Sample records for lasers electron beams

  1. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  2. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short, high-peak- current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (

  3. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  4. Resurrection of beam conditioning for free electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Ming

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    t z , Undulators and Free-Electron Lasers, (Clarendon Press,a fatal flaw in a Free Electron Laser ( F E L ) beamO N Operation of free electron lasers in shorter wavelength

  5. Free Electron Lasers using `Beam by Design'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, J R; McNeil, B W J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods have been proposed in the literature to improve Free Electron Laser output by transforming the electron phase-space before entering the FEL interaction region. By utilising `beam by design' with novel undulators and other beam changing elements, the operating capability of FELs may be further usefully extended. This paper introduces two new such methods to improve output from electron pulses with large energy spreads and the results of simulations of these methods in the 1D limit are presented. Both methods predict orders of magnitude improvements to output radiation powers.

  6. Achromatic and Isochronous Electron Beam Transport for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengtsson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers," LBL-28880 Preprint (Thirteenth mtemational Free Electron Laser Conference, SantaTransport for Tunable Free Electron Lasers 1. Bengtsson and

  7. A PLASMA CHANNEL BEAM CONDITIONER FOR A FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    A PLASMA CHANNEL BEAM CONDITIONER FOR A FREE ELECTRON LASER G. Penn , A.M. Sessler, J.S. Wurtele of free electron lasers (FELs) can be dramatically improved. Under certain con- ditions, the FEL can transverse action and energy, has been shown to be advantageous for free electron laser (FEL) performance [1

  8. Sensitivity of nonlinear harmonic generation to electron beam quality in free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jr. , Principles of Free-electron Lasers (Chapman & Hall,experiment," in Free Electron Laser Challenges II, Harold E.Beam Quality in Free-Electron Lasers* Sandra G . Biedron*f,

  9. A NEW VERSION OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER TWO BEAM ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation in Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",Power 35 GHz Testing of a Free-Electron Laser and Two-BeamA New Version of a Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

  10. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutton, Andrew (Yorktown, VA)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  11. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  12. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongxiu (Williamsburg, VA); Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  13. Title of Dissertation: LASER SWITCHED ELECTRON BEAM MODULATION WITH TERAHERTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: LASER SWITCHED ELECTRON BEAM MODULATION WITH TERAHERTZ APPLICATIONS Jonathan Neumann, PhD 2005 Dissertation Directed By: Dr. Patrick O'Shea, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering This dissertation describes the exploration of relativistic electron beams modulated

  14. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the 11th International Free-Electron Laser Conference, Nuc!.A Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator30418 Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

  15. Macroparticle Theory of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takayama, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motz, Undulators and Free-Electron Laser (Clarendon Press,of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Acceleratorof a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

  16. Thermal effect on prebunched two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirian, N. S. [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the two-beam free electron laser. The fundamental resonance of the fast electron beam coincides with the fifth harmonic of the slow electron beam in order to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Thermal effect in the form of the longitudinal velocity spread is included in the analysis. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, prebunched slow electron beam is considered. The evaluation of the radiation power, bunching parameter, distribution function of energy, and the distribution function of the pondermotive phase is studied. Sensitivity of the power of the fifth harmonic to the jitter in the energy difference between the two beams is also studied. A phase space is presented that shows the trapped electrons at the saturation point.

  17. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse Xiaofang Wang emission from the interaction of an ultrafast ( 29 fs), intense ( 1018 W/cm2 ) laser pulse with underdense of such an ultrafast laser pulse with matter and possible new approaches to MeV electron generation. In this paper we

  18. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, B

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a limited, defined region. Using this technique a 460 MeV electron beam was produced with an energy spread of 5%. This technique is directly scalable to multi-GeV electron beam generation with sub-percent energy spreads.

  19. Electron beam magnetic switch for a plurality of free electron lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for forming and utilizing a sequence of electron beam segments, each of the same temporal length (substantially 15 nsec), with consecutive beams being separated by a constant time interval of the order of 3 nsec. The beam sequence is used for simultaneous inputs to a plurality of wiggler magnet systems that also accept the laser beams to be amplified by interaction with the co-propagating electron beams. The electron beams are arranged substantially in a circle to allow proper distribution of and simultaneous switching out of the beam segments to their respective wiggler magnets.

  20. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short, high- peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact X U V free electron laser (

  1. Laser-driven relativistic electron beam interaction with solid dielectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. B. [Raytheon Ktech, 1300 Eubank Blvd, Albuquerque, NM, 87123 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, 5625 Fox Ave, Reno, NV, 89506 (United States); P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, RAS, 53 Leninski Prospect, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Raytheon Ktech, 1300 Eubank Blvd, Albuquerque, NM, 87123 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-frames shadowgraphy, interferometry and polarimetry diagnostics with sub-ps time resolution were used for an investigation of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by laser-driven relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50 TW Leopard laser at the UNR. For a laser flux of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2} a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3. The maximum of the electron density inside the glass target is {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}cm{sup -3}. Magnetic and electric fields are less than {approx}15 kG and {approx}1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a maximum of {approx}0.5 eV. 2D interference phase shift shows the 'fountain effect' of electron beam. The very low ionization inside glass target {approx}0.1% suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale. 2D PIC-simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields.

  2. Composition monitoring of electron beam melting processes using diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berzins, L.V.

    1991-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam melting processes are used to produce high purity alloys for a wide range of applications. Real time monitoring of the alloy constituents, however, has historically been difficult. Absorption spectroscopy using diode lasers provides a means for measuring constituent densities, and hence alloy composition, in real time. Diode lasers are suggested because they are inexpensive and require little maintenance. There is increasing interest in the composition and quality control of titanium alloys used in aircraft parts. For this reason we describe a proposed system for composition monitoring of titanium alloys. Performance and cost of the proposed system is addressed. We discuss the applicability of this approach to other alloys.

  3. Upgrade of laser and electron beam welding database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Magdalena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this project was to fix existing issues and update the existing database holding parameters of laser-beam and electron-beam welding machines. Moreover, the database had to be extended to hold the data for the new machines that arrived recently at the workshop. As a solution - the database had to be migrated to Oracle framework, the new user interface (using APEX) had to be designed and implemented with the integration with the CERN web services (EDMS, Phonebook, JMT, CDD and EDH).

  4. Theoretical Examination of Transfer Cavities in a Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govil, R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",A.M. Sessler, "The Free-Electron Laser as a Power Source for

  5. Electron beam transport in gas-loaded free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yariv, S.; Friedland, L. (Center for Plasma Physics, Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel (IL))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the presence of helical wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields on the quality of the electron beam in a gas-loaded free-electron laser are investigated. The electron velocity space diffusion theory in the free-electron laser is developed and tested in Monte Carlo simulations. The theory is applied in estimating the collisional limitations on the interaction length of the laser. It is shown that two competing effects related to collisions cause the gain loss in gas-loaded free-electron lasers, i.e., (a) the growing phase mismatch between the electrons and the wave and (b) the destruction of the coherent transverse helical beam motion. The second effect dominates in the absence of the guide field, provided the wiggler field strength is sufficiently small.

  6. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  7. Reversible electron beam heating for suppression of microbunching instabilities at free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrens, Christopher; Xiang, Dao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., "heating" the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) in front and behind a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread will be introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then will be eliminated in the second T...

  8. Common Analysis of the Relativistic Klystron and the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the standing-wave free-electron laser on the same footingSessler, A.M. , "The Free Electron Laser as a Power SourceNew Version of a Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",

  9. Two-Dimensional Simulation Analysis of the Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator,"of a standing-wave free-electron laser," Lawrence Berkeleyof a standing-wave free-electron laser," Lawrence Berkeley

  10. COHERENT INFRARED RADIATION FROM THE ALS GENERATED VIA FEMTOSECOND LASER MODULATION OF THE ELECTRON BEAM*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the energy of an ultra-short (~ 30 micron) slice of a stored electron bunch as they co-propagate throughCOHERENT INFRARED RADIATION FROM THE ALS GENERATED VIA FEMTOSECOND LASER MODULATION OF THE ELECTRON Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse co-propagating through a wiggler at the ALS

  11. Beam conditioning for free electron lasers: Consequences and methods A. Wolski, G. Penn, A. Sessler, and J. Wurtele*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Beam conditioning for free electron lasers: Consequences and methods A. Wolski, G. Penn, A. Sessler cases [VISA, a soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), LCLS, and a ``Greenfield'' FEL] are examined short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) demands electron beams with very small transverse emittance

  12. Optical Deflection and Temporal Characterization of an Ultrafast Laser-Produced Electron Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Optical Deflection and Temporal Characterization of an Ultrafast Laser-Produced Electron Beam show that the optical pulse with a0 0:5 imparts momentum to the electron beam, causing it to deflect optically driven x-ray sources based on nonlinear Thomson scattering [3­5]. A finite optical pulse imparts

  13. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  14. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  15. Generation of electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in pure neon gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Tao, Mengze; Chen, Liming [Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the generation of quasimonoenergetic electron beams by the laser wakefield acceleration of 17–50 TW, 30 fs laser pulses in pure neon gas jet. The generated beams have energies in the range 40–120?MeV and up to ?430 pC of charge. At a relatively high density, we observed multiple electron beamlets which has been interpreted by simulations to be the result of breakup of the laser pulse into multiple filaments in the plasma. Each filament drives its own wakefield and generates its own electron beamlet.

  16. Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in the low-gain free electron laser regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in the low-gain free electron laser regime employs free electron lasers (FELs) with two undulators: the first uses a seed laser to modulate Many proposed x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are designed to produce radiation starting from

  17. Hard x-ray or gamma ray laser by a dense electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, S. [18 Caleb Lane, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Joon Moon, Sung [8 Benjamin Rush Ln., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dense electron beam propagating through a laser undulator can radiate a coherent x-ray or gamma ray. This lasing scheme is studied with the Landau damping theory. The analysis suggests that, with currently available physical parameters, coherent gamma rays of up to 50 keV can be generated. The electron quantum diffraction suppresses the free electron laser action, which limits the maximum radiation.

  18. Demonstration of electron beam focusing by a laser-plasma lens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaury, Cédric; Döpp, Andreas; Lehe, Remi; Lifschitz, Agustin; Phuoc, Kim Ta; Gautier, Julien; Goddet, Jean-Philippe; Tafzi, Amar; Flacco, Alessandro; Tissandier, Fabien; Sebban, Stéphane; Rousse, Antoine; Malka, Victor

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-plasma technology promises a drastic reduction of the size of high energy electron accelerators. It could make free electron lasers available to a broad scientific community, and push further the limits of electron accelerators for high energy physics. Furthermore the unique femtosecond nature of the source makes it a promising tool for the study of ultra-fast phenomena. However, applications are hindered by the lack of suitable lens to transport this kind of high-current electron beams, mainly due to their divergence. Here we show that this issue can be solved by using a laser-plasma lens, in which the field gradients are five order of magnitude larger than in conventional optics. We demonstrate a reduction of the divergence by nearly a factor of three, which should allow for an efficient coupling of the beam with a conventional beam transport line.

  19. Stimulated Raman scattering of laser in a plasma in the presence of a co-propagating electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parashar, J. [Department of Physics, Samrat Ashok Technological Institute, Vidisha, Madhya Pradesh 464001 (India)] [Department of Physics, Samrat Ashok Technological Institute, Vidisha, Madhya Pradesh 464001 (India)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic electron beam co-propagating with a high power laser in plasma is shown to add to the growth of the stimulated Raman back scattering of the laser. The growth rate is sensitive to phase matching of electron beam with the plasma wave. In the case of phase mismatch, the growth rate drops by an order. The energy spread of the electron beam significantly reduces the effectiveness of the beam on the stimulated Raman process.

  20. A focusable, convergent fast-electron beam from ultra-high-intensity laser-solid interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, R H H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel scheme for the creation of a convergent, or focussing, fast-electron beam generated from ultra-high-intensity laser-solid interactions is described. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are used to demonstrate the efficacy of this scheme in two dimensions. It is shown that a beam of fast-electrons of energy 500 keV - 3 MeV propagates within a solid-density plasma, focussing at depth. The depth of focus of the fast-electron beam is controlled via the target dimensions and focussing optics.

  1. Two Dimensional Simulation Analysis of the First Sections of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator,"of a standing-wave free electron laser," Nucl. Instr. anda standing-wave free-electron laser," Proc. SPIE Conference

  2. Longitudinal and transverse cooling of relativistic electron beams in intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoffe, Samuel R; Noble, Adam; Jaroszynski, Dino A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the emergence in the next few years of a new breed of high power laser facilities, it is becoming increasingly important to understand how interacting with intense laser pulses affects the bulk properties of a relativistic electron beam. A detailed analysis of the radiative cooling of electrons indicates that, classically, equal contributions to the phase space contraction occur in the transverse and longitudinal directions. In the weakly quantum regime, in addition to an overall reduction in beam cooling, this symmetry is broken, leading to significantly less cooling in the longitudinal than the transverse directions. By introducing an efficient new technique for studying the evolution of a particle distribution, we demonstrate the quantum reduction in beam cooling, and find that it depends on the distribution of energy in the laser pulse, rather than just the total energy as in the classical case.

  3. Investigations of large area electron beam diodes for excimer lasers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a one year research program at the University of Michigan to investigate the physics and technology of microsecond electron beam diodes. These experiments were performed on the Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator (MELBA) at parameters: Voltage {equals} {minus}0.65 to {minus}0.9 MV, current {equals} 1 {minus}50 kA, and pulselength {equals} 0.5 {minus} 5 microseconds. Major accomplishments include: (1) the first two-wavelength (CO2 and HeNe) laser deflection measurements of diode plasma and neutrals; (2) measurements of the effects on magnetic field gradient on microsecond diode closure; (3) demonstration of good fidelity of processed x-ray signals as a diagnostic of beam voltage; (4) extended-pulselength scaling of electron beam diode arcing and diode closure; and (5) innovative Cerenkov plate diagnostics of e-beam dynamics.

  4. Time-dependent simulation of prebunched one and two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirian, N. S., E-mail: najmeh.mirian@ipm.ir [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Post code 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Post code 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Post code 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the slippage effects on prebunched free electron laser. A technique for the simulation of time dependent free electron lasers (FEL) to model the slippage effects is introduced, and the slowly varying envelope approximation in both z and t is used to illustrate the temporal behaviour in the prebunched FEL. Slippage effect on prebunched two-beam FEL is compared with the one-beam modeling. The evaluation of the radiation pulse energy, thermal and phase distribution, and radiation pulse shape in one-beam and two-beam modeling is studied. It was shown that the performance is considerably undermined when the slippage time is comparable to the pulse duration. However, prebunching reduces the slippage. Prebunching also leads to the radiation pulse with a single smooth spike.

  5. Highly coherent electron beam from a laser-triggered tungsten needle tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehberger, Dominik; Eisele, Max; Krüger, Michael; Noe, Jonathan; Högele, Alexander; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a quantitative measurement of the spatial coherence of electrons emitted from a sharp metal needle tip. We investigate the coherence in photoemission using near-ultraviolet laser triggering with a photon energy of 3.1 eV and compare it to DC-field emission. A carbon-nanotube is brought in close proximity to the emitter tip to act as an electrostatic biprism. From the resulting electron matter wave interference fringes we deduce an upper limit of the effective source radius both in laser-triggered and DC-field emission mode, which quantifies the spatial coherence of the emitted electron beam. We obtain $(0.80\\pm 0.05)\\,$nm in laser-triggered and $(0.55\\pm 0.02)\\,$nm in DC-field emission mode, revealing that the outstanding coherence properties of electron beams from needle tip field emitters are largely maintained in laser-induced emission. In addition, the relative coherence width of 0.36 of the photoemitted electron beam is the largest observed so far. The preservation of electronic coherence du...

  6. Efficient method of gas laser pumping by an electron beam in the SIGE-1 experimental setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arlantsev, S. V., E-mail: arlantsev@mail.ru [Orlov Special Design Engineering Bureau of High-Energy Lasers 'Granat,' (Russian Federation); Kuz'min, G. P.; Minaev, I. M.; Mkheidze, G. P.; Tikhonevich, O. V.; Ul'yanov, D. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lasers, sources of coherent UV and vacuum UV radiation, plasmachemical reactors, reactors for cleaning fouled gases, etc., can be classified as devices the working medium of which is plasma formed as a result of the interaction of a high-current relativistic electronic beam with gas. Efficiency of such devices which are united under the common name 'systems of injection gas electronics' (SIGE) depends mainly on the efficiency of energy transfer from a beam to gas ({eta}g = W{sub g}/W{sub b}) and that of the transform of the energy transferred to gas into the energy of the ultimate product W{sub in} ({eta}{sub in} = W{sub in}/W{sub g}). As a special case of SIGE, an experimental bench laser is considered. The new efficient method of pumping is supposed to be implemented on this laser to optimize the energy contribution {eta}{sub g} and useful output {eta}{sub in}.

  7. STABLE, MONOENERGETIC 50-400 MeV ELECTRON BEAMS WITH A MATCHED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    progress in laser-based particle accelera- tors [1]. Early breakthroughs in laser-based electron accel

  8. Quasimonoenergetic collimated electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in low density pure nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Mengze [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Liming [Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiment is performed using 30 TW, 30 fs, and 800?nm laser pulses, focused onto pure nitrogen plasma having relatively low densities in the range of 0.8×10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3} to 2.7×10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. Electron beams having a low divergence of ?3??mrad (full-width at half-maximum) and quasi-monoenergetic peak energies of ?105??MeV are achieved over 4-mm interaction length. The total electron beam charge reached to 2 nC, however, only 1%–2% of this (tens of pC) had energies >35?MeV. We tried different conditions to optimize the electron beam acceleration; our experiment verifies that lower nitrogen plasma densities are generating electron beams with high quality in terms of divergence, charge, pointing stability, and maximum energy. In addition, if LWFA is to be widely used as a basis for compact particle accelerators in the future, therefore, from the economic and safety points of view we propose the use of nitrogen gas rather than helium or hydrogen.

  9. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  10. Experimental demonstration of longitudinal beam phase space linearizer in a free-electron laser facility by corrugated structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of residual linear energy chirp and intrinsic nonlinear energy curvature in the relativistic electron beam from radiofrequency linear accelerator is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons itself in the corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ~10,000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by about 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  11. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  12. Efficiency enhancement of a two-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouhani, M. H.; Maraghechi, B.; Saberi, H. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A local and nonlinear simulation of two-beam and tapered free-electron laser (FEL) is presented self-consistently. The slippage of the electromagnetic wave with respect to the electron beam is ignored and the relativistic electron beams are assumed to be cold. The fundamental resonance and the third harmonic radiation of the beam with lower energy are considered, in which the third harmonic is at the fundamental resonance of the beam with higher energy. The wiggler field is set to decrease linearly when the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point of tapering and the slope of the reduction in the amplitude of wiggler are found by successive run of the code. Using the slowly varying envelope approximation, a set of nonlinear equations is derived which describes this system. These equations are solved numerically by the Runge-Kutta method. This method can be used to improve the efficiency of the two-beam FEL in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray regions of spectrum.

  13. GeV electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beams [5]–[7] using an ultra-intense laser pulse focused on5]–[7], an ultra-intense ?10 19 W/cm 2 laser pulse focusedpulse laser driver, making such a source ideal for ultra-

  14. Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -

  15. High-brightness electron beam evolution following laser-based cleaning of a photocathode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, F.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F-J.; Emma, P.; Gilevich, S.; Iverson, R.; Stefan, P.; Turner, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-based techniques have been widely used for cleaning metal photocathodes to increase quantum efficiency (QE). However, the impact of laser cleaning on cathode uniformity and thereby on electron beam quality are less understood. We are evaluating whether this technique can be applied to revive photocathodes used for high-brightness electron sources in advanced x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The laser-based cleaning was applied to two separate areas of the current LCLS photocathode on July 4 and July 26, 2011, respectively. The QE was increased by 8–10 times upon the laser cleaning. Since the cleaning, routine operation has exhibited a slow evolution of the QE improvement and comparatively rapid improvement of transverse emittance, with a factor of 3 QE enhancement over five months, and a significant emittance improvement over the initial 2–3 weeks following the cleaning. Currently, the QE of the LCLS photocathode is holding constant at about 1.2×10?4 , with a normalized injector emittance of about 0.3???m for a 150-pC bunch charge. With the proper procedures, the laser-cleaning technique appears to be a viable tool to revive the LCLS photocathode. We present observations and analyses for the QE and emittance evolution in time following the laser-based cleaning of the LCLS photocathode, and comparison to the previous studies, the measured thermal emittance versus the QE and comparison to the theoretical model.

  16. Circular free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM); Cooper, Richard K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  17. Free electron laser with bunched relativistic electron beam and electrostatic longitudinal wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehri Javan, Nasser [Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The system of the nonlinear nonstationary equations describing spatial-temporal dynamics of the amplitudes of an undulator radiation and a space charge wave of a relativistic electron beam in the resonator is obtained. The electrostatic longitudinal wiggler is considered. A bunch of the electron beam injects to the resonator, at the ends of which two mirrors are placed. After the interaction of electrons of bunch with radiation in the presence of wiggler and after amplifying electromagnetic pulse, a part of radiation is reflected back by semitransparent mirror. Then, it reaches to the initial of the system where the other mirror is placed. Synchronously, when the pulse is reflecting, the other electron bunch enters to the resonator and interacts with the pulse. This operation has simulated until saturation of growth of the electromagnetic pulse. The dynamics of the problem is simulated by the method of macro particles. The dynamics of pulse amplification, motion of the electrons, and spectra of output radiation in each stage are simulated.

  18. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Whittum, D.H.; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Sharp, W.M.; Makowski, M.A.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free-electron laser (FEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) is proposed, in which the FEL interaction takes place in a series of drive cavities, rather than in a waveguide. Each drive cavity is 'beat-coupled' to a section of the accelerating structure. This standing-wave TBA is investigated theoretically and numerically, with analyses included of microwave extraction, growth of the FEL signal through saturation, equilibrium longitudinal beam dynamics following saturation, and sensitivity of the microwave amplitude and phase to errors in current and energy. It is found that phase errors due to current jitter are substantially reduced from previous versions of the TBA. Analytic scalings and numerical simulations are used to obtain an illustrative TBA parameter set.

  19. Study of beam transverse properties of a thermionic electron gun for application to a compact THz free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Tongning, E-mail: TongningHu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: yjpei@ustc.edu.cn; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Chen, Qushan; Yang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Pei, Yuanji, E-mail: TongningHu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: yjpei@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Ji [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel thermionic electron gun adopted for use in a high power THz free electron laser (FEL) is proposed in this paper. By optimization of the structural and radiofrequency (RF) parameters, the physical design of the gun is performed using dynamic calculations. Velocity bunching is used to minimize the bunch's energy spread, and the dynamic calculation results indicate that high quality beams can be provided. The transverse properties of the beams generated by the gun are also analyzed. The novel RF focusing effects of the resonance cavity are investigated precisely and are used to establish emittance compensation, which enables the injector length to be reduced. In addition, the causes of the extrema of the beam radius and the normalized transverse emittance are analyzed and interpreted, respectively, and slice simulations are performed to illustrate how the RF focusing varies along the bunch length and to determine the effects of that variation on the emittance compensation. Finally, by observation of the variations of the beam properties in the drift tube behind the electron gun, prospective assembly scenarios for the complete THz-FEL injector are discussed, and a joint-debugging process for the injector is implemented.

  20. Beam energy distribution influences on density modulation efficiency in seeded free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guanglei; Deng, Haixiao; Zhang, Weiqing; Wu, Guorong; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang; Yang, Xueming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam energy spread at the entrance of undulator system is of paramount importance for efficient density modulation in high-gain seeded free-electron lasers (FELs). In this paper, the dependences of high harmonic micro-bunching in the high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) and phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG) schemes on the electron energy spread distribution are studied. Theoretical investigations and multi-dimensional numerical simulations are applied to the cases of uniform and saddle beam energy distributions and compared to a traditional Gaussian distribution. It shows that the uniform and saddle electron energy distributions significantly enhance the performance of HGHG-FELs, while they almost have no influence on EEHG and PEHG schemes. A numerical example demonstrates that, with about 84keV RMS uniform and/or saddle slice energy spread, the 30th harmonic radiation can be directly generated by a single-stage seeding scheme for a soft x-ray FEL f...

  1. Analytical formula of Free Electron Laser exponential gain for non-resonant electron beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Qika

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FEL gain formulas for non-resonant case are studied. For the mono-energetic and non-resonant electron beam, the exact expression of the solution of the FEL characteristic cubic equation is obtained with a form much more simple than that in the literatures, and the gain length as the function of the detuning parameter is explicitly given, then the gain for different detuning parameter and from low to high can be easily calculated. A simplified approximation formula is also given for the exponential gain calculation in the non-resonant case. For the case of the electron beam with an energy spread, the solution of the characteristic cubic equation is given explicitly for rectangular energy distribution and Lorentz distribution, respectively. Moreover the explicit expression also can be used for the solution of the characteristic cubic equation including the impact of the space charge. The transition from the low gain to the high gain is analyzed. The variations of the gain bandwidth and of the detuning param...

  2. Constraints on photon pulse duration from longitudinal electron beam diagnostics at a soft X-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ray free-electron laser C. Behrens1 , N. Gerasimova1 , Ch. Gerth1 , B. Schmidt1 , E.A. Schneidmiller1 , S, Ukraine (Dated: February 28, 2012) The successful operation of X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), like the Linac Coherent Light Source or the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH), makes unprecedented research

  3. Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

  4. A Hybrid Laser-driven E-beam Injector Using Photo-cathode Electron Gun and superconducting Cavity*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Rong-Li

    A Hybrid Laser-driven E-beam Injector Using Photo-cathode Electron Gun and superconducting Cavity as a continuing effort towards a high-brightness superconducting RF injector. Various species of photo and one (betasuperconducting cavities operating under 2 K is to be constructed

  5. Short Wavelength Seeding through Compression for Fee Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tunable short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs) providereduces the laser power needed for the generation of shortbetween the laser ?eld and the electron beam inside a short

  6. Cyclotron-undulator cooling of a free-electron-laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kuzikov, S. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Savilov, A. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose methods of fast cooling of an electron beam, which are based on wiggling of particles in an undulator in the presence of an axial magnetic field. We use a strong dependence of the axial electron velocity on the oscillatory velocity, when the electron cyclotron frequency is close to the frequency of electron wiggling in the undulator field. The abnormal character of this dependence (when the oscillatory velocity increases with the increase of the input axial velocity) can be a basis of various methods for fast cooling of moderately relativistic (several MeV) electron beams.

  7. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  8. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  9. Crystallization and glass formation in electron and laser beam irradiated Cu-Zr alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, J.S.; Kaufmann, E.N.; Wall, M.A.; Olsen, B.L.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four Cu-Zr alloys, Cu/sub 56/Zr/sub 44/, Cu/sub 50/Zr/sub 50/, Cu/sub 47/Zr/sub 53/, and Cu/sub 33/Zr/sub 67/, were surface melted with electron and pulsed laser beams to compare their kinetics of nucleation, growth and glass formation. It was observed that the ease of glass formation increased in the order: Cu/sub 33/Zr/sub 67/, Cu/sub 47/Zr/sub 53/, Cu/sub 56/Zr/sub 44/, and Cu/sub 50/Zr/sub 50/. The nucleation and regrowth produced different metastable phases. At the equiatomic composition, the preferred phase is a CsCl-type (B2) BCC structure. As the composition deviates from this, the preferred phase is either orthorhombic or tetragonal with a much larger unit cell not previously reported in the literature. The maximum growth velocity of these metastable phases was found to be about 0.025 m/s. The slow kinetics are responsible for the ease of glass formation in these systems. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  11. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolbus, Lindsay M [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Cornwell, Paris A [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron beam melting and the other with direct laser sintering. Spatially indexed stress-free cubes were obtained by EDM sectioning equivalent prisms of similar shape. The (311) interplanar spacing examined for the EDM sectioned sample was compared to the interplanar spacings calculated to fulfill force and moment balance. We have shown that Applying force and moment balance is a necessary supplement to the measurements for the stress-free cubes with respect to accurate stress calculations in additively manufactured components. In addition, our work has shown that residual stresses in electron beam melting parts are much smaller than that of direct laser metal sintering parts.

  12. Untangling the contributions of image charge and laser profile for optimal photoemission of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Makino, K.; Ruan, C. Y.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using our model for the simulation of photoemission of high brightness electron beams, we investigate the virtual cathode physics and the limits to spatio-temporal and spectroscopic resolution originating from the image charge on the surface and from the profile of the exciting laser pulse. By contrasting the effect of varying surface properties (leading to expanding or pinned image charge), laser profiles (Gaussian, uniform, and elliptical), and aspect ratios (pancake- and cigar-like) under different extraction field strengths and numbers of generated electrons, we quantify the effect of these experimental parameters on macroscopic pulse properties such as emittance, brightness (4D and 6D), coherence length, and energy spread. Based on our results, we outline optimal conditions of pulse generation for ultrafast electron microscope systems that take into account constraints on the number of generated electrons and on the required time resolution.

  13. Energy-beam processing studies on Ta/U and Ir/Ta systems. [Laser-and electron-beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, E.N.; Peercy, P.S.; Jacobson, D.C.; Draper, C.W.; Huegel, F.J.; Echer, C.J.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Balser, J.D.

    1983-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Films of Ta metal on uranium and of Ir metal on tantalum have been irradiated and melted by pulses from Q-switched Ruby and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers to investigate the nature of the resulting mixtures in light of the very different binary-phase diagrams of the two systems. In addition, a two-phase Ir-Ta alloy has been surface-processed with CW CO/sub 2/-laser radiation and with an electron beam in order to study microstructure refinement and test the advantage of using alloys as opposed to film-on-substrate combinations for the development of claddings.

  14. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, W.B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984). Colson, W. B. , "Free electron laser theory," Ph.D.aspects of the free electron laser," Laser Handbook i,Quant. Elect. Bendor Free Electron Laser Conference, Journal

  15. Free-Electron Laser Targets Fat | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser Targets Fat April 10, 2006 Free-Electron Laser Scientists Rox Anderson, right, and Free-Electron Laser Scientist Steve Benson, left, discuss laser beam...

  16. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  17. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  18. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  19. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-Wiggler Free-Electron-Laser Oscillat.ion. Phys. :_.The Los Alamos Free Electron Laser: Accelerator Perfoemance.First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser. Phys . __ Rev~.

  20. Multifrequency, single pass free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA); Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for simultaneous amplification of laser beams with a sequence of frequencies in a single pass, using a relativistic beam of electrons grouped in a sequence of energies corresponding to the sequence of laser beam frequencies. The method allows electrons to pass from one potential well or "bucket" to another adjacent bucket, thus increasing efficiency of trapping and energy conversion.

  1. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  2. Ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard x-ray driven by laser-produced energetic electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Yin; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method of obtaining a compact ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard X-ray source. This X-ray source has a high peak brightness in the order of 10{sup 22} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1\\%BW), an ultrashort duration (10 fs), and a broadband spectrum (flat distribution from 0.1 MeV to 4 MeV), and thus has wide-ranging potential applications, such as in ultrafast Laue diffraction experiments. In our scheme, laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) provide driven electron beams. A foil target is placed oblique to the beam direction so that the target normal sheath field (TNSF) is used to provide a bending force. Using this TNSF-kick scheme, we can fully utilize the advantages of current LPAs, including their high charge, high energy, and low emittance.

  3. Free-Electron Laser Generation of VUV and X-Ray Radiation using a Conditioned Beam and Ion-Channel Focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, L.-H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a) Accelerator Conditioner Free-Electron Laser L ---~>~ . Free Electron Laser Conference, Santain the Proceedings Free-Electron Laser Generation of VUV and

  4. MEASUREMENT OF BEAM CHARACTERISTICS FOR PHOTO- ELECTRON BEAM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron beam is expected to be used in a wide field, such as X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering, pulse radiolysis, etc. The laser driven photo cathode rf gun system is...

  5. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  6. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R., E-mail: agrt@umich.edu [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  7. GeV electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synchronized to the short-pulse laser driver, making such aa laser-plasma accelerator have naturally short durations onsapphire laser system (? = 810 nm) delivering as short as 38

  8. Experimental Observation of Femtosecond Electron Beam Microbunching by Inverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Experimental Observation of Femtosecond Electron Beam Micro­bunching by Inverse Free­Electron­Laser scale of ß 2.5 ¯m by an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) accelerator was observed. The optimum Cerenkov accelerator (ICA)[5], inverse free electron laser (IFEL) [6] and plasma laser accelerators [7, 8

  9. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  10. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  11. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  12. Feasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chamber to be able to change ion species on a pulse by pulse basis. The optimal plasma drift length variesFeasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea... Takeshi Kanesue Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear

  13. Free-Electron Laser FLASH Injector Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg FLASH Injector Laser Laser 1 Laser 2 Next steps Siegfried | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg Laser 1 System Overview fround trip A 541 (2005) 467­477 #12;Siegfried Schreiber | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser

  14. Synchronization and Characterization of an Ultra-Short Laser for Photoemission and Electron-Beam Diagnostics Studies at a Radio Frequency Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Timothy; Ruan, Jinhao; Piot, Philippe; Lumpkin, Alex; ,

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A commercially-available titanium-sapphire laser system has recently been installed at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory in support of photoemission and electron beam diagnostics studies. The laser system is synchronized to both the 1.3-GHz master oscillator and a 1-Hz signal use to trigger the radiofrequency system and instrumentation acquisition. The synchronization scheme and performance are detailed. Long-term temporal and intensity drifts are identified and actively suppressed to within 1 ps and 1.5%, respectively. Measurement and optimization of the laser's temporal profile are accomplished using frequency-resolved optical gating.

  15. Synchronization and Characterization of an Ultra-Short Laser for Photoemission and Electron-Beam Diagnostics Studies at a Radio Frequency Photoinjector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Timothy; Piot, Philippe; Lumpkin, Alex

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A commercially-available titanium-sapphire laser system has recently been installed at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory in support of photoemission and electron beam diagnostics studies. The laser system is synchronized to both the 1.3-GHz master oscillator and a 1-Hz signal use to trigger the radiofrequency system and instrumentation acquisition. The synchronization scheme and performance are detailed. Long-term temporal and intensity drifts are identified and actively suppressed to within 1 ps and 1.5%, respectively. Measurement and optimization of the laser's temporal profile are accomplished using frequency-resolved optical gating.

  16. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruhn, Charles R. (Martinez, CA); Hammond, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  17. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterhoff, Jens

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beam position monitor (BPM) will be presented. Knowledge ofdiscussed. The deployed BPM [16, 17] consists of a microwaveimportant to note that such a BPM by itself cannot be used

  18. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  19. Free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  20. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  1. Two-dimensional optimization of free electron laser designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA); Haas, Roger A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a "synchronous electron" at an optimal transverse radius r>0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  2. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  3. Laser Beam Profile Influence on LIBS Analytical Capabilities: Single vs. Multimode Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lednev, Vasily N; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single vs. multimode laser beams have been compared for laser ablation on steel samples. Laser plasma properties and analytical capabilities (precision, limit of detection) were used as key parameters for comparison. Peak fluence at focal spot has been observed to be higher for Gaussian beam despite ~14-fold lower pulse energy. A comparison of Gaussian and multimode beams with equal energy was carried out in order to estimate influence of beam profile only. Single mode lasing (Gaussian beam) results in better reproducibility of analytical signals compared to multimode lasing while laser energy reproducibility was the same for both cases. Precision improvements were attributed to more stable laser ablation due to better reproducibility of beam profile fluence at laser spot. Plasma temperature and electron density were higher for Gaussian laser beam. Calibration curves were obtained for four elements under study (Cr, Mn, Si, Cu). Two sampling (drilling and scanning procedures) and two optical detection schemes ...

  4. Detailed dynamics of electron beams self-trapped and accelerated in a self-modulated laser wakefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    . These features are explained by analysis and test particle simulations of electron dynamics during acceleration wave,1 such as the plasma wakefield accel- erator, the plasma beat-wave accelerator, the Laser Wake the linear dephasing limit, and explained it, using Particle-In-Cell PIC simulations, as a result

  5. Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Original objectives of CRADA number BNL-01-03 between BNL and Acceleron, Inc., were to further develop the Plasma Window concept (a BNL invention covered by US Patent number 5,578,831), mate the Plasma Window to an existing electron beam welder to perform in-air electron beam welding, and mount the novel nonvacuum electron beam welder on a robot arm. Except for the last objective, all other goals were met or exceeded. Plasma Window design and operation was enhanced during the project, and it was successfully mated to a conventional4 kW electron beam welder. Unprecedented high quality non-vacuum electron beam . welding was demonstrated. Additionally, a new invention the Plasma Shield (US Patent number 7,075,030) that chemically and thermally shields a target object was set forth. Great interest in the new technology was shown by a number of industries and three arcs were sold for experimental use. However, the welding industry requested demonstration of high speed welding, which requires 100 kW electron beam welders. The cost of such a welder involved the need for additional funding. Therefore, some of the effort was directed towards Plasma Shield development. Although relatively a small portion of the R&D effort was spent on the Plasma Shield, some very encouraging results were obtained. Inair Plasma Shield was demonstrated. With only a partial shield, enhanced vacuum separation and cleaner welds were realized. And, electron beam propagation in atmosphere improved by a factor of about 3. Benefits to industry are the introduction of two new technologies. BNL benefited from licensing fee cash, from partial payment for employee salary, and from a new patent In addition to financial benefits, a new technology for physics studies was developed. Recommendations for future work are to develop an under-water plasma shield, perform welding with high-power electron beam:s, carry out other plasma shielded electron beam and laser processes. Potential benefits from further R&D are that various processes involving electron ion and laser beams that have now restrictions can, with the Plasma Shield be performed in practically any environment. For example, electron beam and laser welding can be performed under water, as well as, in situ repair of ship and nuclear reactor components. The plasma shield results in both thermal (since the plasma is hotter than the environment) and chemical shielding. The latter feature brings about in-vacuum process purity out of vacuum, and the thermal shielding aspect results in higher production rates.

  6. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  7. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  8. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  9. Phase stability of a standing-wave free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser", proceeding of theCoupled-Cavity Free- Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser W. M. Sharp Lawrence

  10. Single lens laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chuyu (Newport News, VA); Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A single lens bullet-shaped laser beam shaper capable of redistributing an arbitrary beam profile into any desired output profile comprising a unitary lens comprising: a convex front input surface defining a focal point and a flat output portion at the focal point; and b) a cylindrical core portion having a flat input surface coincident with the flat output portion of the first input portion at the focal point and a convex rear output surface remote from the convex front input surface.

  11. Generate Uniform Transverse Distributed Electron Beam along a Beam Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been reported that transverse distribution shaping can help to further enhance the energy extraction efficiency in a terawatt, tapered X-ray free-electron laser. Thus, methods of creating and keeping almost uniform transverse distributed (UTD) beam within undulators are required. This study shows that a UTD electron beam can be generated within evenly distributed drift sections where undulators can be placed, by means of octupoles and particular optics. A concrete design is presented, and numerical simulations are done to verify the proposed method.

  12. Protective laser beam viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

  13. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  14. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  15. High energy laser beam dump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John (Tracy, CA)

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser beam dump is positioned in a housing. An absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing. A heat sync means for extracting heat from the absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing and operatively connected to the absorbing glass plate means.

  16. Laser damage study of nodules in electron-beam-evaporated HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng Xinbin; Shen Zhengxiang; Jiao Hongfei; Zhang Jinlong; Ma Bin; Ding Tao; Lu Jiangtao; Wang Xiaodong; Wang Zhanshan

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactive electron beam evaporation process was used to fabricate 1.064 {mu}mHfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflectors. The deposition process was optimized to reduce the nodular density. Cross-sectioning of nodular defects by a focused ion-beam milling instrument showed that the nodule seeds were the residual particles on the substrate and the particulates from the silica source ''splitting.'' After optimizing the substrate preparation procedure and the evaporation process, a low nodular density of 2.7/mm{sup 2} was achieved. The laser damage test revealed that the ejection fluences and damage growth behaviors of nodules created from deep or shallow seeds were totally different. A mechanism based on directional plasma scald was proposed to interpret observed damage growth phenomenon.

  17. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  18. Microstructure-based laser-driven free-electron laser T. Plettner , R.L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Microstructure-based laser-driven free-electron laser T. Plettner Ã, R.L. Byer E.L. Ginzton-synchronous with the electron beam. This allows for an undulator period that is much greater than the laser wavelength. Due and therefore lead to a very compact free-electron-based radiation device. & 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) Waves and their Interactions Driven by the Ponderomotive Force of Crossing Laser Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedros Afeyan; K. Won; V. Savchenko; T. Johnston; A. Ghizzo; P. Bertrand

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We have found, using 1D periodic Vlasov-Poisson simulations, new nonlinear, nonstationary, stable, long lived, coherent structures in phase space, called kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear (KEEN) waves. Ponderomotively driven for a short period of time, at a particular frequency and wavenumber, well inside the band gap that was thought to exist between electron plasma and electron acoustic wave frequencies, KEEN waves are seen to self-consistently form, and persist for thousands of plasma periods. KEEN waves are comprised of 4 or more significant phase-locked harmonic modes which persist only when driven sufficiently strongly. They also merge when two or more at different frequencies are driven sequentially. However, the final stable KEEN state that emerges is highly sensitive to their relative order of excitation. KEEN waves also interact quite strongly with electron plasma waves (EPW) especially when their harmonics are close to being resonant with the EPW frequency at the same k. The common assumption that whenever sufficiently large amplitude coherent laser energy is present in an unmagnetized plasma, EPWs and IAWs are the only waves with which the electromagnetic energy can interact coherently may require reconsideration.

  20. Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

  1. Scattering apodizer for laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, M.A.; Hagen, W.F.; Boyd, R.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

  2. Scattering apodizer for laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Hagen, Wilhelm F. (Livermore, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

  3. annular beam free-electron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and X-ray regions is predicted. KeywordsFree-electron laser, Higher energy beam, Lower energy beam, Two-beam M. Zahedian; B. Maraghechi; M. H. Rouhani 6 Analytic model of...

  4. A laser-wire beam-energy and beam-profile monitor at the BNL linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, R.; Degen, C.; DeSanto, L.; Meng, W.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Nayak, S.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009 a beam-energy monitor was installed in the high energy beam transport (HEBT) line at the Brookhaven National Lab linac. This device measures the energies of electrons stripped from the 40mA H{sup -} beam by background gas. Electrons are stripped by the 2.0x10{sup -7}torr residual gas at a rate of {approx}1.5x10{sup -8}/cm. Since beam electrons have the same velocities as beam protons, the beam proton energy is deduced by multiplying the electron energy by m{sub p}/m{sub e}=1836. A 183.6MeV H{sup -} beam produces 100keV electrons. In 2010 we installed an optics plates containing a laser and scanning optics to add beam-profile measurement capability via photodetachment. Our 100mJ/pulse, Q-switched laser neutralizes 70% of the beam during its 10ns pulse. This paper describes the upgrades to the detector and gives profile and energy measurements.

  5. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, Ady [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  6. Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

  7. Metal Photocathodes for Free Electron Laser Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an Undulator of a Free Electron Laser. Electrons tra- verseand et al. “X-ray free-electron lasers”. In: Journal ofiii List of Tables iv 1 The Free Electron Laser (FEL)

  8. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  9. Effect of deposition temperature on electron-beam evaporated polycrystalline silicon thin-film and crystallized by diode laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, J., E-mail: j.yun@unsw.edu.au; Varalmov, S.; Huang, J.; Green, M. A. [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Kim, K. [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Suntech R and D Australia, Botany, New South Wales 2019 (Australia)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the deposition temperature on the microstructure, crystallographic orientation, and electrical properties of a 10-?m thick evaporated Si thin-film deposited on glass and crystallized using a diode laser, are investigated. The crystallization of the Si thin-film is initiated at a deposition temperature between 450 and 550?°C, and the predominant (110) orientation in the normal direction is found. Pole figure maps confirm that all films have a fiber texture and that it becomes stronger with increasing deposition temperature. Diode laser crystallization is performed, resulting in the formation of lateral grains along the laser scan direction. The laser power required to form lateral grains is higher in case of films deposited below 450?°C for all scan speeds. Pole figure maps show 75% occupancies of the (110) orientation in the normal direction when the laser crystallized film is deposited above 550?°C. A higher density of grain boundaries is obtained when the laser crystallized film is deposited below 450?°C, which limits the solar cell performance by n?=?2 recombination, and a performance degradation is expected due to severe shunting.

  10. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation ([lambda] = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1[sub w1] = 1.43cm) and then absorbed ([approximately] 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1[sub w2] = 1.8 [minus] 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup ([approximately] 9%) of electrons to [approximately] 1MeV.

  11. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation ({lambda} = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1{sub w1} = 1.43cm) and then absorbed ({approximately} 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1{sub w2} = 1.8 {minus} 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup ({approximately} 9%) of electrons to {approximately} 1MeV.

  12. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  13. Isochronous Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berz, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the los alamos free- electron laser. IEEE Journal of1: A schematic layout of a free electron laser. Figure 2: ABeamIines for Free Electron Lasers M. Berz July 1990

  14. Hole Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Highly Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL", theseTwelfth International Free Electron Laser Conference, Paris,Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers M. Xie and K. -

  15. Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) Waves and their Interactions Driven by the Ponderomotive Force of Crossing Laser Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afeyan, Bedros; Savchenko, V; Johnston, T; Ghizzo, A; Bertrand, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have found, using 1D periodic Vlasov-Poisson simulations, new nonlinear, nonstationary, stable, long lived, coherent structures in phase space, called kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear (KEEN) waves. Ponderomotively driven for a short period of time, at a particular frequency and wavenumber, well inside the band gap that was thought to exist between electron plasma and electron acoustic wave frequencies, KEEN waves are seen to self-consistently form, and persist for thousands of plasma periods. KEEN waves are comprised of 4 or more significant phase-locked harmonic modes which persist only when driven sufficiently strongly. They also merge when two or more at different frequencies are driven sequentially. However, the final stable KEEN state that emerges is highly sensitive to their relative order of excitation. KEEN waves also interact quite strongly with electron plasma waves (EPW) especially when their harmonics are close to being resonant with the EPW frequency at the same k. The common assumptio...

  16. Ponderomotive self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in warm collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari Milani, M. R., E-mail: mrj.milani@gmail.com [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farahbod, A. H. [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam through warm collisional plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive force nonlinearity and the complex eikonal function. By introducing the dielectric permittivity of warm unmagnetized plasma and using the WKB and paraxial ray approximations, the coupled differential equations defining the variations of laser beam parameters are obtained and solved numerically. Effects of laser and plasma parameters such as the collision frequency, the initial laser intensity and its spot size on the beam width parameter and the axis laser intensity distribution are analyzed. It is shown that, self-focusing of the laser beam takes place faster by increasing the collision frequency and initial laser spot size and then after some distance propagation the laser beam abruptly loses its initial diameter and vastly diverges. Furthermore, the modified electron density distribution is obtained and the collision frequency effect on this distribution is studied.

  17. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  18. Laser Heater and seeded Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dattoli, G; Sabia, E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the effect of laser heater on a seeded Free Electron Laser. We develop a model embedding the effect of the energy modulation induced by the heater with those due to the seeding. The present analysis is compatible with the experimental results obtained at FERMI displaying secondary maxima with increasing heater intensity. The treatment developed in the paper confirms and extends previous analyses and put in evidence further effects which can be tested in future experiments.

  19. Generation of low-divergence laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for transforming a conventional beam of coherent light, having a Gaussian energy distribution and relatively high divergence, into a beam in which the energy distribution approximates a single, non-zero-order Bessel function and which therefore has much lower divergence. The apparatus comprises a zone plate having transmitting and reflecting zones defined by the pattern of light interference produced by the combination of a beam of coherent light with a Gaussian energy distribution and one having such a Bessel distribution. The interference pattern between the two beams is a concentric array of multiple annuli, and is preferably recorded as a hologram. The hologram is then used to form the transmitting and reflecting zones by photo-etching portions of a reflecting layer deposited on a plate made of a transmitting material. A Bessel beam, containing approximately 50% of the energy of the incident beam, is produced by passing a Gaussian beam through such a Bessel zone plate. The reflected beam, also containing approximately 50% of the incident beam energy and having a Bessel energy distribution, can be redirected in the same direction and parallel to the transmitted beam. Alternatively, a filter similar to the Bessel zone plate can be placed within the resonator cavity of a conventional laser system having a front mirror and a rear mirror, preferably axially aligned with the mirrors and just inside the front mirror to generate Bessel energy distribution light beams at the laser source.

  20. Generation of low-divergence laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for transforming a conventional beam of coherent light, having a Gaussian energy distribution and relatively high divergence, into a beam in which the energy distribution approximates a single, non-zero-order Bessel function and which therefore has much lower divergence. The apparatus comprises a zone plate having transmitting and reflecting zones defined by the pattern of light interference produced by the combination of a beam of coherent light with a Gaussian energy distribution and one having such a Bessel distribution. The interference pattern between the two beams is a concentric array of multiple annuli, and is preferably recorded as a hologram. The hologram is then used to form the transmitting and reflecting zones by photo-etching portions of a reflecting layer deposited on a plate made of a transmitting material. A Bessel beam, containing approximately 50% of the energy of the incident beam, is produced by passing a Gaussian beam through such a Bessel zone plate. The reflected beam, also containing approximately 50% of the incident beam energy and having a Bessel energy distribution, can be redirected in the same direction and parallel to the transmitted beam. Alternatively, a filter similar to the Bessel zone plate can be placed within the resonator cavity of a conventional laser system having a front mirror and a rear mirror, preferably axially aligned with the mirrors and just inside the front mirror to generate Bessel energy distribution light beams at the laser source. 11 figures.

  1. Synchronous Characterization of Semiconductor Microcavity Laser Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam's tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross-section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures.

  2. Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of coherent transition radiation generated at a plasma-and G. Fubiani, “Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedW. P. Leemans, “Synchrotron radiation from electron beams in

  3. Laser and Particle Beams http://journals.cambridge.org/LPB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liska, Richard

    Laser and Particle Beams http://journals.cambridge.org/LPB Additional services for Laser, J. Limpouch, R. Liska and P. Váchal Laser and Particle Beams / Volume 30 / Issue 03 / September 2012 of annularlaserbeamdriven plasma jets from massive planar targets. Laser and Particle Beams,30, pp 445457 doi:10.1017/S

  4. Transmission of Megawatt Relativistic Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arizona State University; Arizona State University; JLAB; MIT; College of William and Mary, JLAB; MIT; JLAB; JLAB; MIT; MIT; Hampton University; MIT; JLAB; MIT; JLAB; MIT; MIT; JLAB; MIT; JLAB; JLAB

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High power, relativistic electron beams from energy recovery linacs have great potential to realize new experimental paradigms for pioneering research in fundamental and applied research. A major design consideration for these new generation of experimental capabilities is the understanding of the halo associated with these bright, intense beams. In this Letter, we report on measurements performed using the 100 MeV, 430 kWatt CW electron beam from the energy recovery linac at the Jeff#11;erson Laboratory's Free Electron Laser facility as it traversed a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Thermal measurements of the block together with neutron measurements near the beam-target interaction point yielded a consistent understanding of the beam losses. These were determined to be 3 ppm through a 2 mm diameter aperture and were maintained during a 7 hour continuous run.

  5. Electron and photon beams interacting with plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    -amplitude plasma waves are dense, ultra-short relativistic electron bunches (Chen et al. 1985) or intense laser A comparison is made between the interaction of electron bunches and intense laser pulses with plasma. The laser pulse is modelled with photon kinetic theory, i.e. a representation of the electromagnetic field

  6. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Carol J. (Warrenville, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  7. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C.J.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

  8. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Edward M. (Pleasanton, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  9. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  10. Nuclear astrophysics and electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwenk, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt, Germany and ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beams provide important probes and constraints for nuclear astrophysics. This is especially exciting at energies within the regime of chiral effective field theory (EFT), which provides a systematic expansion for nuclear forces and electroweak operators based on quantum chromodynamics. This talk discusses some recent highlights and future directions based on chiral EFT, including nuclear structure and reactions for astrophysics, the neutron skin and constraints for the properties of neutron-rich matter in neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae, and the dark matter response of nuclei.

  11. Title of Document: EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS OF THE JEFFERSON LAB FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Document: EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS OF THE JEFFERSON LAB FREE ELECTRON LASER USING, such as the ones that power Free Electron Lasers (FEL), require high quality (low emittance) beams for efficient to Free Electron Lasers............................................ 4 1.2.1 Basic Principles of an FEL

  12. THE VUV FREE ELECTRON LASER BASED ON THE TESLA TEST FACILITY AT DESY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE VUV FREE ELECTRON LASER BASED ON THE TESLA TEST FACILITY AT DESY J. Rossbach, for the TESLA FEL Collaboration Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, 22603 Hamburg , Germany Abstract A Free-Electron Laser exceptionally well suited for a short-wavelength Free-Electron Laser: Excellent beam quality, mandatory

  13. TRANSVERSE ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTICS AT THE VUV-FEL AT K. Honkavaara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRANSVERSE ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTICS AT THE VUV-FEL AT DESY K. Honkavaara , F. L¨oehl, Hamburg. Catani, A. Cianchi, INFN-Roma2, 00133 Roma, Italy Abstract The VUV-FEL is a new free electron laser user tools and methods. At the VUV-FEL the transverse distribution of the electron beam is measured using

  14. Towards demonstration of electron cooling with bunched electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, A.

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    All electron cooling systems which were in operation so far employed electron beam generated with an electrostatic electron gun in DC operating mode, immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. At low energies magnetic field is also being used to transport electron beam through the cooling section from the gun to the collector. At higher energies (few MeV), it was shown that one can have simpler electron beam transport without continuous magnetic field. Because of a rather weak magnetic field on the cathode and in the cooling section the latter approach was referred to as 'non-magnetized cooling', since there was no suppression of the transverse angular spread of the electron beam with the magnetic field in the cooling section. Such a cooler successfully operated at FNAL (2005-11) at electron beam energy of 4.3 MeV. Providing cooling at even higher energies would be easier with RF acceleration of electron beam, and thus using bunched electron beam for cooling. Significant efforts were devoted to explore various aspects of such bunched electron beam cooling as part of R and D of high-energy electron cooling for RHIC. However, experimental studies of such cooling are still lacking. Establishing this technique experimentally would be extremely useful for future high-energy applications. Presently there is an ongoing effort to build Proof-of-Principle (PoP) experiment of Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) at RHIC, which promises to be superior to conventional electron cooling for high energies. Since the CEC experiment is based on bunched electron beam and it has sections where electron beam co-propagates with the ion beam at the same velocity, it also provides a unique opportunity to explore experimentally conventional electron cooling but for the first time with a bunched electron beam. As a result, it allows us to explore techniques needed for the high-energy electron cooling such as 'painting' with a short electron beam and control of ion beam distribution under cooling which is essential if cooling is provided in a collider. The software needed for comparison with the experiments is already developed as part of the previous high-energy electron cooling studies for RHIC. Since electron beam will be non-magnetized and there will be no magnetic field in the cooling section it will be also a first demonstration of fully non-magnetized cooling. The purpose of these studies was to explore whether we would be able to observe conventional electron cooling with parameters expected in the CEC PoP experiment. Below we summarize requirements on electron beam and cooling section needed for such demonstration.

  15. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the electric field of the radiation, this energy-exchangewhere the electric field of the radiation would The energydue to the electric field of the laser radiation, but in

  16. Coherent beam combiner for a high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phase conjugate laser mirror employing Brillouin-enhanced four wave mixing allows multiple independent laser apertures to be phase locked producing an array of diffraction-limited beams with no piston phase errors. The beam combiner has application in laser and optical systems requiring high average power, high pulse energy, and low beam divergence. A broad range of applications exist in laser systems for industrial processing, especially in the field of metal surface treatment and laser shot peening.

  17. Electron Spectrometer: XPS with Laser Interface | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Laser Interface Electron Spectrometer: XPS with Laser Interface This ultrahigh vacuum machine can be applied as a routine means for analyzing the structure and chemical...

  18. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  19. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  20. Quantum electrodynamics in a laser and the electron laser collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi-Ren Zhang

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum electrodynamics in a laser is formulated, in which the electron-laser interaction is exactly considered, while the interaction of an electron and a single photon is considered by perturbation. The formulation is applied to the electron-laser collisions. The effect of coherence between photons in the laser is therefore fully considered in these collisions. The possibility of $\\gamma-$ray laser generation by use of this kind of collision is discussed.

  1. Virtual mask digital electron beam lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, Larry R. (Farragut, TN); Thomas, Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Oak Ridge, TN); Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made.

  2. augmented laser beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important parameters KrF technology leads) Direct Laser Drive is a better choice for Energy Steve Obenschain 2010-01-01 2 Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam Physics Websites...

  3. Amplified short-wavelength light scattered by relativistic electrons in the laser-induced optical lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andriyash, I A; Malka, V; d'Humières, E; Balcou, Ph

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scheme of the XUV/X-ray free electron laser based on the optical undulator created by two overlapped transverse laser beams is analyzed. A kinetic theoretical description and an ad hoc numerical model are developed to account for the finite energy spread, angular divergence and the spectral properties of the electron beam in the optical lattice. The theoretical findings are compared to the results of the one- and three-dimensional numerical modeling with the spectral free electron laser code PLARES.

  4. Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Ronald L

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

  5. Three Dimensioanl Free Electron Laser Dispersion Relation Including Betatron Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Y.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-Dimensional Free Electron Laser Dispersion RelationInternational Free Electron Laser Conference, Santa Fe, NM,International Free Electron Laser Conference, held in Santa

  6. High Gradient Two-Beam Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Y. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Kazakov, S. Yu. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Kuzikov, S. V. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod, 603600 (Russian Federation); Hirshfield, J. L. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-gradient two-beam electron accelerator structure using detuned cavities is described. A self-consistent theory based on a circuit model is presented to calculate idealized acceleration gradient, transformer ratio, and efficiency for energy transfer from the drive beam to the accelerated beam. Experimental efforts are being carried out to demonstrate this acceleration concept.

  7. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, G.R.

    1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  8. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  9. Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, S; Kamiyama, D; Nagashima, T; Barada, D; Gu, Y J; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q; Wang, P X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters and the collimation target sizes. The intense short-pulse lasers are now available, and are used to generate an ion beam. The issues in the laser ion acceleration include an ion beam collimation, ion energy spectrum control, ion production efficiency, ion energy control, ion beam bunching, etc. The laser-produced ion beam tends to expand in the transverse and longitudinal directions during the ion beam propagation. The ion beam collimation is focused in this paper.

  10. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.J.; Prelec, K.

    1990-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source. 2 figs.

  11. Two-color-laser-driven direct electron acceleration in infinite vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Liang Jie

    We propose a direct electron acceleration scheme that uses a two-color pulsed radially polarized laser beam. The two-color scheme achieves electron acceleration exceeding 90% of the theoretical energy gain limit, over twice ...

  12. Dual beam optical system for pulsed laser ablation film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser ablation apparatus having a laser source outputting a laser ablation beam includes an ablation chamber having a sidewall, a beam divider for dividing the laser ablation beam into two substantially equal halves, and a pair of mirrors for converging the two halves on a surface of the target from complementary angles relative to the target surface normal, thereby generating a plume of ablated material emanating from the target.

  13. Dual beam optical system for pulsed laser ablation film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser ablation apparatus having a laser source outputting a laser ablation beam includes an ablation chamber having a sidewall, a beam divider for dividing the laser ablation beam into two substantially equal halves, and a pair of mirrors for converging the two halves on a surface of the target from complementary angles relative to the target surface normal, thereby generating a plume of ablated material emanating from the target. 3 figs.

  14. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  15. Automated analysis for detecting beams in laser wakefield simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Hamann, Bernd; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans

    2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser wakefield particle accelerators have shown the potential to generate electric fields thousands of times higher than those of conventional accelerators. The resulting extremely short particle acceleration distance could yield a potential new compact source of energetic electrons and radiation, with wide applications from medicine to physics. Physicists investigate laser-plasma internal dynamics by running particle-in-cell simulations; however, this generates a large dataset that requires time-consuming, manual inspection by experts in order to detect key features such as beam formation. This paper describes a framework to automate the data analysis and classification of simulation data. First, we propose a new method to identify locations with high density of particles in the space-time domain, based on maximum extremum point detection on the particle distribution. We analyze high density electron regions using a lifetime diagram by organizing and pruning the maximum extrema as nodes in a minimum spanning tree. Second, we partition the multivariate data using fuzzy clustering to detect time steps in a experiment that may contain a high quality electron beam. Finally, we combine results from fuzzy clustering and bunch lifetime analysis to estimate spatially confined beams. We demonstrate our algorithms successfully on four different simulation datasets.

  16. Predicted Bremsstrahlung generation by energetic electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faehl, R.J.; Snell, C.M.; Keinigs, R.K.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CYLTRAN photon/electron Monte Carlo code has been employed to predict Bremsstrahlung generation by monoenergetic electron beams from 10 to 1000 MeV. The forward-directed Bremsstrahlung intensity is investigated as a function of beam energy converter thickness, and material. At high energies, the forward extraction efficiency is maximized by using converters that are about 0.1-electron ranges thick. The largest intensities are attained with low-Z converter materials such as beryllium. Because the Bremsstrahlung radiation is strongly forward-directed, low divergence of the incident electron beam is crucial. Under deal conditions, a 1000-MeV beam can produce intensities up to 10{sup 8} MeV per steradian, per incident electron. 9 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M. [Department of Physics, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Department of Physics, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By using a transient density profile, we have demonstrated stationary self-focusing of an electromagnetic Gaussian beam in cold quantum plasma. The paper is devoted to the prospects of using upward increasing ramp density profile of an inhomogeneous nonlinear medium with quantum effects in self-focusing mechanism of high intense laser beam. We have found that the upward ramp density profile in addition to quantum effects causes much higher oscillation and better focusing of laser beam in cold quantum plasma in comparison to that in the classical relativistic case. Our computational results reveal the importance and influence of formation of electron density profiles in enhancing laser self-focusing.

  18. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasmaA design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generatingare considered. Keywords: Free-electron laser, laser-plasma

  19. Collaborative Research: Instability and transport of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Harvey Arnold [New Mexico Consortium; Lushnikov, Pavel [University of New Mexico

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Our goal was to determine the onset of laser light scattering due to plasma wave instabilities. Such scatter is usually regarded as deleterious since laser beam strength is thereby diminished. While this kind of laser-plasma-instability (LPI) has long been understood for the case of coherent laser light, the theory of LPI onset for a laser beam with degraded coherence is recent. Such a laser beam fills plasma with a mottled intensity distribution, which has large fluctuations. The key question is: do the exceptionally large fluctuations control LPI onset or is it controlled by the relatively quiescent background laser intensity? We have answered this question. This is significant because LPI onset power in the former case is typically small compared to that of the latter. In addition, if large laser intensity fluctuations control LPI onset, then nonlinear effects become significant for less powerful laser beams than otherwise estimated.

  20. PRIMARY TESTS OF LASER / E BEAM INTERACTION IN A PLASMA CHANNEL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POGORELSKY,I.V.; BEN ZVI,I.; HIROSE,T.; YAKIMENKO,V.; KUSCHE,K.; SIDDONS,P.; ET AL

    2002-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy CO{sub 2} laser is channeled in a capillary discharge. Plasma dynamic simulations confirm occurrence of guiding conditions at the relatively low axial plasma density 1 {divided_by} 4 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. A relativistic electron beam transmitted through the capillary changes its properties depending upon the plasma density. We observe focusing, defocusing or steering of the e-beam. Counter-propagation of the electron and laser beams in the plasma channel results in generation of intense picosecond x-ray pulses.

  1. Design for a GeV per meter, laser--driven electron accelerator Y.c. Huang, and R.L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    optics, high power laser, laser-driven accelerator, ultra-fast laser, crossed-laser-beam acceleratorDesign for a GeV per meter, laser--driven electron accelerator Y.c. Huang, and R.L. Byer Stanford-based. multistaged, laser-driven electron linear accelerator microstructure operating in a vacuum that is capable

  2. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  3. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  4. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  5. Laser systems configured to output a spectrally-consolidated laser beam and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koplow, Jeffrey P. (San Ramon, CA)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser apparatus includes a plurality of pumps each of which is configured to emit a corresponding pump laser beam having a unique peak wavelength. The laser apparatus includes a spectral beam combiner configured to combine the corresponding pump laser beams into a substantially spatially-coherent pump laser beam having a pump spectrum that includes the unique peak wavelengths, and first and second selectively reflective elements spaced from each other to define a lasing cavity including a lasing medium therein. The lasing medium generates a plurality of gain spectra responsive to absorbing the pump laser beam. Each gain spectrum corresponds to a respective one of the unique peak wavelengths of the substantially spatially-coherent pump laser beam and partially overlaps with all other ones of the gain spectra. The reflective elements are configured to promote emission of a laser beam from the lasing medium with a peak wavelength common to each gain spectrum.

  6. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B. (eds.) (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA); International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  7. Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCann, Michael P. (Oliver Springs, TN); Chen, Chung H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

  8. Electron-beam furnace with magnetic stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harker, H.R.; Knecht, J.A. II

    1986-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an electron-beam comprising: a. An evacuable chamber having a port for coupling the chamber to vacuum pump means; b. a trough-shaped hearth within the chamber for holding material to be melted, the hearth having a spout for issuing a flow of molten material therefrom; c. a crucible positioned within the chamber for receiving molten material flowing from the hearth; d. one or more electron guns each for producing an energetic beam of electrons, each electron gun being positioned a relatively large distance away from the hearth and the crucible; e. magnetic beam deflection means forming an integral part of each electron gun for scanning and shaping the beam produced thereby across the hearth or the crucible; and f. magnetic means adjacent to the hearth and the crucible for producing a relatively weak magnetic field in the vicinity of the hearth and the crucible for preventing erratic deflections of the scanning electron beams without significantly altering the trajectories of such beams.

  9. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations 367 Automated detection and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations 367 0 Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations Daniela M (particle) accelerators [Geddes et al. (2009); Tajima & Dawson (1979)] model the acceleration of electrons

  10. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy D. Panasenko, A. J. Shu, C. B., Berkeley, California 94720, USA Abstract. Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies

  11. Influence of laser beam profile on electromagnetically induced absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuk, S. M.; Radonjic, M.; Krmpot, A. J.; Nikolic, S. N.; Grujic, Z. D.; Jelenkovic, B. M. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compared, experimentally and theoretically, Hanle electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) obtained using Gaussian and {Pi}-shaped laser beams 3 mm in diameter. The study was done by measuring the transmission of a laser locked to the F{sub g}=2{yields}F{sub e}=3 transition at the D{sub 2} line of {sup 87}Rb in a vacuum cell. EIA linewidths obtained for the two laser profiles were significantly different in the range of laser intensities 1-4 mW/cm{sup 2}. EIA with the {Pi}-shaped laser beam has a broad intensity maximum and linewidths larger than those obtained with the Gaussian beam profile. We also studied Hanle EIA by measuring the transmission of selected segments of the entire laser beam by placing a small movable aperture in front of the detector. Waveforms so obtained in Hanle EIA resonances were strongly influenced both by the radial distance of the transmitted segment from the beam center and by the radial profile of the laser beam. We show that outer regions of Gaussian beam, and central regions of the {Pi}-shaped beam generate the narrowest lines. The different behaviors of EIA owing to different beam profiles revealed by both theory and experiment indicate the importance of the radial profile of the laser beam for proper modeling of coherent effects in alkali metal vapors.

  12. A wide bandwidth free-electron laser with mode locking using current modulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kur, E.; Dunning, D. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A. A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (Univ. of Strathclyde); (STFC Daresbury Lab.); (LBNL)

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new scheme for mode locking a free-electron laser amplifier is proposed based on electron beam current modulation. It is found that certain properties of the original concept, based on the energy modulation of electrons, are improved including the spectral brightness of the source and the purity of the series of short pulses. Numerical comparisons are made between the new and old schemes and between a mode-locked free-electron laser and self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser. Illustrative examples using a hypothetical mode-locked free-electron laser amplifier are provided. The ability to generate intense coherent radiation with a large bandwidth is demonstrated.

  13. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

  14. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC; Rudakov, F.M.; /Brown U.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC; Cardoza, J.D.; /Brown U.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; /SLAC; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  15. Cold electron beams from cryo-cooled, alkali antimonide photocathodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cultrera, Luca; Lee, Hyeri; Liu, Xianghong; Bazarov, Ivan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we report on the generation of cold electron beams using a Cs3Sb photocathode grown by co-deposition of Sb and Cs. By cooling the photocathode to 90 K we demonstrate a significant reduction in the mean transverse energy validating the long standing speculation that the lattice temperature contribution limits the mean transverse energy or thermal emittance near the photoemission threshold, opening new frontiers in generating ultra-bright beams. At 90 K, we achieve a record low thermal emittance of 0.2 $\\mu$m (rms) per mm of laser spot diameter from an ultrafast (sub-picosecond) photocathode with quantum efficiency greater than $7\\times 10^{-5}$ using a visible laser wavelength of 690 nm.

  16. High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in inter- action processes of short and ultra-short laser pulses with matter. Ion generation from laserHigh energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from the NHELIX laser system at GSI G. SCHAUMANN,1 M.S. SCHOLLMEIER,1 G. RODRIGUEZ-PRIETO,2 A. BLAZEVIC,2 E

  17. High-energy electron beam technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.C.; Lundin, C.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Nolting, E.E. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, White Oak, MD (United States))

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy electron beam (HEEB) technology was developed under the US Department of Defense (DOD) charged-particle-beam (CPB) directed-energy program. The program's objective was advanced military weapon systems. For the past two decades, charged-particle-beam research focused on producing intense beams and the vehicles to deliver large amounts of electrical energy. The charged-particle beams of interest for weapon systems had particle energies up to 100 MeV, beam currents of tens of kiloamperes, and propagation distances in excess of 100 m. However, such high energy levels are not required for industrial uses of the technology. It is anticipated that these less-aggressive beams will provide an electrical heat source suitable for a variety of materials processing applications, including surface treatment, joining, shock hardening, phase-transformation hardening, peening, shock-wave compaction, and melting. Much more R and D is needed to transfer to industry the high-energy electron beam technology developed in the CPB program. For example, its power as a materials processing tool must be convincingly demonstrated. Also required are compact, reliable accelerators that are relatively simple to use and reasonably priced.

  18. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duris, J. P.; Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  19. Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

  20. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the visible free- electron laser oscillator experiment”,based VUV and X-ray free electron lasers”, Appl. Phys. BDesign of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-

  1. Chaos in an ion-channel free-electron laser with realistic helical wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taghavi, Amin [Department of Applied Science, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chaotic behavior of an electron motion in a free-electron laser with realistic helical wiggler and ion-channel guiding is studied using Poincare surface-of-section maps. The effects of a realistic electron beam density on chaotic electron dynamics are investigated by considering an electron beam with Gaussian density profile in radial distance. The effects of self-fields on chaotic electron dynamics are investigated for different Gaussian beam parameters, and the results are compared with those of uniform electron beam. It is shown that the electron chaotic behavior can be controlled by changing the Gaussian beam parameter. Also, the chaotic behavior can be controlled by increasing the ion-channel and/or the electron beam densities.

  2. A Free-Electron Laser in the Pulsar Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. -K. Fung; J. Kuijpers

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied systematically the free-electron laser in the context of high brightness pulsar radio emission. In this paper, we have numerically examined the case where a transverse electromagnetic wave is distorting the motion of a relativistic electron beam while travelling over one stellar radius ($ approx 10 :{km}$). For different sets of parameters, coherent emission is generated by bunches of beam electrons in the radio domain, with bandwidths of 3 GHz. Pulse power often reached $10^{13} :{W}$, which corresponds with brightness temperature of $10^{30} :{K}$. The duration of these pulses is of the order of nanoseconds. In the context of pulsar radio emission, our results indicate that the laser can produce elementary bursts of radiation which build up the observed microstructures of a few tens of microseconds duration. The process is sensitive mostly to the beam particles energy, number density and the background magnetic field, but much less so to the transverse wave parameters. We demonstrate that the operation of a free-electron laser with a transverse electromagnetic wiggler in the pulsar magnetosphere occurs preferably at moder ate Lorentz factors $ gamma geq 100$, high beam density $n gtrsim 0.1 n_{textrm{GJ}}(r_ ast)$ where $n_{textrm{GJ}}(r_ ast)$ is the Goldrei ch-Julian density at a stellar radius $r_ ast$, and finally, at large altitude where the background magnetic field is low $B_0 leq 10^{-2} textrm{T}$.

  3. Energy limitation of laser-plasma electron accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardenas, D E; Xu, J; Hofmann, L; Buck, A; Schmid, K; Sears, C M S; Rivas, D E; Shen, B; Veisz, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on systematic and high-precision measurements of dephasing, an effect that fundamentally limits the performance of laser wakefield accelerators. Utilizing shock-front injection, a technique providing stable, tunable and high-quality electron bunches, acceleration and deceleration of few-MeV quasi-monoenergetic beams were measured with sub-5-fs and 8-fs laser pulses. Typical density dependent electron energy evolution with 65-300 micrometers dephasing length and 6-20 MeV peak energy was observed and is well described with a simple model.

  4. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSELMAN, M.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be constructed at ORNL is a collaboration of six laboratories. Beam current monitors for SNS will be used to monitor H-minus and H-plus beams ranging from the 15 mA (tune-up in the Front End and Linac) to over 60 A fully accumulated in the Ring. The time structure of the beams to be measured range from 645 nsec ''mini'' bunches, at the 1.05 MHz ring revolution rate, to an overall 1 mS long macro pulse. Beam current monitors (BCMs) for SNS have requirements depending upon their location within the system. The development of a general approach to satisfy requirements of various locations with common components is a major design objective. This paper will describe the development of the beam current monitors and electronics.

  5. Analysis of Shot Noise Suppression for Electron Beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratner, Daniel; Huang, Zhirong; Stupakov, Gennady

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Shot noise can affect the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) by driving instabilities (e.g., the microbunching instability) or by competing with seeded density modulations. Recent papers have proposed suppressing shot noise to enhance FEL performance. In this paper we use a onedimensional (1D) model to calculate the noise amplification from an energy modulation (e.g., electron interactions from space charge or undulator radiation) followed by a dispersive section. We show that, for a broad class of interactions, selecting the correct dispersive strength suppresses shot noise across a wide range of frequencies. The final noise level depends on the beam’s energy spread and the properties of the interaction potential. We confirm and illustrate our analytical results with 1D simulations.

  6. Method for changing the cross section of a laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Seppala, Lynn (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is disclosed herein in which a circular optical beam, for example a copper vapor laser (CVL) beam, is converted to a beam having a profile other than circular, e.g. square or triangular. This is accomplished by utilizing a single optical mirror having a reflecting surface designed in accordance with a specifically derived formula in order to make the necessary transformation, without any substantial light loss and without changing substantially the intensity profile of the circular beam which has a substantially uniform intensity profile. In this way, the output beam can be readily directed into the dye cell of a dye laser.

  7. Method for changing the cross section of a laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, W.C.; Seppala, L.

    1995-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is disclosed herein in which a circular optical beam, for example a copper vapor laser (CVL) beam, is converted to a beam having a profile other than circular, e.g. square or triangular. This is accomplished by utilizing a single optical mirror having a reflecting surface designed in accordance with a specifically derived formula in order to make the necessary transformation, without any substantial light loss and without changing substantially the intensity profile of the circular beam which has a substantially uniform intensity profile. In this way, the output beam can be readily directed into the dye cell of a dye laser. 4 figs.

  8. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  9. Electron Beam Polarization Measurement Using Touschek Lifetime Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Changchun; /Duke U., DFELL; Li, Jingyi; /Duke U., DFELL; Mikhailov, Stepan; /Duke U., DFELL; Popov, Victor; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Wenzhong; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Ying; /Duke U., DFELL; Chao, Alex; /SLAC; Xu, Hong-liang; /Hefei, NSRL; Zhang, Jian-feng; /Hefei, NSRL

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam loss due to intra-beam scattering, the Touschek effect, in a storage ring depends on the electron beam polarization. The polarization of an electron beam can be determined from the difference in the Touschek lifetime compared with an unpolarized beam. In this paper, we report on a systematic experimental procedure recently developed at Duke FEL laboratory to study the radiative polarization of a stored electron beam. Using this technique, we have successfully observed the radiative polarization build-up of an electron beam in the Duke storage ring, and determined the equilibrium degree of polarization and the time constant of the polarization build-up process.

  10. EIGENMODE ANALYSIS OF OPTICAL GUIDING IN FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers", Department ofGuided Mode Solutions in Free Electron Lasers", "High GainResonator in Free Electron Lasers", to be published. P.

  11. An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron Laser Afterburner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Block diagram of the free-electron laser afterburner. The2. The particular free-electron laser afterburner with aMicrowave Power Source: Free-Electron Laser Afterburner c.

  12. Simulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadband radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajlekov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Technical DesignSimulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadbandcoherence of free-electron laser (FEL) radiation can be

  13. The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnagopal, S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser S. Krishnagopal, G.414 The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser S. Krishnagopal, G.of Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Lasers Parameters A(,um) '

  14. Resonator Modes in High Gain Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers", Department ofModes in High Gain Free Electron Lasers M. Xie. D.A.O.International Free Electron Laser Conference. Naples. FL.

  15. Hole-Coupled Resonators Tunable Infrared Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Free Electron Laser Conference, Kobe, Japan,in Mark III Free Electron Laser", These Proceedings. B.Ozcan and R.H, Pantell, "Free Electron Laser in a Confocal

  16. Free-Electron Lasers: Present Status and Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1977). C. Brau, "Free-Electron Lasers", Science 239, 115 (T. Marshall, "Free-Electron Lasers", MacMillan (1985);C Brau, "Free- Electron Lasers", Academic Press (1990). W.B.

  17. Electron gun jitter effects on beam bunching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M. S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Iqbal, M., E-mail: muniqbal.chep@pu.edu.pk [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For routine operation of Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BEPCII) linac, many factors may affect the beam bunching process directly or indirectly. We present the measurements and analyses of the gun timing jitter, gun high voltage jitter, and beam energy at the exit of the standard acceleration section of the linac quantitatively. Almost 80 mV and more than 200 ps of gun high voltage and time jitters have ever been measured, respectively. It was analyzed that the gun timing jitter produced severe effects on beam energy than the gun high voltage jitter, if the timing jitter exceeded 100 ps which eventually deteriorates both the beam performance and the injection rate to the storage ring.

  18. Two-element free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, C.; Yariv, A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction between the electrons and the radiation in a free-electrons laser leads to a shift and a spread of the electron velocity distribution. The electron dynamics of a two-element system are studied in the small signal region. It is found that the efficiency and gain can be increased through introduction of an adjustable drift distance between two identical wigglers.

  19. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  20. Mechanisms and relationships governing the propagation of pyrolysis and combustion waves along a laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, G I [Institute for Problems in Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationships governing the propagation of pyrolysis and combustion waves along an electric-discharge CO{sub 2}-laser beam in propane and propane - air mixtures were investigated. It was shown that, after the preliminary conversion of propane in the pyrolysis waves, the average velocity of the combustion wave along the laser beam increases by a factor of 6 - 7. It was established that the velocity of the combustion wave along the beam is proportional to the chain-branching rate constant and that the wave appears as a result of consecutive ignition of the mixture along the beam (analogous to an electric breakdown wave). (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Electron-beam envelopes and matching for a combined wiggler and alternating-gradient quadrupole channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T.F.; Cooper, R.K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work studies the electron-beam envelopes and matching for a combined wiggler and alternating-gradient quadrupole field for a free-electron laser (FEL) that will be operated in the VUV or XUV wavelength region. The quadrupole field is assumed to vary continuously along the symmetry axis. The linearized equations of electron motion are solved analytically by using the two-scale perturbation method for a plane polarized wiggler. The electron-beam envelopes and the envelope equations, as well as the matching conditions in phase space, are obtained from the electron trajectories. A comparison with the numerical solution is presented.

  2. Demodulator electronics for laser vibrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudzik, G.; Waz, A. T.; Kaczmarek, P. R.; Antonczak, A. J.; Sotor, J. Z.; Krzempek, K.; Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M. [Laser and Fibre Electronics Group, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important parts of a fiber-laser vibrometer is demodulation electronic section. The distortion, nonlinearity, offset and added noise of measured signal come from electronic circuits and they have direct influence on finale measuring results. Two main parameters of an investigated vibrating object: velocity V(t) and displacement s(t), influence of detected beat signals. They are: the Doppler frequency deviation f(t) and phase shift {phi}(t), respectively. Because of wide range of deviations it is difficult to use just one demodulator. That is the reason why we use three different types of demodulators. The first one is the IQ demodulator, which is the most sensitive one and its output is proportional to the displacement. Each IQ channel is sampled simultaneously by an analog to digital converter (ADC) integrated in a digital signal processor (DSP). The output signals from the two FM demodulators are proportional to the frequency deviation of heterodyne signals. They are sensitive directly to the velocity of the object. The main disadvantage of scattered light interferometry system is a ''speckle effect'', appearing in relatively large amplitude fluctuation of a heterodyne signal. To minimize ''speckle effect'' influence on quality of beat signals we applied the automatic gain control (AGC) system. Data acquisition, further signal processing (e.g. vibration frequency spectra) and presentation of results is realized by PC via USB interface.

  3. Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poelker, Matthew [JLAB

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today's CEBAF polarized source operating at ~ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

  4. Temperature dependence of electron-beam induced effects in amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the electron hammering effect, respectively. Citation: Bae IT, Y Zhang, WJ Weber, M Ishimaru, Y Hirotsu, and M Higuchi.2008."Temperature dependence of electron-beam...

  5. High-gain X-ray free electron laser by beat-wave terahertz undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chao; Hei, DongWei [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an City 710024 (China) [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an City 710024 (China); Institute of Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Pellegrin, Claudio; Tantawi, Sami [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)] [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The THz undulator has a higher gain to realize a much brighter X-ray at saturation, compared with the optical undulator under the same undulator strength and beam quality. In order to fill the high-power THz gap and realize the THz undulator, two superimposed laser pulses at normal incidence to the electron-beam moving direction form an equivalent high-field THz undulator by the frequency difference to realize the high-gain X-ray Free electron laser. The pulse front tilt of lateral fed lasers is used to realize the electron-laser synchronic interaction. By PIC simulation, a higher gain and a larger X-ray radiation power by the beat wave THz undulator could be realized, compared with the optical undulator for the same electron beam parameters.

  6. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma accelerated beamsbetween the short- pulse laser generating the electron beamscale laser-plasma accelerator that produces ultra-short (

  7. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS facility”, in: Proc.electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator ?National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose

  8. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSELMAN,M.; DAWSON,W.C.

    2002-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss the present electronics design for the beam current monitor system to be used throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The beam is composed of a micro-pulse structure due to the 402.5MHz RF, and is chopped into mini-pulses of 645ns duration with a 300ns gap, providing a macro-pulse of 1060 mini-pulses repeating at a 60Hz rate. Ring beam current will vary from about 15ma peak during studies, to about 50Amps peak (design to 100 amps). A digital approach to droop compensation has been implemented and initial test results presented.

  9. A low diffraction laser beam as applied to polymer ablation Xuanhui Lu,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    2 laser, laser drilling I. INTRODUCTION Laser beam quality plays an important role in quality-established process and examples are found in Refs. 7 and 8. Factors of laser beams likely to affect drillingA low diffraction laser beam as applied to polymer ablation Xuanhui Lu,a) Y. Lawrence Yao

  10. Pair Creation and an X-ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alkofer; M. B. Hecht; C. D. Roberts; S. M. Schmidt; D. V. Vinnik

    2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a quantum kinetic equation coupled to Maxwell's equation we study the possibility that focused beams at proposed X-ray free electron laser facilities can generate electric field strengths large enough to cause spontaneous electron-positron pair production from the QED vacuum. Our approach yields the time and momentum dependence of the single particle distribution function. Under conditions reckoned achievable at planned facilities, repeated cycles of particle creation and annihilation take place in tune with the laser frequency. However, the peak particle number density is insensitive to this frequency and one can anticipate the production of a few hundred particle pairs per laser period. Field-current feedback and quantum statistical effects are small and can be neglected in this application of non-equilibrium quantum mean field theory.

  11. Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma Junjie Li, Xuan Wang, Zhaoyang Chen, Richard Clinite, Samuel S. Mao et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Jianming

    , Beijing 100190, China and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China in the early stage of laser ablation of a copper target are investigated in real time by making ultrafast have been a subject of intensive investigation in recent years ow- ing to its importance in a wide

  12. Viewing device for electron-beam equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasyrov, R.S.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viewing devices are used to observe melting, welding, and so on in vacuum systems, an it is necessary to protect the windows from droplets and vapor. A viewing device for electron-beam equipment is described in which the viewing tube and mounting flange are made as a tubular ball joint enclosed in a steel bellows, which render the viewing device flexible. Bending the viewing tube in the intervals between observations protects the viewing window from sputtering and from drops of molten metal.

  13. Bunch length effects in the beam-beam compensation with an electron lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron lenses for the head-on beam-beam compensation are under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The bunch length is of the same order as the {beta}-function at the interaction point, and a proton passing through another proton bunch experiences a substantial phase shift which modifies the beam-beam interaction. We review the effect of the bunch length in the single pass beam-beam interaction, apply the same analysis to a proton passing through a long electron lens, and study the single pass beam-beam compensation with long bunches. We also discuss the beam-beam compensation of the electron beam in an electron-ion collider ring.

  14. FREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING* Vladimir N. Litvinenko, BNL, Upton, Long Island, NY, USA#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    two orders-of-magnitude. Two techniques offering the potential to cool high- energy hadron beamsFREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING* Vladimir N. Litvinenko, BNL, Upton, Long Island, NY, USA# Yaroslav S. Derbenev, TJNAF, Newport News, VA, USA) Abstract Cooling intense high

  15. Analysis of \\v{C}erenkov free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalkal, Yashvir

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of a \\v{C}erenkov free-electron laser (FEL) driven by a flat electron beam. In this system, an electron beam travelling close to a dielectric slab placed at the top of an ideal conductor interacts with the co-propagating electromagnetic surface mode. The surface mode arises due to singularity in the reflectivity of the dielectric slab for the incident evanescent wave. Under suitable conditions, the surface mode grows as a result of interaction with the electron beam. We show that the interaction of the surface mode with the co-propagating electron beam can be rigorously understood by analyzing the singularity in the reflectivity. Using this approach, we set up coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with conventional undulator based FELs. We solve these equations analytically in the small signal regime to obtain formulae for the small signal gain, and the spatial growth rate. Saturation behaviour of the system is analyzed by solving these equations numerically in th...

  16. Dual beam translator for use in Laser Doppler anemometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brudnoy, D.M.

    1984-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for selectively translating the path of at least one pair of light beams in a Laser Doppler anemometry device whereby the light paths are translated in a direction parallel to the original beam paths so as to enable attainment of spacial coincidence of the two intersection volumes and permit accurate measurements of Reynolds shear stress.

  17. Terawatt x-ray free-electron-laser optimization by transverse electron distribution shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emma, C; Wu, J; Fang, K; Chen, S; Serkez, S; Pellegrini, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    33rd International Free Electron Laser Conference, Shanghai,TERAWATT X-RAY FREE-ELECTRON-LASER … Phys. Rev. ST Accel.23rd International Free Electron Laser Conference and 8th

  18. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Retsky, Michael W. (Trumbull, CT)

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  19. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  20. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, H.W.; Albrecht, G.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  1. Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poelker, M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today’s CEBAF polarized source operating at ? 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

  2. Single-electron analysis of the space-charge effect in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, C.; Yariv, A.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An exact treatment of the space-charge effect in the single-electron analysis of a free-electron laser is presented to calculate its small-signal gain. With the inclusion of the repulsive force between electrons, it is found that the trajectory of an electron can be solved from a generalized equation which includes a space-charge term. The results show the gain is saturated with decreasing growth rate due to high electron density. The radiation frequency is found to increase with the electron density and approach the value at plasma resonance. The condition ..omega../sub p/L/c=..pi.. clearly defines the boundary between the noninteracting and the collective regime of an electron beam, where w/sub p/ is the plasma frequency, L is the device length, and c is the light velocity in vacuum.

  3. Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booij, Wilfred Edwin

    Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation Wilfred Edwin Booij Gonville and Caius College Cambridge A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge December 1997... Summary Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation The irradiation of high Tc superconducting thin films with a focused electron beam, such as that obtained in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), can...

  4. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  5. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  6. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  7. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  8. A Free-Electron Laser in the Pulsar Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuijpers, P K F J

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied systematically the free-electron laser in the context of high brightness pulsar radio emission. In this paper, we have numerically examined the case where a transverse electromagnetic wave is distorting the motion of a relativistic electron beam while travelling over one stellar radius ($ approx 10 :{km}$). For different sets of parameters, coherent emission is generated by bunches of beam electrons in the radio domain, with bandwidths of 3 GHz. Pulse power often reached $10^{13} :{W}$, which corresponds with brightness temperature of $10^{30} :{K}$. The duration of these pulses is of the order of nanoseconds. In the context of pulsar radio emission, our results indicate that the laser can produce elementary bursts of radiation which build up the observed microstructures of a few tens of microseconds duration. The process is sensitive mostly to the beam particles energy, number density and the background magnetic field, but much less so to the transverse wave parameters. We demonstrate that th...

  9. Decarburization of uranium via electron beam processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R H

    1998-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For many commercial and military applications, the successive Vacuum Induction Melting of uranium metal in graphite crucibles results in a product which is out of specification in carbon. The current recovery method involves dissolution of the metal in acid and chemical purification. This is both expensive and generates mixed waste. A study was undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate the feasibility of reducing the carbon content of uranium metal using electron beam techniques. Results will be presented on the rate and extent of carbon removal as a function of various operating parameters.

  10. Two-Beam Instability in Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, Alexey V.; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The drift motion of cooling electrons makes them able to respond to transverse perturbations of a cooled ion beam. This response may lead to dipole or quadrupole transverse instabilities at specific longitudinal wave numbers. While the dipole instabilities can be suppressed by a combination of the Landau damping, machine impedance, and the active damper, the quadrupole and higher order modes can lead to either emittance growth, or a lifetime degradation, or both. The growth rates of these instabilities are strongly determined by the machine x-y coupling. Thus, tuning out of the coupling resonance and/or reduction of the machine coupling can be an efficient remedy for these instabilities.

  11. Extraction of a steady state electron beam from HCD (hollow cathode discharge) plasmas for EBIS (electron beam ion source) applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.; Prelec, K.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments to extract high brightness electron beams from hollow cathode discharge plasmas are now in progress. A unique feature of these plasmas, which in principle can facilitate the extraction of large current low emittance electron beams, is the existence of a relatively high energy electron population with a very narrow energy spread. This electron population was identified in a self-extraction experiment, which yielded a 35 eV, 600 mA electron beam with parallel energy spread of less than 0.5 eV. Preliminary, crude application of 2.5 kV extraction voltage yielded a steady state electron beam current of 1.2 A. The end result of this endeavor would be an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) with an electron beam current of 6 A. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, David M.; Hoff, Brad W.; Tang Wilkin; Heidger, Susan; Shiffler, Don [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Allen-Flowers, Jordan [Program in Applied Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gated field emission cathodes can provide short electron pulses without the requirement of laser systems or cathode heating required by photoemission or thermionic cathodes. The large electric field requirement for field emission to take place can be achieved by using a high aspect ratio cathode with a large field enhancement factor which reduces the voltage requirement for emission. In this paper, a cathode gate driver based on the output pulse train from a nonlinear transmission line is experimentally demonstrated. The application of the pulse train to a tufted carbon fiber field emission cathode generates short electron pulses. The pulses are approximately 2 ns in duration with emission currents of several mA, and the train contains up to 6 pulses at a frequency of 100 MHz. Particle-in-cell simulation is used to predict the characteristic of the current pulse train generated from a single carbon fiber field emission cathode using the same technique.

  13. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

  14. GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to synchrotron radiation facilities and free-electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50 MV m-1 ), requiring tens to hundreds of metres to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources

  15. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  16. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin...

  17. Surface Electronic Properties and Site-Specific Laser Desorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Properties and Site-Specific Laser Desorption Processes of Highly Structured Nanoporous MgO Thin Films. Surface Electronic Properties and Site-Specific Laser Desorption Processes...

  18. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Kessler, Terrance J. (Rochester, NY); Short, Robert W. (Rochester, NY); Craxton, Stephen (Rochester, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

  19. Laser beam temporal and spatial tailoring for laser shock processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are provided for formatting laser pulse spatial shape and for effectively and efficiently delivering the laser energy to a work surface in the laser shock process. An appropriately formatted pulse helps to eliminate breakdown and generate uniform shocks. The invention uses a high power laser technology capable of meeting the laser requirements for a high throughput process, that is, a laser which can treat many square centimeters of surface area per second. The shock process has a broad range of applications, especially in the aerospace industry, where treating parts to reduce or eliminate corrosion failure is very important. The invention may be used for treating metal components to improve strength and corrosion resistance. The invention has a broad range of applications for parts that are currently shot peened and/or require peening by means other than shot peening. Major applications for the invention are in the automotive and aerospace industries for components such as turbine blades, compressor components, gears, etc.

  20. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    to the optical components required to utilize XFEL beams, including radiation damage. Theoretical workDamage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength SC were exposed to single 25 fs long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up

  1. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  2. Self-Induced Harmonic Generation in a Storage-Ring Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Ninno, G. [University of Nova Gorica (Slovenia); Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Allaria, E.; Danailov, M. B.; Diviacco, B.; Ferianis, M.; Karantzoulis, E.; Spezzani, C.; Trovo, M. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Coreno, M. [TASC-INFM National Laboratory, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Chowdhury, S. [Xerox Research Center, Webster, New York (United States); Curbis, F. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); University of Trieste (Italy); Longhi, E. C. [Diamond Light Source, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Pinayev, I. V.; Litvinenko, V. N. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States)

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam is a valuable way to overcome the present limitations of conventional lasers and synchrotron radiation light sources. The typical scheme has electrons, directly from a linac, in a single-pass interaction with a laser pulse in the presence of a static undulator magnetic field. We demonstrate that a storage-ring free-electron laser can also achieve harmonic generation (down to 36.5 nm), presenting both experimental and theoretical results, and offer a reliable interpretation of the peculiar underlying physical processes involved.

  3. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrocarbons. Second, we studied the energy transfer mechanism of E-Beam upgrading to optimize the process. Third, we conducted a preliminary economic analysis based on energy consumption and compared the economics of E-Beam upgrading with conventional...

  4. Computationally efficient description of relativistic electron beam transport in collisionless plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Computationally efficient description of relativistic electron beam transport in collisionless and relativistic electron beam transport in collisionless background plasma is developed. Beam electrons of the Weibel instability are derived for the cold and finite-temperature beams. © 2007 American Institute

  5. Electron beam melting state-of-the-art 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakish, R.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1984 electron beam melting and refining appear poised for an important new growth phase. The driving force for this phase is improved production economics made possible by technological advances. There is also a new and exciting growth application for electron beam melting: its use for surface properties beneficiation. This article is based in part on the content of the Conference on Electron Beam Melting and Refining, The State-of-the-Art 1983, held in November 1983 in Reno, Nevada.

  6. PROGRESS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAM SOURCES...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be used to produce femto- seconds coherent IR radiation, or femto-seconds X-ray by laser Compton scattering. Photoelectron beam can also be used to drive FEL. 5 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT...

  7. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zholents, K. Holdack, Free Electron Laser Conference, FEL06,26th International Free Electron Laser Conference, Trieste,27th International Free Electron Laser Conference, Stanford,

  8. Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source. Progress report, June 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D.H.; Giordano, G.; LeVine, M.J.; Matone, G.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.; Ziegler, W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction of the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) began at Brookhaven in October 1983. When completed, the source will provide intense beams of monochromatic and polarized gamma rays with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. The planned layout of this facility with its experimental areas is shown. The gamma-ray beams will be produced by Compton backscattering uv laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV X-RAY storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at BNL. The X-RAY ring is currently running with 50 mA at 1.7 GeV, and is expected to reach 2.5 GeV by November 1984. There is as yet no firm schedule for operation at 3.0 GeV, although some initial testing should be completed by the end of 1986. The availability of the 210-420 MeV LEGS beam will depend upon these 3 GeV studies.

  9. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair, E-mail: mzubairkhan-um76@yahoo.com [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  10. Betatron radiation from electron beams in plasma focusing channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esarey, E.; Catravas, P.; Leemans, W.P.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Betatron Radiation from Electron Beams in Plasma FocusingAbstract. Spontaneous radiation emitted from an electronfrequency of spontaneous radiation is a strong function of

  11. Electron-beam induced recrystallization in amorphous apatite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recrystallization observed in the present study. Citation: Bae IT, Y Zhang, WJ Weber, M Higuchi, and L Giannuzzi.2007."Electron-beam induced recrystallization in amorphous...

  12. Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy Technology available for licensing: A successful and cost-effective means of treating cancer in previously inoperable or radiation-sensitive...

  13. Longitudinal bunch profile and electron beam energy spread

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Storage Ring Operation Modes Longitudinal bunch profile and electron beam energy spread Longitudinal bunch profile depends mainly on the...

  14. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  15. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, G.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; /Fermilab; Assmann, R.; /CERN; Kabantsev, A.; /UC, San Diego

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  16. Development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Isaac; Huang Rongxin; Henderson, Kevin; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Raizen, Mark G. [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector. The detector uses a fiber-optic bundle that spatially splits the incident beam, followed by a fast balanced photodetector. The detector is applied to the study of Brownian motion of particles on fast time scales with 1 A spatial resolution. Future applications include the study of molecule motors, protein folding, as well as cellular processes.

  17. Study of second harmonic generation by high power laser beam in magneto plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Prerana [Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh 465010 (India); Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the problem of nonlinear generation of second harmonic of a high power laser pulse propagating in magnetized plasma. The propagation of strong laser beam is proposed in the direction perpendicular to a relatively weak static magnetic field. The laser pulse is taken to be linearly polarized, with the orientation of its electric field that corresponds to an ordinary electromagnetic wave. Besides the standard ponderomotive nonlinearity, the appropriate wave equation also contains the nonlinearity that arises from the relativistic electron jitter velocities. During its propagation, the laser beam gets filamented on account of relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities present in the plasma. The generated plasma wave gets coupled into the filamentary structures of the pump beam. Due to the expected presence of the beam filamentation, the work has been carried out by considering modified paraxial approximation (i.e., beyond the standard paraxial approximation of a very broad beam). It is found that the power of the plasma wave is significantly affected by the magnetic field strength in the presence of both relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities. It is investigated that the second harmonic generation is also considerably modified by altering the strength of magnetic field. To see the effect of static magnetic field on the harmonic generation, a key parameter, i.e., the ratio of the cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c}=eB{sub 0}/mc over the laser frequency {omega}{sub 0} has been used, where c is the velocity of light, m and e are the mass and charge of the electron and B{sub 0} is the externally applied magnetic field.

  18. Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam J. M. Byrd, Z. Hao, M. C. Martin, D. S. Robin, F. Sannibale, R. W. Schoenlein, A. A. Zholents, and M. S. Zolotorev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    new development of coherent synchrotron radiation [1] in storage rings. In this Letter, we present a novel method for producing intense temporally and spa- tially coherent synchrotron radiation pulses observations of terahertz signals from sliced beams ob- served at BESSY II, an electron storage ring in Berlin

  19. A cascaded laser acceleration scheme for the generation of spectrally controlled proton beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian Michael

    We present a novel, cascaded acceleration scheme for the generation of spectrally controlled ion beams using a laser-based accelerator in a 'double-stage' setup. An MeV proton beam produced during a relativistic laser–plasma ...

  20. Electron Cloud with Inverted Beam Screens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maury Cuna, H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of computer simulations studying the effect of wrongly oriented LHC beam screens on the local electron-cloud heat load and density. At 3.5 or 7-TeV energy and for maximum secondary emission-yield values below 1.5, with the inverted sawtooth orientation about ten times higher heat load is expected than for the standard orientation, and the wrongly oriented sawtooth chambers could lead to a local heat-load bottleneck during the process of surface conditioning at 25-ns bunch spacing. The available cooling margin can be significantly increased by correcting the sawtooth orientations at least for two dipole magnets in LHC arc cells 26 and 32 R3, in order that there be no half-cell cooling loop containing more than one inverted screen.

  1. Delivering pump light to a laser gain element while maintaining access to the laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Honea, Eric C. (Sunol, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lens duct is used for pump delivery and the laser beam is accessed through an additional component called the intermediate beam extractor which can be implemented as part of the gain element, part of the lens duct or a separate component entirely.

  2. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNLlaser-plasma-accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Montgomery, A.L.; Robinson, K.E.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the design and current status of a compactfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, VUVpulses driven by a high-current, GeV electron beam from the existingLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator,whose active acceleration length is only a few cm. The proposedultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to thedrive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science withpulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing to the high current (&10 kA) ofthe laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes arepotentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on SASEand high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length andfluctuations, are considered.

  3. Electro-optic harmonic conversion to switch a laser beam out of a cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, R.A.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to switching laser beams out of laser cavities, and more particularly, it relates to the use of generating harmonics of the laser beam to accomplish the switching. When laser light is generatd in a laser cavity the problem arises of how to switch the laser light out of the cavity in order to make use of the resulting laser beam in a well known multitude of ways. These uses include range finding, communication, remote sensing, medical surgery, laser fusion applications and many more. The switch-out problem becomes more difficult as the size of the laser aperture grows such as in laser fusion applications. The final amplifier stages of the Nova and Novette lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are 46 centimeters with the laser beam expanded to 74 centimeters thereafter. Larger aperture lasers are planned.

  4. Possible generation of $?$-ray laser by electrons wiggling in a background laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi-Ren Zhang

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of $\\gamma-$ray laser generation by the radiation of wiggling electrons in an usual background laser is discussed.

  5. Possible generation of $?$-ray laser by electrons wiggling in a background laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi-Ren Zhang

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of $\\gamma-$ray laser generation by the radiation of wiggling electrons in an usual background laser is discussed.

  6. Quantum effects in electron beam pumped GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yahia, M. E. [Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt) [Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University (Egypt); Azzouz, I. M. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University (Egypt)] [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University (Egypt); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt)

    2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of waves in nano-sized GaAs semiconductor induced by electron beam are investigated. A dispersion relation is derived by using quantum hydrodynamics equations including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, exchange-correlation potentials, and degenerate pressures. It is found that the propagating modes are instable and strongly depend on the electron beam parameters, as well as the quantum recoil effects and degenerate pressures. The instability region shrinks with the increase of the semiconductor number density. The instability arises because of the energetic electron beam produces electron-hole pairs, which do not keep in phase with the electrostatic potential arising from the pair plasma.

  7. Electron energy boosting in laser-wake-field acceleration with external magnetic field Bapprox1 T and laser prepulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosokai, Tomonao [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Zhidkov, Alexei [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Yamazaki, Atsushi [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Mizuta, Yoshio [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Uesaka, Mitsuru [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 22-2 Shirane-shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kodama, Ryosuke [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundred-mega-electron-volt electron beams with quasi-monoenergetic distribution, and a transverse geometrical emittance as small as approx0.02 pi mm mrad are generated by low power (7 TW, 45 fs) laser pulses tightly focused in helium gas jets in an external static magnetic field, Bapprox1 T. Generation of monoenergetic beams strongly correlates with appearance of a straight, at least 2 mm length plasma channel in a short time before the main laser pulse and with the energy of copropagating picosecond pedestal pulses (PPP). For a moderate energy PPP, the multiple or staged electron self-injection in the channel gives several narrow peaks in the electron energy distribution.

  8. Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data Oliver Rübel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high-energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  9. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data Oliver R¨ubel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  10. Terahertz generation by two cross focused laser beams in collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P., E-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ernet.in; Singh, Ram Kishor, E-mail: ram007kishor@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of two cross-focused spatial-Gaussian laser beams has been studied for the high power and efficient terahertz (THz) radiation generation in the collisional plasma. The nonlinear current at THz frequency arises on account of temperature dependent collision frequency of electrons with ions in the plasma and the presence of a static electric field (applied externally in the plasma) and density ripple. Optimisation of laser-plasma parameters gives the radiated THz power of the order of 0.23??MW.

  11. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams C. B. Schroeder, E of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator-charge force of a charged particle beam. Laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) were first proposed in 1979

  12. Laser Irradiated Enhancement of the Atomic Electron Capture Rate in search of New Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takaaki Nomura; Joe Sato; Takashi Shimomura

    2007-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron capture processes are important in the search for new physics. In this context, a high capture rate is desired. We investigate the possibility of enhancing the electron capture rate by irradiating laser beam to ''atom''. The possibility of such enhancement can be understood as a consequence of an enhancement of the electron wave function at the origin, $\\Psi (0)$, through an increased effective mass of the electron. We find that an order of magnitude enhancement can be realized by using a laser with intensity on the order of $10^{10}$ W/mm$^2$ and a photon energy on the order of $10^{-3}$ eV.

  13. Fountain effect of laser-driven relativistic electrons inside a solid dielectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. [Raytheon Ktech, 1300 Eubank Blvd., Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Leblanc, P.; Ivanov, V. V.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89506 (United States); Bychenkov, V. Yu. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninski Pr. 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast interferometry with sub-ps resolution has been applied for the direct measurement of an electron density induced by a laser-driven relativistic electron beam inside a solid dielectric. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the ''fountain effect,'' a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields. The very low ionization, {approx}0.1%, observed after the heating pulse suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale.

  14. Laser beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Meister, D.C.; Tucker, S. [and others

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser power beaming to satellites and orbital transfer vehicles requires the accurate pointing of a low-divergence laser beam to its target, whether the target is in the sunlight or the earth`s shadow. The Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL) has demonstrated reduction in the image size of stars by a factor of 10 or more by using laser beacons and adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation. This same technology is applicable to reducing the divergence of laser beams propagated from earth to space. A team of Phillips Laboratory, COMSAT Laboratories, and Sandia National Laboratories plans to demonstrate the state of the art in this area with laser-beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites. The demonstrations will utilize the 1.5-m diameter telescope with adaptive optics at the AFPL Starfire Optical Range (SOR) and a ruby laser provided by the Air Force and Sandia (1--50 kill and 6 ms at 694.3 nm). The first targets will be corner-cube retro-reflectors left on the moon by the Apollo 11, 14, and 15 landings. We will attempt to use adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation to demonstrate accurate and reliable beam projection with a series of shots over a span of time and shot angle. We will utilize the return signal from the retro-reflectors to help determine the beam diameter on the moon and the variations in pointing accuracy caused by atmospheric tilt. This will be especially challenging because the retro-reflectors will need to be in the lunar shadow to allow detection over background light. If the results from this experiment are encouraging, we will at a later date direct the beam at a COMSAT satellite in geosynchronous orbit as it goes into the shadow of the earth. We will utilize an onboard monitor to measure the current generated in the solar panels on the satellite while the beam is present. A threshold irradiance of about 4 W/m{sup 2} on orbit is needed for this demonstration.

  15. Etching of polycrystalline diamond films by electron beam assisted plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Etching of polycrystalline diamond films by electron beam assisted plasma Koji Kobashi, Shigeaki) Polycrystalline diamond films were processed in a direct current plasma produced by a self-focused electron beam that the etching apparatus used was capable of forming at least a 5-mm wide pattern of polycrystalline diamond film

  16. Electron beam melting and refining state of the art 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakish, R. [ed.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the proceedings of the Electron Beam Melting and Refining - State of the Art 1995 Conference. It contains 23 of the 30 scheduled papers. Papers cover an array of electron beam melting applications, from industrial plating of metal strip, through government work on manufacturing and processing fissile alloys. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this proceedings.

  17. NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

  18. Laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing, inter alia, the current versus voltage curve at the point of illumination on a solar cell and the open circuit voltage of a solar cell. The apparatus incorporates a lock-in amplifier, and a laser beam light chopper which permits the measurement of the AC current of the solar cell at an applied DC voltage at the position on the solar cell where the cell is illuminated and a feedback scheme which permits the direct scanning measurements of the open circuit voltage. The accuracy of the measurement is a function of the intensity and wavelength of the laser light with respect to the intensity and wavelength distribution of sunlight and the percentage the dark current is at the open circuit voltage to the short circuit current of the solar cell.

  19. PARALLEL ION BEAM PROFILE SCAN USING LASER WIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL; Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Huang, Chunning [ORNL; Long, Cary D [ORNL; Dickson, Richard W [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the world s first experiment of a parallel profile scan of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam using a laser wire system. The system was developed at the superconducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex. The laser wire profile scanner is based on a photo-detachment process and therefore can be conducted on an operational H- beam in a nonintrusive manner. The parallel profile scanning system makes it possible to simultaneously measure profiles of the 1-MW neutron production H- beam at 9 different locations of the linac by using a single light source. This paper describes the design, optical system and software platform development, and measurement results of the parallel profile scanning system.

  20. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alarcon, R; Benson, S V; Bertozzi, W; Boyce, J R; Cowan, R; Douglas, D; Evtushenko, P; Fisher, P; Ihloff, E; Kalantarians, N; Kelleher, A; Kossler, W J; Legg, R; Long, E; Milner, R G; Neil, G R; Ou, L; Schmookler, B; Tennant, C; Tschalaer, C; Williams, G P; Zhang, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is ...

  1. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  2. Transverse Coherence of a VUV Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transverse Coherence of a VUV Free Electron Laser Dissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades des The transverse coherence is of paramount importance for many applications of a free electron laser (FEL). In this thesis, the first direct measurement of the transverse coherence of a free electron laser at vacuum

  3. Macro-temporal structure of storage ring free electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    997 Macro-temporal structure of storage ring free electron lasers P. Elleaume Département de laser. Abstract. 2014 I derive simple dimensionless equations governing the storage ring free electron Ring Free Electron Laser (1) (S.R.L.), the S.R.L. was thought to be pseudo-continuous except for some

  4. Electron Gun For Multiple Beam Klystron Using Magnetic Focusing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ives, R. Lawrence (Saratoga, CA); Miram, George (Atherton, CA); Krasnykh, Anatoly (Santa Clara, CA)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An RF device comprising a plurality of drift tubes, each drift tube having a plurality of gaps defining resonant cavities, is immersed in an axial magnetic field. RF energy is introduced at an input RF port at one of these resonant cavities and collected at an output RF port at a different RF cavity. A plurality of electron beams passes through these drift tubes, and each electron beam has an individual magnetic shaping applied which enables confined beam transport through the drift tubes.

  5. Laser rock drilling by a super-pulsed CO{sub 2} laser beam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Reed, C. B.; Parker, R. A.; Gahan, B. C.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.

    2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High power carbon dioxide lasers have successfully been used in drilling or cutting engineering materials such as metals, polymers and ceramics over the years. Can a carbon dioxide laser be used to efficiently drill different rocks in a deep gas well? Research sponsored by US Department of Energy has been carried out to answer this question. This paper will report the study results of using a super-pulsed CO{sub 2} laser beam to drill rocks. A 6 kW CO{sub 2} laser operated at superpulse mode was used to carry out the tests. Both linear tracks and deep holes were produced on the rocks. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, specific energy, was determined. Test results show that superpulsed CO{sub 2} laser beam can be efficiently used to drill deep, large diameter holes in petroleum rocks with the assistance of purging gas.

  6. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kA are generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma acceleratedfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-For the ultra-high currents of the laser plasma accelerated

  7. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fastto the laser driver, making such a source ideal for ultra-

  8. Much Ado about Microbunching: Coherent Bunching in High Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, Daniel; /Stanford U. /SLAC

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The push to provide ever brighter coherent radiation sources has led to the creation of correspondingly bright electron beams. With billions of electrons packed into normalized emittances (phase space) below one micron, collective effects may dominate both the preservation and use of such ultra-bright beams. An important class of collective effects is due to density modulations within the bunch, or microbunching. Microbunching may be deleterious, as in the case of the Microbunching Instability (MBI), or it may drive radiation sources of unprecedented intensity, as in the case of Free Electron Lasers (FELs). In this work we begin by describing models of microbunching due to inherent beam shot noise, which sparks both the MBI as well as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, the world's first hard X-ray laser. We first use this model to propose a mechanism for reducing the inherent beam shot noise as well as for predicting MBI effects. We then describe experimental measurements of the resulting microbunching at LCLS, including optical radiation from the MBI, as well as the first gain length and harmonic measurements from a hard X-ray FEL. In the final chapters, we describe schemes that use external laser modulations to microbunch light sources of the future. In these sections we describe coherent light source schemes for both both linacs and storage rings.

  9. Pulsed-electron-beam melting of Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed (50 nsec) electron beams with deposited energies of 1.1 to 2.3 J/cm/sup 2/ have been used to rapidly melt a surface layer of Fe. Calculations show that this range of energies produces melt depths from 0.4 to 1.2 ..mu..m and melt times of 100 to 500 nsec. Optical microscopy and SEM of pulse treated polycrystalline foils show slip traces, as well as a general smoothing of surface features which shows that melting has occurred. TEM shows that the resolidified material is bcc, and that the material within a grain is epitaxial with the substrate. TEM also shows slip traces along (110) planes, as well as a high density of dislocations, both extended and loop. At the highest energy, subgrain boundaries are observed. Some samples were implanted with 1 x 10/sup 16/ Sn/cm/sup 2/ at 150 keV. After pulse treatment, the Sn depth profile was observed to have broadened, consistent with liquid phase diffusion. The Sn had the unexpected effect of suppressing slip at the sample surface.

  10. Electron beam cold hearth refining in Vallejo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, J.H.C. [Axel Johnson Metals, Inc., Vallejo, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Beam Cold Hearth Refining Furnace (EBCHR) in Vallejo, California is alive, well, and girding itself for developing new markets. A brief review of the twelve years experience with EBCHR in Vallejo. Acquisition of the Vallejo facility by Axel Johnson Metals, Inc. paves the way for the development of new products and markets. A discussion of some of the new opportunities for the advancement of EBCHR technology. Discussed are advantages to the EBCHR process which include: extended surface area of molten metal exposed to higher vacuum; liberation of insoluble oxide particles to the surface of the melt; higher temperatures that allowed coarse solid particles like carbides and carbonitrides to be suspended in the fluid metal as fine micro-segregates, and enhanced removal of volatile trace impurities like lead, bismuth and cadmium. Future work for the company includes the continued recycling of alloys and also fabricating stainless steel for the piping of chip assembly plants. This is to prevent `killer defects` that ruin a memory chip.

  11. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  12. Electro-optic harmonic conversion to switch a laser beam out of a cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Roger A. (Pleasanton, CA); Henesian, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a switch to permit a laser beam to escape a laser cavity through the use of an externally applied electric field across a harmonic conversion crystal. Amplification takes place in the laser cavity, and then the laser beam is switched out by the laser light being harmonically converted with dichroic or polarization sensitive elements present to alter the optical path of the harmonically converted laser light. Modulation of the laser beam can also be accomplished by varying the external electric field.

  13. Non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawsey, Robert A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Scudiere, Matthew B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

  14. Phase transition oscillations induced by a strongly focused laser beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clémence Devailly; Caroline Crauste-Thibierge; Artyom Petrosyan; Sergio Ciliberto

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here the observation of a surprising phenomenon consisting in a oscillating phase transition which appears in a binary mixture, PMMA/3-octanone, when this is enlightened by a strongly focused infrared laser beam. PMMA/3-octanone has a UCST (Upper Critical Solution Temperature) which presents a critical point at temperature Tc = 306.6 K and volume fraction $\\phi$c = 12.8 % [Crauste et al., ArXiv 1310.6720, 2012]. This oscillatory phenomenon appears because of thermophoretic and electrostriction effects and non-linear diffusion. We analyze these oscillations and we propose a simple model which includes the minimal ingredients to produce the oscillatory behavior. Phase transitions in binary mixtures are still a widely studied subject, specifically near the critical point where several interesting and not completely understood phenomena may appear, among them we recall the critical Casimir forces [2],[3], confinement effects [4], [5] and out-of-equilibrium dynamics after a quench. The perturbation of the binary mixtures by mean of external fields is also an important and recent field of investigation [6]. For example, a laser can induce interesting phenomena in demixing binary mixtures because the radiation pressure can deform the interface between the two phases and it can be used to measure the interface tension [7]. Depending on the nature of the binary mixtures, laser illumination can also lead to a mixing or demixing transition. In ref.[8], focused infrared laser light heats the medium initially in the homogeneous phase and causes a separation in the LCST (Low Critical Solution Temperature) system. The radiation pressure gradients in a laser beam also contribute in the aggregation of polymers , thus producing a phase transition. The local heating may induce thermophoretic forces which attract towards the laser beam one of the binary-mixture components [9]. Other forces like electrostriction can also be involved [10]. In this letter, we report a new phenomenon, which consists in an oscillating phase transition induced by a constant illumination from an infrared laser beam in the heterogeneous region of an UCST (Upper Critical Solution Temperature) binary mixture. Oscillation phenomena in phase transition have already been reported in slow cooling UCST [11],[12] but as far as we know, never induced by a stationary laser illumination. After describing our experimental setup , we will present the results. Then we will use a very simplified model which contains the main necessary physical ingredients to induce this oscillation phenomenon.

  15. Thermal response of photovoltaic cell to laser beam irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Yu-Chen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper firstly presents the concept of using dual laser beam to irradiate the photovoltaic cell, so as to investigate the temperature dependency of the efficiency of long distance energy transmission. Next, the model on the multiple reflection and absorption of any monochromatic light in multilayer structure has been established, and the heat generation in photovoltaic cell has been interpreted in this work. Then, the finite element model has been set up to calculate the temperature of photovoltaic cell subjected to laser irradiation. Finally, the effect of temperature elevation on the efficiency and reliability of photovoltaic cell has been discussed to provide theoretical references for designing the light-electricity conversion system.

  16. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW`s) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  18. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  19. Chaos in free electron laser oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bruni; R. Bachelard; D. Garzella; G. L. Orlandi; M. E. Couprie

    2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The chaotic nature of a storage-ring Free Electron Laser (FEL) is investigated. The derivation of a low embedding dimension for the dynamics allows the low-dimensionality of this complex system to be observed, whereas its unpredictability is demonstrated, in some ranges of parameters, by a positive Lyapounov exponent. The route to chaos is then explored by tuning a single control parameter, and a period-doubling cascade is evidenced, as well as intermittence.

  20. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; Campisi, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We first describe the basic physical properties of an inverse free-electron laser and make an estimate of the order of magnitude of the accelerating field obtainable with such a system; then apply the general ideas to the design of an actual device and through this example we give a more accurate evaluation of the fundamental as well as the technical limitations that this acceleration scheme imposes.

  1. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  2. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zschornack, G., E-mail: g.zschornack@hzdr.de [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany); König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A. [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)] [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  3. Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberle, C.C.

    1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the CRADA are to: Confirm that fiber-resin adhesion is responsible for the observed poor shear properties; Determine the mechanism(s) responsible for poor adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins after e-beam curing; Develop and evaluate resin systems and fiber treatments to improve the properties of e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites; and Develop refined methods for processing e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  4. Threshold conditions for lasing of a free electron laser oscillator with longitudinal electrostatic wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehri Javan, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil, 56199-11367 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The system of the nonlinear non-stationary equations describing spatial-temporal dynamics of the amplitudes of an ondulator radiation and a space-charge wave of a relativistic electron beam in the resonator is obtained. A free electron laser resonator with longitudinal electrostatic wiggler is considered. In the linear approximation, the threshold conditions of lasing for Raman and Compton regimes under excitation of forward and backward electromagnetic wave are achieved. In the various physical situations, the variation of the minimum length of the resonator with the amplitude of wiggler, density of electron beam, and with the reflection coefficients of resonator's mirrors is investigated.

  5. Analogy between free electron laser and channeling by crystal planes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Artru

    2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The trapping of electrons in the ponderomotive potential wells, which governs a free electron laser or inverse free electron laser at high gain, is analogous to the channeling of charged particles by atomic planes of a crystal. A bent crystal is analogous to a period-tapered free electron laser. This analogy is different from the well-known one between channeling and undulator radiations.

  6. Laser induced electron acceleration in vacuum K. P. Singha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Kunwar Pal

    Laser induced electron acceleration in vacuum K. P. Singha) Department of Physics, Indian Institute acceleration by a plane polarized laser wave has been studied in vacuum. Relativistic equations of motion have been solved exactly for electron trajectory and energy as a function of laser intensity, phase

  7. Second harmonic generation by propagation of a p-polarized obliquely incident laser beam in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Pallavi; Agrawal, Ekta [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical study of second harmonic generation due to interaction an intense, p-polarized laser beam propagating obliquely in homogeneous underdense plasma, in the mildly relativistic regime, has been presented. The efficiency of the second harmonic radiation as well as its detuning length has been obtained and their variation with the angle of incidence is analyzed. It is shown that, for a given plasma electron density, the second harmonic efficiency increases with the angle of incidence while the detuning length decreases. The second harmonic amplitude vanishes at normal incidence of the laser beam.

  8. Electron gun for a multiple beam klystron with magnetic compression of the electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Tran, Hien T; Bui, Thuc; Attarian, Adam; Tallis, William; David, John; Forstall, Virginia; Andujar, Cynthia; Blach, Noah T; Brown, David B; Gadson, Sean E; Kiley, Erin M; Read, Michael

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-beam electron gun provides a plurality N of cathode assemblies comprising a cathode, anode, and focus electrode, each cathode assembly having a local cathode axis and also a central cathode point defined by the intersection of the local cathode axis with the emitting surface of the cathode. Each cathode is arranged with its central point positioned in a plane orthogonal to a device central axis, with each cathode central point an equal distance from the device axis and with an included angle of 360/N between each cathode central point. The local axis of each cathode has a cathode divergence angle with respect to the central axis which is set such that the diverging magnetic field from a solenoidal coil is less than 5 degrees with respect to the projection of the local cathode axis onto a cathode reference plane formed by the device axis and the central cathode point, and the local axis of each cathode is also set such that the angle formed between the cathode reference plane and the local cathode axis results in minimum spiraling in the path of the electron beams in a homogenous magnetic field region of the solenoidal field generator.

  9. A table-top laser-based source of femtosecond, collimated, ultra-relativistic positron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sarri; W. Schumaker; A. Di Piazza; M. Vargas; B. Dromey; M. E. Dieckmann; V. Chvykov; A. Maksimchuk; V. Yanovsky; Z. H. He; B. X. Hou; J. A. Nees; A. G. R. Thomas; C. H. Keit; M. Zepf; K. Krushelnick

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of ultra-relativistic positron beams with short duration ($\\tau_{e^+} \\leq 30$ fs), small divergence ($\\theta_{e^+} \\simeq 3$ mrad), and high density ($n_{e^+} \\simeq 10^{14} - 10^{15}$ cm$^{-3}$) from a fully optical setup is reported. The detected positron beam propagates with a high-density electron beam and $\\gamma$-rays of similar spectral shape and peak energy, thus closely resembling the structure of an astrophysical leptonic jet. It is envisaged that this experimental evidence, besides the intrinsic relevance to laser-driven particle acceleration, may open the pathway for the small-scale study of astrophysical leptonic jets in the laboratory.

  10. Electron vortex beams in a magnetic field and spin filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debashree Chowdhury; Banasri Basu; Pratul Bandyopadhyay

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation of electron vortex beams in a magnetic field. It is pointed out that when electron vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum propagate in a magnetic field, the Berry curvature associated with the scalar electron moving in a cyclic path around the vortex line is modified from that in free space. This alters the spin-orbit interaction, which affects the propagation of nonparaxial beams. The electron vortex beams with tilted vortex lead to spin Hall effect in free space. In presence of a magnetic field in time space we have spin filtering such that either positive or negative spin states emerge in spin Hall currents with clustering of spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ states.

  11. Active negative-index metamaterial powered by an electron beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Michael

    An active negative index metamaterial that derives its gain from an electron beam is introduced. The metamaterial consists of a stack of equidistant parallel metal plates perforated by a periodic array of holes shaped as ...

  12. Transmission of Megawatt Relativistic Electron Beams through Millimeter Apertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alarcon, R.

    High-power, relativistic electron beams from energy-recovering linacs have great potential to realize new experimental paradigms for pioneering innovation in fundamental and applied research. A major design consideration ...

  13. Achieving sub-10-nm resolution using scanning electron beam lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cord, Bryan M. (Bryan Michael), 1980-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving the highest possible resolution using scanning-electron-beam lithography (SEBL) has become an increasingly urgent problem in recent years, as advances in various nanotechnology applications have driven demand for ...

  14. Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS Hui Li, Doctor of Philosophy, 2004 Dissertation Directed By: Professor, Patrick G. O'Shea Department of Electrical and Computer throughout the strong focusing lattice. We describe in this dissertation the main beam control techniques

  15. Investigation of the electron trajectories and gain regimes of the whistler pumped free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafarinia, F.; Jafari, S. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht 41335-1914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Tarbiat Moallem University, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A free-electron laser (FEL) scheme, which employs the whistler wave as a slow electromagnetic wave wiggler, was studied theoretically. Subjected to the transverse fields of whistler wave wiggler, the beam electrons are the source of the energy needed to produce electromagnetic radiation. The strength and the period of the wiggler field depend on the parameters of the magnetoplasma medium. This configuration has a higher tunability by controlling the plasma density, on top of the {gamma}-tunability of the conventional FELs. The theory of linear gain and electron trajectories was presented and four groups (I, II, III, and IV) of electron orbits were found in the presence of an axial guide magnetic field. Using perturbation analysis, it is found that these groups of orbits were stable except small regions of group I and IV orbits. The function {Phi} which determines the rate of change of axial velocity with beam energy was also derived. In the case in which {Phi}<0 represents a negative-mass regime in which the axial velocity accelerates as the electrons lose energy. Numerical solutions showed that by increasing the cyclotron frequency, the gain for group I and III orbits increased, while a gain decrement was obtained for group II and IV orbits.

  16. Electron beam skull melting and refining of secondary copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bychkov, Y.; Ladokhin, S. [Donetskvtortsvetmet, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Beam Melting is the most efficient technology for metals and alloys refining. For secondary metals processing the Electron Beam Skull Melting (EBSM) with the electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of melt in the crucible was shown to be the most appropriate. The copper produced by EBSM with EMS possesses higher density and electric conductivity in comparison with other refining methods. The details for high power electrical machines were cast of the copper waste refined by EBSM technology.

  17. An electron-beam programmable erasable memory device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Kang-Huai

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ELECTRON-BEAM PROGRAMMABLE ERASABLE MEMORY DEVICE A Thesis by RANG-HUAI WANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE August 1984 Major... Subject: Electrical Engineering AN ELECTRON-BEAM PROGRAMMABLE ERASABLE MEMORY DEVICE A Thesis by Kang-Huai Wang Approved as to style and content by: Dona L. Parker (Chairman of Committee) Mark H. Weicho d (Member) omas . air, III (Member...

  18. Boiling the Vacuum with an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ringwald

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free electron lasers will be constructed in this decade, both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called TESLA XFEL laboratory uses techniques developed for the design of the TeV energy superconducting electron-positron linear accelerator TESLA. Such X-ray lasers may allow also for high-field science applications by exploiting the possibility to focus their beams to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. We consider here the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production) and review the prospects to verify this non-perturbative production mechanism for the first time in the laboratory.

  19. Cherenkov radiation and pair production by particles traversing laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Dremin

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that Cherenkov radiation can be observed at TESLA in electron collisions with optical laser pulses. The prospects for it to be observed at SLC, LEP, LHC and RHIC are discussed. The conclusions are compared with results for pair production.

  20. Free-Electron Laser-Powered Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, S; Edwards, D T; van Tol, J; Ramian, G; Han, S; Sherwin, M S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy interrogates unpaired electron spins in solids and liquids to reveal local structure and dynamics; for example, EPR has elucidated parts of the structure of protein complexes that have resisted all other techniques in structural biology. EPR can also probe the interplay of light and electricity in organic solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and the origin of decoherence in condensed matter, which is of fundamental importance to the development of quantum information processors. Like nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), EPR spectroscopy becomes more powerful at high magnetic fields and frequencies, and with excitation by coherent pulses rather than continuous waves. However, the difficulty of generating sequences of powerful pulses at frequencies above 100 GHz has, until now, confined high-power pulsed EPR to magnetic fields of 3.5 T and below. Here we demonstrate that ~1 kW pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL) can power a pulsed EPR spectrometer at 240 GHz...

  1. Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER 5 MAY 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedand millimeter wave radiation from laser acceleratedNo. 5, May 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated

  2. Electron beam related advances at ATF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to cavity loading. Compensation of the dispersion is needed at the level of a few mm. * Plasma Wakefield experiment needs extra small focus (10 micron) of the bunched beam...

  3. C-AD electron-cooling Photocathode and Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C-AD electron-cooling Photocathode and Laser A. Burrill and T. Rao #12;C-AD electron system ­ Design of 2nd and third generation system · Laser system ­ Requirements ­ Commercial ­ Capsule fabrication · Brazing · Metallization #12;C-AD electron-cooling Overview Photocathode Requirements

  4. Numerical modeling of multi-GeV laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a dielectric capillary tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paradkar, B. S.; Cros, B.; Maynard, G. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, University Paris Sud 11-CNRS, Orsay (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, University Paris Sud 11-CNRS, Orsay (France); Mora, P. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical modeling of laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a gas filled dielectric capillary tube is presented. Guiding of a short pulse laser inside a dielectric capillary tube over a long distance (?1 m) and acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch to ultra-relativistic energies (?5-10 GeV) are demonstrated in the quasi-linear regime of laser wakefield acceleration. Two dimensional axisymmetric simulations were performed with the code WAKE-EP (Extended Performances), which allows computationally efficient simulations of such long scale plasma. The code is an upgrade of the quasi-static particle code, WAKE [P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)], to simulate the acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch (including beam loading effect) and propagation of the laser beam inside a dielectric capillary. The influence of the transverse electric field of the plasma wake on the radial loss of the accelerated electrons to the dielectric wall is investigated. The stable acceleration of electrons to multi-GeV energy with a non-resonant laser pulse with a large spot-size is demonstrated.

  5. Note: Characteristic beam parameter for the line electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iqbal, M. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan) [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Islam, G. U. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan)] [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Zhou, Z.; Chi, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have optimized the beam parameters of line source electron gun using Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre electron beam trajectory program (EGUN), utilizing electrostatic focusing only. We measured minimum beam diameter as 0.5 mm that corresponds to power density of 68.9 kW/cm{sup 2} at 13.5 mm in the post-anode region which is more than two-fold (33 kW/cm{sup 2}), of the previously reported results. The gun was operated for the validation of the theoretical results and found in good agreement. The gun is now without any magnetic and electrostatic focusing thus much simpler and more powerful.

  6. Investigation of stimulated raman scattering using short-pulse diffraction limited laser beam near the instability threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rose, Harvey A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, B J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, R P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shimada, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bowers, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousseaux, C [CEA; Tassin, V [CEA; Baton, S D [FRANCE; Amiranoff, F [FRANCE; Hardin, R A [WEST VIRGINIA UNIV

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and> 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using particle-in-cell codes to validate our understanding quantitatively. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser facility and the LULI (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses) to investigate stimulated Raman scattering near the threshold of the instability using 527 nm and 1059 nm laser light respectively with 1.5-3.0 ps pulses. In both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gas-jet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k{lambda}{sub D} were completed at the Trident laser facility. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Work is currently underway comparing the results of the experiments with simulations using the VPIC [K. J. Bowers, et at., Phys. Plasmas, 15 055703 (2008)] particle-in-cell code. Details of the experimental results are presented in this manuscript.

  7. Generation of high-current electron beam in a wide-aperture open discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.; Gugin, P. P. [A. V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrent'eva 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, it was examined generation of nanosecond-duration electron-beam (EB) pulses by a wide-aperture open discharge burning in helium or in a mixture of helium with nitrogen and water vapor. In the experiments, a discharge cell with coaxial electrode geometry, permitting radial injection of the electron beam into operating lasing medium, was used, with the cathode having radius 2.5 cm and length 12 cm. It was shown possible to achieve an efficient generation of a high-intensity electron beam (EB pulse power {approx}250 MW and EB pulse energy up to 4 J) in the kiloampere range of discharge currents (up to 26 kA at {approx}12 kV discharge voltage). The current-voltage characteristics of the discharge proved to be independent of the working-gas pressure. The existence of an unstable dynamic state of EB, conditioned by the presence of an uncompensated space charge accumulated in the discharge cell due to the exponential growth of the current in time during discharge initiation and the hyperbolic growth of current density in the direction towards the tube axis, was revealed. The obtained pulsed electron beam was used to excite the self-terminated laser on He 2{sup 1}P{sub 1}{sup 0}-2{sup 1}S{sub 0} transition. The oscillations developing in the discharge cell at high discharge currents put limit to the pumping energy and emissive power of the laser excited with the radially converging electron beam.

  8. GeV electron beams from a cm-scale accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation facilities and free electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-

  9. Self-pinched transport of a high ?/? electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, M. C.; Wolford, M. F.; Sethian, J. D. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States)] [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Rose, D. V. [Voss Scientific, 418 Washington St. SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)] [Voss Scientific, 418 Washington St. SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Hegeler, F. [Commonwealth Technology Inc., 5875 Barclay Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22315 (United States)] [Commonwealth Technology Inc., 5875 Barclay Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22315 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-pinched transport of a 0.5 MeV, 18 kA cylindrical electron beam has been studied experimentally and computationally. The relatively low voltage and high current required for materials surface modification applications leads to complicated beam dynamics as the Alfven limit is approached. Transport and focusing of the high ?/? beam was done in a sub-Torr, neutral gas-filled, conducting tube in the ion-focused regime. In this regime, beam space charge forces are progressively neutralized to allow focusing of the beam by its self-magnetic field. The beam exhibits stable envelope oscillations as it is efficiently and reproducibly propagated for distances greater than a betatron wavelength. Experimental results follow the trends seen in 2-D particle-in-cell simulations. Results show that the input electron beam can be periodically focused to a peaked profile with the beam half-current radius decreased by a factor of 2.84. This results in an increase of a factor of 8 in beam current density. This focusing is sufficient to produce desired effects in the surface layers of metallic materials.

  10. Numerical simulations of X-rays Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Antonelli; Agissilaos Athanassoulis; Zhongyi Huang; Peter A. Markowich

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first-principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in \\cite{frat1}. Since XFEL is more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudo-spectral method to investigate numerically the behaviour of the model versus its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case, and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases \\cite{xfel1}.

  11. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perucchi, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); INSTM UdR Trieste-ST, Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Allaria, E. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Lupi, S. [CNR-IOM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', P.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  12. Slippage effect on energy modulation in seeded free-electron lasers with frequency chirped seed laser pulses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Guanglei; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang; Xiang, Dao

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) seeded with external lasers hold great promise for generating high power radiation with nearly transform-limited bandwidth in the soft x-ray region. However, it has been pointed out that the initial seed laser phase error will be amplified by the frequency up-conversion process, which may degrade the quality of the output radiation produced by a harmonic generation scheme. In this paper, theoretical and simulation studies on frequency chirp amplification in seeded FEL schemes with slippage effect taken into account are presented. It is found that the seed laser imperfection experienced by the electron beam can be significantly smoothed by the slippage effect in the modulator when the slippage length is comparable to the seed laser pulse length. This smoothing effect allows one to preserve the excellent temporal coherence of seeded FELs in the presence of large frequency chirp in the seed laser. Our studies show that the tolerance on frequency chirp in the seed laser for generating nearly transform-limited soft x-ray pulses in seeded FELs is much looser than previously thought and fully coherent radiation at nanometer wavelength may be reached with current technologies.

  13. Diffraction Properties of Periodic Lattices under Free Electron Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajkovic, I.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Quevedo, W. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tschentscher, T. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22671 Hamburg (Germany); Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R. [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tolkiehn, M. [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Techert, S. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Max-Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we report the pioneering use of free electron laser radiation for the investigation of periodic crystalline structures. The diffraction properties of silver behenate single nanocrystals (5.8 nm periodicity) with the dimensions of 20 nmx20 nmx20 {mu}m and as powder with grain sizes smaller than 200 nm were investigated with 8 nm free electron laser radiation in single-shot modus with 30 fs long free electron laser pulses. This work emphasizes the possibility of using soft x-ray free electron laser radiation for these crystallographic studies on a nanometer scale.

  14. Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser explores promise of carbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the collaboration's FEL experiment (image not actual size). Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser explores promise of carbon nanotubes By James Schultz January 27, 2003...

  15. High Gradient Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gradient High energy gain Inverse Free Electron Laser P. Musumeci UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy On Behalf of the RUBICON collaboration ATF user meeting, BNL, October 6...

  16. Electron cyclotron beam measurement system in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamio, S., E-mail: kamio@nifs.ac.jp; Takahashi, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Osakabe, M.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to evaluate the electron cyclotron (EC) heating power inside the Large Helical Device vacuum vessel and to investigate the physics of the interaction between the EC beam and the plasma, a direct measurement system for the EC beam transmitted through the plasma column was developed. The system consists of an EC beam target plate, which is made of isotropic graphite and faces against the EC beam through the plasma, and an IR camera for measuring the target plate temperature increase by the transmitted EC beam. This system is applicable to the high magnetic field (up to 2.75 T) and plasma density (up to 0.8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}). This system successfully evaluated the transmitted EC beam profile and the refraction.

  17. Upgrade of the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, D.; Yang, Y.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Yao, K.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y., E-mail: zouym@fudan.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education, 200433 Shanghai (China); Shanghai EBIT Lab, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last few years the Shanghai electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been successfully redesigned and rebuilt. The original machine, developed under collaboration with the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, first produced an electron beam in 2005. It could be tuned with electron energies between 1 and 130 keV and beam current up to 160 mA. After several years of operation, it was found that several modifications for improvements were necessary to reach the goals of better electron optics, higher photon detection, and ion injection efficiencies, and more economical running costs. The upgraded Shanghai-EBIT is made almost entirely from Ti instead of stainless steel and achieves a vacuum of less than 10{sup ?10} Torr, which helps to minimize the loss of highly changed ions through charge exchange. Meanwhile, a more compact structure and efficient cryogenic system, and excellent optical alignment have been of satisfactory. The magnetic field in the central trap region can reach up till 4.8 T with a uniformity of 2.77 × 10{sup ?4}. So far the upgraded Shanghai-EBIT has been operated up to an electron energy of 151 keV and a beam current of up to 218 mA, although promotion to even higher energy is still in progress. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Xe{sup 53+,} {sup 54+} has been produced and the characterization of current density is estimated from the measured electron beam width.

  18. Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons by an electron beam interacting with a nonuniform plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sydorenko, D; Chen, L; Ventzek, P L G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons was observed in simulation of a high- voltage dc discharge with electron emission from the cathode. An electron beam produced by the emission interacts with the nonuniform plasma in the discharge via a two-stream instability. Efficient energy transfer from the beam to the plasma electrons is ensured by the plasma nonuniformity. The electron beam excites plasma waves whose wavelength and phase speed gradually decrease towards anode. The short waves near the anode accelerate plasma bulk electrons to suprathermal energies. The sheath near the anode reflects some of the accelerated electrons back into the plasma. These electrons travel through the plasma, reflect near the cathode, and enter the accelerating area again but with a higher energy than before. Such particles are accelerated to energies much higher than after the first acceleration. This mechanism plays a role in explaining earlier experimental observations of energetic suprathermal electrons i...

  19. Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

  20. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  1. Measurement of Electron Beam Polarization from Unstrained Bulk GaAs via Two Photon Photoemission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, Timothy J.

    the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab, where the polarized electron beamMeasurement of Electron Beam Polarization from Unstrained Bulk GaAs via Two Photon Photoemission Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;Measurement of Electron Beam Polarization from

  2. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Whitney; George Neil

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  3. Optimal beam pattern to maximize inclusion residence time in an electron beam melting hearth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, A.; Pal, U. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Avyle, J. van den [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximate probabilities of inclusion survival through an electron beam melting hearth are computed from nitride dissolution rates, flotation velocities, and residence times. Dissolution rates were determined by measuring shrinkage rates of pure TiN and nitrided sponge in small pools of molten titanium in an electron beam melting hearth. Flotation velocities were calculated using correlations for fluid flow around spheres, and show that particles sink or float unless their densities are extremely close to that of molten titanium. Flow field characteristics which lead to effective inclusion removal are discussed in terms of heat flux pattern required to produce them, based on the electron beam`s unique ability to impart a nearly arbitrary heat flux pattern to the melt surface.

  4. Overview Of Control System For Jefferson Lab`s High Power Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofler, A. S.; Grippo, A. C.; Keesee, M. S.; Song, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the current plans for the control system for Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility`s (Jefferson Lab`s) Infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. The goals for the FEL control system are fourfold: (1) to use EPICS and EPICS compatible tools, (2) to use VME and Industry Pack (IPs) interfaces for FEL specific devices such as controls and diagnostics for the drive laser, high power optics, photocathode gun and electron-beam diagnostics, (3) to migrate Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) technologies to VME when possible, and (4) to use CAMAC solutions for systems that duplicate CEBAF technologies such as RF linacs and DC magnets. This paper will describe the software developed for FEL specific devices and provide an overview of the FEL control system.

  5. Start-to-end modelling of a mode-locked optical klystron free electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunning, D. J.; Thompson, N. R. [University of Strathclyde (SUPA), Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Mc Neil, B. W. J. [University of Strathclyde (SUPA), Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Williams, P. H. [ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser (FEL) in a mode-locked optical klystron (MLOK) configuration is modelled using start-to-end simulations that simulate realistic electron beam acceleration and transport before input into a full three-dimensional FEL simulation code. These simulations demonstrate that the MLOK scheme is compatible with the present generation of radiofrequency accelerator designs. A train of few-optical cycle pulses is predicted with peak powers similar to those of the equivalent conventional FEL amplifier. The role of electron beam energy modulation in these results is explained and the limitations of some simulation codes discussed. It is shown how seeding the FEL interaction using a High Harmonic seed laser can improve the coherence properties of the output.

  6. Production and acceleration of ion beams by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velardi, L.; Siciliano, M. V.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V. [Department of Physics and I.N.F.N., LEAS Laboratory, University of Salento, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a new pulsed laser ablation technique to obtain energetic ion beams. The accelerator we made is a compact device able to extract and accelerate the ionic components of plasma up to 160 keV per charge state. It is composed by a generating chamber containing an expansion chamber used like first electrode. Next, a second electrode connected to ground and a third electrode connected to negative voltage are used. The third electrode is used also as Faraday cup. By the analysis of the ion signals we studied the plume parameters such as TOF accelerated signals, charge state, and divergence.

  7. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Short, R.W.; Craxton, S.; Letzring, S.A.; Soures, J.

    1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies (''colors'') cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers. 8 figures.

  8. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharlemann, Ernst T. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped.

  9. Accelerator Design Study for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kur, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Experiment”, Free Electron Laser Conference, FEL06,from Shot-Noise, Free Electron Laser Conference FEL08for FERMI@elettra, Free Electron Laser Conference FEL07

  10. Longitudinally Coherent Single-Spike Radiation from a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Gabriel Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Free Electron Laser Operation . . . . . . . . . Undulatorfitting formula for free-electron lasers with strong space-modes in high-gain free-electron lasers,” Phys. Rev. ST

  11. Relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing of a laser beam in a radially inhomogeneous plasma. I. Paraxial approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandi, H.S.; Manus, C.; Mainfray, G. (Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, Bat. 522, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)); Lehner, T. (Laboratoire PMI, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)); Bonnaud, G. (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre d'Etudes de Limeil-Valenton, 94195 Villeneuve-St-Georges (France))

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of a high-irradiance laser beam in a plasma whose optical index depends nonlinearly on the light intensity is investigated through both theoretical and numerical analyses. The nonlinear effects examined herein are the relativistic decrease of the plasma frequency and the ponderomotive expelling of the electrons. This paper is devoted to focusing and defocusing effects of a beam assumed to remain cylindrical and for a plasma supposed homogeneous along the propagation direction but radially inhomogeneous with a parabolic density profile. A two-parameter perturbation expansion is used; these two parameters, assumed small with respect to unity, are the ratio of the laser wavelength to the radial electric-field gradient length and the ratio of the plasma frequency to the laser frequency. The laser field is described in the context of a time envelope and spatial paraxial approximations. An analytical expression is provided for the critical beam power beyond which self-focusing appears; it depends strongly on the plasma inhomogeneity and suggests the plasma density tailoring in order to lower this critical power. The beam energy radius evolution is obtained as a function of the propagation distance by numerically solving the paraxial equation given by the two-parameter expansion. The relativistic mass variation is shown to dominate the ponderomotive effect. For strong laser fields, self-focusing saturates due to corrections of fourth order in the electric field involved by both contributions.

  12. Enhanced subthreshold electron-positron production in short laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Titov; H. Takabe; B. Kampfer; A. Hosaka

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission of electron-positron pairs off a probe photon propagating through a polarized short-pulsed electromagnetic (e.g.\\ laser) wave field is analyzed. A significant increase of the total cross section of pair production in the subthreshold region is found for decreasing laser pulse duration even in case of moderate laser pulse intensities.

  13. Powerful, pulsed, THz radiation from laser accelerated relativistic electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    by strongly focused ( 6 µm), high peak power (up to 10 TW), ultra-short ( 50 fs) laser pulses of a 10 Hz at the exit of the plasma accelerator. Keywords: ultrahigh-fields, ultra-short, laser-plasma, wakefieldPowerful, pulsed, THz radiation from laser accelerated relativistic electron bunches Cs. T´otha, J

  14. Strongly aligned gas-phase molecules at Free-Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kierspel, Thomas; Mullins, Terry; Robinson, Joseph; Aquila, Andy; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard; Boll, Rebecca; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucksbaum, Philip; Chapman, Henry N; Christensen, Lauge; Fry, Alan; Hunter, Mark; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Mariani, Valerio; Morgan, Andrew; Natan, Adi; Petrovic, Vladimir; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Schnorr, Kirsten; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Stern, Stephan; Thøgersen, Jan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Wang, Fenglin; Trippel, Sebastian; Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a novel experimental implementation to strongly align molecules at full repetition rates of free-electron lasers. We utilized the available in-house laser system at the coherent x-ray imaging beamline at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Chirped laser pulses, i. e., the direct output from the regenerative amplifier of the Ti:Sa chirped pulse amplification laser system, were used to strongly align 2,5-diiodothiophene molecules in a molecular beam. The alignment laser pulses had pulse energies of a few mJ and a pulse duration of 94 ps. A degree of alignment of $\\left$ = 0.85 was measured, limited by the intrinsic temperature of the molecular beam rather than by the available laser system. With the general availability of synchronized chirped-pulse-amplified near-infrared laser systems at short-wavelength laser facilities, our approach allows for the universal preparation of molecules tightly fixed in space for experiments with x-ray pulses.

  15. Tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron beam using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits is placed above a Faraday cup. The beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. Also, a single computer is used to generate the signals actuating the sweep, to acquire that data, and to do the reconstruction, thus reducing the time and equipment necessary to complete the process.

  16. Multi-MeV electron acceleration by sub-terawatt laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goers, A J; Feder, L; Miao, B; Salehi, F; Milchberg, H M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate laser-plasma acceleration of high charge electron beams to the ~10 MeV scale using ultrashort laser pulses with as little energy as 10 mJ. This result is made possible by an extremely dense and thin hydrogen gas jet. Total charge up to ~0.5 nC is measured for energies >1 MeV. Acceleration is correlated to the presence of a relativistically self-focused laser filament accompanied by an intense coherent broadband light flash, associated with wavebreaking, which can radiate more than ~3% of the laser energy in a sub-femtosecond bandwidth consistent with half-cycle optical emission. Our results enable truly portable applications of laser-driven acceleration, such as low dose radiography, ultrafast probing of matter, and isotope production.

  17. Electron Beam Irradiation for Improving Safety of Fruits and Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adavi, Megha Sarthak

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to pathogens. Conventional techniques of sanitizing washes may not be effective since the organic matter released from the fresh produce use up the free chlorine thus reducing the sanitizing potential of wash water just when it is needed most and a heat... treatment step to kill pathogens cannot be applied if the purpose is to consume fresh produce. Electron beam (e-beam) irradiation was used to treat cut cantaloupe, cut roma tomatoes, baby spinach, romaine lettuce which were surface inoculated with a...

  18. Transmission of High-Power Electron Beams Through Small Apertures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschalaer, Christoph [MIT Bates Linear Accelerator; Alarcon, Ricardo O.; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V. [JLAB; Bertozzi, William; Boyce, James R. [College of William and Mary; Cowan, Ray Franklin [MIT; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Fisher, Peter H.; Ihloff, Ernest E. [MIT Bates Linear Accelerator; Kalantarians, Narbe [Unversity of Texas; Kelleher, Aidan Michael [MIT Bates Linear Accelerator; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Milner, Richard; Neil, George R. [JLAB; Ou, Longwu [MIT; Schmookler, Barak Abraham [MIT; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Williams, Gwyn P. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed to pass a 100 MeV, 430 kWatt c.w. electron beam from the energy-recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's FEL facility through a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Beam transmission losses of 3 p.p.m. through a 2 mm diameter aperture were maintained during a 7 hour continuous run.

  19. Post-Disruptive Runaway Electron Beam in COMPASS Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlainic, Milos; Cavalier, Jordan; Weinzettl, Vladimir; Paprok, Richard; Imrisek, Martin; Ficker, Ondrej; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For ITER-relevant runaway electron studies, such as suppression, mitigation, termination and/or control of runaway beam, obtaining the runaway electrons after the disruption is important. In this paper we report on the first achieved discharges with post-disruptive runaway electron beam, entitled "runaway plateau", in the COMPASS tokamak. The runaway plateau is produced by massive gas injection of argon. Almost all of the disruptions with runaway electron plateaus occurred during the plasma current ramp-up phase. Comparison between the Ar injection discharges with and without plateau has been done for various parameters. Parametrisation of the discharges shows that COMPASS disruptions fulfill the range of parameters important for the runaway plateau occurrence. These parameters include electron density, electric field, disruption speed, effective safety factor, maximum current quench electric field. In addition to these typical parameters, the plasma current value just before the massive gas injection surpris...

  20. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Kwang-Je (Burr Ridge, IL); Zholents, Alexander (Walnut Creek, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  1. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM OF NOVOSIBIRSK FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM OF NOVOSIBIRSK FREE ELECTRON LASER B.A.Gudkov, P.A.Selivanov, V all sensors are recorded to the database every 30 seconds. INTRODUCTION A high-power free electron laser (FEL), based on the microtron-recuperator[1], is under construction now at Budker Institute

  2. Temporal process of plasma discharge by an electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugawa, M.; Sugaya, R.; Isobe, S.; Kumar, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790 (Japan); Honda, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of the plasma discharge due to an electron beam is experimentally investigated. A pulse ({approximately}540 {mu}s) of an electron beam (0.5{endash}1.5 keV, {le}20 mA) is injected into argon gas (5{times}10{sup {minus}5}{endash}5{times}10{sup {minus}4} Torr) in a magnetic field (50{endash}300 G). The discharge based on a gas break down occurs cascade-likely in time. The gas beak down with some steps is explained by the two stream instability of an electron beam-plasma system, from the observation of the temporal evolution of the frequency spectra (0{endash}3.0 GHz) of the instability and the measurement of the temporal plasma density and temperature. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Portable radiography system using a relativistic electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoeberling, R.F.

    1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable radiographic generator is provided with an explosive magnetic flux compression generator producing the high voltage necessary to generate a relativistic electron beam. The relativistic electron beam is provided with target materials which generates the desired radiographic pulse. The magnetic flux compression generator may require at least two conventional explosively driven generators in series to obtain a desired output voltage of at least 1 MV. The cathode and anode configuration of the diode are selected to provide a switching action wherein a high impedance load is presented to the magnetic flux compression generator when the high voltage is being generated, and thereafter switching to a low impedance load to generate the relativistic electron beam. Magnetic flux compression generators can be explosively driven and provided in a relatively compact, portable form for use with the relativistic x-ray equipment. 8 figs.

  4. Dominant Secondary Nuclear Photoexcitation with the X-ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas Gunst; Yuri A. Litvinov; Christoph H. Keitel; Adriana Pálffy

    2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The new regime of resonant nuclear photoexcitation rendered possible by x-ray free electron laser beams interacting with solid state targets is investigated theoretically. Our results unexpectedly show that secondary processes coupling nuclei to the atomic shell in the created cold high-density plasma can dominate direct photoexcitation. As an example we discuss the case of $^{93m}$Mo isomer depletion for which nuclear excitation by electron capture as secondary process is shown to be orders of magnitude more efficient than the direct laser-nucleus interaction. General arguments revisiting the role of the x-ray free electron laser in nuclear experiments involving solid-state targets are further deduced.

  5. ANL Beams and Applications Seminar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterization of the laser and electron beams of the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac Heng Li Cornell University June 18 Interbeam Scattering Studies at CesrTA Michael Ehrlichman...

  6. Computer simulation of the processes at electron beam technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mladenov, G.M.; Vutova, K.; Sabchevsky, S. [Institute of Electronics, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer software packages developed in Bulgaria are among our important research results concerning EB melting and refining. (i) In the field of the gun and the beam improvement optimisation: A new approach, based on beam phase analysis, has been proposed and applied in a computer software package. The computer simulation of beam formation and transport permit to optimize technology electron guns and predict some features of the processes. A investigation of the ion compensation of the electron space charge in the beam at different technology conditions is in progress. (ii) In the electron beam refining technology. The kinetics of the impurities evaporation and refining of the low density contaminants at the drip or cold hearth melting has been investigated. Computer calculation of the component concentration changes during refinement had been developed. Analysis of main processes of the impurity transport can be studied. (iii) In the field of beam heating of the materials: Computer simulation of the heat transport is done. Deep of the melted pool, thermal distribution in the casted ingot as the temperature loading of the equipment parts are possible to be calculated.

  7. Single Crystal Diamond Beam Position Monitors with Radiofrequency Electronic Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solar, B.; Graafsma, H.; Potdevin, G.; Trunk, U. [Hasylab, Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton, Hamburg (Germany); Morse, J.; Salome, M. [Instrumentation Services and Development Division, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the energy range 5{approx}30 keV a suitably contacted, thin ({approx}100 {mu}m) diamond plate can be operated in situ as a continuous monitor of X-ray beam intensity and position as the diamond absorbs only a small percentage of the incident beam. Single crystal diamond is a completely homogeneous material showing fast (ns), spatially uniform signal response and negligible (beams. We report on tests made at ESRF and DESY using diamond beam position monitors of simple quadrant electrode designs with metal contacts, operated using wideband electronic readout corresponding to the RF accelerator frequency. The instrumentation for these monitors must cover a large range of operating conditions: different beam sizes, fluxes, energies and time structure corresponding to the synchrotron fill patterns. Sophisticated new RF sampling electronics can satisfy most requirements: using a modified Libera Brilliance readout system, we measured the center of gravity position of a 25 {mu}m beam at the DORIS III F4 beam line at a rate of 130 Msample/s with narrowband filtering of a few MHz bandwidth. Digitally averaging the signal further provided a spatial resolution {approx}20 nm.

  8. THz radiation as a bunch diagnostic for laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the vacuum chamber by an ultra-intense laser pulse. A secondEO) crystal. An ultra-short NIR laser beam was used to probe

  9. Interaction of ion-acoustic solitons with electron beam in warm plasmas with superthermal electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) is studied using the hydrodynamic equations coupled with the Poisson equation in a warm plasma consisting of adiabatic ions and superthermal (Kappa distributed) electrons in presence of an electron-beam component. In the linear limit, the dispersion relation for ion-acoustic (IA) waves is obtained by linearizing of basic equations. On the other hand, in the nonlinear analysis, an energy-balance like equation involving Sagdeev's pseudo-potential is derived in order to investigate arbitrary amplitude IA solitons. The Mach number range is determined in which, propagation and characteristics of IA solitons are analyzed both parametrically and numerically. The variation of amplitude and width of electrostatic (ES) excitations as a result of superthermality (via) and also the physical parameters (ion temperature, soliton speed, electron-beam density and electron-beam velocity) are examined. A typical interaction between IASWs and the electron-beam in plasma is conf...

  10. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baptiste, Kenneth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bessy Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser, ISBN 3-9809534-0-26th International Free Electron Laser Conference, Trieste,Proceedings of 21st Free-Electron Laser Conference (FEL’99),

  11. Exact and variational solutions of 3D Eigenmodes in high gain Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motz, Undulators and Free-Electron Lasers, (Clarendon Press,in High . Gain Free Electron Lasers MingXie Accelerator andin High Gain Free Electron Lasers Ming Xie Accelerator and

  12. Physically Transparent Formulation of a Free-Electron Laser in the Linear Gain Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barletta, W.A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in High-Gain, High-Power Free-Electron Lasers: Physics andFormulation of a Free-Electron Laser in the Linear GainFormulation of a Free-Electron Laser in the Linear Gain

  13. Design Overview of a Highly Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twelfth International Free Electron Laser Conference, Paris,Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL K. -J. Kim, M.Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL* K. -J. Kim, M.

  14. Sensitivity Studies of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarahan, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 12th Int. Free Electron Laser Conf. , Nuel. Instr. andof a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser G. Rangarajan and A.of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Govindan Rangarajan

  15. THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FOR A HIGH-GRADIENT ACCELERATING STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18-23, 1982 THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FOR AAC03-76SF00098 THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FORVariable Parameter Free Electron Laser", to be pub 1 i shed

  16. The Evolution and Limits of Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers". In the sentenceBandwidth in Free Electron Lasers K. -J. Kim November 1990of Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers* Kwang-Je Kim

  17. Discrete Cavity Model of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarajan, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 1991 Free Electron Laser Conference, Santaof a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser G. Rangarajan, A.of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Govindan Rangarajan

  18. The Evolution and Limits of Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers". In the sentenceBandwidth in Free Electron Lasers K. -J. Kim November 1990of Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers* Kwang-Je Kim

  19. FREE ELECTRON LASERS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF INFRARED AND MILLIMETER WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hughes Low-Voltage Free-Electron Laser Program," in Proc.of the 1985 Free Electron Laser Conference, Lake Tahoe,Mark III Infrared Free-Electron Laser," in Proc. of the 1985

  20. OPTIMIZATION OF THE PARAMETERS OF A STORAGE RING FOR A HIGH POWER XUV FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A.M. Sessler. 'free Electron Laser . LBL -l 8905 (JanuaryFOR A HIGH POWER XUV FREE ELECTRON LASER. A. Jackson, J.for a High Power XUV Free Electron Laser," (LBL'19771, June,

  1. Stability of Resonator Configurations in the Presence of Free-Electron Laser Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnagopal, S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R.H.Pantell, 'The Free-Electron Laser In A ConfocalInternational Free-Electron Laser Conference, Kobe, Japan,in the Presence of Free-Electron Laser Interactions S.

  2. Obtaining attosecond X-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, A.A.; Penn, G.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook, Vol- ume 6: Free Electron Lasers (North-Holland,spontaneous emission free electron laser A.A. Zholents, G.spontaneous emission free electron laser A. A. Zholents and

  3. Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport of Energy by Ultra-Intense Laser-Generated tronsof Energy by Ultra-Intense Laser-Generated Electrons inUltra-High In- tensity Lasers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  4. Ultra-low emittance beam generation using two-color ionization injection in a CO2 laser-driven plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C B; Bulanov, S S; Chen, M; Esarey, E; Geddes, C G R; Vay, J -L; Yu, L -L; Leemans, W P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-low emittance (tens of nm) beams can be generated in a plasma accelerator using ionization injection of electrons into a wakefield. An all-optical method of beam generation uses two laser pulses of different colors. A long-wavelength drive laser pulse (with a large ponderomotive force and small peak electric field) is used to excite a large wakefield without fully ionizing a gas, and a short-wavelength injection laser pulse (with a small ponderomotive force and large peak electric field), co-propagating and delayed with respect to the pump laser, to ionize a fraction of the remaining bound electrons at a trapped wake phase, generating an electron beam that is accelerated in the wake. The trapping condition, the ionized electron distribution, and the trapped bunch dynamics are discussed. Expressions for the beam transverse emittance, parallel and orthogonal to the ionization laser polarization, are presented. An example is shown using a 10-micron CO2 laser to drive the wake and a frequency-doubled Ti:Al2...

  5. Slit disk for modified faraday cup diagnostic for determining power density of electron and ion beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer; John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (State College, PA)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A diagnostic system for characterization of an electron beam or an ion beam includes an electrical conducting disk of refractory material having a circumference, a center, and a Faraday cup assembly positioned to receive the electron beam or ion beam. At least one slit in the disk provides diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam. The at least one slit is located between the circumference and the center of the disk and includes a radial portion that is in radial alignment with the center and a portion that deviates from radial alignment with the center. The electron beam or ion beam is directed onto the disk and translated to the at least one slit wherein the electron beam or ion beam enters the at least one slit for providing diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam.

  6. Surface Science Analysis of GaAs Photocathodes Following Sustained Electron Beam Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutthanandan, V.; Zhu, Zihua; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Hannon, Fay; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Hess, Wayne P.

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Several photocathode degradation processes are suspected, including defect formation by ion back bombardment, photochemistry of surface adsorbed species and irradiation-induced surface defect formation. To better understand the mechanisms of photocathode degradation, we have conducted surface and bulk analysis studies of two GaAs photocathodes removed from the FEL photoinjector after delivering electron beam for a few years. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, strained super-lattice GaAs photocathode samples, removed from the CEBAF photoinjector were analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. This analysis of photocathode degradation during nominal photoinjector operating conditions represents first steps towards developing robust new photocathode designs necessary for generating sub-micron emittance electron beams required for both fourth generation light sources and intense polarized CW electron beams for nuclear and high energy physics facilities.

  7. Electron beam collector for a microwave power tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dandl, Raphael A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a cylindrical, electron beam collector that efficiently couples the microwave energy out of a high power microwave source while stopping the attendant electron beam. The interior end walls of the collector are a pair of facing parabolic mirrors and the microwave energy from an input horn is radiated between the two mirrors and reassembled at the entrance to the output waveguide where the transmitted mode is reconstructed. The mode transmission through the collector of the present invention has an efficiency of at least 94%.

  8. Radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwan, Thomas J. T. (Los Alamos, NM); Mostrom, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator (RBTO) provides a compact high power microwave generator. The RBTO includes a coaxial vacuum transmission line having an outer conductor and an inner conductor. The inner conductor defines an annular cavity with dimensions effective to support an electromagnetic field in a TEM.sub.00m mode. A radial field emission cathode is formed on the outer conductor for providing an electron beam directed toward the annular cavity electrode. Microwave energy is then extracted from the annular cavity electrode.

  9. Electron beam evaporation for titanium metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storer, J. [3M, Mendota Heights, MN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    3M, in partnership with ARPA, is developing electron beam evaporation as a method for producing titanium metal matrix composites (TMC`s). This paper discusses some of the opportunities presented by these strong and lightweight structural materials but also points out the many challenges which must be met. The excellent mechanical properties of titanium matrix composites have been recognized for quite some time; however use of these materials has been limited by the lack of a commercially viable process to produce them. 3M is removing this logjam in processing technology by using high rate electron beam evaporation technology to manufacture these materials on a significantly large scale.

  10. High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - Ã?Â?165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

  11. Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Liu, Jianping [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215125 (China); Asadirad, Mojtaba [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Kwon, Min-Ki [Department of Photonic Engineering, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Dupuis, Russell D. [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Das, Suman [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun, E-mail: jryou@uh.edu [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500?nm, depth of 50?nm, and a periodicity of 1??m were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

  12. Turning point temperature and competition between relativistic and ponderomotive effects in self-focusing of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari Milani, M. R. [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation characters of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive and relativistic nonlinearities. The second-order differential equation of dimensionless beam width parameter is solved numerically, taking into account the effect of electron temperature. The results show that the ponderomotive force does not facilitate the relativistic self-focusing in all intensity ranges. In fact, there exists a certain intensity value that, if below this value, the ponderomotive nonlinearity can contribute to the relativistic self-focusing, or obstruct it, if above. It is also indicated that there is a temperature interval in which self-focusing can occur, while the beam diverges outside of this region. In addition, the results represent the existence of a “turning point temperature” in the mentioned interval that the self-focusing has the strongest power. The value of the turning point is dependent on laser intensity in which higher intensities result in higher turning point.

  13. Electron beam irradiation of gemstone for color enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idris, Sarada; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Hashim, Siti A'iasah; Ahmad, Shamshad; Jusoh, Mohd Suhaimi [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); School of Chemicals and Material Engineering, NUST Islamabad (Pakistan); Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous treatment of gemstones has been going on for hundreds of years for enhancing color and clarity of gems devoid of these attributes. Whereas previous practices included fraudulent or otherwise processes to achieve the color enhancement, the ionizing radiation has proven to be a reliable and reproducible technique. Three types of irradiation processes include exposure to gamma radiation, electron beam irradiation and the nuclear power plants. Electron Beam Irradiation of Gemstone is a technique in which a gemstone is exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate color centers culminating in introduction of deeper colors. The color centers may be stable or unstable. Below 9MeV, normally no radioactivity is introduced in the exposed gems. A study was conducted at Electron Beam Irradiation Centre (Alurtron) for gemstone color enhancement by using different kind of precious gemstones obtained from Pakistan. The study shows that EB irradiation not only enhances the color but can also improves the clarity of some type of gemstones. The treated stones included kunzite, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, aquamarine and cultured pearls. Doses ranging from 25 kGy to 200 KGy were employed to assess the influence of doses on color and clarity and to select the optimum doses. The samples used included both the natural and the faceted gemstones. It is concluded that significant revenue generation is associated with the enhancement of the color in clarity of gemstones which are available at very cheap price in the world market.

  14. High energy electron beam joining of ceramic components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A. [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately}1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of critical components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. Because of transient heating, higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, a pulsed high power beam can melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons as well as ceramic and glass tubes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF Linac accelerator at 10-13 MV. The repetition rate of the pulsed beam was varied between 8 and 120 Hz, the average beam current was varied between 8 and 120 microamps, and the power was varied up to 1.5 kW. These beam parameters gave a beam power density between 0.2 to 2 kW/cm{sup 2}. The duration of the joining runs varied from 5 to 600 sec. Joining experiments have provided high strength between alumina - alumina and alumina - cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals. A series of tests was conducted to determine the minimum beam power and exposure time for producing, a hermetic seal.

  15. Design of a subnanometer resolution beam position monitor for dielectric laser accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    of the first laser-powered particle accel- erators "on a chip" [1,2]. These devices are specifically designed present a new concept for a beam position monitor with the unique ability to map particle beam position, this device is ideal for future x-ray sources and laser-driven particle accelerators "on a chip." © 2012

  16. High-power laser beam control by PTR Bragg gratings Igor Ciapurin(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glebov, Leon

    High-power laser beam control by PTR Bragg gratings Igor Ciapurin(1) , Vadim Smirnov(1,2) , George is a photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass, and used for high-power laser beam control. Exceptionally narrow. The computer controlled recording setup allowed controlling input angles with accuracy better then 0.25 mrad

  17. Electromagnetic cascade in high energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Bulanov; C. B. Schroeder; E. Esarey; W. P. Leemans

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when 3D effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high energy e-beam interacting with a counter-streaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  18. Electron Beam Energy Chirp Control with a Rectangular Corrugated Structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bane, Karl; Ding, Yantao; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Maxwell, Timothy; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam energy chirp is an important parameter that affects the bandwidth and performance of a linac-based, free-electron laser. In this paper we study the wakefields generated by a beam passing between at metallic plates with small corrugations, and then apply such a device as a passive dechirper for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) energy chirp control with a multi-GeV and femtosecond electron beam. Similar devices have been tested in several places at relatively low energies (#24;100 MeV) and with relatively long bunches (> 1ps). In the parameter regime of the LCLS dechirper, with the corrugation size similar to the gap between the plates, the analytical solutions of the wakefields are no longer applicable, and we resort to a #12;field matching program to obtain the wakes. Based on the numerical calculations, we #12;fit the short-range, longitudinal wakes to simple formulas, valid over a large, useful parameter range. Finally, since the transverse wakefields - both dipole and quadrupole-are strong, we compute and include them in beam dynamics simulations to investigate the error tolerances when this device is introduced in the LCLS.

  19. Electron Beam Energy Chirp Control with a Rectangular Corrugated Structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bane, Karl; Ding, Yantao; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Maxwell, Timothy; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam energy chirp is an important parameter that affects the bandwidth and performance of a linac-based, free-electron laser. In this paper we study the wakefields generated by a beam passing between at metallic plates with small corrugations, and then apply such a device as a passive dechirper for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) energy chirp control with a multi-GeV and femtosecond electron beam. Similar devices have been tested in several places at relatively low energies (#24;100 MeV) and with relatively long bunches (> 1ps). In the parameter regime of the LCLS dechirper, with the corrugation size similar tomore »the gap between the plates, the analytical solutions of the wakefields are no longer applicable, and we resort to a #12;field matching program to obtain the wakes. Based on the numerical calculations, we #12;fit the short-range, longitudinal wakes to simple formulas, valid over a large, useful parameter range. Finally, since the transverse wakefields - both dipole and quadrupole-are strong, we compute and include them in beam dynamics simulations to investigate the error tolerances when this device is introduced in the LCLS.« less

  20. Apparatus and method for increasing the bandwidth of a laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Russell B. (Oakland, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus using sinusoidal cross-phase modulation, provides a laser pulse having a very broad bandwidth while substantially retaining the input laser's temporal shape. The modulator may be used in a master oscillator system for a laser having a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) configration. The modulator utilizes a first laser providing an output wavelength .lambda. and a second laser providing an output wavelength shifted by a small amount to .lambda.+.DELTA..lambda.. Each beam has a single, linear polarization. Each beam is coupled into a length of polarization-preserving optical fiber. The first laser beam is coupled into the optical fiber with the beam's polarization aligned with the fiber's main axis, and the second beam is coupled into the fiber with its polarization rotated from the main axis by a predetermined angle. Within the fiber, the main axis' polarization defines an interference beam and the orthogonal axis' polarization defines a signal beam. In the interference beam, the first laser beam and the parallel polarized vector component of the other beam interfere to create areas of high and low intensity, which modulates the signal beam by cross phase modulation. Upon exit from the optical fiber, the beams are coupled out and the modulated signal beam is separated out by a polarization selector. The signal beam can be applied to coherence reducing systems to provide an output that is temporally and spatially incoherent. The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W7405-ENG-48 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Electron beam melting capability at Cabot Performance Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, J.G. [Cabot Performance Materials, Boyertown, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cabot Performance Materials is a manufacturer of selected performance metals from ores to finished powder and mill shapes. CPM has been a world leader for over 40 years in the technology and production of tantalum and niobium for the electronics, aerospace, defense, and chemical processing industries. This paper presents a historical overview of their electron beam furnaces culminating with the successful installation of a second 1200 KW furnace.

  2. Electron Beam Welding of a Depleted Uranium Alloy to Niobium Using a Calibrated Electron Beam Power Density Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; Terrill, P.E.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam test welds were made joining flat plates of commercially pure niobium to a uranium-6wt%Nb (binary) alloy. The welding parameters and joint design were specifically developed to minimize mixing of the niobium with the U-6%Nb alloy. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the precise power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines and/or to other facilities.

  3. Rapid thermal processing of steel using high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J.W.; Newton, A.; Smith, C. Jr.

    1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy electron beams (HEEBs) with megavolt energies represent a new generation of charged particle beams that rapidly deposit up to several hundred joules/pulse over areas on the order of a few square millimeters to 100s of square centimeters. These pulsed beams have energies in the 1 to 10 MeV range, which enables the electrons to deposit large amounts of energy deeply into the material being processed, and these beams have short pulse durations (50 ns) that can heat materials at rates as high as 10{sup 10} {degrees}C/s for a 1000 {degree}C temperature rise in the material. Lower heating rates, on the order of 10{sup 4} {degrees}C/s, can be produced by reducing the energy per pulse and distributing the total required energy over a series of sub-ms pulses, at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) up to several kHz. This paper presents results from materials processing experiments performed on steel with a 6 MeV electron beam, analyzes these results using a Monte Carlo transport code, and presents a first-order predictive method for estimating the peak energy deposition, temperature, and heating rate for HEEB processed steel.

  4. Comparison of laser-induced surface damage density measurements with small and large beams: toward representativeness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamaignere, Laurent; Dupuy, Gabriel; Donval, Thierry; Grua, Pierre; Bercegol, Herve

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed laser damage density measurements obtained with diverse facilities are difficult to compare, due to the interplay of numerous parameters, such as beam area and pulse geometry, which, in operational large beam conditions, are very different from laboratory measurements. This discrepancy could have a significant impact; if so, one could not even pretend that laser damage density control is a real measurement process. In this paper, this concern is addressed. Tests with large beams of centimeter size on a high-power laser facility have beam performed according to a parametric study and are compared to small beam laboratory tests. It is shown that laser damage densities obtained with large and small beams are equal, within calculated error bars.

  5. Simulation of multicomponent evaporation in electron beam melting and refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results and a mathematical model are presented to describe differential evaporation rates in electron beam melting of titanium alloys containing aluminum and vanadium. Experiments characterized the evaporation rate of commercially pure titanium, and vapor composition over titanium with up to 6% Al and 4.5% V content as a function of beam power, scan frequency and background pressure. The model is made up of a steady-state heat and mass transport model of a melting hearth and a model of transient thermal and flow behavior near the surface. Activity coefficients for aluminum and vanadium in titanium are roughly estimated by fitting model parameters to experimental results. Based on the ability to vary evaporation rate by 10-15% using scan frequency alone, we discuss the possibility of on-line composition control by means of intelligent manipulation of the electron beam.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond pulses with high repetition rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, Anne

    Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond average power Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Free Electron Laser. The combination of the free electron laser leads to very different plasma emission and produces films with high quality

  7. Risk Management Plan Electron Beam Ion Source Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management Plan for the Electron Beam Ion Source Project (EBIS) Project # 06-SC-002. There are three specific areas of risk that can be controlled and managed by the EBIS Project team and these are and operations. The BNL ISM clearly indicates that risk management is everybody's business and will be factored

  8. Development of a chemical dosimeter for electron beam food irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivadeneira, Ramiro Geovanny

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    uniform irradiation treatment on apple-phantoms (a complex shaped target) and GAFCHROMIC® HD-810 films using electron beams from (1) a 2 MeV Van de Graaff (VDG) accelerator, (2) a 10 MeV Linear Accelerator (LINAC), and (3) X-rays from a 5 MeV LINAC...

  9. Electron beam melting and casting of zirconium and titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arzhakova, V.M.; Popov, E.I. [A.A. Bochvar All Union Scientific and Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dubrovski, V.A.; Frolov, V.I. [PO ChMZ, Glazov (Russian Federation); Ladohin, S.V.; Levitsky, N.I.; Chernyavsky, V.B. [Scientific and Research Institute of Casting, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of electron beam melting (EBM) and casting Zirconium and Titanium alloys are discussed. The data on different schedules used for EBM of this metals as well as equipment for crucible melting and special equipment for casting are described. The results of production of Zirconium and Titanium alloy mold castings for various purposes are presented.

  10. Electron Beam--21st Century Food Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vestal, Andy

    2003-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and spoil food, sometimes without changing the food's taste, smell, or appearance. Cesium 137, Cobalt 60: Metals that are produced by nuclear reaction and give off ionizing radiation as gamma rays. Chemical Sprout Inhibitors: Certain chemicals being used... flipping is not required and processing can be accomplished in seconds. In the X-Ray Mode, electrons are accelerated to near the speed of light using microwaves into a dense metal which emits X-Rays that pass through the product breaking the DNA chain...

  11. Precision laser surveying instrument using atmospheric turbulence compensation by determining the absolute displacement between two laser beam components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric effects on sighting measurements are compensated for by adjusting any sighting measurements using a correction factor that does not depend on atmospheric state conditions such as temperature, pressure, density or turbulence. The correction factor is accurately determined using a precisely measured physical separation between two color components of a light beam (or beams) that has been generated using either a two-color laser or two lasers that project different colored beams. The physical separation is precisely measured by fixing the position of a short beam pulse and measuring the physical separation between the two fixed-in-position components of the beam. This precisely measured physical separation is then used in a relationship that includes the indexes of refraction for each of the two colors of the laser beam in the atmosphere through which the beam is projected, thereby to determine the absolute displacement of one wavelength component of the laser beam from a straight line of sight for that projected component of the beam. This absolute displacement is useful to correct optical measurements, such as those developed in surveying measurements that are made in a test area that includes the same dispersion effects of the atmosphere on the optical measurements. The means and method of the invention are suitable for use with either single-ended systems or a double-ended systems.

  12. Wavelength dependence of prepulse laser beams on EUV emission from CO2 reheated Sn plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Wavelength dependence of prepulse laser beams on EUV emission from CO2 reheated Sn plasma J. R. The expanding plume was then reheated by a 35 ns CO2 laser operating at 10.6 m. The role of prepulse wavelength, Tanaka et al.11 demonstrated the advantages of using a CO2 laser for generating higher CE. The CO2 LPP

  13. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuyu Liu

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  14. Multiple-beam laser–plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myatt, J. F., E-mail: jmya@lle.rochester.edu; Zhang, J.; Maximov, A. V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Edgell, D. H.; Michel, D. T.; Igumenshchev, I. V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0171 (United States); Hinkel, D. E.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental evidence for multiple-beam laser-plasma instabilities of relevance to laser driven inertial confinement fusion at the ignition scale is reviewed, in both the indirect and direct-drive approaches. The instabilities described are cross-beam energy transfer (in both indirectly driven targets on the NIF and in direct-drive targets), multiple-beam stimulated Raman scattering (for indirect-drive), and multiple-beam two-plasmon decay instability (in direct drive). Advances in theoretical understanding and in the numerical modeling of these multiple beam instabilities are presented.

  15. Apparatus and method for increasing the bandwidth of a laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffee, Paul H. (Bolina, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is disclosed that provides a laser output beam having a broad bandwidth and an intensity smooth over time. The bandwidth of the laser output can be varied easily by varying the intensity of a broadband source. The present invention includes an optical modulation apparatus comprising a narrowband laser that outputs a horizontally polarized beam (a "signal beam") and a broadband laser that outputs a vertically polarized beam (a "pump beam") whose intensity varies rapidly. The two beam are coupled into a birefringent laser material so that the respective polarizations coincide with the principal axes of the material. As the two beams travel through the material, the polarization preserving properties of the birefringent material maintain the respective polarizations of the two beam; however there is coupling between the two beams as a result of cross phase modulations, which induces a bandwidth change of the signal beam. The amount of bandwidth change is dependent upon the average intensity of the pump beam. The beams are coupled out from the birefringent material and the modulated signal beam is separated by a polarization selector. The modulated signal beam now has a wider bandwidth, and its shape remains smooth in time. This signal beam can be applied to incoherence inducing systems. The different bandwidths required by these different incoherence inducing systems can be obtained by varying the intensity of the pump beam. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W7405-ENG-48 between the United States Department of Energy and the University of California for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  16. Practical method and device for enhancing pulse contrast ratio for lasers and electron accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui; Wilson, Guy

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for enhancing pulse contrast ratios for drive lasers and electron accelerators. The invention comprises a mechanical dual-shutter system wherein the shutters are placed sequentially in series in a laser beam path. Each shutter of the dual shutter system has an individually operated trigger for opening and closing the shutter. As the triggers are operated individually, the delay between opening and closing first shutter and opening and closing the second shutter is variable providing for variable differential time windows and enhancement of pulse contrast ratio.

  17. Single-shot measurement of free-electron laser polarization at SDUV-FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Lie; Zhang, Tong; Feng, Chao; Chen, Jianhui; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Shen, Lei; Zhang, Wenyan; Yao, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a division-of-amplitude photopolarimeter (DOAP) for measuring the polarization state of free-electron laser (FEL) pulse is described. The incident FEL beam is divided into four separate beams, and four Stokes parameters can be measured in a single-shot. In the crossed-planar undulators experiment at Shanghai deep ultraviolet FEL test facility, this DOAP instrument constructed in house responses accurately and timely while the polarization-state of fully coherent FEL pulses are switched, which is helpful for confirming the crossed-planar undulators technique for short-wavelength FELs.

  18. Attosecond Thomson-scattering x-ray source driven by laser-based electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China) [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Ma, Y. Y. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China) [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Song, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. C. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of producing attosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering of laser light off laser-driven relativistic electron beams is investigated. For a ?200-as, tens-MeV electron bunch produced with laser ponderomotive-force acceleration in a plasma wire, exceeding 10{sup 6} photons/s in the form of ?160 as pulses in the range of 3–300 keV are predicted, with a peak brightness of ?5 × 10{sup 20} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1% bandwidth). Our study suggests that the physical scheme discussed in this work can be used for an ultrafast (attosecond) x-ray source, which is the most beneficial for time-resolved atomic physics, dubbed “attosecond physics.”.

  19. JLAB Electron Driver Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazimi, Reza [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Several schemes have been proposed for adding a positron beam option at the Continuous Electron Beam Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB). They involve using a primary beam of electrons or gamma rays striking a target to produce a positron beam. At JLAB electron beams are produced and used in two different accelerators, CEBAF and the JLAB FEL (Free Electron Laser). Both have low emittance and energy spread. The CEBAF beam is polarized. The FEL beam is unpolarized but the injector can produce a higher current electron beam. In this paper we describe the characteristics of these beams and the parameters relevant for positron production.

  20. Energy exchange between a laser beam and charged particles using inverse transition radiation and method for its use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimura, Wayne D. (Bellevue, WA); Romea, Richard D. (Seattle, WA); Steinhauer, Loren C. (Bothell, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for exchanging energy between relativistic charged particles and laser radiation using inverse diffraction radiation or inverse transition radiation. The beam of laser light is directed onto a particle beam by means of two optical elements which have apertures or foils through which the particle beam passes. The two apertures or foils are spaced by a predetermined distance of separation and the angle of interaction between the laser beam and the particle beam is set at a specific angle. The separation and angle are a function of the wavelength of the laser light and the relativistic energy of the particle beam. In a diffraction embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the diffraction effect due to the apertures in the optical elements. In a transition embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the transition effect due to pieces of foil placed in the particle beam path.

  1. A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pernet, Pierre-Louis; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne /SLAC

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs), new methods have been developed to extend capabilities at short wavelengths beyond Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). In particular, seeding of a FEL allows for temporal control of the radiation pulse and increases the peak brightness by orders of magnitude. Most recently, Gennady Stupakov and colleagues at SLAC proposed a new technique: Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG). Here a laser microbunches the beam in an undulator and the beam is sheared in a chicane. This process is repeated with a second laser, undulator and chicane. The interplay between these allows a seeding of the X-ray laser up to the 100th harmonic of the first laser. After introducing the physics of FELs and the EEHG seeding technique, we describe contributions to the experimental effort. We will present detailed studies of the experiment including the choice of parameters and their optimization, the emittance effect, spontaneous emission in the undulators, the second laser phase effect, and measurements of the jitter between RF stations. Finally, the status and preliminary results of the Echo-7 experiment will be outlined.

  2. Method of automatic measurement and focus of an electron beam and apparatus therefore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Giedt, W.H.; Campiotti, R.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam focusing system, including a plural slit-type Faraday beam trap, for measuring the diameter of an electron beam and automatically focusing the beam for welding is disclosed. Beam size is determined from profiles of the current measured as the beam is swept over at least two narrow slits of the beam trap. An automated procedure changes the focus coil current until the focal point location is just below a workpiece surface. A parabolic equation is fitted to the calculated beam sizes from which optimal focus coil current and optimal beam diameter are determined. 12 figs.

  3. Numerical Study of Coulomb Scattering Effects on Electron Beam from a Nano-Tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electron beam emitted from a nano- tip. We found that theon Electron Beam from a Nano-Tip ? J. Qiang † , J. Corlett,Switzerland ‡ Abstract Nano-tips with high acceleration

  4. Simulation of Electron-Beam Irradiation of Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo simulation of electrons stopping in liquid water was used to model the penetration and dose distribution of electron beams incident on the full-thickness EpiDermTM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes in various stages of differentiation from a dermal layer of fibroblast embedded in collagen. The simulations were motivated by a desire to selectively expose the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer. Using the variable energy electron microbeam at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a model of device characteristics and irradiation geometry, we find that at the highest beam energy available (90 keV), the estimated 90th percentile of penetration remains in the epidermal layer. To investigate the depth-dose distribution, we calculated lineal energy spectra for 10um thick layers near the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile of penetration by the 90 keV electron beam. Biphasic spectra showed an increasing component of "stoppers" with increasing depth. Despite changes in the lineal energy spectra, the main effect on dose deposition with increasing depth is the screening effect of tissue above the layer of interest.

  5. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Jefferson Lab's upgraded Free-Electron Laser produces first ligh...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Navy's goals and expectations and we expect no less from the upgraded FEL." The Free-Electron Laser upgrade project is funded by the Department of Defense's Office of...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - High Gradient Inverse Free Electron Laser...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hi h G di t Hi h i High Gradient High energy gain Inverse Free Electron Laser at BNL P. Musumeci UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy ATF user meeting April 2-3 2009 Outline...

  8. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for scientific data mining is increasingly considered. In plasma simulations, Bagherjeiran et al. presented a comprehensive report on applying graph-based techniques for orbit classification. They used the KAM classifier to label points and components in single and multiple orbits. Love et al. conducted an image space analysis of coherent structures in plasma simulations. They used a number of segmentation and region-growing techniques to isolate regions of interest in orbit plots. Both approaches analyzed particle accelerator data, targeting the system dynamics in terms of particle orbits. However, they did not address particle dynamics as a function of time or inspected the behavior of bunches of particles. Ruebel et al. addressed the visual analysis of massive laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulation data using interactive procedures to query the data. Sophisticated visualization tools were provided to inspect the data manually. Ruebel et al. have integrated these tools to the visualization and analysis system VisIt, in addition to utilizing efficient data management based on HDF5, H5Part, and the index/query tool FastBit. In Ruebel et al. proposed automatic beam path analysis using a suite of methods to classify particles in simulation data and to analyze their temporal evolution. To enable researchers to accurately define particle beams, the method computes a set of measures based on the path of particles relative to the distance of the particles to a beam. To achieve good performance, this framework uses an analysis pipeline designed to quickly reduce the amount of data that needs to be considered in the actual path distance computation. As part of this process, region-growing methods are utilized to detect particle bunches at single time steps. Efficient data reduction is essential to enable automated analysis of large data sets as described in the next section, where data reduction methods are steered to the particular requirements of our clustering analysis. Previously, we have described the application of a set of algorithms to automate the data analys

  9. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V. (Dublin, CA); Baldis, Hector A. (Pleasanton, CA); Landahl, Eric C. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  10. Direct laser acceleration of electrons in free-space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbajo, Sergio; Wong, Liang Jie; Miller, R J Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact laser-driven accelerators are versatile and powerful tools of unarguable relevance on societal grounds for the diverse purposes of science, health, security, and technology because they bring enormous practicality to state-of-the-art achievements of conventional radio-frequency accelerators. Current benchmarking laser-based technologies rely on a medium to assist the light-matter interaction, which impose material limitations or strongly inhomogeneous fields. The advent of few cycle ultra-intense radially polarized lasers has materialized an extensively studied novel accelerator that adopts the simplest form of laser acceleration and is unique in requiring no medium to achieve strong longitudinal energy transfer directly from laser to particle. Here we present the first observation of direct longitudinal laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons that undergo highly-directional multi-GeV/m accelerating gradients. This demonstration opens a new frontier for direct laser-driven particle accelerati...

  11. Breaking the Attosecond, Angstrom and TV/M Field Barriers with Ultra-Fast Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, James; Andonian, Gerard; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Hemsing, Erik; Marcus, Gabriel; Marinelli, Agostino; Musumeci, Pietro; O'Shea, Brendan; O'Shea, Finn; Pellegrini, Claudio; Schiller, David; Travish, Gil; /UCLA; Bucksbaum, Philip; Hogan, Mark; Krejcik, Patrick; /SLAC; Ferrario, Massimo; /INFN, Rome; Full, Steven; /Penn State U.; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent initiatives at UCLA concerning ultra-short, GeV electron beam generation have been aimed at achieving sub-fs pulses capable of driving X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) in single-spike mode. This use of very low Q beams may allow existing FEL injectors to produce few-100 attosecond pulses, with very high brightness. Towards this end, recent experiments at the LCLS have produced {approx}2 fs, 20 pC electron pulses. We discuss here extensions of this work, in which we seek to exploit the beam brightness in FELs, in tandem with new developments in cryogenic undulator technology, to create compact accelerator-undulator systems that can lase below 0.15 {angstrom}, or be used to permit 1.5 {angstrom} operation at 4.5 GeV. In addition, we are now developing experiments which use the present LCLS fs pulses to excite plasma wakefields exceeding 1 TV/m, permitting a table-top TeV accelerator for frontier high energy physics applications.

  12. Non-Invasive Beam Detection in a High-Average Power Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Harris, J. [Colorado State U.; Martinez, J. [Colorado State U.; Milton, S. V. [Colorado State U.; Van Keuren, J. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Steve V. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Neil, George R. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a free-electron laser (FEL) to work effectively the electron beam quality must meet exceptional standards. In the case of an FEL operating at infrared wavelengths in an amplifier configuration the critical phase space tends to be in the longitudinal direction. Achieving high enough longitudinal phase space density directly from the electron injector system of such an FEL is difficult due to space charge effects, thus one needs to manipulate the longitudinal phase space once the beam energy reaches a sufficiently high value. However, this is fraught with problems. Longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation can both disrupt the overall phase space, furthermore, the phase space disruption is exacerbated by the longitudinal phase space manipulation process required to achieve high peak current. To achieve and maintain good FEL performance one needs to investigate the longitudinal emittance and be able to measure it during operation preferably in a non-invasive manner. Using the electro-optical sampling (EOS) method, we plan to measure the bunch longitudinal profile of a high-energy (~120-MeV), high-power (~10kW or more FEL output power) beam.

  13. Ultra low-K shrinkage behavior when under electron beam in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorut, F.; Imbert, G. [ST Microelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Crolles Cedex (France)] [ST Microelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Crolles Cedex (France); Roggero, A. [Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)] [Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigate the tendency of porous low-K dielectrics (also named Ultra Low-K, ULK) behavior to shrink when exposed to the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope. Various experimental electron beam conditions have been used for irradiating ULK thin films, and the resulting shrinkage has been measured through use of an atomic force microscope tool. We report the shrinkage to be a fast, cumulative, and dose dependent effect. Correlation of the shrinkage with incident electron beam energy loss has also been evidenced. The chemical modification of the ULK films within the interaction volume has been demonstrated, with a densification of the layer and a loss of carbon and hydrogen elements being observed.

  14. Effect of laser beam filamentation on coexisting stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P.; Vyas, Ashish; Kishor Singh, Ram [Centre for Energy Studies, IIT, Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre for Energy Studies, IIT, Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the study of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) when both of these processes are coexisting and pump laser beam initial power is more than filamentation threshold. On account of the ponderomotive nonlinearity, the pump laser beam gets filamented, and both the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) get affected. Simultaneous presence of SRS and SBS (five wave interaction case) also affect the pump filamentation process due to pump depletion. Both the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) are enhanced due to filamentation of laser beam. Results are also compared with the three wave interaction case (either SRS or SBS) with and without filamentation.

  15. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemery, Francois

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collinear high-gradient ${\\cal O} (GV/m)$ beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios $>2$, a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting "drive" bunch to an accelerated "witness" bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative current profiles which are smooth which also lead to enhanced transformer ratios. We especially explore a laser-shaping method capable of generating one the suggested distributions directly out of a photoinjector and discuss a linac concept that could possible drive a dielectric ...

  16. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Laser Conference, Trieste, Italy (2004) p. 558. 11.Committees of: Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy Pohang Light

  17. Results of the free electron laser oscillation experiments on the ACO storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    989 Results of the free electron laser oscillation experiments on the ACO storage ring P. Elleaume. Abstract. 2014 A storage ring free-electron laser oscillator has been operated above threshold at a visible] or from a free electron laser. The free electron laser (F.E.L.) is a very promising source of coherent

  18. democrite-00023911,version1-18Mar2005 Analogy between free electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    democrite-00023911,version1-18Mar2005 Analogy between free electron laser and channeling by crystal, which governs a free electron laser or inverse free electron laser at high gain, is analogous-tapered free electron laser. This analogy is different from the well-known one between channeling and undulator

  19. Electron Dynamics in Nanostructures in Strong Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kling, Matthias

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of our research was to gain deeper insight into the collective electron dynamics in nanosystems in strong, ultrashort laser fields. The laser field strengths will be strong enough to extract and accelerate electrons from the nanoparticles and to transiently modify the materials electronic properties. We aimed to observe, with sub-cycle resolution reaching the attosecond time domain, how collective electronic excitations in nanoparticles are formed, how the strong field influences the optical and electrical properties of the nanomaterial, and how the excitations in the presence of strong fields decay.

  20. Relativistic X-Ray Free Electron Lasers in the Quantum Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengt Eliasson; Padma Kant Shukla

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a nonlinear theory for relativistic X-ray free electron lasers in the quantum regime, using a collective Klein-Gordon (KG) equation (for relativistic electrons), which is coupled with the Maxwell-Poisson equations for the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields. In our model, an intense electromagnetic wave is used as a wiggler which interacts with a relativistic electron beam to produce coherent tunable radiation. The KG-Maxwell-Poisson model is used to derive a general nonlinear dispersion relation for parametric instabilities in three-space-dimensions, including an arbitrarily large amplitude electromagnetic wiggler field. The nonlinear dispersion relation reveals the importance of quantum recoil effects and oblique scattering of the radiation that can be tuned by varying the beam energy.

  1. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Craxton, R. Stephen (Rochester, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

  2. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

    1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

  3. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  4. Proceedings of the conference on electron beam melting and refining - state of the art 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakish, R. [ed.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference proceedings summarizes state-of-the-art work in the field of electron-beam melting and refining, as presented at the 1996 conference. Papers are grouped as follows: invited papers; tutorial papers; electron beam melting related fundamentals; electron beam evaporation papers; and miscellaneous papers. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database for some contributions to this proceedings.

  5. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stablemore »growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.« less

  6. New developments for high power electron beam equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melde, C.; Jaesch, G.; Maedler, E. [Von Ardenne Anlagentechnnik GmbH, Dresden (Germany)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High power electron guns for industrial use work in the range of power of more than 10 kW up to 1200 kW. The only suitable principle for this purpose is that used in axial guns. Elements necessary for these EB guns and their design are described. The outstanding properties required for applications in production and R & D can only be achieved if the equipment is supplemented by a high voltage supply, beam guidance supply, vacuum generator and the various devices for observation, measurement and control. Standard rules for both the technical demands in application and dimensioning of some of the necessary components are explained. Special developments, such as high speed deflection, observation by BSE-camera and arc-free electron beam systems are also presented.

  7. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sood, Shantanu [State Univ., of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Kisslinger, Kim [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gouma, Perena [State Univ., of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stable growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.

  8. Characterization of electron beam melted uranium - 6% niobium ingots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to characterize uranium, 6{percent} niobium ingots produced via electron beam melting,hearth refining and continuous casting and to compare this material with conventional VIM/skull melt /VAR material. Samples of both the ingot and feed material were analyzed for niobium, trace metallic elements, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. Ingot samples were also inspected metallographically and via microprobe analysis.

  9. Electron-beam-induced growth of silicon multibranched nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fonseca, Luis F.; Resto, Oscar; Sola, Francisco [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, P. O. Box 23343, San Juan, 00931-3343 (Puerto Rico)

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Although successful nanobranching has been demonstrated for some materials using a variety of methods, the controlled fabrication of multibranched nanostructures of silicon is an important challenge faced by nanotechnologist; because it is crucial for the assembly of electronic interconnects at the atomic scale. Here, we report an electron-beam-induced approach that enables to grow silicon nanobranched structures at specific locations and to control the growth process at the nanoscale level. We further present a detailed in situ imaging of the growth dynamics and explain the results by a qualitative model based on local heating and charge concentration processes.

  10. Development of diagnostic and manipulation systems for space-charge dominated electron beams and confined electron plasmas in ELTRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rome, M.; Cavaliere, F.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R. [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell'Universita 2, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Ikram, M. [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano, Italy and Department of Physics, Hazara University, 21300 Mansehra (Pakistan)

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications have been implemented in the Penning-Malmberg device ELTRAP aimed at performing studies on the dynamics of space-charge dominated nanosecond electron bunches traveling along the magnetic field. In particular, a Thomson backscattering apparatus has been developed where an infrared (IR) laser pulse collides with the bunched electron beam. The frequency-shifted backscattered radiation, acquired by means of a photomultiplier (PMT), can be exploited to evaluate information on energy, energy spread and density of the bunch. The achievable sensitivity of the diagnostics has been estimated, and valuable information on the main parameters affecting the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio has been obtained [B. Paroli, F. Cavaliere, M. Cavenago, F. De Luca, M. Ikram, G. Maero, C. Marini, R. Pozzoli, and M. Rome, JINST 7, P01008 (2012)]. A series of upgrades are under way, aimed at increasing the S/N ratio through the use of a new laser for the electron source, the insertion of a stray light shield, and the optimization of the detection electronics. Moreover, electromagnetic simulations relevant to the design and implementation of a microwave heating system are presented. The generation of an electron plasma in ELTRAP by means of a low-power radio frequency (RF) drive in the MHz range applied on one of the trap electrodes and under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions has previously been demonstrated [B. Paroli, F. De Luca, G. Maero, F. Pozzoli, and M. Rome, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 19, 045013 (2010)]. The new heating system will allow the extension of the RF studies to the GHz range and in particular the production of a more energetic electron plasma via cyclotron resonant excitation.

  11. Electron bunch energy and phase feed-forward stabilization system for the Mark V RF-linac free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadmack, M. R.; Kowalczyk, J. M. D.; Lienert, B. R.; Madey, J. M. J.; Szarmes, E. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Jacobson, B. T. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, California 90404 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An amplitude and phase compensation system has been developed and tested at the University of Hawai'i for the optimization of the RF drive system to the Mark V free-electron laser. Temporal uniformity of the RF drive is essential to the generation of an electron beam suitable for optimal free-electron laser performance and the operation of an inverse Compton scattering x-ray source. The design of the RF measurement and compensation system is described in detail and the results of RF phase compensation are presented. Performance of the free-electron laser was evaluated by comparing the measured effects of phase compensation with the results of a computer simulation. Finally, preliminary results are presented for the effects of amplitude compensation on the performance of the complete system.

  12. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  13. Backward-Propagating MeV Electrons in Ultra-Intense Laser Interactions: Standing Wave Acceleration and Coupling to the Reflected Laser Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orban, Chris; Chowdhury, Enam D; Nees, John A; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, W Melvyn

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-accelerated electron beams have been created at a kHz repetition rate from the reflection of intense ($\\sim10^{18}$ W/cm$^2$), 30 fs laser pulses focused on a continuous water-jet in an experiment at the Air Force Research Laboratory. This paper investigates Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of the laser-target interaction to identify the physical mechanisms of electron acceleration in this experiment. We find that the standing-wave pattern created by the overlap of the incident and reflected laser is particularly important because this standing wave "injects" electrons into the reflected laser pulse where the electrons are further accelerated. We identify two regimes of standing wave acceleration: a highly relativistic case ($a_0~\\geq~1$), and a moderately relativistic case ($a_0~\\sim~0.5$) which operates over a larger fraction of the laser period. Previous work by other groups investigated the highly relativistic case for its usefulness in launching electrons in the forward direction. We extend this ...

  14. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, John P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

  15. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure. 6 figs.

  16. Fiber Optic Picosecond Laser Pulse Transmission Line for Hydrogen Ion Beam Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL; Huang, Chunning [ORNL; Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for non-intrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multi-killowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large mode area polarization maintaining optical fiber to ensure a high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter and pulse width broadening over a 100-ft fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H- beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. Our experiment is the first demonstration of particle beam profile diagnostics using fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  17. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure describes a free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped.

  18. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1988-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped. 5 figs.

  19. Phase transition oscillations induced by a strongly focused laser beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devailly, Clémence; Petrosyan, Artyom; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here the observation of a surprising phenomenon consisting in a oscillating phase transition which appears in a binary mixture, PMMA/3-octanone, when this is enlightened by a strongly focused infrared laser beam. PMMA/3-octanone has a UCST (Upper Critical Solution Temperature) which presents a critical point at temperature Tc = 306.6 K and volume fraction $\\phi$c = 12.8 % [Crauste et al., ArXiv 1310.6720, 2012]. This oscillatory phenomenon appears because of thermophoretic and electrostriction effects and non-linear diffusion. We analyze these oscillations and we propose a simple model which includes the minimal ingredients to produce the oscillatory behavior. Phase transitions in binary mixtures are still a widely studied subject, specifically near the critical point where several interesting and not completely understood phenomena may appear, among them we recall the critical Casimir forces [2],[3], confinement effects [4], [5] and out-of-equilibrium dynamics after a quench. The perturbation of th...

  20. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  1. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  2. Metal Photocathodes for Free Electron Laser Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uSXRD orientation map of the LCLS Photocathode. The field ofimage of the center of the LCLS photocathode. The horizontalsize of the laser spot in LCLS. The image was taken with a

  3. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  4. A system for the tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teruya, A.; Elmer, J.; O`Brien, D.

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer tomographic technique was developed to measure the current density distribution in electron beams. This technique uses electron-beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high power beams. The beam profile data is acquired by sweeping the beam across a narrow slit. The beam current, integrated along the axis of the slit, is captured by a Faraday cup and its waveform is recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. The slit is repeatedly rotated and beam current waveforms are recorded at regularly spaced angles. A 2-dimensional image of the current density distribution in the beam is reconstructed from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. This paper discusses the techniques used to record beam profiles, discusses the computer tomographic reconstruction of beams, and presents an example of how this method can be used to control beam focus in an unbiased way. 7 refs.

  5. Rapid embedded wire heating via resistive guiding of laser-generated fast electrons as a hydrodynamic driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Pasley, J. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom) [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistively guiding laser-generated fast electron beams in targets consisting of a resistive wire embedded in lower Z material should allow one to rapidly heat the wire to over 100 eV over a substantial distance without strongly heating the surrounding material. On the multi-ps timescale, this can drive hydrodynamic motion in the surrounding material. Thus, ultra-intense laser solid interactions have the potential as a controlled driver of radiation hydrodynamics in solid density material. In this paper, we assess the laser and target parameters needed to achieve such rapid and controlled heating of the embedded wire.

  6. Laser Beam Self-Focusing in the Atmosphere A. M. Rubenchik,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    for further wireless power transportation to Earth is one of the global concepts of renewable energy sources is utilized for transport of converted solar energy to the ground. The use of lasers instead of microwaves powerful laser beams from orbit to the ground. We demonstrate through numerical modeling that when the self

  7. Observation of laser-induced associative ionization in crossed-beam Na+Li collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak-Dingels, P.; Keller, J.; Weiner, J.; Gauthier, J.h.; Bras, N.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of NaLi/sup +/ produced by crossed-beam collisions of Na and Li in the presence of a single laser field. The magnitude of the cross section and its dependence on laser intensity are in accord with a simple second-order perturbation theory.

  8. Exact analytical expression for the electromagnetic field in a focused laser beam or pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander M. Fedotov; Konstantin Yu. Korolev; Maxim V. Legkov

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new class of exact nonsingular solutions for the Maxwell equations in vacuum, which describe the electromagnetic field of the counterpropagating focused laser beams and the subperiod focused laser pulse. These solutions are derived by the use of a modification of the "complex source method", investigated and visualized.

  9. Electro-optic techniques in electron beam diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tilborg, Jeroen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    length. Note that for ultra-short laser pulses (ultra-short laser, or by chirping thethese geometries an ultra-short laser is chirped to a pulse

  10. Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense lasers promise to extend this down to femtosecond timescales. The process by which free-electron lasers of the free-electron laser saturation length, and the generation of nonlinear harmonics13 at 54 nm and 32 nm

  11. Broadband photoacoustic spectroscopy using a free-electron laser J. Gomez Rivasa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprik, Rudolf

    Broadband photoacoustic spectroscopy using a free-electron laser J. Go´mez Rivasa) and R. Sprikb generated by a free-electron laser, we demonstrate the capabilities of this sort of laser to perform demonstrate that the pulsed structure of a free-electron laser FEL might be used for sensitive PA spectroscopy

  12. Vacuum electron acceleration by using two variable frequency laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saberi, H.; Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is proposed for producing a relativistic electron bunch in vacuum via direct acceleration by using two frequency-chirped laser pulses. We consider the linearly polarized frequency-chiped Hermit-Gaussian 0, 0 mode lasers with linear chirp in which the local frequency varies linearly in time and space. Electron motion is investigated through a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional particle trajectory code in which the relativistic Newton's equations of motion with corresponding Lorentz force are solved. Two oblique laser pulses with proper chirp parameters and propagation angles are used for the electron acceleration along the z-axis. In this way, an electron initially at rest located at the origin could achieve high energy, ?=319 with the scattering angle of 1.02{sup ?} with respect to the z-axis. Moreover, the acceleration of an electron in different initial positions on each coordinate axis is investigated. It was found that this mechanism has the capability of producing high energy electron microbunches with low scattering angles. The energy gain of an electron initially located at some regions on each axis could be greatly enhanced compared to the single pulse acceleration. Furthermore, the scattering angle will be lowered compared to the acceleration by using laser pulses propagating along the z-axis.

  13. Methodological demonstration of laser beam pointing control for space gravitational wave detection missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Yu-Hui; Liu, He-Shan [National Microgravity Laboratory (NML), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luo, Zi-Ren; Li, Yu-Qiong; Jin, Gang, E-mail: gajin@imech.ac.cn [National Microgravity Laboratory (NML), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In space laser interferometer gravitational wave (G.W.) detection missions, the stability of the laser beam pointing direction has to be kept at 10 nrad/?Hz. Otherwise, the beam pointing jitter noise will dominate the noise budget and make the detection of G.W. impossible. Disturbed by the residue non-conservative forces, the fluctuation of the laser beam pointing direction could be a few ?rad/?Hz at frequencies from 0.1 mHz to 10 Hz. Therefore, the laser beam pointing control system is an essential requirement for those space G.W. detection missions. An on-ground test of such beam pointing control system is performed, where the Differential Wave-front Sensing technique is used to sense the beams pointing jitter. An active controlled steering mirror is employed to adjust the beam pointing direction to compensate the jitter. The experimental result shows that the pointing control system can be used for very large dynamic range up to 5 ?rad. At the interested frequencies of space G.W. detection missions, between 1 mHz and 1 Hz, beam pointing stability of 6 nrad/?Hz is achieved.

  14. Electron acceleration in cavitated laser produced ion channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naseri, N. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada) [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Pesme, D. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada) [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Rozmus, W. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada)] [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the channeling of a relativistic laser pulse in an underdense plasma and with the subsequent generation of fast electrons in the cavitated ion channel. The laser pulse has a duration of several hundreds of femtoseconds and its power P{sub L} exceeds the critical power for laser channeling P{sub ch}, with P{sub ch}?1.1P{sub c}, P{sub c} denoting the critical power for relativistic self-focusing. The laser pulse is focused in a plasma of electron density n{sub 0} such that the ratio n{sub 0}/n{sub c} lies in the interval [10{sup ?3},10{sup ?1}], n{sub c} denoting the critical density. The laser-plasma interaction under such conditions is investigated by means of three dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations. It is observed that the steep laser front gives rise to the excitation of a surface wave which propagates along the sharp radial boundaries of the electron free channel created by the laser pulse. The mechanism responsible for the generation of relativistic electrons observed in the PIC simulations is also analyzed by means of a test particles code. The fast electrons are found to be generated by the combination of a surface wave and of the betatron resonance. The maximum electron energy observed in the simulations is scaled as a function of P{sub L}/P{sub c}; it reaches 350–600 MeV for P{sub L}/P{sub c} = 70–140.

  15. Thermal plasma irradiation under the action of the microwave-frequency-modulated laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, V. V., E-mail: jasmin@spnet.ru [12 Central Scientific Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the calculation of the thermal irradiation of the laser plasma formed by a powerful laser beam with the microwave-frequency-modulated intensity are presented. The analytical solution has been obtained for the case of the light detonation regime. It has been shown that the modulation of the gasdynamic parameters due to the absorption of the laser radiation leads to the modulation of the spectral and integral brightness observed from the thermal plasma irradiation.

  16. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Fuchs, Silvio; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Zastrau, Ulf [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)] [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Blinne, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Feigl, Torsten [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, Albert-Einstein-Straße 7, 07745 Jena (Germany)] [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, Albert-Einstein-Straße 7, 07745 Jena (Germany); Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Förster, Eckhart [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany) [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz Institute, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed.

  17. Initial commissioning results with the NSCL Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Leitner, D.; Ottarson, J.; Portillo, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Bollen, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kester, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ReA reaccelerator is being added to the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) fragmentation facility in order to provide exotic rare-isotope beams, not available at the Isotope Separation On-Line facilities, in the several-MeV/u energy range. The first stage of the NSCL reaccelerator complex, consisting of an EBIT charge breeder, a room-temperature radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and superconducting linear accelerator modules, has been completed and is being put into operation. Commissioning of the EBIT has started by extracting charge-bred residual gas ions, ions created from a Ne gas jet directed across the EBIT's electron beam and ions captured from an external test ion source. Charge-bred ions from the Ne gas jet have been extracted as a pulse and accelerated through the RFQ and the two cryomodules.

  18. Issues for Bringing Electron Beam Irradiators On-Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaye, R.J.; Turman, B.N.

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Irradiation of red meat and poultry has been approved by the U.S. FDA, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's rule for processing red meat is out for comment. Looking beyond the current issues of packaging materials, labeling, and consumer acceptance, this paper reviews the next step of implementation and how to remove, or at least reduce, the barriers to utilization. Polls of the user community identified their requirements for electron beam or x-ray processing of meat or poultry and their concerns about implementation for on-line processing. These needs and issues are compared to the capabilities of the accelerator industry. The critical issues of beam utilization and dose uniformity, factors affecting floor space requirements, and treatment costs are examined.

  19. Sub-10-nm electron-beam lithography for templated placement of colloidal quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manfrinato, Vitor Riseti

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the investigation of resolution limits of electron-beam lithography (EBL) at the sub-10-nm scale. EBL patterning was investigated at low electron energy (2 keV) in a converted scanning electron microscope ...

  20. Electron beam processing of metals. State-of-the-art assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalwaney, N.S.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam (EB)-based electrotechnologies use a high-energy electron beam as a processing tool - a stream of electrons moving at rates up to two-thirds the speed of light that can weld, melt, machine, drill, heat-treat, and cure a wide variety of materials. As a result, EB processing, mainly welding, is widely used in many industrial markets. Even though it is one of the newer electrotechnologies, its recent growth has been stable rather than spectacular, mainly due to its high initial capital costs. For many low-power applications (less than 5 to 6 kW), lasers have become a competing technology. The vacuum environment synonymous with EB technology is both a strength and a limitation of the process. The trend to automate the control of process parameters and work manipulation will continue. There will be no spectacular growth in the dollar sales of EB processing equipment, but EB processing will continue to have an important role in the metalworking and associated industries. 18 refs., 17 figs.