson gauge action, and domain-wall fermion action. We extrapolate the form factors to Q{sup 2} = 0, corresponding to a real photon, using quark-model-inspired functions. Finally, comparison is made with photocouplings extracted from the measured radiative widths, where known. Our preliminary results find photocouplings commensurate with these experimentally extracted values.

  20. Radiative Processes Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The

  1. Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

  2. Gravitational Tunneling Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz

    2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The isolated black hole radiation of both Hawking and Zel'dovich are idealized abstractions as there is always another body to distort the potential. This is considered with respect to both gravitational tunneling, and black hole "no-hair" theorems. The effects of a second body are to lower the gravitational barrier of a black hole and to give the barrier a finite rather than infinite width so tha a particle can escape by tunneling (as in field emission) or over the top of the lowered barrier (as in Schottky emission). Thus radiation may be emitted from black holes in a process differing from that of Hawking radiation, P SH, which has been undetected for over 24 years. The radiated power from a black hole derived here is PR e ^2__ PSH, where e ^2__ is he ransmission probability for radiation through the barrier. This is similar to electric field emission of electrons from a metal in that the emission can in principle be modulated and beamed. The temperature and entropy of black holes are reexamined. Miniscule black holes herein may help explain the missing mass of the universe, accelerated expansion of the universe, and anomalous rotation of spiral galaxies. A gravitational interference effect for black hole radiation similar to the Aharonov-Bohm effect is also examined.

  3. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  4. Working With Radiation For Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    working with radiation The radiation badge is not a protective device It cannot shield you from ­ Negative Exponential Protection From Radiation #12;18 Time Distance Shielding Basic Principles #121 Working With Radiation For Research Thomas Cummings Junior Physicist Environmental Health

  5. Radiation Safety Annual Refresher Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Radiation Safety Annual Refresher Training Radiation Protection Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety #12;Topics in Radiation Safety (applicable RPD Manual sections indicated) User;Topics in Radiation Safety (applicable RPD Manual sections indicated) User and Non-user topics Types

  6. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  7. Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation EffectsProtection

  8. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  9. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  10. A Near-Infrared Photometric Study of the Low Latitude Globular Clusters Liller 1, Djorgovski 1, HP 1, and NGC 6528

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Davidge

    1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Images recorded through J, H, Ks, 2.2 micron continuum, and 2.3 micron CO filters are used to investigate the stellar contents of the low Galactic latitude globular clusters NGC 6528, Liller 1, Djorgovski 1, and HP 1, as well as surrounding bulge fields. Metallicities are estimated for the latter three clusters by comparing the colors and CO indices of giant branch stars with those in other clusters and the bulge, while reddenings are estimated from the colors of bright bulge stars in the surrounding fields. In some cases the metallicities and reddenings are significantly different from previous estimates.

  11. Coherent Nuclear Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yukalov; E. P. Yukalova

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of this review is devoted to the comprehensive description of coherent radiation by nuclear spins. The theory of nuclear spin superradiance is developed and the experimental observations of this phenomenon are considered. The intriguing problem of how coherence develops from initially incoherent quantum fluctuations is analysed. All main types of coherent radiation by nuclear spins are discussed, which are: free nuclear induction, collective induction, maser generation, pure superradiance, triggered superradiance, pulsing superradiance, punctuated superradiance, and induced emission. The influence of electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions and the role of magnetic anisotropy are studied. Conditions for realizing spin superradiance by magnetic molecules are investigated. The possibility of nuclear matter lasing, accompanied by pion or dibaryon radiation, is briefly touched.

  12. Pediatric radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halperin, E.C.; Kun, L.E.; Constine, L.S.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This text covers all aspects of radiation therapy for treatment of pediatric cancer. The book describes the proper use of irradiation in each of the malignancies of childhood, including tumors that are rarely encountered in adult practice. These include acute leukemia; supratentorial brain tumors; tumors of the posterior fossa of the brain and spinal canal; retinoblastoma and optic nerve glioma; neuroblastoma; Hodgkin's disease; malignant lymphoma; Ewing's sarcoma; osteosarcoma; rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoid tumor; Wilms' tumor; liver and biliary tumors; germ cell and stromal cell tumors of the gonads; endocrine, aerodigestive tract, and breast tumors; Langerhans' cell histiocytosis; and skin cancer and hemangiomas. For each type of malignancy, the authors describe the epidemiology, common presenting signs and symptoms, staging, and proper diagnostic workup. Particular attention is given to the indications for radiation therapy and the planning of a course of radiotherapy, including the optimal radiation dose, field size, and technique.

  13. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  14. Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Courtney

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

  15. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  16. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  17. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  18. Radiation.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiationRadiation Safety Work

  19. MODELING THE DYNAMICAL COUPLING OF SOLAR CONVECTION WITH THE RADIATIVE INTERIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, Allan Sacha [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miesch, Mark S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Toomre, Juri [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  20. Local microwave background radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domingos Soares

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

  1. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  2. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

  3. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative Transfer (RT) effects play a crucial role in the thermal history of the intergalactic medium. Here I discuss recent advances in the development of numerical methods that introduce RT to cosmological hydrodynamics. These methods can also readily be applied to time dependent problems on interstellar and galactic scales.

  4. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  5. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  6. Reproductive, morphological, and phytochemical responses of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to enhanced UV-B radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trumbull, V.L.; McCloud, E.S.; Paige, K.N. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana, collected from Libya and Norway, were grown in the greenhouse under. UV-B doses of 0 and 10.5 kJ m[sup [minus]2] UV-B[sub BE]. The high UV-B dose simulated midsummer ambient conditions over Libya and a 40% reduction in stratospheric ozone over Norway. The Libyan ectotype, which originated from latitudes where solar UV-B is high, showed no UV-B induced damage to plant growth. However the Norwegian ecotype, which originated from latitudes where solar UV-B is low, showed a significant reduction in plant height, inflorescence weight, and rosette weight in response to enhanced UV-B. Although fruit and seed number for both ecotypes were unaffected by enhanced UV-B radiation the germination success of the seeds harvested from the irradiated Norwegian plants were significantly reduced. The two ecotypes also differed with respect to their accumulation of kaempferol, a putative UV-B protective filter. The Libyan ecotype increased kaempferol concentration by 38% over the 0 kJ treatment whereas the Norwegian ecotype increased by only 15%. These data suggest that, for these ecotypes, variation in UV-B sensitivity may be explained by the differential induction of UV-absorbing leaf pigments.

  7. Radiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent; Viskanta, Raymond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. L. Drolen, “Thermal radiation in particulate media withRadiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubblesthermophysical properties and radiation characteristics of

  8. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Abstract: A review is presented of recent results on radiation damage production, defect...

  9. Preliminary radiation shielding design for BOOMERANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary Radiation Shielding Design for BOOMERANG R. J.2003 Abstract Preliminary radiation shielding speci?cationsElectron Photon Stray Radiation from a High Energy Electron

  10. Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER 5 MAY 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedand millimeter wave radiation from laser acceleratedNo. 5, May 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated

  11. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straume, Tore

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ionizing radiation. In: Advances in Medical Physics (A. B.for medical management of radiation casualties. ADVANCES INMedical Center presented the radiation oncology perspective on biomarkers. Advances

  12. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

  13. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 Protocol Title: Training for Sealed Source Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

  14. Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data

  15. RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Richard H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the high-energy proton damage than was the planar detector.as far as radiation damage is concerned. Unfortunately, some28-29, 1978 LBL-7967 RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

  16. DOE Radiation Records Contacts List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

  17. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  18. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  19. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  20. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  1. NCSRNCSR ""DEMOKRITOSDEMOKRITOS"" INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION PROTECTIONINSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROTECTIONINSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION PROTECTION ·· ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORYENVIRONMENTAL·· NCSRNCSR ""DEMOKRITOSDEMOKRITOS"" ·· INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION

  2. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia by more than 50 percent. #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212 ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia

  3. 6, 52315250, 2006 Radiative properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the short- wave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative effects (CRE), but the impact is small: 0.02 W m-2 tests are conducted to evaluate the impact that5 such an over-layer would have on the radiative effects, terrestrial) radiation. The SW "albedo" effect brings about cooling and the LW "greenhouse" effect warming

  4. Terahertz radiation mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

  5. National Ambient Radiation Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

  6. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  7. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  8. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  9. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Knop; P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in spherically symmetric systems that are influenced by the effects of general relativity (GR). We utilize a comoving wavelength ansatz that allows to resolve spectral lines throughout the atmosphere. The used numerical solution is an operator splitting (OS) technique that uses a characteristic formal solution. The bending of photon paths and the wavelength shifts due to the effects of GR are fully taken into account, as is the treatment of image generation in a curved spacetime. We describe the algorithm we use and demonstrate the effects of GR on the radiative transport of a two level atom line in a neutron star like atmosphere for various combinations of continuous and line scattering coefficients. In addition, we present grey continuum models and discuss the effects of different scattering albedos on the emergent spectra and the determination of effective temperatures and radii of neutron star atmospheres.

  10. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  11. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  12. Multilayer radiation shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Urbahn, John Arthur (Saratoga Springs, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Niskayuna, NY)

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  13. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  14. Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide COURSE...

  15. POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubin, Philip Lubin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a 45° angle. Radiation whose electric field (polarization)radiation field, it can be uniquely characterized by its electric

  16. Global aspects of radiation memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Winicour

    2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational radiation has a memory effect represented by a net change in the relative positions of test particles. Both the linear and nonlinear sources proposed for this radiation memory are of the "electric" type, or E mode, as characterized by the even parity of the polarization pattern. Although "magnetic" type, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory in which the velocity of charged particles obtain a net "kick". Again, the physically realistic sources of electromagnetic radiation memory that have been identified are of the electric type. In this paper, a global null cone description of the electromagnetic field is applied to establish the non-existence of B mode radiation memory and the non-existence of E mode radiation memory due to a bound charge distribution.

  17. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  18. Infrared Excess and Molecular Clouds: A comparison of new suerveys of far-infrared and H I 21-cm emission at high galactic latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William T. Reach; William F. Wall; Nils Odegard

    1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have created a map of the large-scale infrared surface brightness in excess of that associated with the atomic interstellar medium, using region-by-region correlations between the far-infrared and 21-cm line surface brightness. Our study updates and extends a previous attempt with IRAS and Berkeley/Parkes H I surveys. The far-infrared observations used here are from DIRBE, which extends far-infrared wavelength coverage to 240 um, so that we are reliably sampling the emission of large, thermal-equilibrium grains that dominate the dust mass. The H I data are from the combined Leiden-Dwingeloo and Parkes 21-cm line surveys. Using the maps of excess infrared emission at 100, 140, and 240 um, we created an atlas and identified the coherent structures. These infrared excess clouds can be caused both by dust that is warmer than average, or by dust associated with gas other than the atomic interstellar medium. We find very few warm clouds, such as the H II region around Spica. The majority of the infrared excess clouds are colder than the average atomic interstellar medium. These clouds are peaks of column density, and their excess infrared emission is due to dust associated with molecular gas. We identify essentially all known high-latitude molecular clouds in the infrared excess maps, and further identify a sample of new clouds with similar infrared properties. The infrared excess was correlated with CO line brightness, allowing us to measure the ratio of N(H2)/W(CO) for high-latitude clouds. The atlas of infrared excess may be a useful guide to regions of relatively high column density, which might cause high extinction toward extragalactic objects at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths and confusion for cosmic infrared and microwave backgrounds.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  20. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

  1. Radiation Field on Superspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

  2. Solar radiation intensity calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , radiation per unit area per unit time, on a flat-plate collector is given by: I = I cos B (2. 1a) where I is the solar constant. insolation received at one astro- nomical unit from the sun. Since clear sky conditions are assumed I o w i 1 1 b e a.... INSOLATION EQUATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS Page III. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX VITA 25 47 48 52 Vi LIST OF TABLES TABLE I. Optimal Inclination for Ap=O, No Checks for Ip &0 and a Time Independent Solar Constant. II. Optimal...

  3. Radiative ?(1S) decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    — wW~ ii~ ~ + v~ 1''&WV'' V 0.20 0.45 0.70 ~y ~ EBFA~ 0.95 l.20 FIG. 4. Energy spectrum (normalized to beam energy) for Y~y2(h+h ) event candidates, with continuum data and ex- pected background from Y~m 2(h +h ) overplotted. 40 30— ~ 20— LLI IO— hl...PHYSICAL REVIEW 0 VOLUME 41, NUMBER 5 Radiative T(lS) decays 1 MARCH 1990 R. Fulton, M. Hempstead, T. Jensen, D. R. Johnson, H. Kagan, R. Kass, F. Morrow, and J. Whitmore Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 W.-Y. Chen, J. Dominick, R. L. Mc...

  4. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

  5. Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation Effects

  6. Radiation Safety Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation

  7. Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

  8. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  9. RADIATIVE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Mineralogie et Cosmochimie de Museum (LMCM), CNRS and Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7202, 57 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris (France); Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr, E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g., at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H II region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick 'adiabatic' regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved, for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state and derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability condition.

  10. Radiator Labs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: TheCompetition » Radiator Labs

  11. Split SUSY Radiates Flavor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Baumgart; Daniel Stolarski; Thomas Zorawski

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative flavor models where the hierarchies of Standard Model (SM) fermion masses and mixings are explained via loop corrections are elegant ways to solve the SM flavor puzzle. Here we build such a model in the context of Mini-Split Supersymmetry (SUSY) where both flavor and SUSY breaking occur at a scale of 1000 TeV. This model is consistent with the observed Higgs mass, unification, and WIMP dark matter. The high scale allows large flavor mixing among the sfermions, which provides part of the mechanism for radiative flavor generation. In the deep UV, all flavors are treated democratically, but at the SUSY breaking scale, the third, second, and first generation Yukawa couplings are generated at tree level, one loop, and two loops, respectively. Save for one, all the dimensionless parameters in the theory are O(1), with the exception being a modest and technically natural tuning that explains both the smallness of the bottom Yukawa coupling and the largeness of the Cabibbo angle.

  12. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL] [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL] [ORNL; Phillips, Rick [ORNL] [ORNL; Erickson, Marjorie A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kirk, Mark T [ORNL] [ORNL; Stevens, Gary L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

  13. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacobexposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Sinceto nuclear explo ions or medical radiation, describes the

  14. Radiation Safety Work Control Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-3) Rev. May 2014 Area: Form : Date: Preliminary Applicability Screen: (a) Will closing the beam line injection stoppers...

  15. Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

  16. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  17. Radiating Levi-Civita Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgur Delice

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper has been withdrawn by the author, See J.Krishna Rao, J. Phys. A: Gen. Phys., 4, 17 (1971) for radiating Levi-Civita metric.

  18. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder; Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  19. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM); Looney, Larry D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  20. Quality Services: Radiation (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish standards for protection against ionizing radiation resulting from the disposal and discharge of radioactive material to the environment. The regulations apply to any...

  1. SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Saul, L.; Wurz, P. [University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Frisch, P. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gruntman, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mueller, H. R. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Ly?. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (?) has increased slightly from ? = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to ? = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

  2. Hawking radiation and Quasinormal modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SangChul Yoon

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of Hawking radiation by quantum fields in the curved spacetime is continuous, so the explanation of Hawking radiation using quasinormal modes can be suspected to be impossible. We find that quasinormal modes do not explain the relation between the state observed in a region far away from a black hole and the short distance behavior of the state on the horizon.

  3. Radiation trapping in coherent media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Matsko; I. Novikova; M. O. Scully; G. R. Welch

    2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the effective decay rate of Zeeman coherence, generated in a Rb87 vapor by linearly polarized laser light, increases significantly with the atomic density. We explain this phenomenon as the result of radiation trapping. Our study shows that radiation trapping must be taken into account to fully understand many electromagnetically induced transparency experiments with optically thick media.

  4. Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY J. Kenneth Shultis and Richard E. Faw* Abstract Physics Society INTRODUCTION THIS IS a review of the technology of shielding against the effects to the review. The first treats the evolution of radiation-shielding technology from the beginning of the 20th

  5. Tilt generation in step-graded In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As metamorphic pseudosubstrate on a singular GaAs substrate using a low-temperature grown InGaP interlayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghanad Tavakoli, Shahram; Hulko, Oksana; Thompson, David A. [Department of Engineering Physics, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4 L7 (Canada)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Metamorphic pseudosubstrates of In{sub 0.42}Ga{sub 0.58}As were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using step-graded In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As buffer layers grown either directly on a (001) GaAs substrate or on a GaAs substrate overgrown with a layer of low-temperature grown In{sub 0.51}Ga{sub 0.49}P (LT-InGaP). The structures were examined using x-ray reciprocal space mapping to determine the characteristics of the pseudosubstrates and buffer layers. For the sample grown on the LT-InGaP layer, the pseudosubstrate exhibited an asymmetric tilt around [110] toward the [110] direction. Weak-beam dark-field electron imaging shows an imbalance of misfit dislocations with opposite sign Burgers vector. An explanation for this tilt is given and it is suggested that it may be responsible for the improved quality of epitaxial layers grown on such pseudosubstrates.

  6. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  7. Gravitational Radiation From Cosmological Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Kosowsky; Andrew Mack; Tinatin Kahniashvili

    2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection of energy into the early Universe on a given characteristic length scale will result in turbulent motions of the primordial plasma. We calculate the stochastic background of gravitational radiation arising from a period of cosmological turbulence, using a simple model of isotropic Kolmogoroff turbulence produced in a cosmological phase transition. We also derive the gravitational radiation generated by magnetic fields arising from a dynamo operating during the period of turbulence. The resulting gravitational radiation background has a maximum amplitude comparable to the radiation background from the collision of bubbles in a first-order phase transition, but at a lower frequency, while the radiation from the induced magnetic fields is always subdominant to that from the turbulence itself. We briefly discuss the detectability of such a signal.

  8. Transition Radiation in QCD matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Djordjevic

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions a finite size QCD medium is created. In this paper we compute radiative energy loss to zeroth order in opacity by taking into account finite size effects. Transition radiation occurs on the boundary between the finite size medium and the vacuum, and we show that it lowers the difference between medium and vacuum zeroth order radiative energy loss relative to the infinite size medium case. Further, in all previous computations of light parton radiation to zeroth order in opacity, there was a divergence caused by the fact that the energy loss is infinite in the vacuum and finite in the QCD medium. We show that this infinite discontinuity is naturally regulated by including the transition radiation.

  9. Radiation Reaction in Quantum Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keita Seto

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    From the development of the electron theory by H. A. Lorentz in 1906, many authors have tried to reformulate this model named "radiation reaction". P. A. M. Dirac derived the relativistic-classical electron model in 1938, which is now called the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. But this model has the big difficulty of the run-away solution. Recently, this equation has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. Therefore, it is desirable to stabilize this model of the radiation reaction for estimations. Via my recent research, I found a stabilized model of radiation reaction in quantum vacuum. This leads us to an updated Fletcher-Millikan's charge to mass ratio including radiation, de/dm, derived as the 4th order tensor measure. In this paper, I will discuss the latest update of the model and the ability of the equation of motion with radiation reaction in quantum vacuum via photon-photon scatterings.

  10. Radiation events in astronomical CCD images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    268. 10. “On the Rates of Radiation Events in CCD’s (Excerpt23 Jan 2002 LBNL-49316 Radiation events in astronomical CCDof depleted silicon to ionizing radiation is a nuisance to

  11. High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ager III, J.W.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. F. Geisz, “Superior radiation resistance of In 1-x Ga x Nand H. Itoh, “Proton radiation analysis of multi-junction56326 High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells Final

  12. Impact of 15 Jan 2010 annular solar eclipse on the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere over Indian region from Magnetometer, Ionosonde and GPS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panda, Sampad Kumar; Rajaram, Girija; Sripathi, Samireddipalle; Bhaskar, Ankush

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annular eclipse of Jan 15, 2010 over southern India was studied with a network of multi-instrumental observations consisting magnetometer, ionosonde and GPS receivers. By selecting the day before and the normal EEJ days as the control days, it is intrinsically proved that the regular eastward electric field for the whole day at the equator was not just weakened but actually was flipped for several hours by the influence of tides related to the spectacular Sun-Moon-Earth alignment near the middle of the day. The effect of flipping the electric field was clearly seen in the equatorial ionosonde data and through the large array of GPS receivers that accomplished the TEC data. The main impact of the change in the electric field was the reduced EIA at all latitudes, with the anomaly crest that shifted towards the equator. The equatorial F-region density profile was also showing an enhanced F region peak in spite of a reduced VTEC. By comparison to the plasma density depletion associated with the temporary lack...

  13. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. (Yale Univ. Medical Center, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  14. Synchrotron radiation from massless charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal'tsov, D V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical radiation power from an accelerated massive charge diverges in the zero-mass limit, while some general arguments suggest that strictly massless charge does not not radiate at all. On the other hand, the regularized classical radiation reaction force, though looking odd, is non-zero and finite. To clarify this controversy, we consider radiation problem in massless scalar quantum electrodynamics in the external magnetic field. In this framework, synchrotron radiation is found to be non-zero, finite, and essentially quantum. Its spectral distribution is calculated using Schwinger's proper time technique for {\\em ab initio} massless particle of zero spin. Provided $E^2\\gg eH$, the maximum in the spectrum is shown to be at $\\hbar \\omega=E/3$, and the average photon energy is $4E/9$. The normalized spectrum is universal, depending neither on $E$ nor on $H$. Quantum nature of radiation makes classical radiation reaction equation meaningless for massless charge. Our results are consistent with the view (sup...

  15. Late Ordovician geographic patterns of extinction compared with simulations of astrophysical ionizing radiation damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian L. Melott; Brian C. Thomas

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the intensity and rates of various kinds of intense ionizing radiation events such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts, it is likely that the Earth has been subjected to one or extinction level events during the Phanerozoic. These induce changes in atmospheric chemistry so that the level of Solar ultraviolet-B radiation reaching the surface and near-surface waters may be doubled for up to a decade. This UVB level is known from experiment to be more than enough to kill off many kinds of organisms, particularly phytoplankton. It could easily induce a crash of the photosynthetic-based food chain in the oceans. Regularities in the latitudinal distribution of damage are apparent in simulations of the atmospheric changes. We previously proposed that the late Ordovician extinction is a plausible candidate for a contribution from an ionizing radiation event, based on environmental selectivity in trilobites. To test a null hypothesis based on this proposal, we confront latitudinal differential extinction rates predicted from the simulations with data from a published analysis of latitudinal gradients in the Ordovician extinction. The pattern of UVB damage always shows a strong maximum at some latitude, with substantially lower intensity to the north and south of this maximum. We find that the pattern of damage predicted from our simulations is consistent with the data assuming a burst approximately over the South Pole, and no further north than -75 degrees. We predict that any land mass (such as parts of north China, Laurentia, and New Guinea) which then lay north of the equator should be a refuge from UVB effects, and show a different pattern of extinction in the first strike of the end-Ordovician extinction, if induced by such a radiation event.

  16. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  17. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accident Registries The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains a number of radiation...

  18. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Treatment Medications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment Medications The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) is a valuable resource in the use of drug therapies to treat radiation exposure. REACTS...

  19. 10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

  20. Hybrid Radiator Cooling System | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiator Cooling System Technology available for licensing: Hybrid radiator cooling system uses conventional finned air cooling under most driving conditions that would be...

  1. Standards for Protection Against Radiation (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes standards for protection against radiation hazards. In addition to complying with requirements set forth, every reasonable effort should be made to maintain radiation levels...

  2. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riedel, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Wintenberg, Alan L. (Knoxville, TN); Clonts, Lloyd G. (Knoxville, TN); Cooper, Ronald G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A preamplifier circuit for processing a signal provided by a radiation detector includes a transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a detector and generate a voltage signal at its output. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifier for providing an amplified voltage signal. Detector electronics include a preamplifier circuit having a first and second transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a first and second location on a detector, respectively, and generate a first and second voltage signal at respective outputs. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifiers for amplifying the first and said second voltage signals to provide first and second amplified voltage signals. A differential output stage is coupled to the second amplification stage for receiving the first and second amplified voltage signals and providing a pair of outputs from each of the first and second amplified voltage signals. Read out circuitry has an input coupled to receive both of the pair of outputs, the read out circuitry having structure for processing each of the pair of outputs, and providing a single digital output having a time-stamp therefrom.

  3. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  4. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  5. Radiation and thermal analysis of production solenoid for Mu2e experimental setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pronskikh, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon-to-Electron (Mu2e) experiment at Fermilab, will seek the evidence of direct muon to electron conversion at the sensitivity level where it cannot be explained by the Standard Model. An 8-GeV 25-kW proton beam will be directed onto a tilted gold target inside a large-bore superconducting Production Solenoid (PS) with the peak field on the axis of {approx}5T. The negative muons resulting from the pion decay will be captured in the PS aperture and directed by an S-shaped Transport Solenoid towards the stopping target inside the Detector Solenoid. In order for the superconducting magnets to operate reliably and with a sufficient safety margin, the peak neutron flux entering the coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude that is achieved by means of a sophisticated absorber placed in the magnet aperture. The proposed absorber, consisting of W- and Cu-based alloy parts, is optimized for the performance and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of energy deposition and radiation are reported. The results of the PS magnet thermal analysis, coordinated with the coil cooling scheme, are reported as well for the selected absorber design.

  6. Energy Flow in Interjet Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carola F. Berger; Tibor Kucs; George Sterman

    2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the distribution of transverse energy, Q_Omega, radiated into an arbitrary interjet angular region, Omega, in high-p_T two-jet events. Using an approximation that emphasizes radiation directly from the partons that undergo the hard scattering, we find a distribution that can be extrapolated smoothly to Q_Omega=Lambda_QCD, where it vanishes. This method, which we apply numerically in a valence quark approximation, provides a class of predictions on transverse energy radiated between jets, as a function of jet energy and rapidity, and of the choice of the region Omega in which the energy is measured. We discuss the relation of our approximation to the radiation from unobserved partons of intermediate energy, whose importance was identified by Dasgupta and Salam.

  7. Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Radiation Control Act is designed to prevent any associated harmful effects upon the environment or the health and safety of the public through the institution and maintenance of a...

  8. Texas Radiation Control Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to institute and maintain a regulatory program for radiation sources that is compatible with federal standards and regulatory programs, and, to the degree possible,...

  9. Ionizing Radiation Injury (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation applies to employers that have more than one employee who engages in activities which involve the presence of ionizing radiation. Employers with less than three employees can...

  10. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  11. MULTI-POINT RADIATION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofstetter, K; Donna Beals, D; Ken Odell, K; Robert Eakle, R; Russell Huffman, R; Larry Harpring, L

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique radiation monitor has been developed for performing wide-area field surveys for radiation sources. This device integrates the real-time output of multiple radiation detectors into a hand-held personal computer (e.g., a PDA) containing an intuitive graphical user interface. An independent hardware module supplies high voltage to the detectors and contains a rapid sampling system for transferring the detector count rates through an interface to the PDA. The imbedded firmware can be changed for various applications using a programmable memory card. As presently configured, the instrument contains a series of Geiger-Mueller (GM) tubes in a flexible detector string. This linear array of multiple sensors can be used by US Coast Guard and Customs container inspection personnel to measure radiation intensity in stacks of transport containers where physical access is impeded.

  12. Using Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget dataUsing Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget data to evaluate global models and radiative processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cloud cover r.p.allan@reading.ac.uk© University of Reading 20108 #12;Radiative bias: climate models estimate radiative effect of contrail cirrus:contrail cirrus: LW ~ 40 Wm-2 SW up to 80 Wm-2 rUsing Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget dataUsing Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget data

  13. Radiation-Associated Liver Injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Charlie C., E-mail: cpan@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Das, Shiva K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The liver is a critically important organ that has numerous functions including the production of bile, metabolism of ingested nutrients, elimination of many waste products, glycogen storage, and plasma protein synthesis. The liver is often incidentally irradiated during radiation therapy (RT) for tumors in the upper- abdomen, right lower lung, distal esophagus, or during whole abdomen or whole body RT. This article describes the endpoints, time-course, and dose-volume effect of radiation on the liver.

  14. Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyzar, James Ronald

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the cyclotron would induce cataracts in the exposed eye (1). In 1949 the National Research Council's Committee on Ophthalmology delegated an investigational team to Japan to study the occurrence of radiation cataracts among atom bomb survivors. This team... for the most part to ophthalmological circles arousing little interest in other elements of the scien- tific world (13) . In the decade of the 1940's conditions arose which were to vastly change research into the area of radiation damage. These conditions...

  15. Ghost Imaging with Blackbody Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangjian Cai; Shiyao Zhu

    2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical study of ghost imaging by using blackbody radiation source. A Gaussian thin lens equation for the ghost imaging, which depends on both paths, is derived. The dependences of the visibility and quality of the image on the transverse size and temperature of the blackbody are studied. The main differences between the ghost imaging by using the blackbody radiation and by using the entangled photon pairs are image-forming equation, and the visibility and quality of the image

  16. Angular Ordering in Gluon Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong B. Choi; Byeong S. Choi; Su K. Lee

    2002-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption of angular ordering in gluon radiation is essential to obtain quantitative results concerning gluonic behaviors. In order to prove the validity of this assumption, we have applied our momentum space flux-tube formalism to check out the angular dependences of gluon radiation. We have calculated the probability amplitudes to get new gluon, and have found that the new gluon is generally expected to have the maximum amplitude when it is produced between the momentum directions of the last two partons.

  17. Solar Radiation and Asteroidal Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Klacka

    2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of solar wind and solar electromagnetic radiation on motion of asteroids are discussed. The results complete the statements presented in Vokrouhlick\\'{y} and Milani (2000). As for the effect of electromagnetic radiation, the complete equation of motion is presented to the first order in $v/c$ -- the shape of asteroid (spherical body is explicitly presented) and surface distribution of albedo should be taken into account. Optical quantities must be calculated in proper frame of reference.

  18. In-Ground Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Hensley, Walter K.

    2006-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertically oriented radiation detectors may not provide sufficient screening in rail or aviation applications. Railcars can be heavily shielded on the sides, reducing the sensitivity of vertically mounted monitors. For aviation, the distance required for wingspan clearance reduces a vertical detector’s coverage of the fuselage. To surmount these, and other, challenging operational and sensitivity issues, we have investigated the use of in-ground radiation detectors. (PIET-43741-TM-605).

  19. Radiation Protection | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The Federal Regulation governing

  20. Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    May 2012 Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist Permit Holder to nuclear substances or radiation devices is restricted to authorized radiation users listed on the permit radiation labs whenever unsealed nuclear substances are used in these designated locations. 1.7(d

  1. Dynamical instability of collapsing radiating fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Azam, M., E-mail: azammath@gmail.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We take the collapsing radiative fluid to investigate the dynamical instability with cylindrical symmetry. We match the interior and exterior cylindrical geometries. Dynamical instability is explored at radiative and non-radiative perturbations. We conclude that the dynamical instability of the collapsing cylinder depends on the critical value {gamma} < 1 for both radiative and nonradiative perturbations.

  2. Liquid cooled fiber thermal radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, B.L.

    1985-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation-to-thermal receiver apparatus for collecting radiation and converting it to thermal energy is disclosed. The invention includes a fibrous mat material which captures radiation striking the receiver. Captured radiation is removed from the fibrous mat material by a transparent fluid within which the material is bathed.

  3. Quantum Properties of Cavity Cerenkov Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, J; Gao, Ju; Shen, Fang

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cerenkov radiation from cavities have been analyzed by quantum electrodynamic theory. Analytical expressions of some basic radiation properties including Einstein's $A$ and $B$ coefficients are derived and shown to be directly modified by the cavities. Coherent and incoherent radiations are analyzed with the aim of generating THz radiation from the devices.

  4. Special Clinical Staff Training Specialized Radiation Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Special Clinical Staff Training Specialized Radiation Safety Training Courses for: Nurses these training courses by contacting the Radiation Safety Training Office at 496-2255. Radiation Safety for Clinical Center Employees A great introduction to radiation and radioactive material for new Clinical

  5. International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  6. Solar Radiation and Meteorological Data Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Solar Radiation and Meteorological Data Support for the Long Island Solar Farm and NSERCand NSERC-9 2011March 8 9, 2011 #12;LISF Solar Radiation and Meteorological Sensor Network ·· Technology Needs on intermittent source of solar radiationintermittent source of solar radiation #12;LISF Solar Radiation

  7. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

  8. INFORMATION SURFING FOR RADIATION MAP BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technology in radiation detection is not well suited for the type of scenario described. Currently, searching

  9. Radiation Shielding for Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, R.T.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel.

  10. Radiative acceleration and transient, radiation-induced electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zampieri; R. Turolla; L. Foschini; A. Treves

    2003-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiative acceleration of particles and the electrostatic potential fields that arise in low density plasmas hit by radiation produced by a transient, compact source are investigated. We calculate the dynamical evolution and asymptotic energy of the charged particles accelerated by the photons and the radiation-induced electric double layer in the full relativistic, Klein-Nishina regime. For fluxes in excess of $10^{27}$ ${\\rm erg} {\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1}$, the radiative force on a diluted plasma ($n\\la 10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$) is so strong that electrons are accelerated rapidly to relativistic speeds while ions lag behind owing to their larger inertia. The ions are later effectively accelerated by the strong radiation-induced double layer electric field up to Lorentz factors $\\approx 100$, attainable in the case of negligible Compton drag. The asymptotic energies achieved by both ions and electrons are larger by a factor 2--4 with respect to what one could naively expect assuming that the electron-ion assembly is a rigidly coupled system. The regime we investigate may be relevant within the framework of giant flares from soft gamma-repeaters.

  11. RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE Campus Radiation Safety Manual UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS Previous Revision: May 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    SAFETY OFFICER AND RADIATION PROTECTION STAFF The Radiation Safety Officer has the responsibilityRADIATION SAFETY OFFICE Campus Radiation Safety Manual UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS Previous Revision radiation safety program will be conducted in such a manner that exposure to faculty, staff, students

  12. 30. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 30. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 30. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION Revised;2 30. Radioactivity and radiation protection caused by different radiation types R weighted with so radiation in a volume element of a specified material divided by the mass of this volume element. · Kerma, K

  13. FINAL REPORT FOR THE DOE/ARM PROJECT TITLED Representation of the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds in SCMs and GCMs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, David L.

    2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The broad goal of this research is to improve climate prediction through better representation of cirrus cloud microphysical and radiative properties in global climate models (GCMs). Clouds still represent the greatest source of uncertainty in climate prediction, and the representation of ice clouds is considerably more challenging than liquid water clouds. While about 40% of cloud condensate may be in the form of ice by some estimates, there have been no credible means of representing the ice particle size distribution and mass removal rates from ice clouds in GCMs. Both factors introduce large uncertainties regarding the global net flux, the latter factor alone producing a change of 10 W/m2 in the global net flux due to plausible changes in effective ice particle fallspeed. In addition, the radiative properties of ice crystals themselves are in question. This research provides GCMs with a credible means of representing the full (bimodal) ice particle size distribution (PSD) in ice clouds, including estimates of the small crystal (D < 65 microns) mode of the PSD. It also provides realistic estimates of mass sedimentation rates from ice clouds, which have a strong impact on their ice contents and radiative properties. This can be done through proper analysis of ice cloud microphysical data from ARM and other field campaigns. In addition, this research tests the ice cloud radiation treatment developed under two previous ARM projects by comparing it against laboratory measurements of ice cloud extinction efficiency and by comparing it with explicit theoretical calculations of ice crystal optical properties. The outcome of this project includes two PSD schemes for ice clouds; one appropriate for mid-latitude cirrus clouds and another for tropical anvil cirrus. Cloud temperature and ice water content (IWC) are the inputs for these PSD schemes, which are based on numerous PSD observations. The temperature dependence of the small crystal mode of the PSD for tropical anvils is opposite to that of mid-latitude cirrus, and this results in very different radiative properties for these two types of cirrus at temperatures less than about 50 C for a given ice water path. In addition, the representative PSD fall velocity is strongly influenced by the small crystal mode, and for temperatures less than 52 C, this fall velocity for mid-latitude cirrus is 2-8 times greater than for tropical anvil cirrus. Finally, the treatment of ice cloud optical properties was found to agree with laboratory measurements and exact theory within 15% for any given wavelength, PSD and ice particle shape. This treatment is analytical, formulated in terms of the PSD and ice particle shape properties. It thus provides the means for explicitly coupling the ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties, and can treat any combination of ice particle shape. It is very inexpensive regarding computer time. When these three deliverables were incorporated into the GCM at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under another project, it was found that the sunlight reflected and the amount of upwelling heat absorbed by cirrus clouds depended strongly on the PSD scheme used (i.e. mid-latitude or tropical anvil). This was largely due to the fall velocities associated with the two PSD schemes, although the PSD shape was also important.

  14. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd [Environmental Effects Branch, EM50, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  15. Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

  16. Ultraviolet-radiation-curable paints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosset, A M; Su, W F.A.; Vanderglas, E

    1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures could be more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. Diffuse ultraviolet light can cure paints on three dimensional metal parts. In the uv curing process, the spectral output of radiation sources must complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents. Photosensitive compounds, such as thioxanthones, can photoinitiate unsaturated resins, such as acrylated polyurethanes, by a free radical mechanism. Newly developed cationic photoinitiators, such as sulfonium or iodonium salts (the so-called onium salts) of complex metal halide anions, can be used in polymerization of epoxy paints by ultraviolet light radiation. One-coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be photoinitiated to produce hard, adherent films. This process has been tested in a laboratory scale unit by spray coating these materials on three-dimensional objects and passing them through a tunnel containing uv lamps.

  17. Reactor Start-up and Control Methodologies: Consideration of the Space Radiation Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Holloway, James Paul [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of fission energy in space power and propulsion systems offers considerable advantages over chemical propulsion. Fission provides over six orders of magnitude higher energy density, which translates to higher vehicle specific impulse and lower specific mass. These characteristics enable the accomplishment of ambitious space exploration missions. The natural radiation environment in space provides an external source of protons and high energy, high Z particles that can result in the production of secondary neutrons through interactions in reactor structures. Initial investigation using MCNPX 2.5.b for proton transport through the SAFE-400 reactor indicates a secondary neutron net current of 1.4x107 n/s at the core-reflector interface, with an incoming current of 3.4x106 n/s due to neutrons produced in the Be reflector alone. This neutron population could provide a reliable startup source for a space reactor. Additionally, this source must be considered in developing a reliable control strategy during reactor startup, steady-state operation, and power transients. An autonomous control system is developed and analyzed for application during reactor startup, accounting for fluctuations in the radiation environment that result from changes in vehicle location (altitude, latitude, position in solar system) or due to temporal variations in the radiation field, as may occur in the case of solar flares. One proposed application of a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle is in a tour of the Jovian system, where the time required for communication to Earth is significant. Hence, it is important that a reactor control system be designed with feedback mechanisms to automatically adjust to changes in reactor temperatures, power levels, etc., maintaining nominal operation without user intervention. This paper will evaluate the potential use of secondary neutrons produced by proton interactions in the reactor vessel as a startup source for a space reactor and will present a potential control methodology for reactor startup procedures in the event of source fluctuations.

  18. Contrasting the direct radiative effect and direct radiative forcing of aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, Colette L.

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols, which is the instantaneous radiative impact of all atmospheric particles on the Earth's energy balance, is sometimes confused with the direct radiative forcing (DRF), which ...

  19. THE EFFECT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION ON THE ACCURACY OF PYRHELIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    r Presented at the Solar Radiation workshop of Solar Rising,MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION D. Grether, D.Diffuse, and Total Solar Radiation," Solar Energy, vol. 4,

  20. Radiation in Lorentz violating electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Montemayor; L. F. Urrutia

    2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is analyzed in the classical effective Lorentz invariance violating model of Myers-Pospelov. Within the full far-field approximation we compute the electric and magnetic fields, the angular distribution of the power spectrum and the total emitted power in the m-th harmonic, as well as the polarization. We find the appearance of rather unexpected and large amplifying factors, which go together with the otherwise negligible naive expansion parameter. This opens up the possibility of further exploring Lorentz invariance violations by synchrotron radiation measurements in astrophysical sources where these amplifying factors are important.

  1. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  2. Radiation Safety Work Control Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiationRadiation Safety Work

  3. Radiator Labs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiationRadiation Safety

  4. The NCI Radiation Research Program: Grant portfolio and radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models (89 animals no human subject material, 21 use both) ­ 109 utilize rodent models ­ 2 have canine and R37s). Of those that utilize radiation: · 6 use tissue culture models only · 110 utilize animal subjects · 39 use human subjects or human subject materials only. #12;Dose and Dosimetry · The majority

  5. Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel Cerenkov Radiator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belle Preprint; Sahu Wang; M. Z. Wang; R. Suda; R. Enomoto; K. C. Peng; C. H. Wang; I. Adachi; M. Amami

    We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the B-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8 MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3% and 0.001 at 90% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed. 1 Introduction Silica aerogels(aerogels) are a colloidal form of glass, in which globules of silica are connected in three dimensional networks with siloxan bonds. They are solid, very light, transparent and their refractive index can be controlled in the production process. Many high energy and nuclear physics experiments have used aerogels instead of pressurized gas for their Cerenkov coun...

  6. Enhanced radiation detectors using luminescent materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vardeny, Zeev V. (Holladay, UT); Jeglinski, Stefan A. (Durham, NC); Lane, Paul A. (Sheffield, GB)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detecting device comprising a radiation sensing element, and a layer of luminescent material to expand the range of wavelengths over which the sensing element can efficiently detect radiation. The luminescent material being selected to absorb radiation at selected wavelengths, causing the luminescent material to luminesce, and the luminescent radiation being detected by the sensing element. Radiation sensing elements include photodiodes (singly and in arrays), CCD arrays, IR detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Luminescent materials include polymers, oligomers, copolymers and porphyrines, Luminescent layers include thin films, thicker layers, and liquid polymers.

  7. REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIATION COUNCIL MEMBERS SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE (CHAIRMAN) SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE.P.O'NEILL DEPARTMENT OF LABOR A.B.PARK DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE R.G.STOTT DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR J.G.TERRILL, JR.L.ANDREWS PUERTO RICO NUCLEAR CENTER V.P.BOND BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY G.W. CASARETT UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER

  8. QCD Radiation off Heavy Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torbjörn Sjöstrand

    2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An algorithm for an improved description of final-state QCD radiation is introduced. It is matched to the first-order matrix elements for gluon emission in a host of decays, for processes within the Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric extension thereof.

  9. Hawking radiation in moving plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. C. Garcia de Andrade

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Bi-metricity and Hawking radiation are exhibit in non-relativistic moving magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) plasma medium generating two Riemannian effective spacetimes. The first metric is a flat metric although the speed of "light" is given by a time dependent signal where no Hawking radiation or effective black holes are displayed. This metric comes from a wave equation which the scalar function comes from the scalar potential of the background velocity of the fluid and depends on the perturbation of the magnetic background field. The second metric is an effective spacetime metric which comes from the perturbation of the background MHD fluid. This Riemann metric exhibits a horizon and Hawking radiation which can be expressed in terms of the background constant magnetic field. The effective velocity is given Alfven wave velocity of plasma physics. The effective black hole found here is analogous to the optical black hole in moving dielectrics found by De Lorenci et al [Phys. Rev. D (2003)] where bi-metricity and Hawking radiation in terms of the electric field are found.

  10. Radiation and Health Thormod Henriksen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    of radioactivity from reactor accidents and fallout from nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. These subjects wereRadiation and Health by Thormod Henriksen and Biophysics group at UiO #12;Preface The present book is an update and extension of three previous books from groups of scientists at the University of Oslo

  11. Gravitational Radiation in Noncommutative Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Jahan; N. Sadeghnezhad

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational radiation power of a binary system in a noncommutative space is derived and it's rate of the period decrease is calculated to first order in noncommutativity parameter. By comparing the theoretical results with the observational data of the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16, we find a bound on the noncommutativity parameter.

  12. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  13. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  14. W. FIFTH AVE. RADIATION LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    W. FIFTH AVE. NASA SPACE RADIATION LAB 958 ENERGY EFFICIENCY & CONSERVATION DIVISION THOMSON RD. E WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITY INSTRUMENTATION 901906 750 801 701 703 815 933 912 923 925 911 938 939 902 197 Matter Physics & Materials Science Dept. 480 J5 Medical Research Center 490 H7 National Synchrotron Light

  15. FABRICATION TECHNIQUES FOR REVERSE ELECTRODE COAXIAL GERMANIUM NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COAXIAL GERMANIUM NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS W.L. Hansenon Semiconductor Nuclear Radiation Detectors", IEEE Trans.COAXIAL GERMANIUM NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS LBL-10726 W.

  16. PROTECTIVE SURFACE COATINGS ON SEMICONDUCTOR NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON SEMICONDUCTOR NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS W. L. Hansen,COATINGS ON SEMICONDUCTOR NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS* W. L.the use of germanium nuclear radiation detec­ tors, a new

  17. CIRCE: A dedicated storage ring for coherent THz synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-power terahertz radiation from relativistic electrons",coherent THz synchrotron radiation: Measuring the Josephsonof coherent synchrotron radiation from the NSLS VUV ring",

  18. Cherenkov Radiation from Jets in Heavy-ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Volker; Majumder, Abhijit; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wiley & Son, Inc. Cherenkov radiation leads to energy lossLBNL-58447 Cherenkov Radiation from Jets in Heavjion Nuclearthe occurrence of Cherenkov radiation in dense matter is

  19. Betatron radiation from electron beams in plasma focusing channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esarey, E.; Catravas, P.; Leemans, W.P.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Betatron Radiation from Electron Beams in Plasma FocusingAbstract. Spontaneous radiation emitted from an electronfrequency of spontaneous radiation is a strong function of

  20. DESCRIPTION OF A SPECTRAL ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION MONITORING NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spectral atmospheric radiation data. The large cylindricalexisting integrated net radiation data is of impor- tance,infrared radiation intensities. The data is permanently

  1. Deriving cloud velocity from an array of solar radiation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosch, J.L.; Zheng, Y.; Kleissl, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    medium term operational solar radiation forecasts in the US.term forecasting of solar radiation: a statistical approachterm forecasting of solar radiation based on satellite data.

  2. automated radiation targeting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffraction radiation (ODR) as a diagnostic tool has increased Sen, Tanaji 9 Radiation damage of the ILC positron source target CERN Preprints Summary: The radiation damage of the...

  3. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION - STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, D.F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15, 1976. "Circumsolar Radiation Data for Central Receiverdata on the instantaneous values of circum- solar radiation andradiation over the course of a day, month or year; and 3) detailed data

  8. Performance Evaluation of Undulator Radiation at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuyu Liu, Geoffrey Krafft, Guimei Wang

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of undulator radiation (UR) at CEBAF with a 3.5 m helical undulator is evaluated and compared with APS undulator-A radiation in terms of brilliance, peak brilliance, spectral flux, flux density and intensity distribution.

  9. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  10. Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kaiyuan

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe...

  11. Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kaiyuan

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe...

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  13. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  14. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Solar Radiation Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL

    1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas provides a record of monthly mean solar radiation generated by a Climatological Solar Radiation model, using quasi-climatological inputs of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, and atmospheric pressure.

  15. Integrated nuclear radiation detector and monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biehl, B.L.; Lieberman, S.I.

    1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery powered device which can continuously monitor and detect nuclear radiation utilizing fully integrated circuitry and which is provided with an alarm which alerts persons when the radiation level exceeds a predetermined threshold.

  16. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  17. Smith Purcell radiation from femtosecond electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korbly, Stephen E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present theoretical and experimental results from a Smith-Purcell radiation experiment using the electron beam from a 17 GHz high gradient accelerator. Smith- Purcell radiation occurs when a charged particle travels ...

  18. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  5. CRAD, Environmental Radiation Protection- December 7, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental Radiation Protection, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-36, Rev. 0)

  6. All conformally flat pure radiation metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Brian Edgar; Garry Ludwig

    1996-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The complete class of conformally flat, pure radiation metrics is given, generalising the metric recently given by Wils.

  7. Optimization of radiation protection: a bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, G.R.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a bibliography of radiation protection optimization documents. Abstracts, an author index, and a subject index are provided.

  8. Radiation issues for the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harward, E.D. (ed.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are organized under the following categories: Radiation Control: New Issues; Exploring the Use of a De Minimus Concept in Radiation Protection; Evolving Radiation Protection Standards; Occupational Radiation Protection: Are We Doing Enough; and Emergency Planning: the Potassium Iodide Issue. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 22 papers for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 6 of the papers are included in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). Three papers were processed earlier.

  9. 1991-2005 National Solar Radiation Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the purpose, benefit, and features of the newly updated National Solar Radiation Database.

  10. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  11. Modeling radiation characteristics of semitransparent media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    and Viskanta8 have proposed a model for the effective radiation characteristics of glass foams. Their analysis

  12. MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Donald

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cloud transient studies); Sandia, Albuquerque (input to performance calculation program Helios); SERI (analysis of effect of circumsolar radiation

  13. Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food and water; and uranium, thorium, and radium-138 138 Cs 32.2 min Technetium-99 99 Tc 2.13E+5 years Cobalt-58 58 Co 70.80 days Thorium-228 228 Th 1.9132 years Cobalt-60 60 Co 5.271 years Thorium-230 230 Th 7.54E+4 years Curium-242 242 Cm 163.2 days Thorium

  14. Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    and water; and uranium, thorium, and radium in the earth's crust are all sources of radiation. The following.13E+5 years Cobalt-60 60 Co 5.271 years Thorium-228 228 Th 1.9132 years Curium-242 242 Cm 163.2 days Thorium-230 230 Th 7.54E+4 years Curium-244 244 Cm 18.11 years Thorium-232 232 Th 1.405E+10 years Iodine

  15. Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food and water; and uranium, thorium, and radium Thorium-228 228 Th 1.9132 years Cobalt-60 60 Co 5.271 years Thorium-230 230 Th 7.54E+4 years Curium-242 242 Cm 163.2 days Thorium-232 232 Th 1.405E+10 years Curium-244 244 Cm 18.11 years Thorium-234 234 Th

  16. RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR SCRAP METAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR SCRAP METAL: PRELIMINARY COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS Prepared for: Radiation Protection Division Office of Air and Radiation U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Prepared from nuclear facilities. Upon their completion, EPA plans to release the preliminary draft regulations

  17. Thermal radiation from an accretion disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. V. Prigara

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An effect of stimulated radiation processes on thermal radiation from an accretion disk is considered. The radial density waves triggering flare emission and producing quasi-periodic oscillations in radiation from an accretion disk are discussed. It is argued that the observational data suggest the existence of the weak laser sources in a two-temperature plasma of an accretion disk.

  18. Wormholes supported by pure ghost radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward

    2002-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Traversible wormhole space-times are found as static, spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein equations with ingoing and outgoing pure ghost radiation, i.e. pure radiation with negative energy density. Switching off the radiation causes the wormhole to collapse to a Schwarzschild black hole.

  19. Radiation Protection Surveys in Clinical Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Radiation Protection Surveys in Clinical Areas Procedure: 7.521 Created: 4/23/2014 Version: 1 as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) it is necessary to perform routine radiation protection surveys minute (DPM) or below. Results should be recorded in DPM. a. Survey Areas #12;Radiation Protection

  20. 7, 499535, 2007 Solar radiation during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 499­535, 2007 Solar radiation during a total solar eclipse C. Emde and B. Mayer Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Simulation of solar radiation during a total solar eclipse: a challenge­535, 2007 Solar radiation during a total solar eclipse C. Emde and B. Mayer Title Page Abstract Introduction

  1. Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage S.L. Dudarev EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association and informative as the most advanced experimental techniques developed for the observation of radiation damage investigation and assessment of radiation damage effects, offering new insight into the origin of temperature

  2. Radiation Safety Edward O'Connell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Bureau of Environmental Radiation Protection (BERP) · Regulatory Compliance ­ State Sanitary 16 · Required Radiation to cause ionization depends on the energy #12;Radiation Can Cause Ionization #12;Units of Measurements millirem per year. · At 50,000 feet, the dose rate is about 1 millirem per hour. · There are areas

  3. 30. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 30. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 30. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION Revised for the 2012 edition (pdg.lbl.gov) February 16, 2012 14:08 #12;2 30. Radioactivity and radiation protection radiation in a volume element of a specified material divided by the mass of this volume element. · Kerma, K

  4. 33. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 33. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    33. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 33. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION Revised://pdg.lbl.gov) June 18, 2012 16:20 #12;2 33. Radioactivity and radiation protection tissue caused by different radiation in a volume element of a specified material divided by the mass of this volume element. · Kerma, K

  5. RADIATION CONTROL GUIDE rev 12/99 1-1 RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    RADIATION CONTROL GUIDE rev 12/99 1-1 CHAPTER 1 RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAM I. INTRODUCTION In view of increased utilization of ionizing and nonionizing radiation at the University of Florida, a university-wide radiation control program was established in September, l960. The primary responsibilities

  6. RADIATION CONTROL GUIDE 2/97 3-1 RADIATION PRODUCING DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    the device. This proposal should point out radiation safety precautions which will be taken to protectRADIATION CONTROL GUIDE 2/97 3-1 CHAPTER 3 RADIATION PRODUCING DEVICES I. AUTHORIZATION TO USE RADIATION PRODUCING DEVICES All devices and apparatus capable of producing ionizing and nonionizing

  7. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Composition of Accelerator Radiation Fields; Shielding of Electrons and Photons at Accelerators; Shielding of Hadrons at Accelerators; Low Energy Prompt Radiation Phenomena; Induced Radioactivity at Accelerators; Topics in Radiation Protection Instrumentation at Accelerators; and Accelerator Radiation Protection Program Elements.

  8. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

  9. Quantum radiation at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralf Schützhold; Günter Plunien; Gerhard Soff

    2001-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the phenomenon of quantum radiation - i.e. the conversion of (virtual) quantum fluctuations into (real) particles induced by dynamical external conditions - for an initial thermal equilibrium state. For a resonantly vibrating cavity a rather strong enhancement of the number of generated particles (the dynamical Casimir effect) at finite temperatures is observed. Furthermore we derive the temperature corrections to the energy radiated by a single moving mirror and an oscillating bubble within a dielectric medium as well as the number of created particles within the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. Possible implications and the relevance for experimental tests are addressed. PACS: 42.50.Lc, 03.70.+k, 11.10.Ef, 11.10.Wx.

  10. Radiation source with shaped emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a source of radiation, such as an electric discharge source, that is equipped with a capillary region configured into some predetermined shape, such as an arc or slit, can significantly improve the amount of flux delivered to the lithographic wafers while maintaining high efficiency. The source is particularly suited for photolithography systems that employs a ringfield camera. The invention permits the condenser which delivers critical illumination to the reticle to be simplified from five or more reflective elements to a total of three or four reflective elements thereby increasing condenser efficiency. It maximizes the flux delivered and maintains a high coupling efficiency. This architecture couples EUV radiation from the discharge source into a ring field lithography camera.

  11. Has Hawking radiation been measured?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Unruh

    2014-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that Hawking radiation has indeed been measured and shown to posses a thermal spectrum, as predicted. This contention is based on three separate legs. The first is that the essential physics of the Hawking process for black holes can be modelled in other physical systems. The second is the white hole horizons are the time inverse of black hole horizons, and thus the physics of both is the same. The third is that the quantum emission, which is the Hawking process, is completely determined by measurements of the classical parameters of a linear physical system. The experiment conducted in 2010 fulfills all of these requirements, and is thus a true measurement of Hawking radiation.

  12. Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

  13. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Hughes, R.C.; Kepler, R.G.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10/sup 15/ to 10/sup 21/ molecules of dopant/cm/sup 3/. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  14. Environmental radiation detection via thermoluminescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, S.D.

    1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The method and apparatus of the present invention relate to cryogenically cooling a thermoluminescent material, exposing it to a low level of radiation (less than about 1 R) while it is at the cooled temperature, warming the thermoluminescent material to room temperature'' and counting the photons emitted during heating. Sufficient sensitivity is achieved without exposing the thermoluminescent material to ultraviolet light thereby simplifying the measurements.

  15. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Kepler, R. Glen (Albuquerque, NM); Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10.sup.15 to 10.sup.21 molecules of dopant/cm.sup.3. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  16. Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyzar, James Ronald

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vulnerable organs, created an urgent need for investigation of proton radiation cataracto- genesis. In a statistical analysis of collected data on solar proton events taking into consideration possible shield- ing and mission duration, an investigator... energy group to a high of 74 for the 20 Mev proton energy group. As previously stated, the maximum possible numerical value was 400. The mean values for degree of lens opacities for the controls and the five dosage subgroups within the 10 Mev, 20 Mev...

  17. Environmental radiation detection via thermoluminescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method and apparatus of the present invention relate to cryogenically cooling a thermoluminescent material, exposing it to a low level of radiation (less than about 1 R) while it is at the cooled temperature, warming the thermoluminescent material to "room temperature", and counting the photons emitted during heating. Sufficient sensitivity is achieved without exposing the thermoluminescent material to ultraviolet light thereby simplifying the measurements.

  18. Local Approach to Hawking Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Peltola

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an approach to the Hawking effect which is free of the asymptotic behavior of the metric or matter fields, and which is not confined to one specific metric configuration. As a result, we find that for a wide class of spacetime horizons there exists an emission of particles out of the horizon. As expected, the energy distribution of the radiating particles turns out to be thermal.

  19. Radiation from SU(3) monopole scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Irwin

    2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy radiated during the scattering of SU(3) monopoles is estimated as a function of their asymptotic velocity v. In a typical scattering process the total energy radiated is of order v^3 as opposed to v^5 for SU(2) monopoles. For charge (1,1) monopoles the dipole radiation produced is estimated for all geodesics on the moduli space. For charge (2,1) monopoles the dipole radiation is estimated for the axially symmetric geodesic. The power radiated appears to diverge in the massless limit. The implications of this for the case of non-Abelian unbroken symmetry are discussed.

  20. Matter Wave Radiation Leading to Matter Teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Yi Huang

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of matter wave radiation is put forward, and its equation is established for the first time. The formalism solution shows that the probability density is a function of displacement and time. A free particle and a two-level system are reinvestigated considering the effect of matter wave radiation. Three feasible experimental designs, especially a modified Stern-Gerlach setup, are proposed to verify the existence of matter wave radiation. Matter wave radiation effect in relativity has been formulated in only a raw formulae, which offers another explanation of Lamb shift. A possible mechanics of matter teleportation is predicted due to the effect of matter wave radiation.

  1. Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

  2. DarkLight radiation backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalantarians, N. [Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton VA 23668 (United States); Collaboration: DarkLight Collaboration

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

  3. Photon rockets and gravitational radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Damour

    1994-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The absence of gravitational radiation in Kinnersley's ``photon rocket'' solution of Einstein's equations is clarified by studying the mathematically well-defined problem of point-like photon rockets in Minkowski space (i.e. massive particles emitting null fluid anisotro\\-pically and accelerating because of the recoil). We explicitly compute the (uniquely defined) {\\it linearized} retarded gravitational waves emitted by such objects, which are the coherent superposition of the gravitational waves generated by the motion of the massive point-like rocket and of those generated by the energy-momentum distribution of the photon fluid. In the special case (corresponding to Kinnersley's solution) where the anisotropy of the photon emission is purely dipolar we find that the gravitational wave amplitude generated by the energy-momentum of the photons exactly cancels the usual $1/r$ gravitational wave amplitude generated by the accelerated motion of the rocket. More general photon anisotropies would, however, generate genuine gravitational radiation at infinity. Our explicit calculations show the compatibility between the non-radiative character of Kinnersley's solution and the currently used gravitational wave generation formalisms based on post-Minkowskian perturbation theory.

  4. The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

  5. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straume, Tore; Amundson, Sally A,; Blakely, William F.; Burns, Frederic J.; Chen, Allen; Dainiak, Nicholas; Franklin, Stephen; Leary, Julie A.; Loftus, David J.; Morgan, William F.; Pellmar, Terry C.; Stolc, Viktor; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary is provided of presentations and discussions from the NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop held September 27-28, 2007, at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Invited speakers were distinguished scientists representing key sectors of the radiation research community. Speakers addressed recent developments in the biomarker and biotechnology fields that may provide new opportunities for health-related assessment of radiation-exposed individuals, including for long-duration space travel. Topics discussed include the space radiation environment, biomarkers of radiation sensitivity and individual susceptibility, molecular signatures of low-dose responses, multivariate analysis of gene expression, biomarkers in biodefense, biomarkers in radiation oncology, biomarkers and triage following large-scale radiological incidents, integrated and multiple biomarker approaches, advances in whole-genome tiling arrays, advances in mass-spectrometry proteomics, radiation biodosimetry for estimation of cancer risk in a rat skin model, and confounding factors. Summary conclusions are provided at the end of the report.

  6. Calibration method for video and radiation imagers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Mark F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fabris, Lorenzo (Knoxville, TN); Gee, Timothy F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goddard, Jr., James S. (Knoxville, TN); Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Ziock, Klaus-peter (Clinton, TN)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the high energy radiation imager pixel (HERIP) coordinate and real-world x-coordinate is determined by a least square fit between the HERIP x-coordinate and the measured real-world x-coordinates of calibration markers that emit high energy radiation imager and reflect visible light. Upon calibration, a high energy radiation imager pixel position may be determined based on a real-world coordinate of a moving vehicle. Further, a scale parameter for said high energy radiation imager may be determined based on the real-world coordinate. The scale parameter depends on the y-coordinate of the moving vehicle as provided by a visible light camera. The high energy radiation imager may be employed to detect radiation from moving vehicles in multiple lanes, which correspondingly have different distances to the high energy radiation imager.

  7. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  8. RSSC ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE OF RADIATION CONTROL PROGRAM / 072011 1-1 ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE OF RADIATION CONTROL PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    ............................................................ 1-13 III. Radiation Detection Instrumentation and Safety Equipment............................................... 1-13 A. Radiation Detection Instruments (Survey Meters

  9. Dose-dependent misrejoining of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in human fibroblasts: Experimental and theoretical study for high and low LET radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rydberg, Bjorn; Cooper, Brian; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Holley, William; Chatterjee, Aloke

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Kim, and R. M. Myers. Radiation hybrid mapping: a somaticformulation of dual radiation action. Radiat. Res. 75: 471-High-Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in Human Fibroblasts.

  10. Radiation effects in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  11. Solid-state radiation-emitting compositions and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott (Albuquerque, NM); Walko, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation, wherein a first substance functions as a source of exciting radiation, and a second substance interacts with the exciting radiation to provide a second radiation. The compositions comprise a porous substrate which is loaded with: a source of exciting radiation, a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with the exciting radiation, or both. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with both a source of exciting radiation, such as tritium, and a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce radiation of a second energy.

  12. Solid-state radiation-emitting compositions and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

    1992-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation, wherein a first substance functions as a source of exciting radiation, and a second substance interacts with the exciting radiation to provide a second radiation. The compositions comprise a porous substrate which is loaded with: a source of exciting radiation, a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with the exciting radiation, or both. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with both a source of exciting radiation, such as tritium, and a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce radiation of a second energy. 4 figs.

  13. Radiative feedback from ionized gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. C. O. Glover

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    H2 formation in metal-free gas occurs via the intermediate H- or H2+ ions. Destruction of these ions by photodissociation therefore serves to suppress H2 formation. In this paper, I highlight the fact that several processes that occur in ionized primordial gas produce photons energetic enough to photodissociate H- or H2+ and outline how to compute the photodissociation rates produced by a particular distribution of ionized gas. I also show that there are circumstances of interest, such as during the growth of HII regions around the first stars, in which this previously overlooked form of radiative feedback is of considerable importance.

  14. Radiative transfer in molecular lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Asensio Ramos; J. Trujillo Bueno; J. Cernicharo

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly convergent iterative methods developed by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho (1995) for radiative transfer (RT) applications are generalized to spherical symmetry with velocity fields. These RT methods are based on Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel (GS), and SOR iteration and they form the basis of a new NLTE multilevel transfer code for atomic and molecular lines. The benchmark tests carried out so far are presented and discussed. The main aim is to develop a number of powerful RT tools for the theoretical interpretation of molecular spectra.

  15. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n u aOct. 29,workshop onSSRL

  16. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n u aOct. 29,workshop onSSRLMelvin

  17. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n u aOct. 29,workshop

  18. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n u aOct. 29,workshopW.E. Spicer

  19. Safety Around Sources of Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton nSafeguards andSafety Alerts Safety

  20. Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation Effects Quality