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Sample records for late fees merchandise

  1. Fees

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The DOE Loan Program is required to collect several fees from loan program Applicants. Please find an outline of these fees below. In addition, DOE is supported by outside consultants and legal...

  2. fees

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PRIME CONTRACTOR FEES ON SUBCONTRACTOR COSTS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES AUDIT REPORT DOE/IG-0427 SEPTEMBER 1998 September 11, 1998 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Acting Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Audit Report on "The U.S. Department of Energy's Prime Contractor Fees on Subcontractor Costs" BACKGROUND In Fiscal Year 1996, the Department's prime contractors awarded $5.3 billion in subcontracts. The

  3. General Merchandise 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Publication Year 2009 URL http:www.nrel.govdocsfy09osti46100.pdf Building Models General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline, General Merchandise 2009...

  4. FOIA FEES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fees The FOIA generally requires that requestors pay fees for processing their requests. If costs associated with the processing of a FOIA request are $15.00 or less, no fees are charged. Each FOIA request is reviewed for the purpose of placing a requestor in one of four fee categories described below: 1. Commercial use requestor: Responsible for all direct costs; i.e. search for responsive documents, review of documents located for responsiveness; 16% administrative costs; reproduction cost of

  5. Commercial Building Partnership General Merchandise Energy Savings Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, national laboratories and private sector exports to explore energy efficiency measures across general merchandise commercial buildings.

  6. General Merchandise 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E.; Leach, M.; Hirsch, A.; Torcellini, P.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents technical analysis for medium-box general merchandise stores aimed at providing design guidance that achieves whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  7. Award Fee Determination Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Contract Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788 Final Fee Determination for Base funded Performance Measures Basis of Evaluation: Completion of Performance Measures contained in Section J, Attachment J.4, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan, according to the identified completion criteria. Evaluation Results: FY 2012 Base Period Fee Available Fee allocated to FY 2012* Performance Measures $10,399,033.60 Incremental Fee $4,490,000.00 Provisional Fee

  8. Award Fee Determination Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Contract Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788 Final Fee Determination for Base funded and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery) funded Performance Measures Basis of Evaluation: Completion of Performance Measures contained in Section J, AttachmentJ.4, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan, according to the identified completion criteria. Evaluation Results: Fiscal Year 2011 (Oct 1, 2010 - Sept 30, 2011) Base Funded Fee Recovery Funded Fee Available

  9. AWARD FEE DETERMINATION SCORECARD Contractor: Restoration Services...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Basis of Evaluation: FY14 Award Fee Plan for Restoration Services, Inc.; Portsmouth Environmental Technical Services II Award Fee Available: 349,708.00 Award Fee Earned:...

  10. Fees | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFees&oldid542709" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  11. ," Excise"," LUST Fee ",," ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...8,0.004,0.184,0.368,,0.18,0.004,0.184,0.428,,"Seawall Tax: 0.03gal (gasoline only) in effect in Harrison, Hancock, and Jackson Counties. Environmental Protection Fee: 0.004gal. ...

  12. FOIA FEES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEES FOIA FEES The FOIA generally requires that requestors pay fees for processing their requests. If costs associated with the processing of a FOIA request are $15.00 or less, no fees are charged. Each FOIA request is reviewed for the purpose of placing a requestor in one of the fee categories described in the document below. PDF icon FOIA FEES More Documents & Publications How to Make a FOIA Request FIA-11-0018 - In the Matter of Robert M. Balick FIA-11-0018 - In the Matter of Robert M.

  13. Contractor Fee Payments- Small Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Small Sites office on these charts.

  14. EM Contractor Fee Payments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contractor Fee Payments EM Contractor Fee Payments In the interest of furthering transparency in its government operations, the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) herein is releasing information relating to fee payments under its major cost-reimbursable contracts. Charts delineating fees that are paid under cost-plus-award-fee (CPAF), cost-plus-incentive-fee (CPIF), and cost-plus-fixed-fee (CPFF) contracts are listed by site location in the following hyperlinks. With

  15. CHPRC Fee Determination Summaries - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHPRC Fee Determination Summaries DOE-RL Contracts/Procurements RL Contracts & Procurements Home Prime Contracts Current Solicitations Other Sources DOE RL Contracting Officers DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives CHPRC Fee Determination Summaries Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size CHPRC Fiscal Year 2014 Fee Evaluation Summary CHPRC Fiscal Year 2013 Fee Evaluation Summary CHPRC Fiscal Year 2012 Fee Determination Summary Fiscal Year 2011 Fee

  16. Microsoft Word - FY14 NWP Fee Scorecards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY14 Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC Contract: DE-EM0001971 Award Period: October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014 Basis of Evaluation: Performance and Evaluation Plan (PEMP) for FY2014 The FY2014 PEMP for this contract is available at: http://www.wipp.energy.gov/NWPpayments/NWP.htm Award Fee Scorecard: Subjective Fee (Award Fee) Criteria Summary Table Criteria Maximum Available Fee Adjectival Rating Fee Range Available for Adjectival Ratings Percentage

  17. RECS Electricity Usage Form_v2 (25418 - Activated, Traditional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AActual EEstimated RRead by Customer (select one) A E R 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar Amount including taxes Exclude late fees, merchandise, repairs, and service ...

  18. FY 14 Award Fee Determination Scorecard

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    14 Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Swift and Staley Inc. (SST) Contract: DE-AC30-10CC40021 Award Period: October 1,2013 - September 30,2014 Basis of Evaluation: FY 14 Award Fee Plan Categories of Performance: $2,415,920 Award Fee Earned $2,295,124 95% Award Fee earned Categories of Performance Award Fee Award Fee Adjectival Ratings: Quality and Effectiveness of Security Quality and Effective Support to DOE Quality and Effective Site Infrastructure Services Cost Savings Initiative

  19. Strategies to Save 50% Site Energy in Grocery and General Merchandise Stores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategies to Save 50% Site Energy in Grocery and General Merchandise Stores Adam Hirsch, Elaine Hale, and Matthew Leach Presented at the ACEEE Summer Study 2010 Pacific Grove, California August 15-20, 2010 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-48197 March 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a

  20. Contractor Fee Payments- Idaho Operations Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Idaho Operations Office on these charts.

  1. Contractor Fee Payments- Carlsbad Field Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Carlsbad Field Office on these charts.

  2. Revenue From Contractor Fees | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revenue From Contractor Fees Revenue From Contractor Fees Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Revenue from Contractor Fees, call slides and discussion summary, November 1, 2012. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability Assessing Revenue Streams: What Is Right for Your Program?

  3. Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2008

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY2008 $87,580 FY2009 $87,580 FY2010 $171,763 FY2011 $1,339,286 FY 2012 $38,126 FY 2013 $42,265 Cumulative Fee Paid $1,766,600 $42,265 Cost Plus Incentive Fee/Cost Plus Fixed Fee $36,602,425 Contract Period: September 2007 - November 30, 2012 Target Fee $521,595 Total Estimated Contract Cost Contract Type: Maximum Fee $3,129,570 $175,160 $377,516 $1,439,287 Fee Available $175,160 $80,871 Accelerated Remediation Company (aRc) DE-AT30-07CC60013 Contractor: Contract Number: Minimum Fee $2,086,380

  4. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Savannah River Remediation, LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remediation, LLC Contract: Cost Plus Award Fee (CPAF) Contract Number: DE-AC09-09SR22505 Award Period: October 1, 2013 - September 30, 2014 Basis of Evaluation: Performance and Evaluation Plan (PEMP) Award Fee: $3,000,000.00 Incentive Fee: $22,500,000.00 Forfeiture of Fee: ($27,092.00) Total Fee Available: $28,500,000.00 Total Fee Earned: $26,825,795.00 Percentage Fee Earned: 95% This is a Cost Plus Award Fee contract as defined by Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR). Fee is made available for

  5. Title 43 CFR 3000.12 What is the Fee Schedule for Fixed Fees...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    000.12 What is the Fee Schedule for Fixed Fees? Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43...

  6. Department of Environmental Conservation Stormwater Program Fee...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: Department of Environmental Conservation Stormwater Program Fee SummaryPermittingRegulatory GuidanceSupplemental Material...

  7. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Savannah River Remediation, LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remediation, LLC Contract: Cost Plus Award Fee (CPAF) Contract Number: DE-AC09-09SR22505 Award Period: October 1, 2012 - September 30, 2013 Basis of Evaluation: Performance and Evaluation Plan (PEMP) Award Fee: $3,370,000 Incentive Fee: $28,000,000 Total Fee Available: $31,370.000 Total Fee Earned: $29,742,886 Percentage Earned: 95% This is a Cost Plus Award Fee contract as defined by Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR). Fee is made available for the completion of explicit work results, such

  8. Richland Operations Office's Fiscal Year 2014 Fee Evaluation Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Office's Fiscal Year 2014 Fee Evaluation Summary Contractor: CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) Contract: Plateau Remediation Contract Contract Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788 Award Period: October 2013 through September 2014 (fiscal year 2014) Basis of Evaluation: Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) Award Fee Available: $9,815,000 Award Fee Earned: $9,659,555 Award Fee Area Adjectival Ratings: Excellent (Earnings represent 98 percent of available fee) Significant

  9. Richland Operations Office's Fiscal Year 2013 Fee Evaluation Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Office's Fiscal Year 2013 Fee Evaluation Summary Contractor: CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) Contract: Plateau Remediation Contract Contract Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788 Award Period: October 2012 through September 2013 (fiscal year 2013) Basis of Evaluation: Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) Award Fee Available: $14,092,235 (includes fee set aside for multi-year incentives for the Plutonium Finishing Plant project) Award Fee Earned: $4,910,099 Award Fee

  10. Contractor Fee Payments - Savannah River Operations Office | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Contractor Fee Payments - Savannah River Operations Office Contractor Fee Payments - Savannah River Operations Office See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Savannah River Site Office on these charts. PDF icon Liquid Waste Processing PDF icon Site Management and Operations PDF icon Comprehensive Security Services PDF icon Salt Waste Processing Facility More Documents & Publications Contractor Fee

  11. Contractor Fee Payments - Oak Ridge Operations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oak Ridge Operations Contractor Fee Payments - Oak Ridge Operations See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Oak Ridge Operations on these charts. PDF icon East Tennessee Technology Park PDF icon Transuranic Waste Processing - Wastren More Documents & Publications Major Contracts Summary Contractor Fee Payments - Savannah River Operations Office Contractor Fee Payments - Portsmouth Paducah Projec

  12. Contractor Fee Payments - Office of River Protection | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of River Protection Contractor Fee Payments - Office of River Protection See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Office of River Protection on these charts. PDF icon Laboratory Analytical Services & Testing PDF icon Tank Operations PDF icon Waste Treatment Plant Design & Construction More Documents & Publications Contractor Fee Payments - Savannah River Operations Office Contractor Fee Payments -

  13. Microsoft Word - Award Fee Determination Scorecard for FY 2013 (4)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract: Tank Operations Contract Contract Number: DE-AC27-08RV14800 Award Fee Period: October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013 Basis of Evaluation: FY 2013 Award Fee, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan Award Fee Available: $7,994,699 Award Fee Earned: $6,483,701 (81.1%) Award Fee Area Adjectival Ratings: Functional Element Adjectival Rating* Conduct of Operations Very Good General Management Very Good -Contract Administration and Compliance Good - Business Systems Management Good -

  14. Federal Court Dismisses Waste Fee Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Court Dismisses Waste Fee Challenges Federal Court Dismisses Waste Fee Challenges December 13, 2010 - 2:31pm Addthis The D.C. Circuit today dismissed petitions filed by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and other entities seeking (1) to force the Department to issue an assessment of the adequacy of the nuclear waste fund fee and (2) compelling suspension of the fee. These petitions were filed before the Department's recent issuance of a new fee

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Fees as Transportation Funding

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternatives Fees as Transportation Funding Alternatives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Fees as Transportation Funding Alternatives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Fees as Transportation Funding Alternatives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Fees as Transportation Funding Alternatives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Fees as Transportation Funding Alternatives on Delicious Rank

  16. Sacramento Ordinance to Waive Solar PV Fees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is an ordinance by the city of Sacramento to suspend for the calendar years 2007-2009 all fees related to installation of photovoltaic systems on existing residences.

  17. Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2001

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY2001 $4,547,400 FY2002 $4,871,000 FY2003 $6,177,902 FY2004 $8,743,007 FY2005 $13,134,189 FY2006 $7,489,704 FY2007 $9,090,924 FY2008 $10,045,072 FY2009 $12,504,247 FY2010 $17,590,414 FY2011 $17,558,710 FY2012 $14,528,770 Cumulative Fee Paid $126,281,339 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-AC29-01AL66444 Washington TRU Solutions LLC Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: $8,743,007 Contract Period: $1,813,482,000 Fee Information Maximum Fee $131,691,744 Total Estimated Contract Cost: $4,547,400

  18. CONCUR: AWARD FEE PLAN - FY15

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as Facility Support Services Contract Award Fee Plan Contract Number DE-CI0000004 3 editorial or personnel changes may be made and implemented without being provided to the...

  19. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contractor: Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) Contract: Design, Construction, and Commissioning of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant Contract Number: DE-AC27-01RV14136 Award Fee Period: January 1, 2014 to June 30, 2014 Basis of Evaluation: 2014-A Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan Award Fee Available: $6,300,000 Award Fee Earned: $3,970,000 (63.0%) Incentive B.1 - Award Fee-Project Management The fee for Project Management is divided into three Award Fee Objectives

  20. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) Contract: Design, Construction, and Commissioning of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant Contract Number: DE-AC27-01RV14136 Award Fee Period: July 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014 Basis of Evaluation: 2014-B Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan Award Fee Available: $6,300,000 Award Fee Earned: $4,095,000 (65.0%) Incentive B.1 - Award Fee-Project Management - Good The fee for Project Management

  1. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract: Tank Operations Contract Contract Number: DE-AC27-08RV14800 Award Fee Period: October 1, 2013 to September 30, 2014 Basis of Evaluation: FY 2014 Award Fee, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan Award Fee Available: $12,597,052 Award Fee Earned: $10,459,418 (83.0%) Award Fee Area Adjectival Ratings for each Award Fee Special Emphasis Area (SEA): Functional Element Adjectival Rating* SEA 1: Management of Single-Shell (SST) and Double-Shell Tank (DST) System Excellent SEA 2:

  2. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Contract: Tank Operations Contract Contract Number: DE-AC27-08RV14800 Award Fee Period: October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015 Basis of Evaluation: FY 2015 Award Fee, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan Award Fee Available: $15,600,000 Award Fee Earned: $13,728,000 (88%) Award Fee Area Adjectival Ratings for each Award Fee Special Emphasis Area (SEA): Functional Element Adjectival Rating* SEA 1: Management of Single-Shell (SST) and Double-Shell

  3. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Total Fee Paid FY2008 $134,832 FY2009 $142,578 FY2010 $299,878 FY2011 $169,878 Cumulative Fee Paid $747,166 Contract Period: September 2007 - October 2012 $31,885,815 C/P/E Environmental Services, LLC DE-AM09-05SR22405/DE-AT30-07CC60011/SL14 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee $357,223 $597,797 $894,699 EM Contractor Fee Site: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Contract Name: SLAC Environmental Remediation December 2012 $1,516,646 Fee Available $208,620 Fee

  4. Title 18 CFR 381 Fees | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regulation: Title 18 CFR 381 FeesLegal Abstract Part 381 Fees, Forms under Title 18: Conservation of Power and Water Resources of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, current...

  5. Alaska Division of Water Permit Fees | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Permit Fees Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Alaska Division of Water Permit Fees Author Alaska Division of Water Published...

  6. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Option Period: Maximum Fee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Earned FY2011/2012 $4,059,840 FY2013 $2,928,000 FY2014 $3,022,789 FY2015 FY2016 Cumulative Fee $10,010,629 $19,878,019 $3,214,544 $5,254,840 $5,662,028 $1,421,695 Fee Available $4,324,912 $417,833,183 Contract Base Period: January 3, 2011 - September 2, 2016 (Extended) Fee Information Minimum Fee $0 N/A $19,878,019 Contractor: Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee EM Contractor Fee

  7. Utah Water Rights Fee Schedule | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Utah Water Rights Fee Schedule Abstract Water rights fee schedule based on amount appropriated....

  8. Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 5 Fees | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 Fees Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 5 FeesLegal Abstract...

  9. Contractor Fee Payments - Savannah River Site Office | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Savannah River Site Office on these charts. Liquid Waste...

  10. UCOR Contract & Fee Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UCOR Contract & Fee Determination UCOR Contract & Fee Determination The attached document is UCOR's conformed contract with the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Managment. It is contract DE-SC0004645, and it includes all sections through MOD94. PDF icon UCOR contract (DE-SC0004645) PDF icon UCOR Fee Determination Letter (July 2014) More Documents & Publications PPPO Contract Awards Contractor Fee Payments - Oak Ridge Operations Policy Flash 2014-37 Update to the Department of Energy

  11. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - September 30, 2013 Basis of Evaluation: Performance and Evaluation Plan (PEMP) This is a Cost Plus Award Fee contract as defined by federal acquisition regulations (FAR). Fee is made available for the completion of explicit work results, such as completing a task on time, or for implicit performance in areas of cost, schedule/timeliness, quality and business relations. Fee may be earned based on an annual evaluation of contract performance. Total available fee for each contract year is

  12. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - September 30, 2015 Basis of Evaluation: Performance and Evaluation Plan (PEMP) This is a Cost Plus Award Fee contract as defined by federal acquisition regulations (FAR). Fee is made available for the completion of explicit work results, such as completing a task on time, or for implicit performance in areas of cost, schedule/timeliness, quality and business relations. Fee may be earned based on an annual evaluation of contract performance. Total available fee for each contract year is

  13. Incentive Fee Determination Summary Contractor: Washington Closure Hanford LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Incentive Fee Determination Summary Contractor: Washington Closure Hanford LLC Contract: River Corridor Closure Contract Line Item Number One (CLIN 1) Schedule Performance Incentive Fee (SPIF) Contract Number: DE-AC06-05RL14655 Award Fee Available: $32,800,000 Award Fee Earned: $31,200,000 Basis of Evaluation: Completion of CLIN 1 incentivized scope identified in Section J, Attachment J-1, River Corridor Closure Contract Work Scope, according to the schedule set forth in Section B, Table B.1

  14. Contractor Fee Payments - Richland Operations Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Richland Operations Office Contractor Fee Payments - Richland Operations Office See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Richland Operations Office on these charts. PDF icon Occupational Medical Services - HPM Corporation PDF icon Infrastructure and Site Services Support PDF icon Plateau Remediation PDF icon River Corridor Closure PDF icon Occupational Health Services More Documents & Publications Contractor Fee

  15. FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 The purpose of this U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report is to present an analysis of the adequacy of the fee being paid by nuclear power utilities for the permanent disposal of their spent nuclear fuel by the Government. In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (the Act), the costs for disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel are to be funded by a fee

  16. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) AWARD FEE PLAN (AFP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - March 2013 Page 1 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) AWARD FEE PLAN (AFP) 1 OCTOBER 2012 through 30 SEPTEMBER 2013 Contract No. DE- EM-0001971 I. INTRODUCTION This Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) provides a standard process for development, administration, and coordination of all phases of the fee determination process consistent with Section B.2 of the subject contract. Fee determinations are not subject to the Disputes Clause of the contract. II.

  17. Gordon Fee, part 1 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Gordon Fee, part 1 Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Gordon FeePart 1 |

  18. Gordon Fee, part 2 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Gordon Fee, part 2 Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Gordon FeePart 1 |

  19. Unique Fee-for-Service Revenues | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unique Fee-for-Service Revenues Unique Fee-for-Service Revenues Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Peer Exchange Calls on Program Sustainability: Unique Fee-for-Service Revenues, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, April 11, 2013. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Programs: Operating as a Prime Contractor Assessing Revenue Streams: What Is Right for Your Program? Administering Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Programs

  20. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Solutions Contract: Management and Operations Contract Number: DE-AC09-08SR22470 Award Period: October 1, 2013 - September 30, 2014 Basis of Evaluation: Performance and Evaluation Plan (PEMP) This is a Cost Plus Award Fee contract as defined by federal acquisition regulations (FAR). Fee is made available for the completion of explicit work results, such as completing a task on time, or for implicit performance in areas of cost, schedule/timeliness, quality and business relations. Fee may

  1. Contractor Fee Payments - Portsmouth Paducah Project Office | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Contractor Fee Payments - Portsmouth Paducah Project Office See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office on these charts. PDF icon Paducah Remediation - LATA of Kentucky PDF icon Paducah Infrastructure Support PDF icon Portsmouth D&D PDF icon Operation of DUF6 PDF icon Portsmouth Facility Support Services PDF icon Paducah Deactivation

  2. Section L Attachment I - Summary and Fee Sheet Amendment 000002...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    within the submitted MS Excel electronic spreadsheets and workbooks. Section L Attachment I Summary and Fee Sheet Amendment 000002 mulas and links intact and all cells...

  3. Sacramento Ordinance to Waive Fees for Solar Hot Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An ordinance suspending for the calendar years 2007-2009 all fees related to installations of solar water heaters on existing residences.

  4. Oregon Fees for Underground Injection Control Program Fact Sheet...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fees for Underground Injection Control Program Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material:...

  5. Wetland Permit Application Fees 2015 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Wetland Permit Application Fees 2015PermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuide...

  6. Award Fee Evaluation Period 6 Determination Scorecard Contractor: Wastren-EnergX Mission Support, LLC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Determination Scorecard Contractor: Wastren-EnergX Mission Support, LLC Contract: DE-CI0000004 Award Fee Evaluation Period: Fiscal Year 2015 (October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015) Basis of Evaluation: Award Fee Plan for Wastren-EnergX Mission Support, LLC Award Fee Evaluation Period 6 Categories of Performance: $1,435,629 Award Fee Available: $1,435,629 Award Fee Earned: $1,406,916 (98%) Categories of Performance Award Fee Award Fee Area Adjectival Ratings Award Fee Available: $1,435,629 1.

  7. WEIGHTED GUIDELINES PROFIT/FEE OBJECTIVE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WEIGHTED GUIDELINES PROFIT/FEE OBJECTIVE DOE F 4220.23 (06-95) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1. CONTRACTOR IDENTIFICATION 2. TYPE OF ACQUISTION ACTION (REFER TO OFPP MANUAL, FEDERAL PROCUREMENT DATA SYSTEMS - PRODUCT AND SERVICE CODES. APRIL 1980) a. Name c. Street address b. Division (If any) d. City e. State f. Zip code a. SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT b. RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT c. SERVICES: (1) ARCHITECT-ENGINEER: (2) MANAGEMENT SERVICES: (3) MEDICAL: (4) OTHER (e.g., SUPPORT SERVICES) 3.

  8. Award Fee Evaluation Period 5 Determination Scorecard Contractor: Fluor-BWXT Portsmouth LLC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 Determination Scorecard Contractor: Fluor-BWXT Portsmouth LLC Contract: DE-AC30-10CC40017 Award Fee Evaluation Period: Fiscal Year 2015 (October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015) Basis of Evaluation: Award Fee Plan for Fluor-BWXT Portsmouth, LLC Award Fee Evaluation Period 5 Categories of Performance: Subjective: $4,280,759 PBI: $9,988,437 Stretch: $0 Award Fee Available: $14,269,196 Award Fee Earned: $10,503,998 (73.6%) Categories of Performance Award Fee Award Fee Area Adjectival Ratings Base

  9. Microsoft Word - DRAFT FY15 Award Fee Plan LATA - 09-19-2014 clean

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Remediation Contract Award Fee Plan Contract Number: DE-AC30-10CC40020 AWARD FEE PLAN FOR LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC DE-AC30-10CC40020 TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. DEFINITION OF TERMS 1 3. AWARD FEE STRUCTURE 1 4. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE 2 5. RESPONSIBILITIES 3 6. AWARD FEE AMOUNTS AND PERIODS 3 7. AWARD FEE PROCESS 4 8. TERMINATION FOR CONVENIENCE 7 EXHIBITS 1. Performance Evaluation Board (PEB) Members and Advisors 8 2. Award Fee Rating Table, Award Fee

  10. Fiscal year 1999 Battelle performance evaluation and fee agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, T.L.

    1998-10-22

    Fiscal Year 1999 represents the third fill year utilizing a results-oriented, performance-based evaluation for the Contractor's operations and management of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (here after referred to as the Laboratory). However, this is the first year that the Contractor's fee is totally performance-based utilizing the same Critical Outcomes. This document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, and the basis for the evaluation of the Contractor's performance for the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999, as required by Clauses entitled ''Use of Objective Standards of Performance, Self Assessment and Performance Evaluation'' and ''Performance Measures Review'' of the Contract DE-ACO6-76RL01830. Furthermore, it documents the distribution of the total available performance-based fee and the methodology set for determining the amount of fee earned by the Contractor as stipulated within the causes entitled ''Estimated Cost and Annual Fee,'' ''Total Available Fee'' and ''Allowable Costs and Fee.'' In partnership with the Contractor and other key customers, the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters (HQ) and Richland Operations Office (RL) has defined four critical outcomes that serve as the core for the Contractor's performance-based evaluation and fee determination. The Contractor also utilizes these outcomes as a basis for overall management of the Laboratory.

  11. Spent fuel management fee methodology and computer code user's manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R.L.; White, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology and computer model described here were developed to analyze the cash flows for the federal government taking title to and managing spent nuclear fuel. The methodology has been used by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the spent fuel disposal fee that will provide full cost recovery. Although the methodology was designed to analyze interim storage followed by spent fuel disposal, it could be used to calculate a fee for reprocessing spent fuel and disposing of the waste. The methodology consists of two phases. The first phase estimates government expenditures for spent fuel management. The second phase determines the fees that will result in revenues such that the government attains full cost recovery assuming various revenue collection philosophies. These two phases are discussed in detail in subsequent sections of this report. Each of the two phases constitute a computer module, called SPADE (SPent fuel Analysis and Disposal Economics) and FEAN (FEe ANalysis), respectively.

  12. Idaho Water Right Applications, Forms, and Fees Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Idaho Water Right Applications, Forms, and Fees Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an overview...

  13. Fact #901: November 30, 2015 States Assessing Fees on Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    combination of Federal and state taxes collected at the pump from the sale of motor fuels. ... Idaho is the only state that has a fee for conventional hybrid electric vehicles (without ...

  14. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Centerra-Savannah River Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Centerra-Savannah River Site Contract: Protective Force Security Services Contract Number: DE-AC30-10CC60025 Award Period: October 1, 2014 - September 30, 2015 Basis of Evaluation: Award Fee Plan The contractor is required to provide, operate and maintain an armed and uniformed protective force for the physical protection of United States Department of Energy (DOE) security interests and other such related duties at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The

  15. Logistics & Fees - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Logistics & Fees Logistics & Fees Location/Accommodations The Summer School will be held on the beautiful campus of Princeton University. On-campus lodging in single-person, air-conditioned dormitory rooms with same-gender shared bath facilities is available to all participants(1). Breakfast, lunch and dinner meal plans are available to all participants. Participants may also choose to make arrangements to stay and dine at area hotels and restaurants. (1) Summer school dormitory

  16. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Nuclear Testing Archive Fee Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Testing Archive > Fee Schedule NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Nuclear Testing Archive (NTA) Fee Schedule The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Testing Archive (NTA) is a centralized repository of publicly releasable documents on the subject of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Testing Program. The Nuclear Testing Archive is operated for the NNSA by NSTec. Normal services provided to the public by the Nuclear Testing

  17. Fiscal Year 2007 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report is to present an analysis of the adequacy of the fee being paid by nuclear power utilities...

  18. Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee I adopt and approve the attached annual determination of the Director, Office of Standard Contract Management, that there is no reasonable basis at this time to conclude that either excess or insufficient funds are being collected and thus will not propose an adjustment to the fee to Congress; the fee will, therefore, remain at

  19. Fourth Fridays - Museum Open Late

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fourth Fridays - Museum Open Late Fourth Fridays - Museum Open Late WHEN: Oct 23, 2015 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544 USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Fourth Fridays in Downtown Los Alamos Event Description The museum will be open late until 6 p.m. every Fourth Friday offering extended access to exhibits, special programming, and activities. The Los Alamos Creative District is

  20. Fourth Fridays - Museum Open Late

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fourth Fridays - Museum Open Late Fourth Fridays - Museum Open Late WHEN: Jan 22, 2016 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544 USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Fourth Fridays in Downtown Los Alamos Event Description The museum will be open late until 6 p.m. every Fourth Friday offering extended access to exhibits, special programming, and activities. The Los Alamos Creative District is

  1. RECS Fuel Oil Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    fuel oil usage for this delivery address between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar Amount including taxes [Exclude late fees, merchandise, repairs, and service charges] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Form EIA 457G OMB No. 1905-0092 Expires 1/31/13 2009 RECS Fuel Oil and Kerosene Usage Form Delivery Address: Account Number: $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

  2. RECS Propane Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane usage for this housing unit between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar Amount including taxes [Exclude late fees, merchandise, repairs, and service charges] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Form EIA 457D OMB No. 1905-0092 Expires 1/31/13 2009 RECS Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form Delivery Address: Account Number: $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

  3. Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive's Input | Department of Energy 4 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input Attached is Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Michael Righi of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Policy, Office Acquisition and Project

  4. FISCAL YEAR 2014 AWARD FEE DETERMINATION SCORECARD Contractor: LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FISCAL YEAR 2014 AWARD FEE DETERMINATION SCORECARD Contractor: LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC Contract No.: DE-AC30-10CC40020 Award Period: October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014 (FY14) Basis of Evaluation: Fy14 Award Fee Plan for LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky LLC Award Fee Area Adjectival Ratings: Quality and Effectiveness of Documents and Associated Support: Very Good Quality and Effective of ESH&QA: Very Good Quality and Effective of Project Support: Excellent

  5. Microsoft Word - FPDP Award Fee Plan 2015-2016 Rev 4 (Final) (2)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CONCUR: Reinhard Knerr AWARD FEE PLAN for Fluor Federal Services, Inc. Paducah Deactivation Task Order Number DE-DT0007774 Interim Award Fee Evaluation Period August 1, 2015 to July 31, 2016 Date hjfj;) Paducah Deactivation Technical Lead Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Date o/f!s- * ortsmouth/Paducah Project Office APPROVED: Date: ~ Manager Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Deactivation Task Order No. DE-DT0007774 Attachment J-11 - Award Fee Plan Page 2 of 26

  6. Privacy Act Fees and Time Limits | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fees and Time Limits | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at

  7. Letter from DOE to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC on Award Fee Determination for

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April to September 2015 | Department of Energy DOE to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC on Award Fee Determination for April to September 2015 Letter from DOE to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC on Award Fee Determination for April to September 2015 DOE's Oak Ridge Environmental Management Office told URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) in a letter that it had completed its evaluation of the company's performance for the award fee period of April to September 2015 and determined that UCOR earned a fee of more

  8. Fourth Fridays - Museum Open Late

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Museum is participating by staying open late until 6:00 p.m. offering access to exhibits and special activities for all ages. Admission is free and open to the public...

  9. Fact #901: November 30, 2015 States Assessing Fees on Electric Vehicles to Make Up For Lost Fuel Tax Revenue- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for States Assessing Fees on Electric Vehicles to Make Up For Lost Fuel Tax Revenue

  10. Inspection of Westinghouse Savannah River Company Fees for Managing and Operating the Savannah River Site, IG-0377

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IG-1 INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of Westinghouse Savannah River Company Fees for Managing and Operating the Savannah River Site" The Secretary BACKGROUND: During the first five years of its contract with the Department of Energy, Westinghouse Savannah River Company was paid over $130 million in fees to manage and operate the Savannah River Site. Fees paid to Westinghouse steadily increased over the five year period. For example, fees paid for the last six months of this five

  11. Policy Flash 2014-08 ACQUISITION LETTER 2014-02: PROVISIONAL PAYMENT OF FEE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 8 ACQUISITION LETTER 2014-02: PROVISIONAL PAYMENT OF FEE Policy Flash 2014-08 ACQUISITION LETTER 2014-02: PROVISIONAL PAYMENT OF FEE Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Michael Righi of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Policy, Office Acquisition and Project Management at (202) 287-1337 or at Michael.Righi@hq.doe.gov. PDF icon Policy Flash 2014-08.pdf PDF icon Acquisition Letter on provsional payment of fee for

  12. H.A.R. 19-102 - Fee Schedule for the Issuance of a Permit to...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: H.A.R. 19-102 - Fee Schedule for the Issuance of a Permit to Perform Work on State...

  13. GC Commits to Transparency on Nuclear Waste Fund Fee Adequacy Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consistent with the Administration's commitment to transparency, DOE General Counsel Scott Blake Harris has decided that all future determinations as to the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee...

  14. Microsoft Word - DRAFT FY15 Award Fee Plan LATA - 09-19-2014...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    convened, which includes meeting place, time, advising all PEB members, preparing the agenda, and taking minutes. The TL is an advisor to the PEB. 3. AWARD FEE STRUCTURE The...

  15. 16 TAC, part 1, chapter 3, rule 3.78 Fees and Financial Security...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 16 TAC, part 1, chapter 3, rule 3.78 Fees and Financial Security RequirementsLegal Abstract These regulations...

  16. I.C. 42-221 - Appropriation of Water Fees | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 42-221 - Appropriation of Water FeesLegal Abstract This statutory section provides for...

  17. NMAC 20.2.71 Air Quality Operating Permit Emissions Fees | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 Air Quality Operating Permit Emissions Fees Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: NMAC 20.2.71 Air Quality...

  18. City of Santa Monica- Building Permit Fee Waiver for Solar Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In early 2002, the City of Santa Monica began waiving building permit fees for solar energy systems. In December 2008, after months of working with industry trainers, solar contractors and staff...

  19. Title 43 CFR 3203.12 What Fees Must I Pay to Nominate Lands?...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .12 What Fees Must I Pay to Nominate Lands? Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43 CFR...

  20. Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act Advisory Exemptions How to Submit a FOIA Request Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Electronic Reading Room ISC Conventional Reading Rooms Reference Links Privacy Act NEPA Documents Contact Information Integrated Support Center Roxanne Purucker U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-2110 Don F. Thress, Jr. U.S. Department of

  1. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: G4S Government Solutions, Inc. - Wackenhut Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: G4S Government Solutions, Inc. - Wackenhut Services Incorporated (WSI) Contract: Protective Force Security Services Contract Number: DE-AC30-10CC60025 Award Period: October 1, 2013 - September 30, 2014 Basis of Evaluation: Award Fee Plan The contractor is required to provide, operate, and maintain an armed and uniformed protective force for the physical protection of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) security interests and other such related duties at

  2. Reclamation fee on coal production: an example of federal regulatory taxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reese, C.E.

    1983-09-01

    The coal mining reclamation fee is part of the federal government's efforts to regulate the strip mining of coal and to use proceeds from the fee for land use and pollution control problems associated with abandoned mines. Authorized by the 1977 Surface Mining Contol and Reclamation Act rather than the Internal Revenue Code, the exaction is still shown to be both a regulatory and a severance tax. 41 references. (DCK)

  3. Effluent fees: policy considerations on a source of revenue for infrastructure financing. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, P.

    1988-01-01

    This project is part of the National Network for Environmental Management Studies conducted under the auspices of the Office of Cooperative Environmental Management - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. With the phasing out of EPA's construction grants program and the implementation of State Revolving Funds (SRF's), it appears that more money will be needed for the financing of waste-water treatment facilities in the next twenty years. Infrastructure needs for waste-water treatment facilities will increase significantly due to required replacement and upgrading needs, while user fees may be significantly understated due to years of capital subsidies. With Federal seed capital for the SRF's stopping after 1994, alternative sources of funding will be necessary. An effluent fee program could both offer a way to make the polluter pay and provide a reliable financing mechanism for the SRF's. The paper discusses the experience of effluent fees in Europe, and proposes an effluent fee program that would provide needed capital to the State Revolving Fund. The fee would be tied into the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits through gradual implementation. Various options for setting the fee and enforcement procedures are also discussed.

  4. DOE Rates EM’s Savannah River Site Contractor as ‘Very Good’ in Fee Determination Scorecard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – In its award fee determination scorecard for fiscal year 2015, DOE gave the Savannah River Site’s (SRS) management and operations contractor an overall “very good” rating, allowing the company to receive $37.8 million, or 82.7 percent of its total fee of $45.7 million.

  5. Fact #901: November 30, 2015 States Assessing Fees on Electric Vehicles to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Make Up For Lost Fuel Tax Revenue | Department of Energy 1: November 30, 2015 States Assessing Fees on Electric Vehicles to Make Up For Lost Fuel Tax Revenue Fact #901: November 30, 2015 States Assessing Fees on Electric Vehicles to Make Up For Lost Fuel Tax Revenue SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week The maintenance of our highways has traditionally been funded from a combination of Federal and state taxes collected at the pump from the sale of motor fuels. Because electric vehicles (EVs) do

  6. Section L Attachment I - Summary and Fee Sheet Amendment 000002.xlsx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I Summary and Fee Sheet Amendment 000002 Nevada National Security Site Management and Operating (M&O) Contract PROPOSED 2017 Mgt Team Costs 2018 Mgt Team Costs Subtotal $0 FEE CLIN 0001 - Management and Operation of NNSS Base Term Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Option Term Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Subtotal $0 CLIN 0002 - Strategic Partnership Program Base Term Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Option Term Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Subtotal $0 TOTAL ALL $0 Mgt Team

  7. Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Petrography of late...

  8. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Peer Exchange Calls on Program Sustainability: Unique Fee-for-Service Revenues Call Slides and Discussion Summary, April 11, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, 2013 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Peer Exchange Calls on Program Sustainability: Unique Fee-for-Service Revenues Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Welcome and Introductions  What are some unique fee-for-service revenues your program is implementing or considering? * Program Experience  Chris Jones, Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance * Discussion Topics:  How can you determine the feasibility and financial potential of unique fee-for-service revenues?  How do you

  9. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Revenue from Contractor Fees, November 1, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Revenue from Contractor Fees Agenda and Discussion * Welcome and Call Purpose  This call was the first in a new series of calls focusing on topics relating to program sustainability. * Call Logistics and Participants  The call had 25 participants representing 16 Better Buildings Neighborhood Programs (see next slide). * Call participants discussed:  How programs are beginning to devise plans for a

  10. ANNEX A TO APPENDIX G, Standard Remittance Advice For Payment of Fees

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration Form NWPA-830G (Revised 03/12) ANNEX A TO APPENDIX G Standard Remittance Advice For Payment of Fees OMB No: 1901-0260 Expires: 3-31-2016 Burden: 5 Hours Section 1. Identification Information: Please first read the instructions on the back. Section 2. Net Electricity Generated Calculation 1.1 Purchaser Information: Item Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Station Total 1 1.11 Name:____________________________________________ 2.1 Unit ID Code: 1.12

  11. Report on Audit of Department of Energy Management and Operating Contractor Available Fees, IG-0390

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AUDIT OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTOR AVAILABLE FEES The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the Internet five to seven days after publication at the following alternative address: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher gopher.hr.doe.gov Department of Energy Headquarters Anonymous FTP vm1.hqadmin.doe.gov

  12. Equity of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal fees. Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    In the Report accompanying the Fiscal Year 1997 Senate Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill, the Senate Appropriations Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a study of the costs of operating a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility such as the one at Barnwell, South Carolina, and to determine whether LLW generators are paying equitable disposal fees. The disposal costs of four facilities are reviewed in this report, two operating facilities and two planned facilities. The operating facilities are located at Barnwell, South Carolina, and Richland, Washington. They are operated by Chem-Nuclear, LLC, (Chem-Nuclear), and US Ecology, Inc., (US Ecology), respectively. The planned facilities are expected to be built at Ward Valley, California, and Sierra Blanca, Texas. They will be operated by US Ecology and the State of Texas, respectively. This report found that disposal fees vary significantly among facilities for a variety of reasons. However, the information suggests that at each disposal facility, LLW generators pay equitable disposal fees.

  13. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a Late Wash' facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  14. VERY LATE PHOTOMETRY OF SN 2011fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerzendorf, W. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 Saint George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Taubenberger, S.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Ruiter, A. J., E-mail: wkerzendorf@gmail.com [Max-Planck-Institut fr Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strae 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    The Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe is one of the closest supernovae of the past decades. Due to its proximity and low dust extinction, this object provides a very rare opportunity to study the extremely late time evolution (>900 days) of thermonuclear supernovae. In this Letter, we present our photometric data of SN 2011fe taken at an unprecedented late epoch of ?930 days with GMOS-N mounted on the Gemini North telescope (g=23.43 0.28, r=24.14 0.14, i=23.91 0.18, and z=23.90 0.17) to study the energy production and retention in the ejecta of SN 2011fe. Together with previous measurements by other groups, our result suggests that the optical supernova light curve can still be explained by the full thermalization of the decay positrons of {sup 56}Co. This is in spite of theoretical predicted effects (e.g., infrared catastrophe, positron escape, and dust) that advocate a substantial energy redistribution and/or loss via various processes that result in a more rapid dimming at these very late epochs.

  15. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z {approx gt} 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ({Delta}T/T) {approx lt} 10{sup {minus}5} can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of {approximately}100M pc for large-scale structure as well as {approximately}1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs.

  16. EM's Oak Ridge Office Contractor Scores High in Latest Award Fee Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – EM gave URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) a score of nearly 96 percent, allowing the contractor to earn over $4.4 million of the available fee of more than $4.6 million for the period from April to September 2015. UCOR is responsible for cleaning up the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, as well as other select sites on DOE’s Oak Ridge Reservation under a contract valued at $2.4 billion.

  17. Probing Late Neutrino Mass Properties With SupernovaNeutrinos (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Probing Late Neutrino Mass Properties With SupernovaNeutrinos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Probing Late Neutrino Mass Properties With SupernovaNeutrinos Models of late-time neutrino mass generation contain new interactions of the cosmic background neutrinos with supernova relic neutrinos (SRNs). Exchange of an on-shell light scalar may lead to significant modification of the differential SRN flux observed at earth. We consider an

  18. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated ...

  19. Have You Looked at Your Pipes Lately? | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Looked at Your Pipes Lately? Have You Looked at Your Pipes Lately? March 14, 2011 - 1:27pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory You know, it doesn't matter that some of you are probably already thinking about spring. It doesn't matter that the bulk of winter is over for a lot of you. I'm going to say this anyway, because sometime, someday, it might be useful. Or, well, it might not be if you live in Florida. But for the rest of you, I will repeat this

  20. Radioactive demonstration of the late wash'' Precipitate Hydrolysis Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.

    1992-06-30

    This report presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the DWPF Precipitate Hydrolysis Process as it would occur in the late wash'' flowsheet in the absence of hydroxylamine nitrate. Radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 from the April, 1983, in-tank precipitation demonstration in Tank 48 was used for these tests.

  1. Radioactive demonstration of the ``late wash`` Precipitate Hydrolysis Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.

    1992-06-30

    This report presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the DWPF Precipitate Hydrolysis Process as it would occur in the ``late wash`` flowsheet in the absence of hydroxylamine nitrate. Radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 from the April, 1983, in-tank precipitation demonstration in Tank 48 was used for these tests.

  2. Slide 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Late payment fee assessed, which typically is higher than the prompt payment interest. Frauddelinquency losses borne by the bank Comparison of Charge Card FeesLiabilities Office...

  3. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a ``Late Wash` facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  4. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly PMLL Identifier: ... design changes occur late in Title II or early in Title III Discussion: Numerous ...

  5. Initial technical basis for late washing filter cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, M.F.; Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1992-07-23

    Bench scale filter cleaning tests at the Savannah River Technology Center have shown that cross-flow filter elements can be cleaned between late wash filtration runs and restored to original clean water flux conditions. The most effective cleaning technique was high flow axial recirculation, followed by flushing with caustic solution. Simple flushing with oxalic acid and caustic is less effective and is not recommended because of adverse experience in ITP filter cleaning and uncertainty in the.nature of radiolysis by-product contaminants.

  6. S. 42: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, January 25, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 42 is a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products.

  7. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  8. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load Baseline | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPLbaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  9. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load Baseline ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPLBaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  10. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load 50% Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchHPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  11. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsChicago2009TSDGeneralMerchHPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  12. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsChicago2009TSDGeneralMerchHPLBaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  13. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load Baseline |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchHPLbaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  14. Hydrology of modern and late Holocene lakes, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasso, D.N.

    1996-07-01

    Above-normal precipitation and surface-water runoff, which have been generally related to the cyclic recurrence of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, have produced modern ephemeral lakes in the closed-basin Death Valley watershed. This study evaluates the regional hydroclimatic relations between precipitation, runoff, and lake transgressions in the Death Valley watershed. Recorded precipitation, runoff, and spring discharge data for the region are used in conjunction with a closed-basin, lake-water-budget equation to assess the relative contributions of water from these sources to modern lakes in Death Valley and to identify the requisite hydroclimatic changes for a late Holocene perennial lake in the valley. As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program, an evaluation of the Quaternary regional paleoflood hydrology of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was planned. The objectives of the evaluation were (1) to identify the locations and investigate the hydraulic characteristics of paleofloods and compare these with the locations and characteristics of modern floods, and (2) to evaluate the character and severity of past floods and debris flows to ascertain the potential future hazards to the potential repository during the pre-closure period (US Department of Energy, 1988). This study addresses the first of these objectives, and the second in part, by assessing and comparing the sizes, locations, and recurrence rates of modern, recorded (1962--83) floods and late Holocene paleofloods for the 8,533-mi{sup 2}, closed-basin, Death Valley watershed with its contributing drainage basins in the Yucca Mountain site area.

  15. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials:

  16. Hydrolysis of late-washed, irradiated tetraphenylborate slurry simulants I: Phenylboric acid hydrolysis kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marek, J.C.

    2000-02-10

    The attached report details the kinetics of phenylboric acid reaction at 90 degrees C during precipitate hydrolysis processing of late-washed, irradiated tetraphenylborate slurry simulants.

  17. Late Cenozoic fault kinematics and basin development, Calabrian arc, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott, S.D.; Turco, E.

    1988-08-01

    Current views for explaining the present structure of the Calabrian arc emphasize bending or buckling of an initially straight zone by rigid indentation. Although bending has played an important role, bending itself cannot explain all structural features now seen in the arc for the following reasons: (1) across-arc extension is inconsistent with buckling, (2) north-south compression predicted by a bending mechanism to occur in the internal part of a curved mountain belt is not present in the Calabrian arc, and (3) lateral shear occurs throughout the arc, not just along the northern and southern boundaries. The model presented here is based on lateral bending of mantle and lower crust (demonstrated by variation in extension in the Tyrrhenian basin) and semibrittle faulting and block rotation in the upper crust. These two styles of deformation are confined to the upper plate of the Calabrian subduction system. This deformation is considered to have been active from the beginning of extension in the Tyrrhenian basin (late Tortonian) and is still active today (based on Holocene seismicity). Block rotations are a consequence of lateral heterogeneous shear during extension. Therefore, some of the observed rotation of paleo-magnetic declinations may have occurred in areas undergoing extension and not just during thrusting. Inversion of sedimentary basins by block rotation is predicted by the model. The model will be a useful aid in interpreting reflection seismic data and exploring and developing offshore and onshore sedimentary basins in southern Italy.

  18. LATE-TIME OPTICAL EMISSION FROM CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect LATE-TIME OPTICAL EMISSION FROM CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LATE-TIME OPTICAL EMISSION FROM CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE Ground-based optical spectra and Hubble Space Telescope images of 10 core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) obtained several years to decades after outburst are analyzed with the aim of understanding the general properties of their late-time emissions. New observations of SN 1957D, 1970G, 1980K, and 1993J are included as part

  19. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly PMLL Identifier: PMLL-2006-Y12-HEUMF-0001 (Source: User Submitted) Validator: Victoria Pratt Date: 4/24/2010 Contact: 202-586-7358 Statement: Expect increased costs as well as omissions and errors if significant design changes occur late in Title II or early in Title III Discussion: Numerous changes in design requirements late in Title II and early in Title III resulted in significant concurrency in the design-and-build process,

  20. Theoretical physicist Evgeny Epelbaum joined Jefferson Lab late in 2003 as

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the inaugural Nathan Isgur Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow | Jefferson Lab Theoretical physicist Evgeny Epelbaum joined Jefferson Lab late in 2003 as the inaugural Nathan Isgur Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow. May 12, 2004 The Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab and the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) established the Nathan Isgur Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship as a memorial to the late Nathan Isgur, who served as head of Jefferson Lab's Theory Group and as

  1. NWP Fee Payments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contracts Payment Information Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC (NWP) 2016 Performance Evaluation & Measurement Plan (PEMP) 2015 Performance Evaluation & Measurement Plan (PEMP)...

  2. Mini Z' Burst from Relic Supernova Neutrinos and Late NeutrinoMasses

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Mini Z' Burst from Relic Supernova Neutrinos and Late NeutrinoMasses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mini Z' Burst from Relic Supernova Neutrinos and Late NeutrinoMasses Authors: Goldberg, Haim ; Perez, Gilad ; Sarcevic, Ina Publication Date: 2006-11-26 OSTI Identifier: 933093 Report Number(s): LBNL--57632 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of High Energy Physics;

  3. LATE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE EJECTA AND REVERSE SHOCK IN SN 1987A

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect LATE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE EJECTA AND REVERSE SHOCK IN SN 1987A Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LATE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE EJECTA AND REVERSE SHOCK IN SN 1987A We present observations with the Very Large Telescope and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the broad emission lines from the inner ejecta and reverse shock of SN 1987A from 1999 February until 2012 January (days 4381-9100 after explosion). We detect broad lines from H{alpha},

  4. DOUBLETS AND DOUBLE PEAKS: LATE-TIME [O I] lambdalambda6300, 6364 LINE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROFILES OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE, CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect DOUBLETS AND DOUBLE PEAKS: LATE-TIME [O I] lambdalambda6300, 6364 LINE PROFILES OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE, CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DOUBLETS AND DOUBLE PEAKS: LATE-TIME [O I] lambdalambda6300, 6364 LINE PROFILES OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE, CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE We present optical spectra of SN 2007gr, SN 2007rz, SN 2007uy, SN 2008ax, and SN 2008bo obtained in the

  5. Exploration of cloud computing late start LDRD #149630 : Raincoat. v. 2.1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echeverria, Victor T.; Metral, Michael David; Leger, Michelle A.; Gabert, Kasimir Georg; Edgett, Patrick Garrett; Thai, Tan Q.

    2010-09-01

    This report contains documentation from an interoperability study conducted under the Late Start LDRD 149630, Exploration of Cloud Computing. A small late-start LDRD from last year resulted in a study (Raincoat) on using Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) to enhance security in a hybrid cloud environment. Raincoat initially explored the use of OpenVPN on IPv4 and demonstrates that it is possible to secure the communication channel between two small 'test' clouds (a few nodes each) at New Mexico Tech and Sandia. We extended the Raincoat study to add IPSec support via Vyatta routers, to interface with a public cloud (Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)), and to be significantly more scalable than the previous iteration. The study contributed to our understanding of interoperability in a hybrid cloud.

  6. TESTING THE METAL OF LATE-TYPE KEPLER PLANET HOSTS WITH IRON-CLAD METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J.; Gaidos, Eric; Kraus, Adam

    2013-06-10

    It has been shown that F, G, and early K dwarf hosts of Neptune-sized planets are not preferentially metal-rich. However, it is less clear whether the same holds for late K and M dwarf planet hosts. We report metallicities of Kepler targets and candidate transiting planet hosts with effective temperatures below 4500 K. We use new metallicity calibrations to determine [Fe/H] from visible and near-infrared spectra. We find that the metallicity distribution of late K and M dwarfs monitored by Kepler is consistent with that of the solar neighborhood. Further, we show that hosts of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets have metallicities consistent with those lacking detected planets and rule out a previously claimed 0.2 dex offset between the two distributions at 6{sigma} confidence. We also demonstrate that the metallicities of late K and M dwarfs hosting multiple detected planets are consistent with those lacking detected planets. Our results indicate that multiple terrestrial and Neptune-sized planets can form around late K and M dwarfs with metallicities as low as 0.25 solar. The presence of Neptune-sized planets orbiting such low-metallicity M dwarfs suggests that accreting planets collect most or all of the solids from the disk and that the potential cores of giant planets can readily form around M dwarfs. The paucity of giant planets around M dwarfs compared to solar-type stars must be due to relatively rapid disk evaporation or a slower rate of planet accretion, rather than insufficient solids to form a core.

  7. The origin of the plateau and late rebrightening in the afterglow of GRB 120326A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, S. J.; Lu, J. F.; Geng, J. J.; Wang, K.; Huang, Y. F.; Dai, Z. G.; Wu, X. F.

    2014-04-20

    GRB 120326A is an unusual gamma-ray burst (GRB) that has a long plateau and a very late rebrightening in both X-ray and optical bands. The similar behavior of the optical and X-ray light curves suggests that they may share a common origin. The long plateau starts at several hundred seconds and ends at tens of thousands of seconds, and the peak time of the late rebrightening is about 30,000 s. We analyze the energy injection model by means of numerical and analytical solutions, considering both the wind environment and the interstellar medium environment for GRB afterglows. We particularly study the influence of the injection starting time, ending time, stellar wind density (or density of the circumburst environment), and injection luminosity on the shape of the afterglow light curves, respectively. In the wind model, we find that the light curve is largely affected by the parameters and that there is a 'bump' in the late stage. In the wind environment, we found that the longer the energy is injected, the more obvious the rebrightening will be. We also find that the peak time of the bump is determined by the stellar wind density. We use the late continuous injection model to interpret the unusual afterglow of GRB 120326A. The model fits the observational data well; however, we find that the timescale of the injection must be higher than 10,000 s, which implies that the timescale of the central engine activity must also be more than 10,000 s. This information can give useful constraints on the central engines of GRBswe consider a newborn millisecond pulsar with a strong magnetic field to be the central engine. On the other hand, our results suggest that the circumburst environment of GRB 120326A is very likely a stellar wind.

  8. Clues to the nature of SN 2009ip from photometric and spectroscopic evolution to late times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, M. L. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sand, D. J. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Parrent, J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Halford, M.; Zaritsky, D. [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bianco, F. [Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dilday, B., E-mail: melissagraham@berkeley.edu [North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Avenue, Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN 2009ip from the start of its outburst in 2012 September until 2013 November. These data were collected primarily with the new robotic capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, a specialized facility for time domain astrophysics, and includes supporting high-resolution spectroscopy from the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Based on our nightly photometric monitoring, we interpret the strength and timing of fluctuations in the light curve as interactions between fast-moving ejecta and an inhomogeneous circumstellar material (CSM) produced by past eruptions of this massive luminous blue variable (LBV) star. Our time series of spectroscopy in 2012 reveals that, as the continuum and narrow H? flux from CSM interactions declines, the broad component of H? persists with supernova (SN)-like velocities that are not typically seen in LBVs or SN impostor events. At late times, we find that SN 2009ip continues to decline slowly, at ? 0.01 mag day{sup 1}, with small fluctuations in slope similar to Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) or SN impostors but no further LBV-like activity. The late-time spectrum features broad calcium lines similar to both late-time SNe and SN impostors. In general, we find that the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2009ip is more similar to SNe IIn than either continued eruptions of an LBV star or SN impostors but we cannot rule out a nonterminal explosion. In this context, we discuss the implications for episodic mass loss during the late stages of massive star evolution.

  9. Enforcement Policy Statement: Treatment of Late-Arriving Goods Due to West

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Treatment of Late-Arriving Goods Due to West Coast Port Closure February 27, 2015 Closures at 29 West Coast marine ports in February 2015 due to a labor dispute have resulted in significant delays for certain goods entering the United States through those ports, including covered products and equipment subject to DOE energy or water conservation standards. Covered products and equipment subject to energy or water conservation standards must meet the standard(s) that are effective on the date

  10. Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm From Late Type II Endoleak Treated by Transarterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunasekaran, Senthil; Funaki, Brian Lorenz, Jonathan

    2013-02-15

    Endoleak is the most common complication after endovascular aneurysm repair. The most common type of endoleak, a type II endoleak, typically follows a benign course and is only treated when associated with increasing aneurysm size. In this case report, we describe a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm due to a late, type II endoleak occurring 10 years after endovascular aneurysm repair that was successfully treated by transarterial embolization.

  11. Eolian evidence for climatic fluctuations during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaylord, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of eolian features, particularly sand dunes, in the Ferris-Lost Solider area of south-central Wyoming demonstrates the dynamic character of late Pleistocene and Holocene climatic fluctuations in a high altitude, intermontane basin. Directly- and indirectly-dated stratigraphic, sedimentary, and geomorphic evidence documents recurrent late Quaternary eolian activity as well as the timing and severity of episodic aridity during the Altithermal. Eolian activity in the Ferris-Lost Solider area began under cool and arid conditions by the late Pleistocene. Radiocarbon-dated dune and interdune strata reveal that Holocene sand dune building at Ferris-Lost Solider peaked between ca. 7660 and 4540 years b.p. The first phase of dune building was the most extensive and lasted until ca. 6460 years b.p. Warm, persistently arid conditions during this time favored active dunes with slipfaces, even in historically well-vegetated locales subject to high water tables. Increased effective moisture from ca. 6460 to 5940 years b.p. promoted dune stabilizing vegetation; but renewed dune building, lasting until ca. 4540 years b.p., followed this climatic moderation. Subsequent dune and interdune deposits reveal a return to climatic conditions where only sporadic and localized dune reactivations have interrupted overall dune stability. The most significant recent reactivation, probably associated with a regional decrease in effective moisture, occurred ca. 290 years b.p.

  12. H. R. 4662: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 22, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products was introduced and referred to the House Ways and Means Committee. The fee would apply to the first sale of crude or refined petroleum products following importation into the US and the first use. It exempts certain exports, but requires proof of eligibility for exemption. Sections of the bill outline procedures for determining prices and adjustments, the registration of affected parties, and penalties for non-compliance.

  13. Late Mesozoic crustal extension and rifting on the western edge of the Parana Basin, Paraguay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGraff, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Geophysical and geological evidence indicates that the western edge of the Parana basin in Paraguay was a site of NE-SW directed crustal extension during late Mesozoic time. Major zones of normal faulting in south-eastern Paraguay trend northwesterly on average, and mafic dikes of probable late Mesozoic age have similar orientations. At least two NW-trending zones of tectonic subsidence, each over 200 km long, are now recognized in eastern Paraguay. Most alkalic rocks of south-eastern Paraguay are concentrated along this rift, and occur as simple to composite stocks and ring complexes composed of rocks ranging from foid-syenite to essexite. NW-trending, lamprophyric to phonolitic dikes are associated with some alkalic complexes. The southern zone, located about 125 km southwest, is a composite tectonic basin about 60 km wide and nearly devoid of alkalic rocks. The timing of crustal extension and rifting in eastern Paraguay is largely based on isotopic ages of associated alkalic rocks, which cluster between 150 and 100 Ma (latest Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous). Geologic evidence for the age of faulting and subsidence is consistent with this age range; tectonic depressions were being filled in late Cretaceous to early Cenozoic time. The age range of alkalic rocks in Paraguay contain that of the Serra Geral basalts and spans the time when South America Separated from Africa. This suggests that alkalic activity and crustal extension in eastern Paraguay are grossly related to the Serra Geral extrusive event, and were a manifestation of the breakup of South America and Africa far from the site of final separation.

  14. Stratigraphic evidence for late Quaternary dune activity near Hudson on the Piedmont of northern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forman, S.L.; Maat, P. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Stabilized dune fields are common features near Hudson, on the Piedmont of northern Colorado. Exposures in dune and interdune sites expose a sequence of eolian sediments and paleosols that record a complex history of eolian activity during the late Quaternary. Radiocarbon and thermoluminescence age estimates on A horizons buried by eolian sand indicate that dunes were reactivated sometime between 7 and 9 ka. On the basis of morphology of surface soils, the dunes were most recently stabilized <3 ka. At present that are no data to indicate if there were multiple periods of dune movement and stabilization during the Holocene. The penultimate pre-Holocene dune-forming episode probably terminated ca. 13 ka and may be coincident with the Pinedale glaciation. The stratigraphy at interdune sites shows at least two eolian depositional events prior to the penultimate event; they were separated by periods of pedogenesis, one of which may have exceeded 40 ka. This analysis indicates that dunes in northern Colorado were active during both cold-arid and warn-arid periods in the late Quaternary.

  15. Proxy late Holocene climatic record deduced from northwest Alaska beach ridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, O.K.; Jordan, J.W.

    1992-03-01

    A climatically sensitive, oscillatory pattern of progradation and erosion is revealed in late Holocene accretionary sand ridge and barrier island complexes of Seward Peninsula, northwest Alaska. Archaeological and geological radiocarbon dates constrain the chronology for the Cape Espenberg beach ridge plain and the Shishmaref barrier islands, 50 km to the southwest. Cape Espenberg, the depositional sink for the northeastward longshore transport system, contains the oldest sedimentary deposits: 3700 +/- 90 B.P. (B-23170) old grass from a paleosol in a low dune. The oldest date on the Shishmaref barrier islands is 1550 +/- 70 B.P. (B-23183) and implies that the modern barrier is a comparatively recent phenomenon. Late Holocene sedimentation along the Seward Peninsula varied between intervals of rapid progradation and erosion. Rapid progradation predominated from 4000-3300 B.P. and from 2000-1200 B.P., with the generation of low beach ridges without dunes, separated by wide swales. During erosional periods higher dunes built atop beach ridges: as between 3300-2000 B.P. and intermittently from 1000 B.P. to the present. Dune formation correlates with the Neoglacial and Little Ice Age glacial advances and increased alluviation in northern and central Alaska, while rapid progradation is contemporaneous with warmer intervals of soil and/or, peat formation atop alluvial terraces, dated to 4000-3500 and 2000-1000 B.P.

  16. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  17. Lung Irradiation Increases Mortality After Influenza A Virus Challenge Occurring Late After Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Casey M.; Johnston, Carl J.; Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York ; Reed, Christina K.; Lawrence, B. Paige; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York ; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Finkelstein, Jacob N.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To address whether irradiation-induced changes in the lung environment alter responses to a viral challenge delivered late after exposure but before the appearance of late lung radiation injury. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice received either lung alone or combined lung and whole-body irradiation (0-15 Gy). At 10 weeks after irradiation, animals were infected with 120 HAU influenza virus strain A/HKx31. Innate and adaptive immune cell recruitment was determined using flow cytometry. Cytokine and chemokine production and protein leakage into the lung after infection were assessed. Results: Prior irradiation led to a dose-dependent failure to regain body weight after infection and exacerbated mortality, but it did not affect virus-specific immune responses or virus clearance. Surviving irradiated animals displayed a persistent increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and edema. Conclusions: Lung irradiation increased susceptibility to death after infection with influenza virus and impaired the ability to complete recovery. This altered response does not seem to be due to a radiation effect on the immune response, but it may possibly be an effect on epithelial repair.

  18. EnergySolve Demand Response | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demand Response Place: Somerset, New Jersey Product: Somerset-based utility bill outsourcing company that provides electronic utility bill auditing, tariff analysis, late fee...

  19. Hypopharyngeal Dose Is Associated With Severe Late Toxicity in Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: An RTOG Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Moughan, Jennifer; Farach, Andrew; University of Texas Health Science Center Martin-O'Meara, Elizabeth; Galvin, James; Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Cooper, Jay S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) increases local tumor control but at the expense of increased toxicity. We recently showed that several clinical/pretreatment factors were associated with the occurrence of severe late toxicity. This study evaluated the potential relationship between radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal wall and toxicity. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of long-term survivors from 3 previously reported Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials of CCRT for locally advanced SCCHN (RTOG trials 91-11, 97-03, and 99-14). Severe late toxicity was defined in this secondary analysis as chronic grade 3-4 pharyngeal/laryngeal toxicity and/or requirement for a feeding tube {>=}2 years after registration and/or potential treatment-related death (eg, pneumonia) within 3 years. Radiation dosimetry (2-dimensional) analysis was performed centrally at RTOG headquarters to estimate doses to 4 regions of interest along the pharyngeal wall (superior oropharynx, inferior oropharynx, superior hypopharynx, and inferior hypopharynx). Case-control analysis was performed with a multivariate logistic regression model that included pretreatment and treatment potential factors. Results: A total of 154 patients were evaluable for this analysis, 71 cases (patients with severe late toxicities) and 83 controls; thus, 46% of evaluable patients had a severe late toxicity. On multivariate analysis, significant variables correlated with the development of severe late toxicity, including older age (odds ratio, 1.062 per year; P=.0021) and radiation dose received by the inferior hypopharynx (odds ratio, 1.023 per Gy; P=.016). The subgroup of patients receiving {<=}60 Gy to the inferior hypopharynx had a 40% rate of severe late toxicity compared with 56% for patients receiving >60 Gy. Oropharyngeal dose was not associated with this outcome. Conclusions: Severe late toxicity following CCRT is common in long-term survivors. Age is the most significant factor, but hypopharyngeal dose also was associated.

  20. S. 2886: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil or refined petroleum products. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, September 27, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This bill amends Subtitle E of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil or refined petroleum products. The bill inserts Chapter 54, which defines the rate of tax, procedures for its payment and for registration, and imposes penalties for non-compliance.

  1. S. 2779: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products to protect the national and energy security interests of the United States. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, August 15, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Energy Security Act of 1986 amends the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on petroleum and petroleum product imports. The purpose is to protect the US national and energy security interests. The general tax rate shall be $4 per barrel, with a formula for reduction when the price is $18 or more. Exemptions include petroleum intended for export.

  2. Late-time structure of the Bunch-Davies de Sitter wavefunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Anous, Tarek; Freedman, Daniel Z.; Konstantinidis, George

    2015-11-30

    We examine the late time behavior of the Bunch-Davies wavefunction for interacting light fields in a de Sitter background. We use perturbative techniques developed in the framework of AdS/CFT, and analytically continue to compute tree and loop level contributions to the Bunch-Davies wavefunction. We consider self-interacting scalars of general mass, but focus especially on the massless and conformally coupled cases. We show that certain contributions grow logarithmically in conformal time both at tree and loop level. We also consider gauge fields and gravitons. The four-dimensional Fefferman-Graham expansion of classical asymptotically de Sitter solutions is used to show that the wavefunction contains no logarithmic growth in the pure graviton sector at tree level. Finally, assuming a holographic relation between the wavefunction and the partition function of a conformal field theory, we interpret the logarithmic growths in the language of conformal field theory.

  3. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN THE EJECTA OF OLD CLASSICAL NOVAE FROM LATE-EPOCH SPITZER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, L. Andrew; Vacca, William D.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Woodward, Charles E.; Shenoy, Dinesh P.; Wagner, R. Mark; Evans, Aneurin; Krautter, Joachim; Schwarz, Greg J.; Starrfield, Sumner

    2012-08-10

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared IRS spectra, supplemented by ground-based optical observations, of the classical novae V1974 Cyg, V382 Vel, and V1494 Aql more than 11, 8, and 4 years after outburst, respectively. The spectra are dominated by forbidden emission from neon and oxygen, though in some cases, there are weak signatures of magnesium, sulfur, and argon. We investigate the geometry and distribution of the late time ejecta by examination of the emission line profiles. Using nebular analysis in the low-density regime, we estimate lower limits on the abundances in these novae. In V1974 Cyg and V382 Vel, our observations confirm the abundance estimates presented by other authors and support the claims that these eruptions occurred on ONe white dwarfs (WDs). We report the first detection of neon emission in V1494 Aql and show that the system most likely contains a CO WD.

  4. MOA-2010-BLG-328Lb: A sub-Neptune orbiting very late M dwarf?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furusawa, K.; Abe, F.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Gould, A.; Jrgensen, U. G.; Snodgrass, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Albrow, M. D.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Chote, P.; Harris, P.; Fukui, A. E-mail: liweih@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: rzellem@lpl.arizona.edu; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; ?FUN Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; RoboNet Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; and others

    2013-12-20

    We analyze the planetary microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-328. The best fit yields host and planetary masses of M {sub h} = 0.11 0.01 M {sub ?} and M {sub p} = 9.2 2.2 M {sub ?}, corresponding to a very late M dwarf and sub-Neptune-mass planet, respectively. The system lies at D {sub L} = 0.81 0.10 kpc with projected separation r = 0.92 0.16 AU. Because of the host's a priori unlikely close distance, as well as the unusual nature of the system, we consider the possibility that the microlens parallax signal, which determines the host mass and distance, is actually due to xallarap (source orbital motion) that is being misinterpreted as parallax. We show a result that favors the parallax solution, even given its close host distance. We show that future high-resolution astrometric measurements could decisively resolve the remaining ambiguity of these solutions.

  5. WE-D-BRE-03: Late Toxicity Following Photon Or Proton Radiotherapy in Patients with Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munbodh, R; Ding, X; Yin, L; Anamalayil, S; Dorsey, J; Lustig, R; Alonso-Basanta, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To identify indicators of Late Grade 3 (LG3) toxicity, late vision and hearing changes in patients treated for primary brain tumors with photon (XRT) or proton radiotherapy (PRT). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 102 patients who received brain XRT or PRT to doses of 54 or 59.6 Gy in daily fractions of 1.8–2 Gy. Of the 80 patients (34 XRT, 39 PRT and 7 both modalities) reviewed for indicators of LG3 toxicity, 25 developed LG3 toxicity 90 to 500 days after radiotherapy completion. 55 patients had less than LG3 toxicity > 500 days after treatment. In that time, late vision and hearing changes were seen in 44 of 75 and 25 of 78 patients, respectively. The correlation between late toxicity and prescription dose, planning target volume (PTV) size, and doses to the brainstem, brain, optic chiasm, optic nerves, eyes and cochlea was evaluated. A two-tailed Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used for the statistical analysis for XRT, PRT and all patients combined. Results: Exceeding the 54 Gy-5% dose-volume brainstem constraint, but not the optic structure constraints, was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with late vision changes in all three groups. Exceeding maximum and mean cochlear doses of 45 and 30 Gy, respectively, was a significant indicator of hearing changes (p < 0.05) in PRT patients and all patients combined. In a sub-group of 52 patients in whom the brain was contoured, the absolute brain volume receiving ≤ 50 Gy and > 60 Gy was significantly larger in patients with LG3 toxicity for all patients combined (p < 0.05). Prescription dose, brainstem dose and PTV volume were not correlated to LG3 toxicity. Conclusion: Our results indicate the importance of minimizing the brain volume irradiated, and brainstem and cochlea doses to reduce the risk of late toxicities following brain radiotherapy.

  6. QER- Comment of Christopher Fee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Until you stop subsidizing and worshipping at the altar of Big Energy, all this "We the people" crapola is just that. We no longer have. Democracy, Mr. Reed, because our government is owned by heartless men with big pockets. Sent from my iPhone. La dee freakin' da.

  7. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  8. EVALUATING SHORT-TERM CLIMATE VARIABILITY IN THE LATE HOLOCENE OF THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph H. Hartman

    1999-09-01

    This literature study investigated methods and areas to deduce climate change and climate patterns, looking for short-term cycle phenomena and the means to interpret them. Many groups are actively engaged in intensive climate-related research. Ongoing research might be (overly) simplified into three categories: (1) historic data on weather that can be used for trend analysis and modeling; (2) detailed geological, biological (subfossil), and analytical (geochemical, radiocarbon, etc.) studies covering the last 10,000 years (about since last glaciation); and (3) geological, paleontological, and analytical (geochemical, radiometric, etc.) studies over millions of years. Of importance is our ultimate ability to join these various lines of inquiry into an effective means of interpretation. At this point, the process of integration is fraught with methodological troubles and misconceptions about what each group can contribute. This project has met its goals to the extent that it provided an opportunity to study resource materials and consider options for future effort toward the goal of understanding the natural climate variation that has shaped our current civilization. A further outcome of this project is a proposed methodology based on ''climate sections'' that provides spatial and temporal correlation within a region. The method would integrate cultural and climate data to establish the climate history of a region with increasing accuracy with progressive study and scientific advancement (e. g., better integration of regional and global models). The goal of this project is to better understand natural climatic variations in the recent past (last 5000 years). The information generated by this work is intended to provide better context within which to examine global climate change. The ongoing project will help to establish a basis upon which to interpret late Holocene short-term climate variability as evidenced in various studies in the northern Great Plains, northern hemisphere, and elsewhere. Finally these data can be integrated into a history of climate change and predictive climate models. This is not a small undertaking. The goals of researchers and the methods used vary considerably. The primary task of this project was literature research to (1) evaluate existing methodologies used in geologic climate change studies and evidence for short-term cycles produced by these methodologies and (2) evaluate late Holocene climate patterns and their interpretations.

  9. Very late nonfatal consequences of fractionated TBI in children undergoing bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faraci, Maura; Cohen, Amnon; Lanino, Edoardo; Sacco, Oliviero; Cabria, Manlio; De Marco, Riccardo; Stella, Gilberto; Dallorso, Sandro; Vitale, Vito; Dini, Giorgio

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To describe long-term late consequences in children who received total body irradiation (TBI) for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation 10 years earlier. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 42 children treated with TBI between 1985 and 1993, still alive at least 10 years after fractionated TBI (FTBI), was evaluated. Twenty-five patients received FTBI at 330 cGy/day for 3 days (total dose 990 cGy), whereas 17 children were administered fractions of 200 cGy twice daily for 3 days (total dose 1200 cGy). Twenty-seven patients received autologous and 16 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Median age at TBI was 6.3 years, and 18.4 years at most recent follow-up. Results: Cataract was diagnosed in 78% of patients after a median of 5.7 years. Hypothyroidism was detected in 12%, whereas thyroid nodules were observed in 60% of our population after a median interval of 10.2 years. Patients treated with 990 cGy developed thyroid nodules more frequently than those treated with 1200 cGy (p = 0.0002). Thyroid carcinoma was diagnosed in 14% of the total population. Females who received FTBI after menarche more frequently developed temporary ovarian dysfunction than those treated before menarche, but cases of persistent ovarian dysfunction did not differ between the two groups. Indirect signs of germinal testicular dysfunction were detected in 87% of males. Restrictive pulmonary disease was observed in 74% of patients. Osteochondroma was found in 29% of patients after a median interval of 9.2 years. This latter complication appeared more frequently in patients irradiated before the age of 3 years (p < 0.001). Conclusions: This study shows that late effects that are likely permanent, although not fatal, are frequent in survivors 10 years after TBI. However, some of the side effects observed shortly after TBI either disappeared or remained unchanged without signs of evolution. Monitoring is recommended to pursue secondary prevention strategies and counseling on family planning.

  10. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Francois, E-mail: francois.meyer@chuq.qc.ca [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu [Radiation Therapy Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Geoffrey [Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Bairati, Isabelle [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help tailoring therapies to reduce toxicities among patients treated with RT for HNC.

  11. Synsedimentary tectonics in Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary pelagic basin of northern Apennines, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, A.; Chan, L.S.; Alvarez, W.

    1987-05-01

    The sequence of Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary pelagic limestones in the Umbria-Marches Apennines of Italy have recorded, with remarkable continuity, the geologic history of an epeiric sea on the eastern continental margin of the Ligurian Ocean during a time of widespread tectonism in the western Tethys domain. Sedimentary facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate that intrabasinal depocenters and structural highs have formed in response to extensional tectonic movements which started to affect the central part of the paleobasin in the early Turonian. The topography of the paleobasin was probably controlled by a complex pattern of buried fault blocks formed during the passive margin phase of the western Tethys and then reactivated in the Turonian after a prolonged time (Aptian to Cenomanian) of tectonic quiescence. Calcareous turbidites essentially made of remobilized pelagic mud were generated on the newly formed intrabasinal slopes and deposited in the adjacent depocenters. Conspicuous sedimentary events such as maxima in turbiditic deposition and soft-sediment slumps in these intrabasinal depocenters are attributed to major syndepositional earthquakes of regional extent. A detailed event-stratigraphy based on these sedimentary features indicates that the level of syndepositional tectonic activity reached a peak in the late Maastrichtian-early Paleocene and rapidly diminished in the Eocene.

  12. KELT-3b: A HOT JUPITER TRANSITING A V = 9.8 LATE-F STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper, Joshua; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cargile, Phillip A.; Dhital, Saurav; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Eastman, Jason; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Collins, Karen; Latham, David W.; Bieryla, Allyson; Calkins, Michael L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Berlind, Perry; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Manner, Mark; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R.; and others

    2013-08-10

    We report the discovery of KELT-3b, a moderately inflated transiting hot Jupiter with a mass of 1.477{sub -0.067}{sup +0.066} M{sub J}, radius of 1.345 {+-} 0.072 R{sub J}, and an orbital period of 2.7033904 {+-} 0.000010 days. The host star, KELT-3, is a V = 9.8 late F star with M{sub *} = 1.278{sub -0.061}{sup +0.063} M{sub sun}, R{sub *} = 1.472{sub -0.067}{sup +0.065} R{sub sun}, T{sub eff}= 6306{sub -49}{sup +50} K, log (g) = 4.209{sub -0.031}{sup +0.033}, and [Fe/H] = 0.044{sub -0.082}{sup +0.080}, and has a likely proper motion companion. KELT-3b is the third transiting exoplanet discovered by the KELT survey, and is orbiting one of the 20 brightest known transiting planet host stars, making it a promising candidate for detailed characterization studies. Although we infer that KELT-3 is significantly evolved, a preliminary analysis of the stellar and orbital evolution of the system suggests that the planet has likely always received a level of incident flux above the empirically identified threshold for radius inflation suggested by Demory and Seager.

  13. Characterization of a Messer The late-Medieval single-edged sword of Central Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajfar, Peter; Medved, Joef; Klan?nik, Grega; Lazar, Toma; Ne?emer, Marijan; Mrvar, Primo

    2013-12-15

    Metallurgical characterization of a sword blade fragments dating from the second half of the 15th century found in central Slovenia was performed in order to determine its chemical composition, microstructure, microhardness, and to obtain insight into the methods of manufacture of a late-medieval Messer sword. As the artefact was broken, examinations were limited to six very small fragments that were allowed to be removed from the cutting edge, core and the back of the blade. Light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry, thermodynamics approach and Vickers micro-hardness tests were employed to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties. The results show that the sword was manufactured from a single wrought iron billet. The surface of the sword was carburized. No evidence of quenching was found. The ferritic microstructure is concentrated in the core, and the pearlitic in the outer layer of the blade. All metal fragments contained non-metallic inclusions that were derived mostly from slag and some from hammer scale. - Highlights: A metallurgical characterization of a medieval sword blade has been performed. The carbon content decreased from the surface to the core of the blade. The dominant microstructure in the outer layer is pearlite and in the core is ferrite. The presence of lump shaped and elongated non-metallic inclusions was observed. The sword was manufactured from a single wrought iron billet.

  14. Overexpression of Late Embryogenesis Abundant 14 enhances Arabidopsis salt stress tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Fengjuan Qi, Shengdong Li, Hui Liu, Pu Li, Pengcheng Wu, Changai Zheng, Chengchao Huang, Jinguang

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: It is the first time to investigate the biological function of AtLEA14 in salt stress response. AtLEA14 enhances the salt stress tolerance both in Arabidopsis and yeast. AtLEA14 responses to salt stress by stabilizing AtPP2-B11, an E3 ligase, under normal or salt stress conditions. - Abstract: Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are implicated in various abiotic stresses in higher plants. In this study, we identified a LEA protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtLEA14, which was ubiquitously expressed in different tissues and remarkably induced with increased duration of salt treatment. Subcellular distribution analysis demonstrated that AtLEA14 was mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Transgenic Arabidopsis and yeast overexpressing AtLEA14 all exhibited enhanced tolerance to high salinity. The transcripts of salt stress-responsive marker genes (COR15a, KIN1, RD29B and ERD10) were overactivated in AtLEA14 overexpressing lines compared with those in wild type plants under normal or salt stress conditions. In vivo and in vitro analysis showed that AtLEA14 could effectively stabilize AtPP2-B11, an important E3 ligase. These results suggested that AtLEA14 had important protective functions under salt stress conditions in Arabidopsis.

  15. Gold deposits in the late Archaean Nzega-Igunga greenstone belt, central plateau of tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feiss, P.G.; Siyomana, S.

    1985-01-01

    2.2 m oz of gold have been produced, since 1935, from late Archaean (2480-2740 Ma) greenstone belts of the Central Plateau, Tanzania. North and east of Nzega (4/sup 0/12'S, 3/sup 0/11'E), 18% of the exposed basement, mainly Dodoman schists and granites, consists of metavolcanics and metasediments of the Nyanzian and Kavirondian Series. Four styles of mineralization are observed. 1. Stratabound quartz-gold veins with minor sulfides. Host rocks are quartz porphyry, banded iron formation (BIF), magnetite quartzite, and dense, cherty jasperite at the Sekenke and Canuck mines. The Canuck veins are on strike from BIF's in quartz-eye porphyry of the Igusule Hills. 2. Stratabound, disseminated gold in coarse-grained, crowded feldspar porphyry with lithic fragments and minor pyrite. At Bulangamilwa, the porphyry is conformable with Nyanzian-aged submarine (.) greenstone, volcanic sediment, felsic volcanics, and sericite phyllite. The deposits are on strike with BIF of the Wella Hills, which contains massive sulfide with up to 15% Pb+Zn. 3. Disseminated gold in quartz-albite metasomes in Nyanzian greenstones. At Kirondatal, alteration is associated with alaskites and feldspar porphyry dikes traceable several hundred meters into post-Dodoman diorite porphyry. Gold is with pyrite, arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, minor chalcopyrite, and sphalerite as well as tourmalinite and silica-cemented breccias. 4. Basal Kavirondian placers in metaconglomerates containing cobbles and boulders of Dodoman and Nyanzian rocks several hundred meters up-section from the stratabound, disseminated mineralization at Bulangamilwa.

  16. Novel, highly expressed late nodulin gene (LjNOD16) from Lotus japonicus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapranov, P.; Bruijn, F.J. de; Szczyglowski, K.

    1997-04-01

    We have isolated a Lotus japonicus cDNA corresponding to a highly abundant, late nodule-specific RNA species that encodes a polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 15.6 kD. The protein and its corresponding gene were designated NIj16 and LjNOD16, respectively. LjNOD16 was found to be expressed only in the infected cells of L. japonicus nodules. Related DNA sequences could be identified in the genomes of both Glycine max and Medicago sativa. In the latter, a homologous mRNA species was detected in the nodules. Unlike LiNOD16, its alfalfa homologs appear to represent low-abundance mRNA species. However, the proteins corresponding to the LjNOD16 and its alfalfa homolog could be detected at similar levels in nodules but not in roots of both legume species. The predicted amino acid sequence analysis of nodulin NIj16 revealed the presence of a long {alpha}-helical region and a positively charged C terminus. The former domain has a very high propensity to form a coiled-coil type structure, indicating that nodulin NIj16 may interact with an as-yet-unidentified protein target(s) in the nodule-infected cells. Homology searches revealed no significant similarities to any known sequences in the databases, with the exception of two related, anonymous Arabidopsis expressed sequence tags.

  17. Diagenetic features of Trenton Limestone in northern Indiana: petrographic evidence for Late (Mesogenetic) Dolostone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fara, D.R.

    1986-08-01

    Three conventional cores of the entire Trenton section were examined in detail by in-depth visual description, analysis of more than 250 thin sections, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The cores are located in the northern half of Indiana where they span the major dolostone pinch-out that is the trap for the prolific Trenton oil and gas field. The Trenton Limestone is completely dolomitized in northern Indiana. Dolostone abundance decreases to the south where the dolostone is restricted to the upper few feet of the formation. Two major types of dolostone are recognized. The top 5-20 ft of the Trenton cores consists of medium crystalline nonporous xenotopic ferroan dolostone. Mesogenetic dewatering of the overlying Maquoketa shale is the proposed dolomitizing mechanisms for this ferroan dolostone cap. Below the ferroan dolostone cap in northern Indiana is coarsely crystalline dolostone, which consists of thin intercalated subfacies of porous idiotopic and nonporous xenotopic dolostone. This is the dominant dolostone type and is the reservoir in the Trenton field. The coarsely crystalline dolostone postdates the ferroan dolostone cap, chert nodule formation, and initial pressure solution. Therefore, this dolostone is considered to have formed relatively late in the diagenetic history of the Trenton under mesogenetic conditions. In the northernmost core, nearly all of the secondary dolomitic porosity is plugged by poikilotopic gypsum and minor amounts of calcite and celestite. Other diagenetic features observed in Trenton are also discussed, including silicification, ferroan calcite cement, upper Trenton contact formation, hardgrounds, and pressure solution.

  18. BUILDING LATE-TYPE SPIRAL GALAXIES BY IN-SITU AND EX-SITU STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillepich, Annalisa; Madau, Piero; Mayer, Lucio

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the formation and evolution of the stellar components in ''Eris'', a 120pc resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulation of a late-type spiral galaxy. The simulation includes the effects of a uniform UV background, a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback, and a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold. It allows a detailed study of the relative contributions of ''in-situ'' (within the main host) and ''ex-situ'' (within satellite galaxies) star formation to each major Galactic component in a close Milky Way analog. We investigate these two star-formation channels as a function of galactocentric distance, along different lines of sight above and along the disk plane, and as a function of cosmic time. We find that: (1) approximately 70% of today's stars formed in-situ; (2) more than two thirds of the ex-situ stars formed within satellites after infall; (3) the majority of ex-situ stars are found today in the disk and in the bulge; (4) the stellar halo is dominated by ex-situ stars, whereas in-situ stars dominate the mass profile at distances ? 5 kpc from the center at high latitudes; and (5) approximately 25% of the inner, r ? 20 kpc, halo is composed of in-situ stars that have been displaced from their original birth sites during Eris' early assembly history.

  19. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus entry mechanism requires late endosome formation and resists cell membrane cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Fleming, Elisa H.; Davey, Robert A. . E-mail: radavey@utmb.edu

    2006-04-10

    Virus envelope proteins determine receptor utilization and host range. The choice of receptor not only permits specific targeting of cells that express it, but also directs the virus into specific endosomal trafficking pathways. Disrupting trafficking can result in loss of virus infectivity due to redirection of virions to non-productive pathways. Identification of the pathway or pathways used by a virus is, thus, important in understanding virus pathogenesis mechanisms and for developing new treatment strategies. Most of our understanding of alphavirus entry has focused on the Old World alphaviruses, such as Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus. In comparison, very little is known about the entry route taken by more pathogenic New World alphaviruses. Here, we use a novel contents mixing assay to identify the cellular requirements for entry of a New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Expression of dominant negative forms of key endosomal trafficking genes shows that VEEV must access clathrin-dependent endocytic vesicles for membrane fusion to occur. Unexpectedly, the exit point is different from Old World alphaviruses that leave from early endosomes. Instead, VEEV also requires functional late endosomes. Furthermore, unlike the Old World viruses, VEEV entry is insensitive to cholesterol sequestration from cell membranes and may reflect a need to access an endocytic compartment that lacks cholesterol. This indicates fundamental differences in the entry route taken by VEEV compared to Old World alphaviruses.

  20. FORMING REALISTIC LATE-TYPE SPIRALS IN A {Lambda}CDM UNIVERSE: THE ERIS SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guedes, Javiera; Madau, Piero [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Callegari, Simone [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-9057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Mayer, Lucio [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zuerich, Wolgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-12-01

    Simulations of the formation of late-type spiral galaxies in a cold dark matter ({Lambda}CDM) universe have traditionally failed to yield realistic candidates. Here we report a new cosmological N-body/smooth particle hydrodynamic simulation of extreme dynamic range in which a close analog of a Milky Way disk galaxy arises naturally. Named 'Eris', the simulation follows the assembly of a galaxy halo of mass M{sub vir} = 7.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} with a total of N = 18.6 million particles (gas + dark matter + stars) within the final virial radius, and a force resolution of 120 pc. It includes radiative cooling, heating from a cosmic UV field and supernova explosions (blastwave feedback), a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold (n{sub SF} = 5 atoms cm{sup -3} rather than the canonical n{sub SF} = 0.1 atoms cm{sup -3}), and neglects any feedback from an active galactic nucleus. Artificial images are generated to correctly compare simulations with observations. At the present epoch, the simulated galaxy has an extended rotationally supported disk with a radial scale length R{sub d} = 2.5 kpc, a gently falling rotation curve with circular velocity at 2.2 disk scale lengths of V{sub 2.2} = 214 km s{sup -1}, an i-band bulge-to-disk ratio B/D = 0.35, and a baryonic mass fraction within the virial radius that is 30% below the cosmic value. The disk is thin, has a typical H I-to-stellar mass ratio, is forming stars in the region of the {Sigma}{sub SFR}-{Sigma}{sub HI} plane occupied by spiral galaxies, and falls on the photometric Tully-Fisher and the stellar-mass-halo-virial-mass relations. Hot (T > 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K) X-ray luminous halo gas makes up only 26% of the universal baryon fraction and follows a 'flattened' density profile {proportional_to}r{sup -1.13} out to r = 100 kpc. Eris appears then to be the first cosmological hydrodynamic simulation in which the galaxy structural properties, the mass budget in the various components, and the scaling relations between mass and luminosity are all consistent with a host of observational constraints. A twin simulation with a low star formation density threshold results in a galaxy with a more massive bulge and a much steeper rotation curve, as in previously published work. A high star formation threshold appears therefore key in obtaining realistic late-type galaxies, as it enables the development of an inhomogeneous interstellar medium where star formation and heating by supernovae occur in a clustered fashion. The resulting outflows at high redshifts reduce the baryonic content of galaxies and preferentially remove low-angular-momentum gas, decreasing the mass of the bulge component. Simulations of even higher resolution that follow the assembly of galaxies with different merger histories shall be used to verify our results.

  1. Thermonuclear supernovae: probing magnetic fields by positrons and late-time IR line profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P., E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com, E-mail: rpenney@g.clemson.edu [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32305 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of ? and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 ?m, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M {sub Ch}) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 10{sup 9} G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a ?-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 ?m can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M {sub Ch} mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central {sup 56}Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M {sub Ch}. Good time coverage is required to separate the effects of optical depth, the size and morphology of B, and the aspect angle of the observer. The spectra require a resolution of about 500 km s{sup 1} and a signal-to-noise ratio of about 20%. Two other strong near-IR spectral features at about 1.5 and 1.8 ?m are used to demonstrate the importance of line blending, which may invalidate a kinematic interpretation of emission lines. Flat-topped line profiles between 300 and 400 days have been observed and reported in the literature. They lend support for M {sub Ch} mass explosions in at least some cases and require magnetic fields equal to or in excess of 10{sup 6} G. We briefly discuss the effects of the size and morphology of B on light curves, as well as limitations. We argue that line profiles are a more direct measurement of B than light curves because they measure both the distribution of {sup 56}Ni and the redistribution of the energy input by positrons rather than the total energy input. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms for the formation of high B-fields and the limitations of our analysis.

  2. Late Pleistocene landslide-dammed lakes along the Rio Grande, White Rock Canyon, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reneau, S.L.; Dethier, D.P.

    1996-11-01

    Massive slump complexes composed of Pliocene basaltic rocks and underlying Miocene and Pliocene sediments flank the Rio Grande along 16 km of northern White Rock Canyon, New Mexico. The toe area of at least one slump complex was active in the late Pleistocene, damming the Rio Grande at least four times during the period from 18 to 12 {sup 14}C ka and impounding lakes that extended 10-20 km upriver. Stratigraphic relationships and radiocarbon age constraints indicate that three separate lakes formed between 13.7 and 12.4 {sup 14}C ka. The age and dimensions of the ca. 12.4 ka lake are best constrained; it had an estimated maximum depth of {approx}30 m, a length of {approx}13 km, a surface area of {approx}2.7 km{sup 2}, and an initial volume of {approx}2.5 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}. The youngest landslide-dammed lakes formed during a period of significantly wetter regional climate, strongly suggesting that climate changes were responsible for reactivation of the slump complexes. We are not certain about the exact triggering mechanisms for these landslides, but they probably involved removal of lateral support due to erosion of the slope base by the Rio Grande during periods of exceptionally high flood discharge or rapid incision; increased pore pressures associated with higher water tables; higher seepage forces at sites of ground-water discharge; or some combination of these processes. Seismic shaking could also have contributed to triggering of some of the landslides, particularly if aided by wet antecedent conditions. 54 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Late Quaternary paleodune deposits in Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAF: Paleoclimatic implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouwers, E.M.; Bown, T.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Hadley, D.G. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Remnants of late Quaternary paleodunes are exposed near the coast of the Arabian Gulf and in large inland playas and interdunal areas in central and western Abu Dhabi Emirate over a distance of >45 km normal to the coast. Paleodunes occur south of Madinat Zayed (lat. 23[degree]35 N), which marks the northern limit of a modern dune field that grades into the mega-dune sand sea of the ar Rub al Khali, Saudi Arabia. Coastal paleodunes are composed of weakly cemented millolid foraminifers, ooids, and rounded biogenic grains, whereas inland and southward the paleodunes show a progressive increase in the proportion of eolian quartz sand. The paleodunes exhibit large-scale trough foresets in remnant exposures 0.5 to 10 m thick, indicating paleowind directions from 65[degree] to 184[degree] (dominantly southeast transport). Scattered paleoplaya remnants provide paleodune scale. Paleoplaya deposits form buttes 30--50 m high. If coeval with the Paleodunes, large-scale paleodune fields are implied (100+ m high), comparable to star dunes and sand mountains at the northwestern edge of the ar Rub al Khali. Based on U-Th isotopic analyses, the carbonate paleodune sands are >160ka and probably >250ka. The carbonate source was a shallow, nearly dry Arabian Gulf at a time when large areas were exposed during a low sea-level stand. Paleowind direction indicates that Pleistocene prevailing winds were northwesterly, the direction of the dominant (winter shamal) wind today. The geographic extend and implied magnitude of the paleodunes suggest large-scale eolian transport of carbonate sand during the Pleistocene disiccation, and admixed quartz sand identifies a youthful stage of contemporaneous evolution of the ar Rub al Khali. Wave-eroded paleodunes probably floor much of the present-day Gulf and extend beneath the modern dunes and sand mountains.

  4. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.P. Burke; S.D. Brandes; D.C. McCoy; R.A. Winschel; D. Gray; G. Tomlinson

    2001-07-01

    Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes.

  5. Climatic change and the planktonic foraminiferal species - coincidences in some Late Neogene clades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malmgren, B.A.; Berggren, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Planktonic foraminifera adjust their position in the water column through modifications in size, shape, and external ornamention (keel, costae, etc.); this is useful in exploiting new ecologic niches. Evolutionary change may be triggered by paleoceanographic change, for example, low sea level, often associated with cool climate, may result in enhanced vertical mixing in the upper water column, decrease in density stratification and available niches. Phyletic evolution is well documented in several clades of Late Neogene planktonic foraminifera. Accelerated or decelerated evolutionary rates in these clades may be due to change in selection pressure in response to changing paleoceanographic conditions. The latest Miocene was marked by low sea level and cool climate; the earliest Pliocene by higher sea level and warmer, more stable climate. In response, size (cross-sectional area) in the Globorotalia tumida clade trebled, test acquired thicker encrustation, ventral/dorsal height proportions changed; the keel was lost in the Globorotalia inflata clade, and chambers became rounded rather than conical; and supplementary apertures appeared in the Sphaeroidinellopsis-Sphaeroidinella clade. The beginning of gradually increasing conicality in the G. inflata clade, which continued to the Miocene-Pliocene boundary, coincided with falling sea level and depletion of delta/sup 13/C in sea water at about 6 ma. Lowered sea level and cooler climate in the middle Pliocene (3.2 Ma) may be responsible for a relatively rapid increase in frequency of supplementary apertures (from 20 to 100 %) in the Sphaeroidinellopsis-Sphaeroidinella clade. This event also coincided with a stepwise increase in benthonic delta/sup 18/O and a brief interval of increased planktonic delta/sup 18/O.

  6. Similarities in shoreline response to Late Holocene lake-level variations in Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, T.A.; Baedke, S.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Beach ridges dating back to 2600 B.P. occur in embayments throughout Lake Michigan. Similarities in their geomorphic development are interpreted to be the product of three scales of lake-level variation. The largest of these embayments is roughly coincident with the Indiana shore of Lake Michigan known as the Toleston Beach. In the western part of the Toleston Beach, more than 150 beach ridges have formed in response to short-term variations in lake level occurring at a quasi-periodic interval of about 30 years. Bundles of five of these ridges merge eastward to form higher relief beach ridges that record an intermediate-term lake-level variation of about 150 years. Both the 30-year and 150-year lake-level events are superimposed on a longer term lake-level variation of about 600 years. Beach-ridge development in northern Lake Michigan reflects a similar response to late Holocene lake-level variations. For example, the southern embayment of the Platte Bay Unit of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore also contains a series of beach ridges that record three scales of lake-level variation. In this area, most of the beach ridges formed between 2600 and 1200 B.P., with individual ridges forming about every 29 years. Also recorded in this embayment are the time equivalent groupings of beach ridges every 150 and 600 years. Although embayments containing beach ridges in Lake Michigan may record different short-term lake-level variations in response to local depositional conditions within the embayment, the 150-year and 600-year variations appear to be represented throughout the lake. Relative lake-level curves for the Toleston Beach and the Platte Bay embayment are displaced by approximately 1.5 m. This displacement is accounted for under current models of isostasy for Lake Michigan.

  7. Predictive Factors for Acute and Late Urinary Toxicity After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy: Long-Term Outcome in 712 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, Mira Miller, Stacy; Moravan, Veronika; Pickles, Tom; McKenzie, Michael; Pai, Howard; Liu, Mitchell; Kwan, Winkle; Agranovich, Alexander; Spadinger, Ingrid; Lapointe, Vincent; Halperin, Ross; Morris, W. James

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the frequency of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) urinary toxicity, associated predictive factors, and resolution of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) in 712 consecutive prostate brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent implantation between 1998 and 2003 (median follow-up, 57 months). The IPSS and RTOG toxicity data were prospectively collected. The patient, treatment, and implant factors were examined for an association with urinary toxicity. The time to IPSS resolution was examined using Kaplan-Meier curves, and multivariate modeling of IPSS resolution was done using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with urinary toxicity. Results: The IPSS returned to baseline at a median of 12.6 months. On multivariate analysis, patients with a high baseline IPSS had a quicker resolution of their IPSS. Higher prostate D90 (dose covering 90% of the prostate), maximal postimplant IPSS, and urinary retention slowed the IPSS resolution time. The rate of the actuarial 5-year late urinary (>12 months) RTOG Grade 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 32%, 36%, 24%, 6.2%, and 0.1%, respectively. At 7 years, the prevalence of RTOG Grade 0-1 was 92.5%. Patients with a larger prostate volume, greater number of needles, greater baseline IPSS, and use of hormonal therapy had more acute toxicity. On multivariate analysis, the significant predictors for late greater than or equal to RTOG toxicity 2 were a greater baseline IPSS, maximal postimplant IPSS, presence of acute toxicity, and higher prostate V150 (volume of the prostate covered by 150% of the dose). More recently implanted patients had less acute urinary toxicity and patients given hormonal therapy had less late urinary toxicity (all p < 0.02). Conclusion: Most urinary symptoms resolved within 12 months after prostate brachytherapy, and significant long-term urinary toxicity was very low. Refined patient selection and greater technical experience in prostate brachytherapy were associated with less urinary toxicity.

  8. Prospective Study of Local Control and Late Radiation Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, David W.; Marvelde, Luc te; Chua, Boon H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the local recurrence rate and late toxicity of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) boost to the tumor bed using the Intrabeam System followed by external-beam whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with early-stage breast cancer in a prospective single-institution study. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer ?3 cm were recruited between February 2003 and May 2005. After breast-conserving surgery, a single dose of 5 Gy IORT boost was delivered using 50-kV x-rays to a depth of 10 mm from the applicator surface. This was followed by WBI to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients were reviewed at regular, predefined intervals. Late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring systems. Results: Fifty-five patients completed both IORT boost and external-beam WBI. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 1.4-4.1 years). There was no reported locoregional recurrence or death. One patient developed distant metastases. Grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis was detected in 29 (53%) and 8 patients (15%), respectively. Conclusions: The use of IORT as a tumor bed boost using kV x-rays in breast-conserving therapy was associated with good local control but a clinically significant rate of grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis.

  9. A late-time flattening of light curves in gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Giannios, Dimitrios E-mail: dgiannio@purdue.edu

    2013-12-01

    The afterglow emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually interpreted as synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated at the GRB external shock. We investigate the temporal decay of the afterglow emission at late times, when the bulk of the shock-accelerated electrons are non-relativistic (the 'deep Newtonian phase', as denoted by Huang and Cheng). We assume that the electron spectrum in the deep Newtonian phase is a power-law distribution in momentum with slope p, as dictated by the theory of Fermi acceleration in non-relativistic shocks. For a uniform circumburst medium, the deep Newtonian phase begins at t{sub DN}?3 ?{sub e,?1}{sup 5/6}t{sub ST}, where t {sub ST} marks the transition of the blast wave to the non-relativistic, spherically symmetric Sedov-Taylor (ST) solution, and ? {sub e} = 0.1 ? {sub e,1} quantifies the amount of shock energy transferred to the electrons. For typical parameters, the deep Newtonian stage starts ?0.5 to several years after the GRB. The radio flux in this phase decays as F {sub ?}?t {sup 3(p+1)/10}?t {sup (0.91.2)}, for a power-law slope 2 < p < 3. This is shallower than the scaling F {sub ?}?t {sup 3(5p7)/10}?t {sup (0.92.4)} derived by Frail et al., which only applies if the GRB shock is non-relativistic, but the electron distribution still peaks at ultra-relativistic energies (a regime that is relevant for a narrow time interval, and only if t {sub DN} ? t {sub ST}, namely, ? {sub e} ? 0.03). We discuss how the deep Newtonian phase can be reliably used for GRB calorimetry, and we comment on the good detection prospects of trans-relativistic blast waves at 0.110 GHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and LOw-Frequency ARray.

  10. High-resolution dynamically downscaled projections of precipitation in the mid and late 21st century over North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-07-29

    This study performs high-spatial-resolution (12 km) Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) simulations over a very large domain (7200 km 6180 km, covering much of North America) to explore changes in mean and extreme precipitation in the mid and late 21st century under Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 (RCP 4.5) and 8.5 (RCP 8.5). We evaluate WRF model performance for a historical simulation and future projections, applying the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) as initial and boundary conditions with and without a bias correction. WRF simulations using boundary and initial conditions from both versions of CCSM4 show smaller biases versus evaluation data sets than does CCSM4 over western North America. WRF simulations also improve spatial details of precipitation over much of North America. However, driving the WRF with the bias-corrected CCSM4 does not always reduce the bias. WRF-projected changes in precipitation include decreasing intensity over the southwestern United States, increasing intensity over the eastern United States and most of Canada, and an increase in the number of days with heavy precipitation over much of North America. Projected precipitation changes are more evident in the late 21st century than the mid 21st century, and they are more evident under RCP 8.5 than under RCP 4.5 in the late 21st century. Uncertainties in the projected changes in precipitation due to different warming scenarios are non-negligible. Differences in summer precipitation changes between WRF and CCSM4 are significant over most of the United States.

  11. High-resolution dynamically downscaled projections of precipitation in the mid and late 21st century over North America

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    none,

    2015-07-29

    This study performs high-spatial-resolution (12 km) Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) simulations over a very large domain (7200 km × 6180 km, covering much of North America) to explore changes in mean and extreme precipitation in the mid and late 21st century under Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 (RCP 4.5) and 8.5 (RCP 8.5). We evaluate WRF model performance for a historical simulation and future projections, applying the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) as initial and boundary conditions with and without a bias correction. WRF simulations using boundary and initial conditions from both versions of CCSM4 show smaller biasesmore » versus evaluation data sets than does CCSM4 over western North America. WRF simulations also improve spatial details of precipitation over much of North America. However, driving the WRF with the bias-corrected CCSM4 does not always reduce the bias. WRF-projected changes in precipitation include decreasing intensity over the southwestern United States, increasing intensity over the eastern United States and most of Canada, and an increase in the number of days with heavy precipitation over much of North America. Projected precipitation changes are more evident in the late 21st century than the mid 21st century, and they are more evident under RCP 8.5 than under RCP 4.5 in the late 21st century. Uncertainties in the projected changes in precipitation due to different warming scenarios are non-negligible. Differences in summer precipitation changes between WRF and CCSM4 are significant over most of the United States.« less

  12. Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krema, Hatem

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the logrank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

  13. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  14. A closer look at the fluctuations in the brightness of SN 2009IP during its late 2012 eruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J. C. [Barber Observatory, University of Illinois Springfield, Springfield, IL 62704 (United States); Hambsch, F.-J. [Remote Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile Vereniging Voor Sterrenkunde (VVS), Oude Bleken 12, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Margutti, R.; Soderberg, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02318 (United States); Tan, T. G. [Perth Exoplanet Survey Telescope, Perth (Australia); Curtis, I., E-mail: jmart5@uis.edu [Adelaide (Australia)

    2015-01-01

    The supernova (SN) impostor SN 2009ip has re-brightened several times since its initial discovery in 2009 August. During its last outburst in late 2012 September, it reached a peak brightness of m{sub v} ?13.5 (M{sub v} brighter than ?18), causing some to speculate that it had undergone a terminal core-collapse SN. Relatively high-cadence multi-wavelength photometry of the post-peak decline revealed bumps in brightness infrequently observed in other SNe IIn. These bumps occurred synchronously in all ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands with amplitudes of 0.10.4 mag at intervals of 1030 days. Episodic continuum brightening and dimming in the UV and optical with these characteristics is not easily explained within the context of models that have been proposed for the late September 2012 outburst of SN 2009ip. We also present evidence that the post-peak fluctuations in brightness occur at regular intervals and raise more questions about their origin.

  15. S. 65: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, January 21, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    S. 65 may be cited as the [open quotes]Domestic Petroleum Security Act of 1993.[close quotes] This Bill proposes a fee on imported crude oil or refined petroleum products. In general, Subtitle E of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is to be amended by adding at the end thereof the following new chapter: [open quotes]Chapter 55--Imported Crude Oil of Refined Petroleum Products.[close quotes] Section 5891 will be Imposition of Tax; Section 5892, Definitions; Section 5893, Registration; and Section 5894, Procedures, Returns, and Penalties.

  16. H. R. 838: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil or refined petroleum products. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, February 4, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    H.R. 838 may be cited as the [open quotes]Energy Security Tax Act.[close quotes] The purpose of this Bill is to impose a fee on imported crude oil or refined petroleum products. In general, Subtitle E of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is to be amended by adding at the end thereof the following new chapter: [open quotes]Chapter 55--Imported Crude Oil, Refined Petroleum Products, and Petrochemical Feedstocks or Derivatives.[close quotes] Section 5886 will be concerned with Imposition of Tax; Section 5887 with Definitions; Section 5888 with Procedures, Returns, and Penalties; and Section 5890 with Adjustment for inflation.

  17. SU-E-T-381: Radio-Dynamic Therapy (RDT) for the Treatment of Late-Stage Cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, C; Chen, L; Price, R [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zhang, Q [Wu Xi Yi Ren Tumor Hosiptal, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Zeng, J; Xu, K; Sun, Q [Wuxi Yiren Cancer Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Photo-dynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment modality because of the preferential absorption of photosensitizing agent in tumor cells than in surrounding normal tissues. A limitation of PDT for cancer therapy is the finite penetration of laser light to activate the targeting agent in deep-seated tumors. Radio-dynamic therapy (RDT) is designed to overcome this problem by the combination of high-energy (up to 45MV) photon beams and photo/radio-sensitizers. This work investigates the feasibility of PDT for late-stage cancer patients who are no longer respond to conventional therapies available. Methods: The high-energy photon beams are generated using a LA45 RaceTrack Microtron (Top Grade Medical, Beijing, China). The targeting agent investigated is 5- aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA). Both in vitro cell lines and in vivo animal models have been used to investigate the mechanisms of RDT and its therapeutic effects and normal tissue toxicities. Oral 5-ALA (30-60 mg/kg) was administered 4-6 hours before the radiation treatment and the total radiation dose varied between 0.1-4.0Gy in 1-4 fractions. Clinical trials are initiated in China for late-stage cancer patients targeting both primary tumors utilizing localized therapies such as 3DCRT/IMRT and metastases using TBI. Results: There is clear correlation between the cell death and the 5-ALA concentration/radiation dose. The therapeutic effect of RDT is demonstrated using an animal model where the volume of parotid tumors for the RT only group continued to grow after 3Gy irradiation while the RDT group showed a complete response with the same radiation dose. The preliminary clinical results showed encouraging clinical outcome. Conclusion: RDT is a novel treatment technique that may be developed into an effective cancer treatment modality. Further studies on the mechanisms of RDT and its potential clinical applications are warranted.

  18. Sedimentology and diagenesis of windward-facing fore-reef calcarenites, Late Pleistocene of Barbados, West Indies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphrey, J.D.; Kimbell, T.N.

    1989-03-01

    Late Pleistocene reef terraces in southeastern Barbardos developed extensive fore-reef sand facies during deposition in response to high-energy windward-facing conditions. Sedimentology and diagenesis of these deposits illustrate significant contrasts with previous studies from the leeward west coast. These calcarenites are dominantly skeletal packstones with less common grainstones and wackestones present. The fore-reef sand facies occurs within progradational reef sequences, being conformably overlain by deep-water head coral facies. Medium-bedded, laterally continuous sand sheets retain original depositional slopes, dipping seaward at 10/degrees/-15/degrees/. These fore-reef deposits, in places, are over 30 m thick (average 20 m) and developed rapidly during late Pleistocene glacio-eustatic sea level highstands. Sedimentation rate ranges from 2 to 5 m/1000 years. Areal extent of fore-reef calcarenites in southeastern Barbados is estimated to be 8-10 km/sup 2/. Lithologically, the packstones are composed of an abundance of coralline red algae and the benthic foraminifer Amphistegina sp. Other volumetrically significant allochems include echinoids, mollusks, rhodoliths, peloids, and micritized grains. Micrite in the wackestone and packstone lithologies is likely derived from intense physical/mechanical abrasion of shoal-water reef facies. Diagenesis of these lithologies reflects a complex interplay of meteoric, mixing zone, and marine environments as a result of glacio-eustasy. Differences in diagenetic character are derived from differences in terrace ages, terrace geometry, a paleotopographic control on meteoric ground-water distribution, and high-energy coastal conditions. Diagenetic fabrics include equant, blocky meteoric phreatic calcite; limpid dolomite of mixing zone origin: and peloidal and isopachous fibrous cements from marine precipitation.

  19. Sequence stratigraphy of carbonate buildups developed in an active tectonic/volcanic setting: Triassic (Late Ladinian and Carnian) of the Dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yose, L.A. ); Littmann, P. )

    1991-03-01

    Late Ladinian and Carnian deposits of the Dolomites record the evolution of carbonate buildups developed during the waning phases of a major period of volcanism and strike-slip tectonics. Each separate buildup provides an independent record of eustasy, tectonism, and competing carbonate and volcaniclastic sedimentation. Palynomorphs, calibrated with ammonites, are used to correlate between buildups and provide a means for distinguishing local variations in buildup histories from regional, synchronous trends in sedimentation which may record third-order eustasy. Although individual buildup histories vary dramatically, two depositional sequences may be recorded at a regional scale: one of late Ladinian age (early to late Longobardian) and another of late Ladinian to middle Carnian age (late Longobardian to Cordevolian). A relative sea-level fall in the late Ladinian resulted in an increased supply of volcaniclastics that onlap the flanks of many buildups and/or downslope shifts in carbonate production. Buildups of the second sequence developed in response to a relative sea-level rise and are similar in diversity to those of the first sequence. Extensive buildup progradation and accretion during this phase, concomitant with mixed-carbonate/volcaniclastic basin filling and diminished tectonic activity, result in a regional suturing of the complex paleogeography developed during the middle Ladinian. Local paleogeography, determined by the distribution of earlier platforms in addition to tectonic and volcanogenic processes, is interpreted as the primary control over buildup geometries and the variability of buildups within sequences. However, the regional extent and synchroneity of the sequences described above many record third-order eustasy.

  20. Total synthesis of gracilioether F. Development and application of Lewis acid promoted ketenealkene [2+2] cycloadditions and late-stage CH oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasik, Christopher M.; Brown, M. Kevin

    2014-12-22

    The first synthesis of gracilioether F, a polyketide natural product with an unusual tricyclic core and five contiguous stereocenters, is described. Key steps of the synthesis include a Lewis acid promoted ketenealkene [2+2] cycloaddition and a late-stage carboxylic acid directed C(sp)H oxidation. The synthesis requires only eight steps from norbornadiene.

  1. Registration

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    Registration Print Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Register Now General Registration Student Registration Exhibitor's Registration When registering, you must indicate what workshops you plan to attend. Registration Fees and Deadlines Regular Student Deadline Early registration: $225 $95 September 21, 2015 Late registration: $300 $150 September 30, 2015 Registration fees include

  2. Registration

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    Registration Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Register Now General Registration Student Registration Exhibitor's Registration When registering, you must indicate what workshops you plan to attend. Registration Fees and Deadlines Regular Student Deadline Early registration: $225 $95 September 21, 2015 Late registration: $300 $150 September 30, 2015 Registration fees include Attendance at

  3. Registration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Registration Print Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Register Now General Registration Student Registration Exhibitor's Registration When registering, you must indicate what workshops you plan to attend. Registration Fees and Deadlines Regular Student Deadline Early registration: $225 $95 September 21, 2015 Late registration: $300 $150 September 30, 2015 Registration fees include

  4. Registration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Registration Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Register Now General Registration Student Registration Exhibitor's Registration When registering, you must indicate what workshops you plan to attend. Registration Fees and Deadlines Regular Student Deadline Early registration: $225 $95 September 21, 2015 Late registration: $300 $150 September 30, 2015 Registration fees include Attendance at

  5. Constraints on the binary properties of mid- to late T dwarfs from Hubble space telescope WFC3 observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aberasturi, M.; Solano, E.; Burgasser, A. J.; Mora, A.; Martn, E. L.; Reid, I. N.; Looper, D.

    2014-12-01

    We used Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of a sample of 26 nearby (?20 pc) mid- to late T dwarfs to search for cooler companions and measure the multiplicity statistics of brown dwarfs (BDs). Tightly separated companions were searched for using a double point-spread-function-fitting algorithm. We also compared our detection limits based on simulations to other prior T5+ BD binary programs. No new wide or tight companions were identified, which is consistent with the number of known T5+ binary systems and the resolution limits of WFC3. We use our results to add new constraints to the binary fraction (BF) of T-type BDs. Modeling selection effects and adopting previously derived separation and mass ratio distributions, we find an upper limit total BF of <16% and <25% assuming power law and flat mass ratio distributions, respectively, which are consistent with previous results. We also characterize a handful of targets around the L/T transition.

  6. Status Update on the NCRP Scientific Committee SC 5-1 Report: Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents - 13450

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.

    2013-07-01

    In August 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its final Protective Action Guide (PAG) for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and improvised nuclear device (IND) incidents. This document specifies protective actions for public health during the early and intermediate phases and cleanup guidance for the late phase of RDD or IND incidents, and it discusses approaches to implementing the necessary actions. However, while the PAG provides specific guidance for the early and intermediate phases, it prescribes no equivalent guidance for the late-phase cleanup actions. Instead, the PAG offers a general description of a complex process using a site-specific optimization approach. This approach does not predetermine cleanup levels but approaches the problem from the factors that would bear on the final agreed-on cleanup levels. Based on this approach, the decision-making process involves multifaceted considerations including public health, the environment, and the economy, as well as socio-political factors. In an effort to fully define the process and approach to be used in optimizing late-phase recovery and site restoration following an RDD or IND incident, DHS has tasked the NCRP with preparing a comprehensive report addressing all aspects of the optimization process. Preparation of the NCRP report is a three-year (2010-2013) project assigned to a scientific committee, the Scientific Committee (SC) 5-1; the report was initially titled, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late- Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents. Members of SC 5-1 represent a broad range of expertise, including homeland security, health physics, risk and decision analysis, economics, environmental remediation and radioactive waste management, and communication. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and guided by a recent process led by the White House through a Principal Level Exercise (PLE), the optimization approach has since been expanded to include off-site contamination from major nuclear power plant accidents as well as other nuclear or radiological incidents. The expanded application under the current guidance has thus led to a broadened scope of the report, which is reflected in its new title, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. The NCRP report, which is due for publication in 2013, will substantiate the current DHS guidance by clarifying and elaborating on the processes required for the development and implementation of procedures for optimizing decision making for late-phase recovery, enabling the establishment of cleanup goals on a site-specific basis. The report will contain a series of topics addressing important issues related to the long-term recovery from nuclear or radiological incidents. Special topics relevant to supporting the optimization of the decision-making process will include cost-benefit analysis, radioactive waste management, risk communication, stakeholder interaction, risk assessment, and decontamination approaches and techniques. The committee also evaluated past nuclear and radiological incidents for their relevance to the report, including the emerging issues associated with the Fukushima nuclear accident. Thus, due to the commonality of the late-phase issues (such as the potential widespread contamination following an event), the majority of the information pertaining to the response in the late-phase decision-making period, including site-specific optimization framework and approach, could be used or adapted for use in case of similar situations that are not due to terrorism, such as those that would be caused by major nuclear facility accidents or radiological incidents. To ensure that the report and the NCRP recommendations are current and relevant to the effective implementation of federal guidance, SC 5-1 has actively coordinated with the agencies of interest and other relevant stakeholders throughout the duration of the project. The resulting report will be an important resource to guide those involved in late-phase recovery efforts following a nuclear or radiological incident. (authors)

  7. Association Between Disruption of Fibrin Sheaths Using Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty Balloons and Late Onset of Central Venous Stenosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Nina Mojibian, Hamid; Pollak, Jeffrey; Tal, Michael

    2011-02-15

    To compare the rates of central venous stenosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis who underwent disruption of fibrin sheath with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloons and those who underwent over-the-wire catheter exchange. This study is a retrospective review of 209 percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon disruption and 1304 over-the-wire catheter exchange procedures performed in 753 patients. Approval from the Human Investigations Committee was obtained for this study. Up to 10-year follow-up was performed. A {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare the rates of central venous stenosis after balloon disruption versus catheter exchange. A t-test was used to compare time to central venous stenosis development. Of the 753 patients in the study, 127 patients underwent balloon disruption of fibrin sheath and 626 had catheter exchange. Within the balloon disruption group, 18 (14.2%) of 127 patients subsequently developed central venous stenosis, compared with 44 (7.0%) of 626 in the catheter exchange group (P < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2} test). Time to central venous stenosis development was approximately 3 years in both groups and not significantly different (1371 and 1010 days, P = 0.20). A total of 25.2% of patients in the balloon disruption group had four or more subsequent catheter exchanges, versus 12.6% in the catheter exchange group (P < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2} test). In conclusions, there is a possible association between percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon disruption of fibrin sheath and late-onset central venous stenosis. Because venography was not routinely performed in catheter exchange patients, future randomized studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  8. Detailed Analysis of a Late-Phase Core-Melt Progression for the Evaluation of In-vessel Corium Retention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; R. J. Park; S. B. Kim; K. Y. Suh; F. B.Cheung

    2006-12-01

    Detailed analyses of a late-phase melt progression in the advanced power reactor (APR)1400 were completed to identify the melt and the thermal-hydraulic states of the in-vessel materials in the reactor vessel lower plenum at the time of reactor vessel failure to evaluate the candidate strategies for an in-vessel corium retention (IVR). Initiating events considered included high-pressure transients of a total loss of feed water (LOFW) and a station blackout (SBO) and low-pressure transients of a 0.0009-m2 small, 0.0093-m2 medium, and 0.0465-m2 large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) without safety injection. Best-estimate simulations for these low-probability events with conservative accident progression assumptions that lead to reactor vessel failure were performed by using the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 computer code. The SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 results have shown that the pressurizer surge line failed before the reactor vessel failure, which results in a rapid decrease of the in-vessel pressure and a delay of the reactor vessel failure time of ~40 min in the high-pressure sequences of the total LOFW and the SBO transients. In all the sequences, ~80 to 90% of the core material was melted and relocated to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel at the time of reactor vessel failure. The maximum value of the volumetric heat source in the corium pool was estimated as 1.9 to 3.7 MW/m3. The corium temperature was ~2800 to 3400 K at the time of reactor vessel failure. The highest volumetric heat source sequence is predicted for the 0.0465-m2 large-break LOCA without safety injection in the APR1400, because this sequence leads to an early reactor vessel failure.

  9. City of Asheville- Building Permit Fee Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Asheville offers rebates for building permits and plan reviews for certain renewable energy technologies and green building certifications for homes and mixed-use commercial buildings....

  10. FY2015AwardFeeApproved.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  11. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Mission Support...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ratings: Objective: Excellent (98%) 12,910,813 Subjective: Very Good (63%) 3,607,813 The contractor met or exceeded the majority of performance goals and objectives for...

  12. FY 14 Award Fee Determination Scorecard

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    such new tasks as redesigning switchyard configuration to support infrastructure optimization to establishing and greatly expanding technology infrastructure to support five...

  13. RL's Fiscal Year 2013 Fee Evaluation Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response, and Safeguards and Security organizations. These awards recognize tremendous efforts in the DOE Voluntary...

  14. RL's Fiscal Year 2013 Fee Evaluation Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reflected the experiences of site workers utilizing HPMC's delivery of occupational health services. HPMC maintained a focus on service delivery. Despite many challenges (i.e.,...

  15. WAI Contract & Fee Determination | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    letter (Oct. 2014) More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Nevada Field Office - 2014 Nevada National Security Site...

  16. A Novel Method for Predicting Late Genitourinary Toxicity After Prostate Radiation Therapy and the Need for Age-Based Risk-Adapted Dose Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Egleston, Brian; Alcantara, Pino; Li, Linna; Pollack, Alan; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2013-07-15

    Background: There are no well-established normal tissue sparing dosevolume histogram (DVH) criteria that limit the risk of urinary toxicity from prostate radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to determine which criteria predict late toxicity among various DVH parameters when contouring the entire solid bladder and its contents versus the bladder wall. The area under the histogram curve (AUHC) was also analyzed. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2000, 503 men with prostate cancer received 3-dimensional conformal RT (median follow-up time, 71 months). The whole bladder and the bladder wall were contoured in all patients. The primary endpoint was grade ?2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity occurring ?3 months after completion of RT. Cox regressions of time to grade ?2 toxicity were estimated separately for the entire bladder and bladder wall. Concordance probability estimates (CPE) assessed model discriminative ability. Before training the models, an external random test group of 100 men was set aside for testing. Separate analyses were performed based on the mean age (? 68 vs >68 years). Results: Age, pretreatment urinary symptoms, mean dose (entire bladder and bladder wall), and AUHC (entire bladder and bladder wall) were significant (P<.05) in multivariable analysis. Overall, bladder wall CPE values were higher than solid bladder values. The AUHC for bladder wall provided the greatest discrimination for late bladder toxicity when compared with alternative DVH points, with CPE values of 0.68 for age ?68 years and 0.81 for age >68 years. Conclusion: The AUHC method based on bladder wall volumes was superior for predicting late GU toxicity. Age >68 years was associated with late grade ?2 GU toxicity, which suggests that risk-adapted dose constraints based on age should be explored.

  17. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braendengen, Morten, E-mail: mortbrae@medisin.uio.no [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Bruheim, Kjersti [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Cvancarova, Milada [Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Berglund, Ake [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  18. A Scoping Analysis Of The Impact Of SiC Cladding On Late-Phase Accident Progression Involving CoreConcrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The overall objective of the current work is to carry out a scoping analysis to determine the impact of ATF on late phase accident progression; in particular, the molten-core concrete interaction portion of the sequence that occurs after the core debris fails the reactor vessel and relocates into containment. This additional study augments previous work by including kinetic effects that govern chemical reaction rates during core-concrete interaction. The specific ATF considered as part of this study is SiC-clad UO2.

  19. Chromosome Damage and Cell Proliferation Rates in In Vitro Irradiated Whole Blood as Markers of Late Radiation Toxicity After Radiation Therapy to the Prostate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaton, Lindsay A.; Ferrarotto, Catherine; Marro, Leonora; Samiee, Sara; Malone, Shawn; Grimes, Scott; Malone, Kyle; Wilkins, Ruth C.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: In vitro irradiated blood samples from prostate cancer patients showing late normal tissue damage were examined for lymphocyte response by measuring chromosomal aberrations and proliferation rate. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from a randomized trial evaluating the optimal timing of dose-escalated radiation and short-course androgen deprivation therapy. Of 438 patients, 3% experienced grade 3 late radiation proctitis and were considered to be radiosensitive. Blood samples were taken from 10 of these patients along with 20 matched samples from patients with grade 0 proctitis. The samples were irradiated at 6 Gy and, along with control samples, were analyzed for dicentric chromosomes and excess fragments per cell. Cells in first and second metaphase were also enumerated to determine the lymphocyte proliferation rate. Results: At 6 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the radiosensitive and control cohorts for 3 endpoints: the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell (3.26 0.31, 2.91 0.32; P=.0258), the mean number of excess fragments per cell (2.27 0.23, 1.43 0.37; P<.0001), and the proportion of cells in second metaphase (0.27 0.10, 0.46 0.09; P=.0007). Conclusions: These results may be a valuable indicator for identifying radiosensitive patients and for tailoring radiation therapy.

  20. NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS OF GRB130427A ESTABLISH A SINGLE COMPONENT SYNCHROTRON AFTERGLOW ORIGIN FOR THE LATE OPTICAL TO MULTI-GEV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Racusin, J. L.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J. E.; Zhang, W. W.; Bellm, E.; Harrison, F. A.; Vianello, G.; Oates, S.; Fryer, C. L.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Dermer, C. D.; Hailey, C. J.; Melandri, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Mundell, C. G.; Stern, D. K. E-mail: granot@openu.ac.il

    2013-12-10

    GRB130427A occurred in a relatively nearby galaxy; its prompt emission had the largest GRB fluence ever recorded. The afterglow of GRB130427A was bright enough for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) to observe it in the 3-79keV energy range long after its prompt emission (?1.5 and 5days). This range, where afterglow observations were previously not possible, bridges an important spectral gap. Combined with Swift, Fermi, and ground-based optical data, NuSTAR observations unambiguously establish a single afterglow spectral component from optical to multi-GeV energies a day after the event, which is almost certainly synchrotron radiation. Such an origin of the late-time Fermi/Large Area Telescope >10GeV photons requires revisions in our understanding of collisionless relativistic shock physics.

  1. BANYAN. V. A SYSTEMATIC ALL-SKY SURVEY FOR NEW VERY LATE-TYPE LOW-MASS STARS AND BROWN DWARFS IN NEARBY YOUNG MOVING GROUPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagn, Jonathan; Lafrenire, David; Doyon, Ren; Malo, Lison; Artigau, tienne

    2015-01-10

    We present the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS) catalog, consisting of 228 new late-type (M4-L6) candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs) with an expected false-positive rate of ?13%. This sample includes 79 new candidate young brown dwarfs and 22 planetary-mass objects. These candidates were identified through the first systematic all-sky survey for late-type low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in YMGs. We cross-matched the Two Micron All Sky Survey and AllWISE catalogs outside of the galactic plane to build a sample of 98,970 potential ?M5 dwarfs in the solar neighborhood and calculated their proper motions with typical precisions of 5-15 mas yr{sup 1}. We selected highly probable candidate members of several YMGs from this sample using the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNsII tool (BANYANII). We used the most probable statistical distances inferred from BANYANII to estimate the spectral type and mass of these candidate YMG members. We used this unique sample to show tentative signs of mass segregation in the AB Doradus moving group and the Tucana-Horologium and Columba associations. The BASS sample has already been successful in identifying several new young brown dwarfs in earlier publications, and will be of great interest in studying the initial mass function of YMGs and for the search of exoplanets by direct imaging; the input sample of potential close-by ?M5 dwarfs will be useful to study the kinematics of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs and search for new proper motion pairs.

  2. Individualized 3D Reconstruction of Normal Tissue Dose for Patients With Long-term Follow-up: A Step Toward Understanding Dose Risk for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Angela; Brock, Kristy K.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Tim; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Hodgson, David C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (D{sub mean}) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) and 20Gy (V{sub 20}) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. Results: For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in D{sub mean} between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V{sub 5} and V{sub 20} were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average D{sub mean} values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Conclusions: Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose to organs at risk can be estimated accurately many years after exposure by using limited 2D data. Compared to contemporary involved-field treatments, normal tissue doses were significantly higher in historical mantle-field treatments. These methods build capacity to quantify the relationship between 3D normal tissue dose and observed late effects.

  3. Internal energy dissipation of gamma-ray bursts observed with Swift: Precursors, prompt gamma-rays, extended emission, and late X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, You-Dong; Liang, En-Wei; Xi, Shao-Qiang; Peng, Fang-Kun; Lu, Rui-Jing; L, Lian-Zhong [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn, E-mail: Zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We jointly analyze the gamma-ray burst (GRB) data observed with Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and X-ray Telescope on board the Swift mission to present a global view on the internal energy dissipation processes in GRBs, including precursors, prompt gamma-ray emission, extended soft gamma-ray emission, and late X-ray flares. The Bayesian block method is utilized to analyze the BAT light curves to identify various emission episodes. Our results suggest that these emission components likely share the same physical origin, which is the repeated activation of the GRB central engine. What we observe in the gamma-ray band may be a small part of more extended underlying activities. The precursor emission, which is detected in about 10% of Swift GRBs, is preferably detected in those GRBs that have a massive star core-collapse origin. The soft extended emission tail, on the other hand, is preferably detected in those GRBs that have a compact star merger origin. Bright X-ray emission is detected during the BAT quiescent phases prior to subsequent gamma-ray peaks, implying that X-ray emission may be detectable prior the BAT trigger time. Future GRB alert instruments with soft X-ray capability are essential for revealing the early stages of GRB central engine activities, and shedding light on jet composition and the jet launching mechanism in GRBs.

  4. THERMAL EMISSION IN THE EARLY X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: FOLLOWING THE PROMPT PHASE TO LATE TIMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friis, Mette [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Watson, Darach, E-mail: mef4@hi.is, E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-07-01

    Thermal radiation, peaking in soft X-rays, has now been detected in a handful of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and has to date been interpreted as shock break-out of the GRB's progenitor star. We present a search for thermal emission in the early X-ray afterglows of a sample of Swift bursts selected by their brightness in X-rays at early times. We identify a clear thermal component in eight GRBs and track the evolution. We show that at least some of the emission must come from highly relativistic material since two show an apparent super-luminal expansion of the thermal component. Furthermore, we determine very large luminosities and high temperatures for many of the components-too high to originate in a supernova shock break-out. Instead, we suggest that the component may be modeled as late photospheric emission from the jet, linking it to the apparently thermal component observed in the prompt emission of some GRBs at gamma-ray and hard X-ray energies. By comparing the parameters from the prompt emission and the early afterglow emission, we find that the results are compatible with the interpretation that we are observing the prompt quasi-thermal emission component in soft X-rays at a later point in its evolution.

  5. Impact of TBI on late effects in children treated by megatherapy for Stage IV neuroblastoma. A study of the French Society of Pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flandin, Isabelle; Michon, Jean; Pinkerton, Ross; Coze, Carole; Stephan, Jean Louis; Fourquet, Bernard; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Bergeron, Christophe; Philip, Thierry; Carrie, Christian . E-mail: carrie@lyon.fnclcc.fr

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the contribution of total body irradiation (TBI) to late sequelae in children treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation for Stage IV neuroblastoma. Patients and Methods: We compared two populations that were similar with regard to age, stage, pre-autologous bone marrow transplantation chemotherapy (CT) regimen, period of treatment, and follow-up (12 years). The TBI group (n = 32) received TBI as part of the megatherapy procedure (1982-1993), whereas the CT group (n 30) received conditioning without TBI (1985-1992). Analysis 12 years later focused on growth, weight and corpulence (body mass index) delay; hormonal deficiencies; liver, kidney, heart, ear, eye, and dental sequelae; school performance; and the incidence of secondary tumors. Results: Impact of TBI was most marked in relation to growth and weight delay, although the mean delay was not severe, probably because of treatment with growth hormones. Other consequences of TBI were thyroid insufficiency, cataracts, and a high incidence of secondary tumors. Hearing loss and dental agenesis were more prominent in the group treated with CT alone. No differences were observed in school performance. Conclusion: The most frequent side effects of TBI were cataracts, thyroid insufficiency, and growth delay, but more worrying is the risk of secondary tumors. Because of the young mean age of patients and the toxicity of TBI regimens without any survival advantage, regimens without TBI are preferable in the management of Stage IV neuroblastoma.

  6. Late Holocene shoreline behavior in embayments of Lake Michigan: Influence of quasi-periodic lake-level variations and sediment supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, T.A.; Baedke, S.J. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Indiana Geological Survey)

    1994-04-01

    Lake Michigan contains numerous former embayments into glacial deposits or bedrock. Many of the embayments contain dunes, spits, and captured lakes, but others contain arcuate strandplains of beach ridges. The strandplains are a geologic record of shoreline behavior and lake-level variation throughout the late Holocene. The larger strandplains show similar long-term patterns of beach-ridge development. The similar patterns are expected because variations in lake level are a primary control on shoreline behavior, and all embayments would have experienced relatively the same lake-level changes. Some variations in the long-term pattern of shoreline development do occur between strandplains. These dissimilarities are primarily a function of different rates of sediment supply to the shoreline of each embayment. Beach-ridge development within embayments can be represented on a rate of water level change versus rate of sediment supply diagram (Curray diagram) as three superimposed ovals on the positive rate of sediment supply side of the diagram. The three stacked ovals represent the three quasi-periodic lake-level variations defined by Thompson (1992) and show the position of the shoreline for a given time within the Curray diagram fields. For shorelines with a high rate of sediment supply, only the 30-year quasi-periodic variation would reach the aggradation line. For shorelines having significantly less sediment supply, rising lake level on the 150- and 600-year variations would force the 30-year oval across the aggradation line and well into the depositional and possibly the erosional transgression fields. Under these conditions erosion would occur that may remove, stack, or at least prevent one or more beach ridges from being developed.

  7. Ultrasonic Nakagami-parameter characterization of parotid-gland injury following head-and-neck radiotherapy: A feasibility study of late toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Ning; Wang, Yuefeng; Tridandapani, Srini; School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 ; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian; Bruner, Deborah W.; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322; School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The study aims to investigate whether Nakagami parametersestimated from the statistical distribution of the backscattered ultrasound radio-frequency (RF) signalscould provide a means for quantitative characterization of parotid-gland injury resulting from head-and-neck radiotherapy. Methods: A preliminary clinical study was conducted with 12 postradiotherapy patients and 12 healthy volunteers. Each participant underwent one ultrasound study in which ultrasound scans were performed in the longitudinal, i.e., vertical orientation on the bilateral parotids. For the 12 patients, the mean radiation dose to the parotid glands was 37.7 9.5 Gy, and the mean follow-up time was 16.3 4.8 months. All enrolled patients experienced grade 1 or 2 late salivary-gland toxicity (RTOG/EORTC morbidity scale). The normal parotid glands served as the control group. The Nakagami-scaling and Nakagami-shape parameters were computed from the RF data to quantify radiation-induced parotid-gland changes. Results: Significant differences in Nakagami parameters were observed between the normal and postradiotherapy parotid glands. Compared with the control group, the Nakagami-scaling parameter of the postradiotherapy group decreased by 25.8% (p < 0.001), and the Nakagami-shape parameter decreased by 31.3% (p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.85 for the Nakagami-scaling parameter and was 0.95 for the Nakagami-shape parameter, which further demonstrated the diagnostic efficiency of the Nakagami parameters. Conclusions: Nakagami parameters could be used to quantitatively measure parotid-gland injury following head-and-neck radiotherapy. Moreover, the clinical feasibility was demonstrated and this study provides meaningful preliminary data for future clinical investigation.

  8. Predictors of Grade 3 or Higher Late Bowel Toxicity in Patients Undergoing Pelvic Radiation for Cervical Cancer: Results From a Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, Supriya; Dora, Tapas; Chinnachamy, Anand N.; Thomas, Biji; Kannan, Sadhna; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N.; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The present study investigates relationship between dosevolume parameters and severe bowel toxicity after postoperative radiation treatment (PORT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 to December 2012, a total of 71 patients undergoing PORT were included. Small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops were contoured 2cm above the target volume. The volume of SB and LB that received 15Gy, 30Gy, and 40Gy was calculated (V15 SB, V15 LB, V30 SB, V30 LB, V40 SB, V 40 LB). On follow-up, bowel toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. A reciever operating characteristic (ROC) curve identified volume thresholds that predicted for grade 3 or higher toxicity with highest specificity. All data was dichotomized across these identified cut-off values. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using SPSS, version15. Results: The median patient age was 47years (range, 35-65years). Of the 71 patients, 46 received image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, and 25 received conformal radiation (50Gy in 25 fractions for 5weeks). Overall, 63 of 71 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. On a median follow-up of 18months (range, 8-29months), grade 2 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 22 of 71 patients (30.9%) and grade 3 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 9 patients (12.6%). On univariate analysis, V15 SB <275 cc (P=.01), V30 SB <190 cc (P=.02), V40 SB <150 cc (P=.01), and V15 LB <250 cc (P=.03), and V40 LB <90 cc (P=.04) predicted for absence of grade 3 or higher toxicity. No other patient- or treatment-related factors were statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, only V15 SB (P=.002) and V15 LB (P=.03) were statistically significant. Conclusions: V 15Gy SB and LB are independent predictors of late grade 3 or higher toxicity. Restricting V15 SB and V15 LB to <275 cc and <250 cc can reduce grade 3 or higher toxicity to less than 5%.

  9. Formation of short-lived radionuclides in the protoplanetary disk during late-stage irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, B; Matzel, J; Hutcheon, I D; Krot, A N; Yin, Q -; Nagashima, K; Ramon, E; Weber, P; Ishii, H; Ciesla, F

    2010-11-30

    The origin of short-lived (t{sub 1/2} < 5 Myr) and now extinct radionuclides ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 53}Mn, {sup 60}Fe; hereafter SLRs) is fundamental to understanding the formation of the early solar system. Two distinct classes of models have been proposed to explain the origin of SLRs: (1) injection from a nearby stellar source (e.g., supernova, asymptotic giant branch star or Wolf-Rayet star) and (2) solar energetic particle irradiation of dust and gas near the proto-Sun. Recent studies have demonstrated that {sup 36}Cl was extant in the early solar system. However, its presence, initial abundance and the noticeable decoupling from {sup 26}Al raise serious questions about the origin of SLRs. Here we report {sup 36}Cl-{sup 36}S and {sup 26}Al-{sup 26}Mg systematics for wadalite and grossular, secondary minerals in a calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the CV chondrite Allende that allow us to reassess the origin of SLRs. The inferred abundance of {sup 36}Cl in wadalite, corresponding to a {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio of (1.81 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -5}, is the highest {sup 36}Cl abundance reported in any early solar system material. The high level of {sup 36}Cl in wadalite and the absence of {sup 26}Al ({sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al {le} 3.9 x 10{sup -6}) in co-existing grossular indicates that (1) {sup 36}Cl formed by late-stage solar energetic particle irradiation and (2) the production of {sup 36}Cl, recorded by secondary minerals, is unrelated to the origin of {sup 26}Al and other SLRs ({sup 10}Be, {sup 53}Mn) recorded by primary minerals of CAIs and chondrules. We conclude that 36Cl was produced by solar energetic particle irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir in an optically thin protoplanetary disk adjacent to the accretion region of the CV chondrite parent asteroid.

  10. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancerspecific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy applicators and a more rigorous skin dose constraint of ?100%.

  11. Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Michael Righi of the Contract and Financial Assistance...

  12. Certificate of Public Good Application Fee Form | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for in-state facilities under Sections 248a and 248 of Title 30. When applying for Public Service Board approval of an in-state facility under Sections 248a and 248, the...

  13. Nyseg non-residential adjustment fees? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MFC on Nyseg's site and each is less than 0.005kWh. That being said, the posted value matches my expectations more for high New York electricity rates (0.16kWh). Am I missing...

  14. MSA_FY2012_Award_Fee_Scorecard.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  15. Local Option- Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Public Act 15-194 effective October 1st 2015, requires each municipality to incorporate residential solar photovoltaic systems on its building permit application process. The municipalities are...

  16. FISCAL YEAR 2014 AWARD FEE DETERMINATION SCORECARD Contractor...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    multiple regulatory documents on schedule and provided on-time, quality draft language for all the budget letters. LATA Kentucky worked very well with DOE, USEC and the...

  17. EM Reviews Portsmouth, Paducah Site Contractor Performance, Determines Award Fees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEXINGTON, Ky. – EM has completed annual performance evaluations of four prime contractors working on the deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning of the former gaseous diffusion plants near Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky.

  18. Microsoft Word - FY12 Fee Des.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NR0000031 copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. If by virtue of this amendment you desire to change an offer already submitted, such change may be

  19. SNLM448-FY2011Fee(12.7.11).pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  20. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafe, Susan; Moughan, Jennifer; McCormick, Beryl; Wong, John; Pass, Helen; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Arthur, Douglas W.; Petersen, Ivy; White, Julia; Vicini, Frank A.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ?3 cm, negative margins, and ?3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  1. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee September 2015 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: 3,264,909,094 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee s Idaho...

  2. NWPA-830G U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3-31-2016 Burden: 5 Hours Appendix G -Standard Remittance Advice for Payment of Fees This information is being collected under mandatory authorities vested in the U.S. Department of Energy under Public Law 97-425. Late filing, failure to file or otherwise comply with instructions provided may result in interest penalties as provided by Article VIII C of the Standard Contract of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High Level Radioactive Waste. For information concerning confidentiality of information see

  3. NWPA-830G U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    xx/xx/xxxx Burden: 5 Hours Appendix G -Standard Remittance Advice for Payment of Fees This information is being collected under mandatory authorities vested in the U.S. Department of Energy under Public Law 97-425. Late filing, failure to file or otherwise comply with instructions provided may result in interest penalties as provided by Article VIII C of the Standard Contract of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High Level Radioactive Waste. For information concerning confidentiality of information see

  4. Contractor: Restoration Services, Inc. Contract: DE-EM0002639

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Restoration Services, Inc. Contract: DE-EM0002639 Award Fee Evaluation Period 2 Determination Scorecard Award Fee Evaluation Period: Fiscal Year 2015 (October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015) Basis of Evaluation: Award Fee Plan for Restoration Services Inc., Award Fee Evaluation Period 2 Categories of Performance: $392,092 Award Fee Available: $392,092 Award Fee Earned: $360,724.64 (92%) Categories of Performance Award Fee Award Fee Area Adjectival Ratings Award Fee Available: $392,092 1. Quality

  5. How to find fees, taxes, and other charges built into rate in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and other charges built into rate in different locations Home > Groups > Utility Rate Hi, I am looking to find the rate charges beyond demand, generation, and transmission that...

  6. HPMC_FY14_Performance_Assessment-Performance_Fee_Determination.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  7. Policy Flash 2014-08 ACQUISITION LETTER 2014-02: PROVISIONAL PAYMENT OF FEE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Michael Righi of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Policy, Office Acquisition and Project Management at ...

  8. FY14 AWARD FEE DETERMINATION SCORECARD Contractor: Wastren-EnergX...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the period. Significant Achievements: * Received the Federal Electronic Challenge Gold Award illustrating the site's commitment to sustainability. * Deployed the Virtual...

  9. DEAC3010CC40021 FY 15 Award Fee Plan SSI_0.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  10. DEAC3011CC40015 FY15 Award Fee Plan BWCS.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  11. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    15 (Fixed Fee) 346,377,995 Fee Information 2,039,246 EM Contractor Fee Oak Ridge Office - Oak Ridge, TN Transuranic Waste Processing Contract September 2015 Cost Plus Award Fee...

  12. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    350,000 Cumulative Fee 1,950,000 564,955 HPM Corporation DE-EM0002043 Firm Fixed Price Plus Award Fee Fee Information 0 October 1, 2012 - September 30, 2014 EM Contractor Fee...

  13. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cost (Price of base): Contract Base Period: Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee (Base Only) Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2012 15,763,807 15,087,078...

  14. U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office - Contractor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance Contractor Performance Contractor Performance SRNS FY 15 Award Fee Determination Scorecard Adobe Acrobat PDF FY 14 Award Fee Determination Scorecard Adobe Acrobat PDF FY 13 Award Fee Determination Scorecard Adobe Acrobat PDF Award Fee Determination for FY 13 Adobe Acrobat PDF Award Fee Determination for FY 12 Adobe Acrobat PDF Award Fee Determination for FY 11 Adobe Acrobat PDF Award Fee Determination for FY 10 Adobe Acrobat PDF Award Fee Determination for FY 09 Adobe Acrobat PDF

  15. Observational constraints on late-time {lambda}(t) cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C.; Dantas, M. A.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2008-04-15

    The cosmological constant {lambda}, i.e., the energy density stored in the true vacuum state of all existing fields in the Universe, is the simplest and the most natural possibility to describe the current cosmic acceleration. However, despite its observational successes, such a possibility exacerbates the well-known {lambda} problem, requiring a natural explanation for its small, but nonzero, value. In this paper we study cosmological consequences of a scenario driven by a varying cosmological term, in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, {lambda}{proportional_to}H. We test the viability of this scenario and study a possible way to distinguish it from the current standard cosmological model by using recent observations of type Ia supernova (Supernova Legacy Survey Collaboration), measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the position of the first peak of the cosmic microwave background angular spectrum from the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  16. Transition duct with late injection in turbine system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray; Flanagan, James Scott; Kim, Won -Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston

    2015-09-15

    A system for supplying an injection fluid to a combustor is disclosed. The system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The passage defines a combustion chamber. The system further includes a tube providing fluid communication for the injection fluid to flow through the transition duct and into the combustion chamber.

  17. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km3 of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending...

  18. Millennial-scale ocean acidification and late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riding, Dr Robert E; Liang, Liyuan; Braga, Dr Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification by atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased almost continuously since the last glacial maximum (LGM), 21 000 years ago. It is expected to impair tropical reef development, but effects on reefs at the present day and in the recent past have proved difficult to evaluate. We present evidence that acidification has already significantly reduced the formation of calcified bacterial crusts in tropical reefs. Unlike major reef builders such as coralline algae and corals that more closely control their calcification, bacterial calcification is very sensitive to ambient changes in carbonate chemistry. Bacterial crusts in reef cavities have declined in thickness over the past 14 000 years with largest reduction occurring 12 000 10 000 years ago. We interpret this as an early effect of deglacial ocean acidification on reef calcification and infer that similar crusts were likely to have been thicker when seawater carbonate saturation was increased during earlier glacial intervals, and thinner during interglacials. These changes in crust thickness could have substantially affected reef development over glacial cycles, as rigid crusts significantly strengthen framework and their reduction would have increased the susceptibility of reefs to biological and physical erosion. Bacterial crust decline reveals previously unrecognized millennial-scale acidification effects on tropical reefs. This directs attention to the role of crusts in reef formation and the ability of bioinduced calcification to reflect changes in seawater chemistry. It also provides a long-term context for assessing anticipated anthropogenic effects.

  19. Silica diagenesis in Santa Cruz mudstone, Late Miocene, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Sabbagh, D.

    1987-05-01

    The silica-rich upper Miocene Santa Cruz Mudstone is similar to the Miocene Monterey Formation. Previous studies have suggested the Santa Cruz Mudstone was not buried deeply nor had it undergone extensive diagenesis. Because opaline diagenesis is temperature dependent, the author examined the silica diagenesis of the Santa Cruz Mudstone using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction methods to study its burial history. In a series of samples from Santa Cruz to Davenport, California (over 16 km), opal-CT is the dominant silica phase present and clay minerals are notably absent. The d(101)-spacing values of opal-CT range from 4.11 A (Santa Cruz area) to 4.06 A (north of Santa Cruz), exhibiting the complete range of d(101)-spacing values found in opal-CT zones. Scanning electron micrographs of crystalline microtextures show rosettes of opal-CT (lepispheres) in cavities of samples with medium to high d(101)-spacing values. The morphology of lepisphere crystallites grades from bladed to spiny with decreasing d(101)-spacing values, reflecting an internal crystal ordering with increased diagenesis. Further diagenetic changes occurred in a sample with 4.06 A d(101)-spacing where incipient quartz crystals signal the initial conversion of opal-CT to microcrystalline quartz. Silica diagenesis demonstrates that burial temperatures surpassed the range of opal-A to opal-CT conversion and approached conversion temperatures (55/sup 0/C to 110/sup 0/C) of opal-CT to microcrystalline quartz. The conversion occurred when the Santa Cruz Mudstone was buried over 1900 m (depth calculated from a geohistory diagram). This burial temperature brings the Santa Cruz Mudstone within the oil generation window, and could account for the presence of hydrocarbons in the unit.

  20. Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Abstract Cover rocks of the Raft River metamorphic core complex, located in the Sevier belt hinterland, preserve a...

  1. Category:Building Models | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    category "Building Models" The following 12 pages are in this category, out of 12 total. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings General...

  2. Property:Buildings/ModelXmlFile | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsChicago2009TSDGeneralMerchHPL50percent.xml +...

  3. Property:Buildings/ModelBuildingType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Religious Worship Service Warehouse and Storage Other Vacant Pages using the property "BuildingsModelBuildingType" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise...

  4. Property:Buildings/Models | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    It links to pages that use the form Buildings Publication. Pages using the property "BuildingsModels" Showing 2 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 50% Energy...

  5. Property:Buildings/ModelIdfFile | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsChicago2009TSDGeneralMerchHPL50percent.idf +...

  6. Aerial photographic interpretation of lineaments and faults in late cenozoic deposits in the Eastern part of the Benton Range 1:100,000 quadrangle and the Goldfield, Last Chance Range, Beatty, and Death Valley Junction 1:100,000 quadrangles, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reheis, M.C.; Noller, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    Lineaments and faults in Quaternary and late Tertiary deposits in the southern part of the Walker Lane are potentially active and form patterns that are anomalous with respect to the typical fault patterns in most of the Great Basin. Little work has been done to identify and characterize these faults, with the exception of those in the Death Valley-Furnace Creek (DVFCFZ) fault system and those in and near the Nevada Test Site. Four maps at a scale of 1:100,000 summarize the existing knowledge about these lineaments and faults based on extensive aerial-photo interpretation, limited field investigations, and published geologic maps. The lineaments and faults in all four maps can be divided geographically into two groups. The first group includes west- to north-trending lineaments and faults associated with the DVFCFZ and with the Pahrump fault zone in the Death Valley Junction quadrangle. The second group consists of north- to east-northeast-trending lineaments and faults in a broad area that lies east of the DVFCFZ and north of the Pahrump fault zone. Preliminary observations of the orientations and sense of slip of the lineaments and faults suggest that the least principle stress direction is west-east in the area of the first group and northwest-southeast in the area of the second group. The DVFCFZ appears to be part of a regional right-lateral strike-slip system. The DVFCFZ steps right, accompanied by normal faulting in an extensional zone, to the northern part of the Walker Lane a the northern end of Fish Lake Valley (Goldfield quadrangle), and appears to step left, accompanied by faulting and folding in a compressional zone, to the Pahrump fault zone in the area of Ash Meadows (Death Valley Junction quadrangle). 25 refs.

  7. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contract Cost: Contract Base Period: Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee (Base Fee) Maximum Fee (Award Fee) Performance Period Award Fee Available Award Fee Earned FY2010 $359,179 $289,238 FY2011 $725,476 $573,169 FY2012 $1,479,652 $1,339,065 FY2013 $1,499,253 $1,319,342 FY2014 $1,556,035 $1,447,113 FY2015 $1,435,629 FY2016* $564,658 Cumulative Fee $7,619,882 $4,967,927 DE-CI0000004 Fee Information $7,619,882 EM Contractor Fee Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Portsmouth Facility Support

  8. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Option Period: Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contractor: Bechtel National Inc. Contract Number: DE-AC27-01RV14136 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee NA Maximum Fee 599,588,540 Fee Available 102,622,325 10,868,785,789...

  9. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cumulative Fee 5,985,266 2,636,218 5,985,266 Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 NA Cost Plus Award Fee 131,545,597 November 4, 2011 - September 30, 2016 0 EM Contractor Fee...

  10. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fees for interconnection requests increase with each Level. A Level 1 request must submit $50 fee; a Level 2 request must submit a fee of $50 plus $1/kW of generator capacity; a Level 3 request m...

  11. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cumulative Fee 570,363,260 394,157,083 EM Contractor Fee Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Management & Operating Contract June 2015 DE-AC09-08SR22470 Cost Plus Award Fee...

  12. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2015 $5,553,915 FY2016 $5,553,915 FY2017 $5,553,915 Cumulative Fee $16,661,745 DE-EM0001131-DE-DT0007774 EM Contractor Fee December 2015 Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Paducah Deactivation Task Order Fluor Federal Services $16,661,745 N/A $0 Cost Plus Award Fee and FFP $422,000,000 July 22, 2014 - July 21, 2017 Fee Information

  13. 1127i.pmk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state: city: nights: Lodging state: city: nights: 10. Official PhoneFax: 11. ATM Fees: 12. Lodging with Friends and Relatives 13. Registration Fee: Lab Issued? Yes...

  14. Portland HQ Letterhead

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "All award fee letters to Management and Operations Contractors at Department of Energy facilities in which an award fee was reduced or eliminated as a result of a...

  15. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fee Target Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2016 $10,604,604 $0 FY2017 $9,627,727 $0 Cumulative Fee $20,232,331 $0 EM Contractor Fee Los Alamos Los Alamos Legacy Cleanup Bridge Contract December 2015 $20,232,331 CPAF Los Alamos National Security LLC $309,790,555 DE-EM0003528 $0 Fee Information September 30, 2015 - September 30, 2016 $0 October 1, 2016 - March 31, 2017 (Option Period 1) April 1, 2017 - September 30, 2017 (Option Period 2)

  16. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2014 $389,929 $358,735 FY2015 $392,092 FY2016 $397,054 Cumulative Fee $1,179,075 $358,735 $1,179,075 Cost Plus Award Fee $50,615,957 October 1, 2013 - September 30, 2016 Fee Information $0 Option 1: 10/1/16 - 9/30/18 DE-EM0002639 EM Contractor Fee December 2015 Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Portsmouth Environmental Technical Services II Restoration Services Inc

  17. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2010 $435,613 $283,148 FY2011 $806,501 $717,785 FY2012 $834,588 $825,720 FY2013 $933,700 $822,589 FY2014 $2,415,920 $2,295,124 FY2015 $2,781,656 Cumulative Fee $8,207,978 $4,944,366 EM Contractor Fee Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Paducah Infrastructure Contract December 2015 $8,207,978 Swift & Staley Mechanical Contractors Inc. DE-AC30-10CC40021 March 16, 2010 - November 30, 2015 Cost Plus Award Fee $137,637,795 Fee

  18. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Availability Fee Earned FY2013 $300,000 $284,250 FY2014 $310,000 $280,705 FY2015 $320,000 $287,680 FY2016 $330,000 FY2017 $340,000 FY2018 $350,000 Cumulative Fee $1,950,000 $852,635 EM Contractor Fee Richland Operations Office - Richland, WA Occupational Medical Services at Hanford December 2015 $100,100,000 $1,950,000 Option 2: 10/1/15 -9/30/16 (Exercised) HPM Corporation DE-EM0002043 Firm Fixed Price Plus Award Fee Fee Information $0 October 1, 2012 -

  19. G

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the Contractor for that incentive and for the Contractor to have any right to retain the provisionally paid fee. Regarding the requirements for provisional payment of fee...

  20. BPA-2011-00940-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photocopies Type of Requester (if provided): An individual seeking information for personal use and not for commercial use. Fees and Fee Waivers: I request a waiver or...

  1. Oregon Underground Injection Control Registration Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Oregon Underground Injection Control Registration Application Fees (DEQ Form UIC 1003-GIC) Abstract Required fees and form...

  2. Port~rnuuth IJcconllimi1rntion nml Decommissioning...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Award Fee Evaluation Process Flowchart 40 7. PBI Completion Status 41 iii Portsmouth Decontamination and Decommissioning Contract FY-15 & FY-16 Award Fee Plan Contract ...

  3. Audit Report: Department of Energy's Controls over Recovery Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... a portion of the incentive fee, while still providing fair compensation to the contractor. ... contract; 2. Renegotiate performance incentives fees using current cost and pricing ...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Electric Drive Vehicle Fee In addition to standard registration fees, plug-in electric vehicle owners must pay an annual fee of $140 and hybrid electric vehicle owners must pay an annual fee of $75. (Reference House Bill 312, 2015, and Idaho Statutes 49-402 and 49-457

  5. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2008 $728,937 $0 FY2009 $728,937 $0 FY2010 $741,610 $0 FY2011 $786,779 $0 FY2012 $12,862 $12,862 FY2013 $1,111,678 $645 FY2014 $114,126 $114,126 FY2015 $110,253 $85,344 Cumulative Fee $4,335,182 $212,977 EM Contractor Fee Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU), Niskayuna, NY SPRU Deactivation, Demolition, and Removal of Contaminated Facilities September 2015 $4,335,182 Cost Plus Incentive Fee (FY2008-FY2011)/ Cost Plus Fixed Fee

  6. PPPO Contracts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contracts PPPO Contracts Award Fee Contracts: Portsmouth D&D Project Fluor-BWXT Portsmouth LLC (FBP); Contract: DE-AC30-10CC40017; Size/Status: Large Business [Expires 3/28/16 (w/5-yr opt.)] AWARD FEE INFO: FY15-16 Award Fee Plan | FY14 FBP Scorecard on Award Fee Portsmouth Infrastructure Support Services Wastren - EnergX Mission Support LLC (WEMS) Contract: DE-CI0000004; Size/Status: Small Business (Expires 1/25/16) AWARD FEE INFO: FY15 Award Fee Plan | FY14 WEMS Scorecard on Award Fee

  7. Commercial Building Partnership Retail Food Sales Energy Savings Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, national laboratories and private sector exports to explore energy efficiency measures across general merchandise commercial buildings.

  8. Property:Buildings/PublicationName | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "BuildingsPublicationName" Showing 2 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 50%...

  9. Property:Buildings/ModelName | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "BuildingsModelName" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD...

  10. Property:Buildings/PublicationURL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type URL. Pages using the property "BuildingsPublicationURL" Showing 2 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 50%...

  11. Property:Buildings/ModelTargetType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are: ASHRAE 90.1 2007 ASHRAE 90.1 2004 ASHRAE 189.1 LEED Pages using the property "BuildingsModelTargetType" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise...

  12. Property:Buildings/ReportNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "BuildingsReportNumber" Showing 2 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 50%...

  13. Property:Buildings/ModelClimateZone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Pages using the property "BuildingsModelClimateZone" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise...

  14. Property:Buildings/PublicationType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "BuildingsPublicationType" Showing 2 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 50%...

  15. Property:Buildings/ModelYear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "BuildingsModelYear" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD...

  16. Property:Buildings/PublicationYear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "BuildingsPublicationYear" Showing 2 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 50%...

  17. Word Pro - S1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    related material. "Non-Energy Balance" and "Total Merchandise" include foreign exports (i.e., re-exports) and nonmonetary gold and U.S. Department of Defense Grant-Aid shipments. ...

  18. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of YTe3, LaTe3 and CeTe3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ru, N.

    2011-08-19

    Measurements of heat capacity, susceptibility, and electrical resistivity are presented for single crystals of the charge density wave compounds YTe{sub 3}, LaTe{sub 3}, and CeTe{sub 3}. The materials are metallic to low temperatures, but have a small density of states due to the charge density wave gapping large portions of the Fermi surface. CeTe{sub 3} is found to be a weak Kondo lattice, with an antiferromagnetic ground state and T{sub N} = 2.8 K. The electrical resistivity of all three compounds is highly anisotropic, confirming the weak dispersion perpendicular to Te planes predicted by band structure calculations.

  19. DOUBLETS AND DOUBLE PEAKS: LATE-TIME [O I] lambdalambda6300,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    32306 (United States) Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States) Publication Date: 2010-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 21392260 ...

  20. EARLY- AND LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2008ha: ADDITIONAL CONSTRAINTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It is therefore likely that SN 2008ha was the result of a thermonuclear explosion of a carbon-oxygen WD. Carbon features at maximum light show that unburned material is present...

  1. CORRELATED SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL BEHAVIOR OF LATE-TIME AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2012-12-20

    The cannonball (CB) model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) predicts that the asymptotic behavior of the spectral energy density of GRB afterglows is a power law in time and in frequency, and the difference between the temporal and spectral power-law indices, {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X}, is restricted to the values 0, 1/2, and 1. Here we report the distributions of the values {alpha}{sub X} and {beta}{sub X}, and their difference for a sample of 315 Swift GRBs. This sample includes all Swift GRBs that were detected before 2012 August 1, whose X-ray afterglow extended well beyond 1 day and the estimated error in {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} was {<=}0.25. The values of {alpha}{sub X} were extracted from the CB-model fits to the entire light curves of their X-ray afterglow while the spectral index was extracted by the Swift team from the time-integrated X-ray afterglow of these GRBs. We found that the distribution of the difference {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} for these 315 Swift GRBs has three narrow peaks around 0, 1/2, and 1 whose widths are consistent with being due to the measurement errors, in agreement with the CB-model prediction.

  2. Crystallized alkali-silica gel in concrete from the late 1890s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Gress, David . E-mail: dlgress@unh.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu

    2006-08-15

    The Elon Farnsworth Battery, a concrete structure completed in 1898, is in an advanced state of disrepair. To investigate the potential for rehabilitation, cores were extracted from the battery. Petrographic examination revealed abundant deposits of alkali silica reaction products in cracks associated with the quartz rich metasedimentary coarse aggregate. The products of the alkali silica reaction are variable in composition and morphology, including both amorphous and crystalline phases. The crystalline alkali silica reaction products are characterized by quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The broad extent of the reactivity is likely due to elevated alkali levels in the cements used.

  3. Late Cenozoic Ring Faulting and Volcanism in the Coso Range Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the surface during the past few million years. Author Wendell A. Duffield Published Journal Geology, 1975 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  4. THE LINK BETWEEN LIGHT AND MASS IN LATE-TYPE SPIRAL GALAXY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaters, Robert A.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, David R.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2014-12-20

    We present the correlation between the extrapolated central disk surface brightness (?) and extrapolated central surface mass density (?) for galaxies in the DiskMass sample. This ?-? relation has a small scatter of 30% at the high surface brightness (HSB) end. At the low surface brightness (LSB) end, galaxies fall above the ?-? relation, which we attribute to their higher dark matter content. After correcting for the dark matter as well as for the contribution of gas and the effects of radial gradients in the disk, the LSB end falls back on the linear ?-? relation. The resulting scatter around the corrected ?-? relation is 25% at the HSB end and about 50% at the LSB end. The intrinsic scatter in the ?-? relation is estimated to be 10%-20%. Thus, if ? {sub K,} {sub 0} is known, the stellar surface mass density is known to within 10%-20% (random error). Assuming disks have an exponential vertical distribution of mass, the average ?{sub ?}{sup K} is 0.24 M {sub ?}/L {sub ?}, with an intrinsic scatter around the mean of at most 0.05 M {sub ?}/L {sub ?}. This value for ?{sub ?}{sup K} is 20% smaller than we found in Martinsson et al., mainly due to the correction for dark matter applied here. This small scatter means that among the galaxies in our sample, variations in scale height, vertical density profile shape, and/or the ratio of vertical over radial velocity dispersion must be small.

  5. Mini Z' Burst from Relic Supernova Neutrinos and Late NeutrinoMasses...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  6. Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

    2013-10-01

    This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

  7. The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Abstract Heat-flow and coal-maturation data suggest that the thermal history of the San Juan Basin has...

  8. Late Pseudocoarctation Syndrome After Stent-Graft Implantation For Traumatic Aortic Rupture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letocart, Vincent Fau, Georges Tirouvanziam, Ashok; Toquet, Claire; Al Habash, Oussama Guerin, Patrice; Rousseau, Herve; Crochet, Dominique

    2013-06-15

    The present observation illustrates an unusual complication occurring after stent-grafting (S-graft) for aortic isthmus rupture. A 22-year-old patient, treated by S-graft in the emergency department for traumatic aortic rupture, was readmitted 10 months later with pseudocoarctation syndrome. A membrane was found inside the stent-graft that had induced a pseudo-dissection, which caused the pseudocoarctation syndrome. Surgical treatment consisted of removing the stent-graft and membrane and replacing it with a vascular implant. The patient's clinical course was fair. The suggested mechanism was circumferential neoendothelialization of the stent-graft. Dehiscence caused the superior part of the membrane to drop into the lumen of the stent-graft creating a 'false channel' that compressed the 'true lumen' and induced 'pseudocoarctation' syndrome. The cause of the extensive neointimalization remains unexplained. Thoracic aortic stent-grafts require regular follow-up monitoring by angioscan or angio-magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco fee. Volume III. Final report. Annual report, February 1982-March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, C.O. Jr.; O'Brien, F.D.; Rodgers, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the testing of Sand 3 (15,245 to 15,280 feet in depth) which occurred from November 1983 to March 1984 and evaluates these new data in comparison to results from the testing of Sand 5 (15,385 to 15,415 feet in depth) which occurred from June 1981 to February 1982. It also describes the reworking of the production and salt water disposal wells preparatory to the Sand 3 testing as well as the plug and abandon procedures requested to terminate the project. The volume contains two parts: Part 1 includes the text and accompanying plates, figures and tables; Part 2 consists of the appendixes including auxiliary reports and tabulations.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  The 2007 total system life...

  11. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Base Period: Contract Option Periods: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2009/2010 $22,386,342 $19,332,431 FY2011 $26,164,766 $23,956,349 FY2012 $21,226,918 $19,099,251 FY2013 $21,030,647 $19,352,402 FY2014 $18,986,489 $16,518,626 FY2015 $21,043,816 FY2016 FY2017 Cumulative Fee $130,838,978 $98,259,059 $130,838,978 EM Contractor Fee Richland Operations Office - Richland, WA Infrastructure and Site

  12. Microsoft Word - AcqGuide70pt15rev9.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    70.15 (Septeber 2008) 1 M&O Contractor Incentives - Fee, Rollover of Performance Fee, and Award Term [Reference, DEAR 970.1504-1] Overview This chapter provides: (1) a synopsis of the M&O contractor fee policy (focused on the mechanics of the calculation and the key considerations of the policy); (2) guidance on a key aspect of the policy, linking performance fee to outcomes, including guidelines on allowing rollover of performance fee; and (3) guidance on the use of the non-fee

  13. Microsoft Word - BWCS Scorecard Third period FY 2014 Mar 9 2015 revised (FINAL)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY 14 Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: B&W Conversion Services, LLC Contract: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Award Period: October 1, 2013 - September 30, 2014 Basis of Evaluation Performance and Evaluation Plan (PEMP)/Award Fee Plan for Award Period Award Fee Available: $2,095,635 Award Fee Earned: $1,508,857 Categories of Performance Award Fee Award Fee Area Adjectival Ratings: Quality and Effectiveness of Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance: Good Quality and Effectiveness

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Fee All-electric vehicle operators must pay an annual vehicle registration renewal fee of $100. This fee expires if the legislature imposes a vehicle miles traveled fee or tax in the state. Beginning July 1, 2016, this fee is increased to $150. Also beginning July 1, 2016, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles with an all-electric range of at least 30 miles will be subject to the registration renewal fee. (Reference Revised Code of Washington 46.17.323

  15. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2005 - September 30, 2016 (estimated completion date) Washington Closure LLC DE-AC06-05RL14655 Cost Plus Incentive Fee 2,641,870,419 Fee Information 0 356,652,507 180,983,014...

  16. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    September 2015 Mission Support Alliance, LLC DE-AC06-09RL14728 0 Fee Information Cost Plus Award Fee 3,381,097,250 May 26, 2009 - May 25, 2014 Option 1: 52614 to 52517...

  17. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Option Period: Maximum...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee EM Contractor Fee September 2015 Site: Portsmouth Paducah Project Office...

  18. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    September 2015 8,207,978 Swift & Staley Mechanical Contractors Inc. DE-AC30-10CC40021 March 16, 2010 - November 30, 2015 Cost Plus Award Fee 137,637,795 Fee Information NA 0...

  19. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - September 30, 2013 Washington River Protection Solutions LLC DE-AC27-08RV14800 Cost Plus Award Fee 5,553,789,617 Fee Information Option 1: 10113 - 93016 (Exercised)...

  20. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Richland, WA Plateau Remediation Contract September 2015 0 CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company DE-AC06-08RL14788 Cost Plus Award Fee 5,468,188,902 228,491,376 Fee Information...

  1. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2015 October 1, 2012 - September 30, 2017 0 1,332,178,100 Fee Information 43,523,663 Option 1: 10117 - 93022 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-EM0001971 Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC...

  2. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Office Paducah Deactivation Task Order Fluor Federal Services 16,661,745 NA 0 Cost Plus Award Fee and FFP 422,000,000 July 22, 2014 - July 21, 2017 Fee Information...

  3. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Idaho Falls, ID Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project September 2015 0 NA Cost Plus Award Fee 448,256,946 Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 15,929,756 Fee...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Level. A Level 1 request must submit 50 fee; a Level 2 request must submit a fee of 50 plus 1kW of generator capacity; a Level 3 request m... Eligibility: Commercial,...

  5. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2015 127,088,676 URSCH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) DE-SC-0004645 July 30, 2011 - July 31, 2016 Cost Plus Award Fee 1,669,215,180 Fee Information 0 August 1, 2016 - July 31, 2020...

  6. B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Available Award Fee: B.1 Project Management Incentive Attachment B-2-B 66,545,997 B.2 Cost Incentive Attachment B-2-B 38,022,560 *See Table B-2-B-1 B.3 REA Settlement Fee...

  7. Flag rates for deletion? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    some "rates" that don't belong; they are one-time connection fees instead of rates (e.g. with a 2,500 connection fee as a "fixed monthly charge"). Is there some way to flag...

  8. BPA-2015-01645-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gathering and not for commercial use. Select Type of media: O Newspaper 0 Magazine 0 Television Station Oother: l I Fees and Fee Waivers Your request must include a statement that...

  9. Policy Flash 2012-26 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    26 Policy Flash 2012-26 Below is Policy Flash 2012-26, Release of Department of Energy Award Fee and Incentive Fee Reports PolicyFlash2012-26.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  10. Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) has issued final rules regarding an increase in the application fee for this tax credit. The new fee is $100 plus 3.8 percent of the tax credit amount ...

  11. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    January 1, 2010 - October 7, 2014 EM Contractor Fee Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Comprehensive Security Services June 2015 Fee Information 42,685,445 0 Option 1:...

  12. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to 63017 DE-AC09-09SR22505 Fee Information 0 EM Contractor Fee Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Liquid Waste Processing Contract June 2015 Savannah River Remediation LLC...

  13. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DE-AC09-02SR22210 Fee Information NA EM Contractor Fee Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Salt Waste Processing Contract June 2015 50,000,000 0 September 17, 2002 -...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    City of Santa Monica- Building Permit Fee Waiver for Solar Projects In early 2002, the City of Santa Monica began waiving building permit fees for solar energy systems. In December...

  15. Solar Permitting Law

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation also addressed permitting fees for solar systems.  Counties and cities may not charge permit fees for solar permit applications specifically, but they can charge building permit ...

  16. BPA-2010-02087-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2005-present. Any data available within that time-frame is of interest. Preferred format: excel Type of Requester: Business I Agree to pay all applicable fees Please Limit my fees...

  17. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    33,802,034 Fee Information August 29, 2011 - March 9, 2020 0 NA EM Contractor Fee West Valley Demonstration Project - West Valley, NY West Valley Demonstration Project Phase 1...

  18. AIIEJIIDIENTOF IOLICITA~TIOit OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    by DOE in accordance with DEAR 970.15 (consistent with the FY 2001 fee computation methodology), multiplied by the ratio ofthe proposed FY 2001 Maximum Available Fee in (b)(1)...

  19. L AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    by DOE in accordance with DEAR 970.15 (consistent with the FY 2001 fee computation methodology), multiplied by the ratio of the proposed FY 2001 Maximum Available Fee in (b)(1)...

  20. 23 V.S.A. Section 1402 Overweight, Width, Height, and Length...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FeesLegal Abstract Sets forth fee requirements for issuing permits for operating a motor vehicle in excess of weight and size limits. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  1. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fee Target Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available (N/A) Fee Earned FY2002 $15,829 FY2003 $523,056 FY2004 $276,342 FY2005 $941,713 FY2006 $2,856,570 FY2007 $2,972,377 FY2008 $5,223,667 FY2009 $10,018,301 FY2010 $5,696,426 FY2011 $0 FY2012 $0 FY2013 -$20,000,000 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 Cumulative Fee $8,524,281 Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group DE-AC09-02SR22210 Fee Information N/A EM Contractor Fee Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Salt Waste Processing Contract December

  2. BPA-2012-01776-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with this request. We are willing and able to pay any applicable fees associated with the retrieval and production of this information. We are not requesting a fee waiver at this...

  3. BPA-2013-00400-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with this request. We are willing and able to pay any applicable fees associated with the retrieval and production of this information. We are not requesting a fee waiver at this...

  4. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Virginia's interconnection standards include two levels of review. The qualifications and application fees for each level are as follows:...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    permit fees. For each additional category that the project me... Eligibility: Commercial, Construction, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Fee PEV owners must pay an annual fee of $50, in addition to other registration fees, for a PEV decal. The decal will authorize PEV owners to use public electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) in Colorado. Fees contribute to the Highway Users Tax Fund and the Electric Vehicle Grant Fund, which provides grants for EVSE. (Reference Colorado Revised Statutes 42-3-304

  7. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY2015 392,092 FY2016 397,054 Cumulative Fee 1,179,075 358,735 1,179,075 Cost Plus Award Fee 50,615,957 October 1, 2013 - September 30, 2016 Fee Information 0 Option...

  8. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    14,269,197 FY2016 23,819,121 Cumulative Fee 93,153,077 45,853,670 93,153,077 0 Cost-Plus-Award-Fee 1,684,717,283 March 29, 2011 - March 28, 2016 Fee Information Option 1: 3...

  9. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    886,941 FY2015 789,766 0 Cumulative Fee 5,641,147 4,490,103 DE-AC27-10RV15051 Cost Plus Award Fee EM Contractor Fee Office of River Protection - Richland, WA Laboratory...

  10. SR0008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wachenhut Receives Award Fee Flag Ribbon Art Note to Editors and News Directors The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined the performance award fee earned by Wackenhut Services, Incorporated, for the evaluation period October 1, 1999, through March 31, 2000. A copy of the letter announcing DOE's award fee determination can be obtained by calling (803) 725-2889. -DOE- SR-00-08

  11. SR0302

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2003 Media Contact: Rick Ford (803) 725-2889 DOE Announces WSI Award Fee Flag Ribbon Art The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined the performance award fee earned by Wackenhut Services, Incorporated, for the evaluation period October 1, 2002, through March 31, 2003. The letter announcing DOE's award fee determination is available by calling (803)725-2889. -DOE- SR-03

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Electric Vehicle (EV) Annual Fee The owner of an EV that does not rely on a non-electric source of power must pay a fee of $100 in addition to any other required registration fees at the time of initial registration and annual registration renewal. (Reference North Carolina General Statutes 20-87

  13. 2011 SECRETARIAL DETERMINATION OF THE ADEQUACY OF THE NUCLEAR WASTE FUND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEE | Department of Energy 2011 SECRETARIAL DETERMINATION OF THE ADEQUACY OF THE NUCLEAR WASTE FUND FEE 2011 SECRETARIAL DETERMINATION OF THE ADEQUACY OF THE NUCLEAR WASTE FUND FEE As required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), DOE has completed its annual review of the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee. Based on that review, the Office of Standard Contract Management has determined that there is no basis to propose an adjustment to the fee to Congress. The Secretary of

  14. PPPO Contract Awards | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PPPO Contract Awards PPPO Contract Awards PPPO Contracts, Award Fee Plans, and Scorecards: PDF icon FBP Contract Conformed to Mod 177 1-19-2016.pdf PDF icon FBP Rev 2 AFP FY15 and FY16.pdf PDF icon FBP FY15 Award Fee Determination Scorecard.pdf PDF icon WEMS Conformed Contract thru Mod 113 (12-21-15).pdf PDF icon WEMS Revised Award Fee Plan FY15 and Award Fee Plan for FY16.pdf PDF icon WEMS FY15 Award Fee Determination Scorecard.pdf PDF icon RSI PORTS ETS II Conformed Contract - Through MOD 30 -

  15. January 16, 2013 Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Fund Fee | Department of Energy January 16, 2013 Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee January 16, 2013 Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee As required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), DOE has completed its review of the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee. Based on that review, the Secretary has determined not to propose an adjustment to the fee at this time. The Secretary's determination is

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Registration Fees Beginning January 2017, PEVs, are subject to an increased vehicle registration fee. These fees apply to all-electric vehicles (EVs) as well as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) with a minimum battery capacity of 4 kilowatt-hours. The specific fee increases are as follows: Vehicle Type Gross Vehicle Weight Rating Fee Increase PHEV 8,000 pounds (lbs.) or less $30 PHEV > 8,000 lbs. $100 EV 8,000 lbs. or less $100 EV > 8,000 lbs. $200

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane and Parking Fee Exemptions Qualified PEVs affixed with special state-issued PEV license plates may use HOV lanes regardless of the number of passengers and are exempt from parking fees charged by any state or county authority. PEVs displaying state PEV license plates are also exempt from parking fees, except when parked at a meter for more than 2.5 hours or the maximum time allowed to park, whichever is longer. Parking fee exemptions do not apply to parking fees

  18. Super-massive planets around late-type starsthe case of OGLE-2012-BLG-0406Lb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poleski, Rados?aw; Gould, Andrew; Udalski, Andrzej; Szyma?ski, Micha? K.; Soszy?ski, Igor; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzy?ski, Grzegorz; Koz?owski, Szymon; Pietrukowicz, Pawe?; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Skowron, Jan; Wyrzykowski, ?ukasz; Dong, Subo

    2014-02-10

    Super-Jupiter-mass planets should form only beyond the snow line of host stars. However, the core accretion theory of planetary formation does not predict super-Jupiters forming around low-mass hosts. We present a discovery of a 3.9 1.2 M {sub Jup} mass planet orbiting the 0.59 0.17 M {sub ?} star using the gravitational microlensing method. During the event, the projected separation of the planet and the star is 3.9 1.0 AU, i.e., the planet is significantly further from the host star than the snow line. This is the fourth such planet discovered using the microlensing technique and challenges the core accretion theory.

  19. Evidence for change in climate variability during the late-holocene inferred from a sequence of Lake Michigan dune ridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichter, J. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States))

    1994-06-01

    The timing of ridge formation at a sequence of northern Lake Michigan foredune ridges was calibrated with the historical lake-level record and with climate records to reconstruct a history of climate-related lake-level variation. Foredune ridges are constructed during receding and low lake levels related to regional drought. Shore recession during high lake levels may promote eolian erosion which modifies the shore-parallel foredune ridges into parabolic dunes. A chronology of ridge formation over the last 2400 years indicates that parabolic dunes developed only during periods of frequent ridge formation and drought. Analysis of ridge formation during the historical record of lake-level variation suggest that this association results from increase variability in regional water balances as opposed to variation in sediment supply. Periods of high variability in regional water balances occurred between 380 BC and AD 20, AD 20, AD 20-300, AD 880-990, AD 1180-1280, and AD 1520-1650.

  20. An inverse Compton origin for the 55 GeV photon in the late afterglow of GRB 130907A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-20

    The extended high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) emission which occurs well after the prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually explained as the afterglow synchrotron radiation. Here we report the analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of GRB 130907A. A 55 GeV photon compatible with the position of the burst was found about 5 hr after the prompt phase. The probability that this photon is associated with GRB 130907A is higher than 99.96%. The energy of this photon exceeds the maximum synchrotron photon energy at this time and its occurrence thus challenges the synchrotron mechanism as the origin for the extended high-energy >10 GeV emission. Modeling of the broadband spectral energy distribution suggests that such high energy photons can be produced by the synchrotron self-Compton emission of the afterglow.

  1. microRNA Alterations Driving Acute and Late Stages of Radiation-Induced Fibrosis in a Murine Skin Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simone, Brittany A.; Ly, David; Savage, Jason E.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Dan, Tu D.; Ylaya, Kris; Shankavaram, Uma; Lim, Meng; Jin, Lianjin; Camphausen, Kevin; Mitchell, James B.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Although ionizing radiation is critical in treating cancer, radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) can have a devastating impact on patients' quality of life. The molecular changes leading to radiation-induced fibrosis must be elucidated so that novel treatments can be designed. Methods and Materials: To determine whether microRNAs (miRs) could be responsible for RIF, the fibrotic process was induced in the right hind legs of 9-week old CH3 mice by a single-fraction dose of irradiation to 35Gy, and the left leg served as an unirradiated control. Fibrosis was quantified by measurements of leg length compared with control leg length. By 120days after irradiation, the irradiated legs were 20% (P=.013) shorter on average than were the control legs. Results: Tissue analysis was done on muscle, skin, and subcutaneous tissue from irradiated and control legs. Fibrosis was noted on both gross and histologic examination by use of a pentachrome stain. Microarrays were performed at various times after irradiation, including 7days, 14days, 50days, 90days, and 120days after irradiation. miR-15a, miR-21, miR-30a, and miR-34a were the miRs with the most significant alteration by array with miR-34a, proving most significant on confirmation by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, c-Met, a known effector of fibrosis and downstream molecule of miR-34a, was evaluated by use of 2cell lines: HCT116 and 1522. The cell lines were exposed to various stressors to induce miR changes, specifically ionizing radiation. Additionally, invitro transfections with pre-miRs and anti-miRs confirmed the relationship of miR-34a and c-Met. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate an inverse relationship with miR-34a and c-Met; the upregulation of miR-34a in RIF causes inhibition of c-Met production. miRs may play a role in RIF; in particular, miR-34a should be investigated as a potential target to prevent or treat this devastating side effect of irradiation.

  2. Analysis of In-Vessel Late Phase Melt Progression Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, R.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, P.O.Box 105, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    High-pressure in-vessel melt progressions of the KSNP (Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant) have been analyzed using the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 computer code. The total loss of feed water (LOFW) to the steam generators with/without intentional RCS depressurization using the safety depressurization system (SDS) and the station blackout (SBO) have been simulated from transient initiation to reactor vessel failure. The SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 results have shown that the pressure boundary of the reactor coolant system did not fail before reactor vessel failure in the high-pressure sequences of the LOFW and the SBO transients of the KSNP. In all the high-pressure transients, approximately 20-30 % of the core material was melted and relocated to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel at the time of reactor vessel failure. Intentional RCS depressurization using the SDS for the total LOFW delays reactor vessel failure for approximately 5 hours by actuation of the safety injection tanks. At the time of reactor vessel failure, approximately 50-60 % of the fuel rod cladding was oxidized for the total LOFW and the SBO transients of the KSNP. (authors)

  3. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Period: Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2010 $524,019 $282,970 FY2011 $1,379,960 $1,026,899 FY2012 $4,800,033 $3,859,131 FY2013 $3,373,360 $3,019,607 FY2014 $1,109,635 $918,639 FY2015 $3,097,864 Cumulative Fee $14,284,871 $9,107,246 $14,284,871 N/A DE-AC30-10CC40020 EM Contractor Fee December 2015 Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Paducah Remediation Contract LATA of Kentucky $0 Cost Plus Award Fee $423,332,936 April 22, 2010 - July

  4. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Base Period: Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee Target Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available (N/A) Fee Earned (Equals 10% of Target) FY2005 $223,991 FY2006 $1,548,986 FY2007 $1,170,889 FY2008 $1,270,755 FY2009 $1,567,325 FY2010 $2,374,992 FY2011 $2,498,835 FY2012 $1,440,273 FY2013 $1,595,460 FY2014 $33,113,257 FY2015 $1,546,386 FY2016 $1,200,000 Cumulative Fee $49,551,149 N/A EM Contractor Fee Richland Operations Office -

  5. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fee Available (N/A) Total Fee Paid $23,179,000 $18,632,000 $16,680,000 $18,705,000 $25,495,000 $34,370,000 $32,329,000 $33,913,000 $66,794,000 $10,557,000 $3,135,000 $283,789,000 FY2015 FY2014 FY2013 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Dec 2015 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: $3,264,909,094 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee s Idaho Operations Office - Idaho Falls, ID Contract Name: Idaho Cleanup Project $0 Contract Type: CH2M Washington Group

  6. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Availability Fee Earned FY2010 $3,667,493 $3,422,993 FY2011 $5,041,415 $4,688,516 FY2012 $5,204,095 $5,021,952 FY2013 $5,428,947 $4,533,171 FY2014 $5,554,162 $4,970,975 FY2015 $5,739,724 $2,582,876 FY2016 $5,925,249 FY2017 $6,124,360 Cumulative Fee $42,685,445 $25,220,482 Centerra, LLC DE-AC30-10CC60025 Cost Plus Award Fee $989,000,000 January 1, 2010 - October 7, 2014 EM Contractor Fee Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Comprehensive Security Services

  7. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contract Base Period: Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2009 $0 $0 FY2010 $39,171,018 $34,660,005 FY2011 $31,370,000 $30,916,500 FY2012 $32,871,600 $32,071,600 FY2013 $31,597,837 $29,742,886 FY2014 $28,500,000 $26,852,887 FY2015 $22,140,000 $0 Cumulative Fee $185,650,455 $154,243,878 Cost Plus Award Fee $4,104,318,749 $185,650,455 July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2015 Two Options: 07/1/15 to 6/30/17 DE-AC09-09SR22505 Fee Information $0 EM

  8. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Availability Fee Earned FY2010 $3,667,493 $3,422,993 FY2011 $5,041,415 $4,688,516 FY2012 $5,204,095 $5,021,952 FY2013 $5,428,947 $4,533,171 FY2014 $5,554,162 $4,970,975 FY2015 $5,739,724 $5,280,546 FY2016 $5,925,249 FY2017 $6,124,360 Cumulative Fee $42,685,445 $27,918,152 EM Contractor Fee Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Comprehensive Security Services December 2015 Fee Information $42,685,445 $0 Option 1: 10/8/14 to 10/07/17 (exercised) Option 2:

  9. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contract Base Period: Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2009 $0 $0 FY2010 $39,171,018 $34,660,005 FY2011 $31,370,000 $30,916,500 FY2012 $32,871,600 $32,071,600 FY2013 $31,597,837 $29,742,886 FY2014 $28,500,000 $26,852,887 FY2015 $30,167,000 $0 Cumulative Fee $193,677,455 $154,243,878 DE-AC09-09SR22505 Fee Information $0 EM Contractor Fee Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Liquid Waste Processing Contract December 2015 Savannah

  10. NREL Recommends Ways to Cut Building Energy Costs in Half (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Building designers and operators could cut energy use by 50% in large office buildings, hospitals, schools, and a variety of stores - including groceries, general merchandise outlets, and retail outlets - by following the recommendations of researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  11. NREL Recommends Ways to Cut Building Energy Costs in Half (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    Building designers and operators could cut energy use by 50% in large office buildings, hospitals, schools, and a variety of stores -- including groceries, general merchandise outlets, and retail outlets -- by following the recommendations of NREL researchers. The innovative energy-saving recommendations are contained in technical support documents and Advanced Energy Design Guides compiled by NREL.

  12. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2011 $0 $0 FY2012 $3,463,912 $200,000 FY2013 $3,463,912 $350,000 FY2014 $4,535,359 $175,000 FY2015 $8,141,680 $410,000 FY2016 $4,112,058 FY2017 $4,112,058 FY2018 $4,112,058 FY2019 $1,860,997 Cumulative Fee $33,802,034 $1,135,000 EM Contractor Fee West Valley Demonstration Project - West Valley, NY West Valley Demonstration Project Phase 1 Decommissioning - Facility Disposition December 2015 $59,039,818 Cost Plus Award Fee $494,970,881

  13. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cost (Exercised CLINs,excluding fee): Contract Base Period: Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee (Exercised CLINs) Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2012 $15,763,807 $15,087,078 FY2013-01 $10,763,331 $10,402,078 FY2013-02 $16,098,142 $15,775,605 FY2014-01 $3,433,270 $3,219,034 FY2014-02* $17,977,254 $31,966,742 FY2015-01 $6,178,183 $6,016,799 FY2015-02 $8,716,668 $8,524,378 FY2016-01** $7,484,019 $2,528,489 Cumulative Fee $86,414,674 $93,520,203 *$14,150,224 of $28,300,488

  14. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2011 $6,190,992 $5,779,687 FY2012 $16,380,944 $14,173,044 FY2013 $16,972,816 $12,693,413 FY2014 $15,520,007 $13,207,526 FY2015 $14,269,197 FY2016 $23,819,121 Cumulative Fee $93,153,077 $45,853,670 $93,153,077 $0 Cost-Plus-Award-Fee $1,684,717,283 March 29, 2011 - March 28, 2016 Fee Information Option 1: 3/29/16 -9/28/18 Option 1a: 9/29/18 - 3/28/21 DE-AC30-10CC40017 EM Contractor Fee December 2015 Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Portsmouth D&D

  15. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2009 $26,647,324 $19,757,181 FY2010 $35,264,395 $22,009,931 FY2011 $70,699,523 $69,100,507 FY2012 $18,134,034 $12,265,000 FY2013 $17,766,524 $4,910,099 FY2014 $13,315,000 $9,659,555 FY2015 $11,500,000 $0 FY2016 $12,025,000 FY2017 $11,500,000 FY2018 $11,639,576 Cumulative Fee $228,491,376 $137,702,273 Option 1: 10/1/13 - 9/30/18 (exercised) June 19, 2008 -September 30, 2013 EM Contractor Fee Richland

  16. BWXT/B&W Pantex Contract No. DE-AC04-00AL66620 FY BUDGET

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    BWXT/B&W Pantex Contract No. DE-AC04-00AL66620 FY BUDGET (LAB TABLE) ESTIMATED COST AWARD FEE AVAILABLE WFO FEE AVAILABLE (Estimated) AVAILABLE FEE FROM OTHER REIMBURSABLE WORK (Estimated) AWARD FEE EARNED WFO FEE EARNED EARNED FEE FROM OTHER REIMBURSABLE WORK 2011 533,140,000 498,262,000 34,878,000 276,000 127,000 2010 575,020,000 537,402,000 37,618,000 278,000 120,000 35,930,423 270,406 125,005 2009 511,744,000 478,265,421 33,478,579 224,634 91,932 31,815,053 207,296 192,086 2008

  17. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contract Base Period: Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 $2,550,203 FY2009 $42,649,069 $36,473,354 FY2010 $69,660,249 $64,874,187 FY2011 $48,750,000 $44,329,841 FY2012 $48,950,000 $41,492,503 FY2013 $122,283,499 $66,203,499 FY2014 $144,860,240 $138,233,496 FY2015 $45,730,000 $37,853,814 FY2016 $44,930,000 Cumulative Fee $570,363,260 $432,010,897 EM Contractor Fee Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Management &

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlander Golf Course (Wenatchee) April 22, 2016 1 p.m. Shotgun Start BEST BALL FORMAT Four persons per team $80 per person Entry fee covers the following: Range balls, green fees and power cart Plus Dinner! *PRIZES*PRIZES*PRIZES* Entry fee and registration form MUST be turned in to Julie Mitchem no later than April 20, 2016 For Team/Player sign-up, call/email: Julie Mitchem - 373-1344

  19. SR0009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 8, 2000 Media Contact: Rick Ford (803) 725-2889 WSRC Receives Award Fee Flag Ribbon Art Note to Editors and News Directors The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined the performance award fee earned by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the evaluation period October 1, 1999, through March 31, 2000. To obatin a copy of the letter announcing DOE's award fee determination click here or call (803) 725-2889 -DOE- SR-00-08

  20. SR0015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , 2000 Media Contact: Jim Giusti (803) 725-2889 WSRC Receives Award Fee Flag Ribbon Graphic Note to Editors and News Directors The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined the performance award fee earned by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the evaluation period April 1, 2000, through September 30, 2000. To obatin a copy of the letter announcing DOE's award fee determination click here or call (803) 725-2889 -DOE- SR-00-15 | Back |

  1. SR0018

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rick Ford (803) 725-2889 Wackenhut Receives Award Fee Flag Ribbon Graphic The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined the performance award fee earned by Wackenhut Services, Incorporated, for the evaluation period April 1, 2000, through September 30, 2000. To obatin a copy of the letter announcing DOE's award fee determination click here or call (803) 725-2889. -DOE- SR-00-18

  2. SR9805

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16, 1999 Media Contact: Rick Ford (803) 725-2889 WSCR Receives Award Fee Flag Ribbon Art The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined the performance award fees earned by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the evaluation period October 1, 1998, through March 31, 1999. The letter announcing DOE's award fee determination is available by calling (803)725-2889. -DOE- SR-98-05

  3. SR9917

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 1999 Media Contact: Rick Ford (803) 725-2889 WSCR Receives Award Fee Flag Ribbon Art The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined the performance award fees earned by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the evaluation period April 1, 1999, through September 30, 1999. The letter announcing DOE's award fee determination is available by calling (803)725-2889. -DOE- SR-99-17

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Annual Fee Beginning July 1, 2015, PEV owners are required to pay an annual license fee of $200 for non-commercial PEVs and $300 for commercial PEVs. The Georgia Department of Revenue may adjust fees annually based on vehicle fuel economy and the Consumer Price Index through July 1, 2018. (Reference House Bill 170, 2015, and Georgia Code 40-2-15

  5. What is the meaning of this map's colors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    access to the data, all without an additional fee. Commercial Data Access Tiers - Demand ResponseEnergy Efficiency The tiers for demand response and energy efficiency are...

  6. H

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    criteria for earning fee in accordance with the Section H clause entitled "PERFORMANCE EVALUATION MEASUREMENT PLAN." If the clause "PROJECT CONTROL SYSTEMS AND REPORTING...

  7. Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program, Peer Exchange Call: Program Sustainability, September 27, 2012. PDF icon Program Sustainability Summary More Documents & Publications Revenue From Contractor Fees How Can ...

  8. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Valley Demonstration Project - West Valley, NY West Valley Demonstration Project Phase 1 Decommissioning - Facility Disposition September 2015 59,039,818 Cost Plus Award Fee...

  9. Catawba County- Green Construction Permitting Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Catawba County is providing incentives to encourage the construction of sustainably built homes and commercial buildings. Rebates on permit fees and plan reviews are available for certain...

  10. MEMORANDUM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    --- 0 Production 0 DisposalStorage TYPE OF CONTRACT --- 0 Prime 0 Subcontract& 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit...

  11. City of St. George- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of St. George Energy Services Department (SGESD) offers a net metering program to its customers, and updated program guidelines and fees in September 2015.* 

  12. City of Columbus- Green Columbus Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Columbus Fund incentivizes sustainable development and redevelopment in Columbus, Ohio. The Fund reimburses private and non-profit developers the application fee for the Green Building...

  13. RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/California | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    necessary drilling fees to DOGGR. Following review, DOGGR will issue a Permit to Conduct Geothermal Operations to the developer. Local Well Field Process not available Policies &...

  14. Vermont Drinking Water and Groundwater Protection Division Permit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2015 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Vermont Drinking Water and Groundwater Protection Division Permit Fees...

  15. Microsoft Word - ALonEO13423Last.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Performance Evaluation and Management Plan (PEMP)Award Fee Plan. With respect to the second component, if Performance Based Incentives (PBI) are utilized under the contract, a...

  16. BPA-2015-00187-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    working for Bechtel Corporation, Bonneville Power Administration, Vandenberg AFB, Fort Irwin, etc. Namely activities in the South Pacific and stateside. If there are any fees for...

  17. Part II: Section B - Supplies, Services, and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Actual construction management fee available will be established through negotiation of ... Contractor's team that are: (1) small business(es); (2) Protg firms as part of an ...

  18. Fact #891: September 21, 2015 Comparison of State Incentives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    such as tax credits and rebates, sales and use tax exemptions, reduced license taxes, title tax exemptions, and reduced registration fees. Colorado, Connecticut and...

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/4-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and written evidence confirming that it is not delinquent in paying its franchise taxes. The application to prospect must be accompanied by the appropriate filing fee....

  20. Travel Policies & Tips | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    should clearly document goods and services. Foreign currency transaction fees such as ATM charges or currency conversion are reimbursable expenses. When rentingleasing vehicles...

  1. BPA-2010-01306-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1004. You have agreed to pay 100 in fees. Mr. Bob King, Supervisor, Public Utility Specialist, Transmission Policy and Strategy, has been...

  2. BPA-2010-01578-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1004. You have agreed to pay up to 100 in fees associated with the FOIA. Mr. Robert D. King, Supervisory, Public Utilities Specialist, Transmission Policy & Strategy, has been...

  3. Property:FinancialIncentive | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of financial incentives This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Capital Subsidies, Grants, & Rebates Credit Enhancements Fee Waivers...

  4. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice08.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    liaison) legal costs and contract fees should be clearly disclosed to the public during annual reviews of the Hanford Cleanup budget. 5. While comparisons to other facilities,...

  5. software | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software, developed under various DOENETL projects, includes numerical simulators, ... E&P Tools CO2 Prophet Fuzzy Expert Exploration Tool (Fee) Frac Explore Intelligent ...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    License Fee Effective July 1, 2015, each alternative fuel supplier, refiner, distributor, terminal operator, importer or exporter of alternative fuel used in motor vehicles must...

  7. DOC182.PDF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    line item. This fee is similar to those paid by commercial firms to belong to trade and industry associations related to their government contracts, and is considered an...

  8. Vermont Notice of Intent to Discharge Stormwater Pursuant to...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fees and all other application information required, to the Vermont Watershed Management Division for a Operational Stormwater Permit. Author Vermont Department of...

  9. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Earned FY2012 $475,395 $418,348 FY2013 $1,141,987 $1,096,308 FY2014 $1,401,951 $1,121,562 FY2015 $1,494,810 FY2016 $1,507,373 Cumulative Fee $6,021,516 $2,636,218 $6,021,516 Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 N/A Cost Plus Award Fee $136,743,769 November 4, 2011 - September 30, 2016 $0 EM Contractor Fee Moab Uranium Mill Tailings - Moab, UT Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract December 2015 Fee Information

  10. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 $8,192,895 $7,892,519 FY2014 $8,192,895 $1,024,112 FY2015 $10,249,460 $5,909,460 FY2016 $9,241,711 $0 FY2017 $7,646,702 Cumulative Fee $43,523,663 $14,826,091 EM Contractor Fee Carlsbad Field Office - Carlsbad, NM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operations December 2015 October 1, 2012 - September 30, 2017 $0 $1,332,178,100 Fee Information $43,523,663 Option 1: 10/1/17 - 9/30/22 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-EM0001971 Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC

  11. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Earned FY 2011 $0 $0 FY 2012 $2,857,830 $2,762,134 FY 2013 $3,258,260 $3,108,260 FY 2014 $3,258,260 $2,921,628 FY 2015 $6,555,406 $5,316,753 Cumulative Fee $15,929,756 $14,108,775 EM Contractor Fee Idaho Operations Office - Idaho Falls, ID Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project December 2015 $0 N/A Cost Plus Award Fee $448,256,946 Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 $15,929,756 Fee Information October 2011 - September 2015

  12. DOE Headquarters FOIA Request Form | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    gathering and not for commercial use. Affiliation Type of media Newspaper Magazine Television Station Other Other media type Fees and waivers Your request must include a...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program There are six green building categories. Meeting the minimum criteria for three categories qualifies the project for a 30% rebate on permit fees. For each...

  14. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and experts in project management to ensure issues are identified early and lessons learned are being applied in real-time; Selecting proper contract types; tying fee...

  15. PART III ? SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX B AWARD FEE PLAN Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award....

  16. Montana Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization, and Permit Fees Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance -...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Energy Efficiency Trust Fund Additional funds may be accumulated through non-compliance fees as part of the...

  18. Bill Wilcox, part 3 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  19. AQ AM Announcement Y150512 DRAFT jm-cpb

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sponsors: Los Alamos National Laboratory: Institute for Materials Science (IMS) and MaRIE Cost: 250 fee with the New Mexico Consortium (NMC workshop registration site to come)...

  20. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost: 250 Registration fee Sponsors: Los Alamos National Laboratory - NSECIMS, MaRIE Hotel Reservations: Guests can begin booking reservations at La Fonda online or by...

  1. Patrick Case | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  2. Alice Piercey | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  3. Bill Wilcox, part 1 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  4. Bill Wilcox, part 2 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  5. Oral History Videos | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  6. Blake Case | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  7. Wilma Brooks | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  8. Beverly Woods | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  9. Willard Brock | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gas, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Wind (Small), Anaerobic Digestion City of Santa Monica- Building Permit Fee Waiver for Solar Projects In early 2002, the City of Santa...

  11. Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Capitalizing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Better Buildings Residential Network Commitment: Provide DOE ... separately from housing unit operations - every saved on ... - no dump fees and electricity generation: win-win ...

  12. Prime Contract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PEP. This performance fee is used for nonallowable costs, which range from recruiting and retention of the world's foremost scientists and engineers to an annual employee picnic....

  13. 2015 triple e | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Registration Fee: Free Venue: National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Phone: 412-386-4824 tripleEinteraction.jpg Agenda Menu This...

  14. DOE - Fossil Energy:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    importing natural gas from a country like Mexico? Answer: In accordance with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), all fees were eliminated on June 30, 1999. Question...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    non-compliance fees as part of the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS). For both natural gas and electric utilities, failure to submit an energ... Eligibility:...

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    estate andor equipment. As of February 1, 2011, loan applicants will be charged credit analysis fees incurred by the Idaho Governor's Office of Energy... Eligibility:...

  17. BlueChoice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surgeon (including maternity services that are not part of OBGyn global delivery fee and complications of pregnancy) 10% after deductible 5 10% after deductible 10% after...

  18. Microsoft Word - PPO Plan Highlight.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surgeon (including maternity services that are not part of OBGyn global delivery fee and complications of pregnancy) 10% after deductible 5 10% after deductible 10% after...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5608 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 3090 RE: NOTICE OF COMPLETENESS DETERMINATION AND FEE ASSESSMENT WIPP HAZARDOUS WASTE FACILITY PERMIT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088...

  1. Information Repository

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CBFOM.F. Sharif, WTS dated May 3, 2012 Administrative Completeness Determination and Fee Assessment for Class 1 Permit Modification. JE Kieling, NMED dated February 17, 2012 Class...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Yes; specific technologies not identified Local Option- Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Projects Public Act 15-194 effective October 1st 2015, requires each...

  3. DE-AC05-06OR23100

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fee FD04029OR36, as revised Characterization, Verification, and Technical Support to ORO Environmental Management in support of the Defense ARRA Work at Y-12 National Security...

  4. OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION P.O. Box 450, MSIN H6-60

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... C. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE FOR PERFORMANCE FEE ... 60 5. INTERIM RATING CHART - OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE ... FY fiscal year HFFACO Hanford Federal Facility Agreement ...

  5. Generating Energy Efficiency Project Leads and Allocating Leads...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary More Documents & Publications Unique Fee-for-Service Revenues Think Again A Fresh Look at Home Performance Business Models and Service Offerings (301) Program Automation

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    InstallersContractors Savings Category: Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building City of Santa Monica- Building Permit Fee Waiver for Solar Projects In early 2002, the City of Santa...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fees as part of the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS). For both natural gas and electric utilities, failure to submit an energ... Eligibility: Investor-Owned...

  8. BPA-2011-01724-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Bonneville's actions on species listed under the Endangered Species Act and wetlands. I request a waiver or reduction of fees because the discolsure is "likely to...

  9. Microsoft Word - EM Major Contracts Summary 101515update.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Services, Inc. DE-EM0001131 72214 - 102017 465M Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Deactivation Cost, firm fixed price, and award fee elements Site Contractor Contract...

  10. WAC 173-160-151 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    outlining notice and fee requirements for well constructing, reconstructing, or decommissioning a water well in Washington. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2009 Legal...

  11. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    real estate andor equipment. As of February 1, 2011, loan applicants will be charged credit analysis fees incurred by the Idaho Governor's Office of Energy... Eligibility:...

  13. NREL: Technology Transfer - Nonexclusive and Exclusive Licenses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sold utilizing the licensed technology. The fees and payments vary depending on the business model, market(s), and the number of patents licensed. Exclusive NREL grants an...

  14. A:\\CHAP05PERFASSM(REVISED).PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... in such a way that non-critical (but necessary) ... Payment of Fee, Profit, or Incentives," affords ... partnership, and trust that minimizes the ...

  15. DOE16-001-ATVM-Handout-v05

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Powertrain Technologies * Increased Number of Gear Ratios * Hybrid EV Powertrain Integration LOW-COST FINANCING FOR U.S. MANUFACTURING FACILITIES MINIMAL FEES The ...

  16. SECTION C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Laboratory; (c) Provide for appropriate financial incentives (e.g., fee) when performance ... These activities are strongly supported by theory and modeling programs, international ...

  17. Property:Incentive/Cont2Phone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 601-961-5134 + Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) + 515-281-8468 + Air Pollution Control (Indiana) + (317) 439-0759 + Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) +...

  18. Property:Incentive/Cont2Name | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Jerry Beasley + Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) + Marnie Stein + Air Pollution Control (Indiana) + Beverly Gard + Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) + Bruce...

  19. Registration Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory. No registration fee is required. Participants need to cover travel, hotel, and dinner costs. Breakfast, lunch, and snacks will be provided. Registration is...

  20. Document

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    February 6, 2004 Part II The President Executive Order 13327-Federal Real Property Asset Management VerDate jul<14>2003 12:11 Feb 05, 2004 Jkt 203001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\06FEE0.SGM 06FEE0 VerDate jul<14>2003 12:11 Feb 05, 2004 Jkt 203001 PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\06FEE0.SGM 06FEE0 Presidential Documents 5897 Federal Register Vol. 69, No. 25 Friday, February 6, 2004 Title 3- The President Executive Order 13327 of February 4, 2004

  1. Depositional and erosional coastal processes during the late postglacial sea-level rise: An example from the central Tyrrhenian continental shelf (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tortora, P.

    1996-03-01

    A transgressive systems tract (TST) deposit on the inner continental shelf of the south Tuscany region (central Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) formed during the last postglacial sea-level rise. Its small-scale stratigraphy has been detailed using high-resolution seismic profiles, gravity cores, and grab samples. The TST deposit overlies a lowstand unconformity, shows a tabular geometry, and comprises three internal architectures of beach facies. Because the lateral distribution of these vertical successions is not random, but parallel to the coast, each architecture represents an individual sedimentary stage during sea-level rise. However, all architectures were formed via shoreface retreat in response to the landward migration of a beach complex over the unconformity. During this migration the beach system was characterized by a source diastem located in the surf zone and by two sediment dispersal systems. One moved the eroded sand over the flat back-barrier palustrine area by storm washover, while the other transported part of this sand to the lower shoreface, forming a reworked sand sheet above the older and inactive source diastem (ravinement surface). The TST architectures originated from a transgressive succession of beach facies, differentiated according to the intensity of shoreface retreat. Architecture A represents a low preservation potential of the original beach complex, Architecture B relatively high preservation, and Architecture C no preservation. The intensity of erosion and the consequent preservation potential were totally controlled by antecedent topography.

  2. Middle to Late Holocene Fluctuations of C3 and C4 Vegetation in a Northern New England Salt Marsh, Sprague Marsh, Phippsburg Maine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B J; Moore, K A; Lehmann, C; Bohlen, C; Brown, T A

    2006-05-26

    A 3.1 meter sediment core was analyzed for stable carbon isotope composition of organic matter and higher plant leaf wax (HPLW) lipid biomarkers to determine Holocene shifts in C{sub 3} (higher high marsh) and C{sub 4} (low and/or high marsh) plant deposition at the Sprague River Salt Marsh, Phippsburg, Maine. The carbon isotope composition of the bulk sediment and the HPLW parallel each other throughout most of the core, suggesting that terrestrial plants are an important source of organic matter to the sediments, and diagenetic alteration of the bulk sediments is minimal. The current salt marsh began to form 2500 cal yr BP. Low and/or high C{sub 4} marsh plants dominated deposition at 2000 cal yr BP, 700 cal yr BP, and for the last 200 cal yr BP. Expansion of higher high marsh C{sub 3} plants occurred at 1300 and 600 cal yr BP. These major vegetation shifts result from a combination of changes in relative sea-level rise and sediment accumulation rates. Average annual carbon sequestration rates for the last 2500 years approximate 40 g C yr{sup -1} m{sup -2}, and are in strong agreement with other values published for the Gulf of Maine. Given that Maine salt marshes cover an area of {approx}79 km{sup 2}, they represent an important component of the terrestrial carbon sink. More detailed isotopic and age records from a network of sediment cores at Sprague Marsh are needed to truly evaluate the long term changes in salt marsh plant communities and the impact of more recent human activity, including global warming, on salt marsh vegetation.

  3. Possible flexural mechanisms for origins of extensive, ooid-rich, carbonate environments, middle and early late Mississippian, east-central United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettensohn, F.R. )

    1989-08-01

    During the earliest Mississippian, much of east-central US was a deep-water black-shale basin formed due to subsidence accompanying Acadian tectonism; by the middle Mississippian, this basin had been transformed into a very shallow epeiric sea characterized by ooid-rich carbonates. This transformation probably occurred in two parts due to flexural mechanisms accompanying the end of the Acadian orogeny and the beginning of the Ouachita orogeny. In the eastern part of the basin, with the end of active Acadian deformational loading, lithospheric relaxation caused uplift and eastward migration of the Acadian peripheral bulge from near the Cincinnati arch into the Appalachian basin. By the middle Meramecian, this uplift and a concomitant infilling of the basin with post-orogenic clastics created an extensive shallow-water platform conducive to ooid deposition well into the Appalachian basin. In western parts of the cratonic black-shale basin, from the western flanks of the Cincinnati arch to the eastern flanks of the Transcontinental arch, any infilling with postorogenic Acadian clastics was minor. However, by the Kinderhook-Osage transition, apparent collision and subduction leading to the Ouachita orogeny had begun, and with the inception of collision, the entire foreland as far north as the Illinois basin was upwarped by the cratonward (north and northeast) migration of the accompany peripheral bulge. As a result, by the early Meramecian, shallow-water conditions favorable for oolitic-carbonate deposition prevailed throughout the area.

  4. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY2011 0 FY2012 0 FY2013 -20,000,000 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 Cumulative Fee 8,524,281 Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group DE-AC09-02SR22210 Fee Information NA EM...

  5. SR0106

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31, 2001 Media Contact: Rick Ford (803) 725-2889 DOE Announces Wackenhut Services Inc. Award Fee Flag Ribbon Art Note To Editors and News Directors: The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined the performance award fee earned by Wackenhut Services, Incorporated, for the evaluation period October 1, 2000, through March 31, 2001. -DOE- SR-01-06

  6. DE-SOL-0005388

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5388 Page 1 of 327 B.1 SERVICES TO BE ACQUIRED - Mission Execution and Strategic Analysis (MESA) ..................... 8 B.2 ESTIMATED TOTAL COST OF CONTRACT ................................................................................... 11 B.3 LIMITATION OF FUNDS -- COST PLUS AWARD FEE .................................................................. 11 B.4 DISTRIBUTION OF PERFORMANCE AWARD FEE ...................................................................... 11 Section C -

  7. Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    This analysis supplements the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 alternative cases which imposed hypothetical carbon dioxide emission fees on fossil fuel consumers. It offers further cases that examine the impacts of fees placed only on the emissions from electric power facilities, impacts of returning potential revenues to consumers, and two cap-and-trade policies.

  8. Advanced Fossil Energy Projects Solicitation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Advanced Fossil Energy Projects Solicitation Advanced Fossil Energy Projects Solicitation Informational Materials Advanced Fossil Energy Projects Solicitation Solicitation and Supplements I through V (December 4, 2015). Applicants should review the final solicitation and all supplements before submitting an application. The full download above contains the following documents listed below: Solicitation (December 12, 2013) Supplement I regarding Application Fee and Facility Fee (July 8, 2014)

  9. TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    08 DATE: October 31, 2013 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: ACQUISITION LETTER 2014-02: PROVISIONAL PAYMENT OF FEE SUMMARY: The subject Acquisition Letter's purpose is to provide guidance on provisional payment of fee for non management and operating contracts

  10. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AC05-00OR22800 TABLE OF CONTENTS Contents Page # TOC - i SECTION A - SOLICITATION/OFFER AND AWARD ......................................................................... A-i SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS ........................................................ B-i B.1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED ....................................................................................B-2 B.2 TRANSITION COST, ESTIMATED COST, MAXIMUM AVAILABLE FEE, AND AVAILABLE FEE (Modification 295,

  11. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2009 $18,417,000 $17,667,000 FY2010 $28,613,905 $28,141,405 FY2011 $33,334,089 $33,300,000 FY2012 $23,507,000 $23,078,500 FY2013 $20,894,699 $19,073,701 FY2014 $25,073,192 $21,887,968 FY2015 $30,000,000 $28,182,000 FY2016 $22,421,038 Cumulative Fee $202,260,923 $171,330,574 $0 EM Contractor Fee Office of River Protection - Richland, WA Tank Operations Contract December 2015 $202,260,923 October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2013 Washington

  12. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2010-A $811,313 $685,560 FY2010-B $811,313 $687,588 FY2011-A $747,788 $601,221 FY2011-B $1,281,021 $1,208,003 FY2012-A $613,324 $502,926 FY2012-B $693,521 $618,967 FY2013-A $795,968 $585,435 FY2013-B $795,968 $614,885 FY2014-A $592,117 $405,601 FY2014-B $53,178 $33,762 FY2015-A $729,174 $729,174 FY2015-B $1,094,694 $1,094,694 FY2016A $527,978 $527,978 Cumulative Fee $9,547,357 $8,295,794 $9,547,357 Wastren Advantage Inc. DE-EM0000323

  13. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contract Base Period: Contract Option Period: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 $2,550,203 FY2009 $42,649,069 $36,473,354 FY2010 $69,660,249 $64,874,187 FY2011 $48,750,000 $44,329,841 FY2012 $48,950,000 $41,492,503 FY2013 $122,283,499 $66,203,499 FY2014 $144,860,240 $138,233,496 FY2015 $45,730,000 $0 FY2016 $44,930,000 Cumulative Fee $570,363,260 $394,157,083 $9,400,000,000 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC August 1, 2008 - July 31, 2013

  14. Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2004 $294,316 FY2005 $820,074 FY2006 $799,449 FY2007 $877,898 FY2008 $866,608 FY2009 $886,404 FY2010 $800,314 FY2011 $871,280 FY2012 $824,517 FY2013 Cumulative Fee Paid $7,040,860 $820,074 $799,449 $877,898 $916,130 $886,608 Computer Sciences Corporation DE-AC06-04RL14383 $895,358 $899,230 $907,583 Cost Plus Award Fee $134,100,336 $8,221,404 Fee Available Contract Period: Fee Information Minimum

  15. Word Pro - S1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 1.5 Merchandise Trade Value (Million Dollars a ) Petroleum b Energy c Non- Energy Balance Total Merchandise Exports Imports Balance Exports Imports Balance Exports Imports Balance 1974 Total ................ 792 24,668 -23,876 3,444 25,454 -22,010 18,126 99,437 103,321 -3,884 1975 Total ................ 907 25,197 -24,289 4,470 26,476 -22,006 31,557 108,856 99,305 9,551 1980 Total ................ 2,833 78,637 -75,803 7,982 82,924 -74,942 55,246 225,566 245,262 -19,696 1985 Total

  16. Effects of ethanol on small engines and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettis, M.D.

    1995-01-09

    With the support of the Missouri Corn Merchandising Council and the Department of Energy, Northwest Missouri State University conducted an applied research project to investigate the effects of the commercially available ethanol/gasoline fuel blend on small engines. The study attempted to identify any problems when using the 10% ethanol/gasoline blend in engines designed for gasoline and provide solutions to the problems identified. Fuel economy, maximum power, internal component wear, exhaust emissions and engine efficiency were studied.

  17. Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting Report and Actions Proposed - Appendix C

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    APPENDIX C: Data Sheets for New Products Table of Contents Product Page Product Page Commercial Refrigeration Miscellaneous Residential Equipment Standards Consideration C-1 Standards Consideration C-50 Beverage Merchandisers Test Procedure Summary C-3 Ceiling Fans Test Procedure Summary C-52 Standards Consideration C-4 Compact Audio Standards Consideration C-53 Ice Machines Test Procedure Summary C-6 Component Stereo and Rack Audio Standards Consideration C-54 Reach-In Freezers Standards

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Commercial Refrigeration - Annual Primary Energy Consumption Equipment Type Percent of Total Supermarket Refrigeration 56% Walk-Ins 12% Reach-Ins 9% Refrigerated Vending Machines 8% Ice Machines 7% Beverage Merchandisers 4% Food Service Equipment 4% Total Source(s): 1.23 Quad DOE/EERE/Navigant Consulting, Energy Savings Potential and R&D Opportunities for Commercial Refrigeration, Sept. 2009, Figure 1-2, p. 17

  19. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modification No. 0171 Section B i PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. B.1 - SERVICE BEING ACQUIRED B-1 B.2 - OBLIGATION OF FUNDS AND FINANCIAL LIMITATIONS B-1 B.3 - PERFORMANCE AND OTHER INCENTIVE FEES B-1 B.4 - ALLOWABILITY OF SUBCONTRACTOR FEE B-3 B.5 - PROVISIONAL PAYMENT OF PERFORMANCE FEE B-3 Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Modification No. 0171 Section B B-1 PART I SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS B.1 - SERVICE BEING ACQUIRED

  20. The fight to save the university research reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobeck, L.M.; Perez, P.B.

    1993-10-01

    This article looks at impacts of Nuclear Regulatory Commission actions on nonprofit educational reactors. In mid-July the NRC issued a ruling on fee policy, which eliminated the historical fee exemeption for nonprofit research reactors. The ensuing regulatory fees placed an economic burden on these facilities which was likely to close many of them. On September 13, the NRC agreed to reconsider this rule. In part this reflects that this rule had an impact on a larger user base than just research reactors. The article summarizes this problem, and tries to put it in perspective for the reader.

  1. Payments to LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Payments to LANL Payments to LANL Make payments for event registrations, sponsorships, insurance, travel, other fees. Contact Treasury Team (505) 667-4090 Email If you need to make a payment to LANL for an event registration, insurance, travel, or other fees, you may pay by check or credit card. However, if you are a LANL employee attending a LANL-sponsored event that requires a registration fee, do not submit your payment by check or credit card. Instead provide the event coordinators with your

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle License Fee Drivers using natural gas or propane to fuel a vehicle may pay a special use fuel license fee annually in lieu of the state fuel excise tax of $0.30 per gallon. The fee is determined by multiplying a base amount in the table below by the current tax rate and dividing by 12. Combined Vehicle Weight (pounds) Base Amount 0 - 10,000 $60 10,001 - 26,000 $300 26,001 and above $400 (Reference Oregon Revised Statutes 319.530

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Residential Water Billing Rate Structures for Community Water Systems Rate Structure Uniform Rates Declining Block Rate Increasing Block Rate Peak Period or Seasonal Rate Separate Flat Fee Annual Connection Fee Combined Flat Fee Other Rate Structures Note(s): Source(s): 3.0% 9.0% 1) Systems serving more than 10,000 users provide service to 82% of the population served by community water systems. Columns do not sum to 100% because some systems use more than one rate structure. 2) Uniform rates

  4. S. 254: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil or refined petroleum products. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, January 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is the text of a bill to impose import taxes on crude oil and refined petroleum products, petrochemical feedstock or petrochemical derivatives. Taxes will be paid by the first person who sells the product within the U.S. and by the person who uses the product.

  5. BPA-2014-01482-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ) - D-1 Subject: Re: FOJA BPA-2014-01482*F Date: Thursday, July 31, 2014 4:36:31 PM Hi Kim, The purpose of my writing you is to ask for a fee waiver in reference to my FOIA...

  6. BPA-2016-00303-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Please w aive the fees due to the d iscriminatory nature of the PSC community within SPA. The requested information will be used in a fu ture complaint. The informative value...

  7. Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Program, Peer Exchange Call: Program Sustainability, September 27, 2012. PDF icon Program Sustainability Summary More Documents & Publications Revenue From Contractor Fees How Can the Network Meet Your Needs? Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    efficiency improvements in eligible homes. There is a 15 application fee for all loans plus additional closing costs (typically around 150). No work that is to be paid for by...

  9. Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Support Services Contract September 2015 Wastren-EnergX Mission Support, LLC Cost Plus Award Fee 147,232,912 December 22, 2009 - December 31, 2015 Extension executed POP...

  10. Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office of Procurement and Assistance Management, Office of Management Subject: Cost-Plus Award Fee PDF icon 8-3-09FinalTestimony(Simpson).pdf More Documents & Publications...

  11. Office of Environmental Management MAJOR CONTRACTS SUMMARY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    12 - 93017 1.33B Waste Isolation Pilot Project Management and Operating Contract Cost plus award fee 5-Yr Option 100117 - 93022 Portage, Inc. DE-EM0004007 Base Period 116...

  12. Y-12, early records from the National Archives at Atlanta

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cost is 346M (this was pencil changed to 390M) and the fixed fee for Stone and Webster was set at 2.9M. Of course, this interim agreement would continue to be modified...

  13. BPA-2014-00538-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    archaeological survey done for the BPA line east of Missoula, in the area of Beavertail Hill to Bearmouth stretch." Response: BPA has found no responsive records. There are no fees...

  14. Line Extension Alternatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Board (PSB) of Vermont developed rules regarding utility line extension requests. While the majority of the rules focus on the procedure followed (and associated fees) for the...

  15. New Jersey Natural Gas- SAVEGREEN Residential On-Bill Financing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the SAVEGREEN Project, New Jersey Natural Gas (NJNG) provides an On-Bill Repayment Program (OBRP) for $2,500 up to $10,000 at 0% APR with no fees, points, or closing cost for energy...

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a new permit and fee will be required for any drilling beyond the permit expiration date. Process Flowchart 19-NM-b - Permit to Drill a Well with No Consumptive Use of Water.pdf...

  17. Document

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Costs C. Solicitation D. Payment of the Credit Subsidy Cost E. Assessment of Fees F. Financial Structure G. Eligible Lenders H. FCRA I. Default and Audit Provisions J. Tax Exempt...

  18. BPA-2013-01480-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the two 11 5K transmission lines at Nafelle-- -- -. Substation feeding Pacific county PUD No. 2 for the calendar year 2012. I agree to pay reasonable duplication fees for the...

  19. Savannah River Operations Office P.O. Box A Aiken. South Carolina...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fee. As a result of careful and considerate evaluation of the performance-based incenti ves, I have determined that SRNS has earned 44,329,841. Additional guidance will be...

  20. Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.