Sample records for laser-driven electron source

  1. The investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    , access to high temperature states of mat- ter capable of thermonuclear fusion and/or the effi- cientThe investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources for fusion materials. The application of fast pulse, high intensity lasers to drive low cost DT point neutron sources for fusion

  2. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS facility”, in: Proc.electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator ?National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose

  3. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasmaA design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generatingare considered. Keywords: Free-electron laser, laser-plasma

  4. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the visible free- electron laser oscillator experiment”,based VUV and X-ray free electron lasers”, Appl. Phys. BDesign of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-

  5. Laser-driven relativistic electron beam interaction with solid dielectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. B. [Raytheon Ktech, 1300 Eubank Blvd, Albuquerque, NM, 87123 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, 5625 Fox Ave, Reno, NV, 89506 (United States); P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, RAS, 53 Leninski Prospect, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Raytheon Ktech, 1300 Eubank Blvd, Albuquerque, NM, 87123 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-frames shadowgraphy, interferometry and polarimetry diagnostics with sub-ps time resolution were used for an investigation of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by laser-driven relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50 TW Leopard laser at the UNR. For a laser flux of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2} a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3. The maximum of the electron density inside the glass target is {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}cm{sup -3}. Magnetic and electric fields are less than {approx}15 kG and {approx}1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a maximum of {approx}0.5 eV. 2D interference phase shift shows the 'fountain effect' of electron beam. The very low ionization inside glass target {approx}0.1% suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale. 2D PIC-simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields.

  6. Microstructure-based laser-driven free-electron laser T. Plettner , R.L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Microstructure-based laser-driven free-electron laser T. Plettner Ã, R.L. Byer E.L. Ginzton-synchronous with the electron beam. This allows for an undulator period that is much greater than the laser wavelength. Due and therefore lead to a very compact free-electron-based radiation device. & 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, and W. P. Leemans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, and W. P Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self

  8. Design for a GeV per meter, laser--driven electron accelerator Y.c. Huang, and R.L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    optics, high power laser, laser-driven accelerator, ultra-fast laser, crossed-laser-beam acceleratorDesign for a GeV per meter, laser--driven electron accelerator Y.c. Huang, and R.L. Byer Stanford-based. multistaged, laser-driven electron linear accelerator microstructure operating in a vacuum that is capable

  9. Scaling the Yield of Laser-Driven Electron-Positron Jets to Laboratory Astrophysical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hui; Link, A; Hazi, A; Hill, M; Hoarty, D; James, S; Kerr, S; Meyerhofer, D D; Myatt, J; Park, J; Sentoku, Y; Williams, G J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new experimental results obtained on three different laser facilities that show directed laser-driven relativistic electron-positron jets with up to 30 times larger yields than previously obtained and a quadratic (~ E^2) dependence of the positron yield on the laser energy. This favorable scaling stems from a combination of higher energy electrons due to increased laser intensity and the recirculation of MeV electrons in the mm-thick target. Based on this scaling, first principles simulations predict the possibility of using such electron-positron jets, produced at upcoming high-energy laser facilities, to probe the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks in the laboratory.

  10. Fountain effect of laser-driven relativistic electrons inside a solid dielectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. [Raytheon Ktech, 1300 Eubank Blvd., Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Leblanc, P.; Ivanov, V. V.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89506 (United States); Bychenkov, V. Yu. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninski Pr. 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast interferometry with sub-ps resolution has been applied for the direct measurement of an electron density induced by a laser-driven relativistic electron beam inside a solid dielectric. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the ''fountain effect,'' a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields. The very low ionization, {approx}0.1%, observed after the heating pulse suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale.

  11. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    XPLOTGIN, Technical Report LBNL-49625, Lawrence BerkeleyLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR AT THE LBNL LOASIS FACILITY,” inelectron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

  12. A Hybrid Laser-driven E-beam Injector Using Photo-cathode Electron Gun and superconducting Cavity*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Rong-Li

    A Hybrid Laser-driven E-beam Injector Using Photo-cathode Electron Gun and superconducting Cavity as a continuing effort towards a high-brightness superconducting RF injector. Various species of photo and one (betasuperconducting cavities operating under 2 K is to be constructed

  13. Proposed dielectric-based microstructure laser-driven undulator T. Plettner and R. L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    by the possibility of future dielectric-based laser-driven particle accelerators that are expected to produce GeV=m accel- eration gradients accompanied by a low-emittance, low- energy spread, and high-repetition rate electron sources [8,9] as well as for dielectric-structure laser-driven particle accelerators are underway

  14. Photonic laser-driven accelerator for GALAXIE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naranjo, B.; Ho, M.; Hoang, P.; Putterman, S.; Valloni, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B. [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design and development of an all-dielectric laser-driven accelerator to be used in the GALAXIE (GV-per-meter Acce Lerator And X-ray-source Integrated Experiment) project's compact free-electron laser. The approach of our working design is to construct eigenmodes, borrowing from the field of photonics, which yield the appropriate, highly demanding dynamics in a high-field, short wavelength accelerator. Topics discussed include transverse focusing, power coupling, bunching, and fabrication.

  15. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fastto the laser driver, making such a source ideal for ultra-

  16. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNLlaser-plasma-accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Montgomery, A.L.; Robinson, K.E.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the design and current status of a compactfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, VUVpulses driven by a high-current, GeV electron beam from the existingLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator,whose active acceleration length is only a few cm. The proposedultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to thedrive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science withpulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing to the high current (&10 kA) ofthe laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes arepotentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on SASEand high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length andfluctuations, are considered.

  17. Two-color-laser-driven direct electron acceleration in infinite vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Liang Jie

    We propose a direct electron acceleration scheme that uses a two-color pulsed radially polarized laser beam. The two-color scheme achieves electron acceleration exceeding 90% of the theoretical energy gain limit, over twice ...

  18. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma accelerated beamsbetween the short- pulse laser generating the electron beamscale laser-plasma accelerator that produces ultra-short (

  19. Calibration of Time Of Flight Detectors Using Laser-driven Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirfayzi, S R; Ahmed, H; Krygier, A G; Green, A; Alejo, A; Clarke, R; Freeman, R R; Fuchs, J; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Morrison, J T; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q and EJ410) in a time-of-flight (TOF) arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors are shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  20. Calibration of Time Of Flight Detectors Using Laser-driven Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Mirfayzi; S. Kar; H. Ahmed; A. G. Krygier; A. Green; A. Alejo; R. Clarke; R. R. Freeman; J. Fuchs; D. Jung; A. Kleinschmidt; J. T. Morrison; Z. Najmudin; H. Nakamura; P. Norreys; M. Oliver; M. Roth; L. Vassura; M. Zepf; M. Borghesi

    2015-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q and EJ410) in a time-of-flight (TOF) arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors are shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  1. Laser-driven high-power X- and gamma-ray ultra-short pulse source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Zhidkov, Alexei G; Pirozhkov, Alexander S; Kando, Masaki

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel ultra-bright high-intensity source of X-ray and gamma radiation is suggested. It is based on the double Doppler effect, where a relativistic flying mirror reflects a counter-propagating electromagnetic radiation causing its frequency multiplication and intensification, and on the inverse double Doppler effect, where the mirror acquires energy from an ultra-intense co-propagating electromagnetic wave. The role of the flying mirror is played by a high-density thin plasma slab accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime. Frequencies of high harmonics generated at the flying mirror by a relativistically strong counter-propagating radiation undergo multiplication with the same factor as the fundamental frequency of the reflected radiation, approximately equal to the quadruple of the square of the mirror Lorentz factor.

  2. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  3. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kA are generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma acceleratedfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-For the ultra-high currents of the laser plasma accelerated

  4. The slingshot effect: a possible new laser-driven high energy acceleration mechanism for electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaetano Fiore; Renato Fedele; Umberto de Angelis

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that under appropriate conditions the impact of a very short and intense laser pulse onto a plasma causes the expulsion of surface electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to the one of propagation of the pulse. This is due to the combined effects of the ponderomotive force and the huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation ("slingshot effect"). The effect should also be present with other states of matter, provided the pulse is sufficiently intense to locally cause complete ionization. An experimental test seems to be feasible and, if confirmed, would provide a new extraction and acceleration mechanism for electrons, alternative to traditional radio-frequency-based or Laser-Wake-Field ones.

  5. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 27 SEPTEMBER 2009 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1404 Laser-driven soft-X-ray undulator source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sources of X-ray radiation. They constitute invaluable tools for a broad range of research1 ; however, their dependence on large- scale radiofrequency electron accelerators means that only a few of these sources exist-laboratory scale. Here, we demonstrate the generation of soft-X-ray undulator radiation with laser

  6. Characterisation of deuterium spectra from laser driven multi-species sources by employing differentially filtered image plate detectors in Thomson spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alejo, A.; Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk; Ahmed, H.; Doria, D.; Green, A.; Jung, D.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Nersisyan, G. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Clarke, R.; Green, J. S.; Notley, M. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Fernandez, J. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Morrison, J. T. [Propulsion Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Lab, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H. [Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for characterising the full spectrum of deuteron ions emitted by laser driven multi-species ion sources is discussed. The procedure is based on using differential filtering over the detector of a Thompson parabola ion spectrometer, which enables discrimination of deuterium ions from heavier ion species with the same charge-to-mass ratio (such as C{sup 6+}, O{sup 8+}, etc.). Commonly used Fuji Image plates were used as detectors in the spectrometer, whose absolute response to deuterium ions over a wide range of energies was calibrated by using slotted CR-39 nuclear track detectors. A typical deuterium ion spectrum diagnosed in a recent experimental campaign is presented, which was produced from a thin deuterated plastic foil target irradiated by a high power laser.

  7. Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Advanced diagnostics of experiments covering many orders of magnitude in strain...

  8. Low-Charge, Hard X-Ray Free Electron Laser Driven with an X-Band Injector and Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    After the successful operation of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), soft and hard x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are being built, designed, or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency rf cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic rf system is employed to linearize the beam's longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency rf acceleration process. In this paper, a hard x-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photocathode rf gun to linac end) is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic rf linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient, and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (rms), low-charge (10 pC) electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macroparticle 3D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, and incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low-charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters), which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  9. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  10. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We demonstrate guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode. We also discuss particle beam dynamics in the structure, presenting a novel method for focusing the beam. In addition we describe some potential coupling methods for the structure.

  11. Fiber optic mounted laser driven flyer plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser driven flyer plate where the flyer plate is deposited directly onto the squared end of an optical fiber. The plasma generated by a laser pulse drives the flyer plate toward a target. In another embodiment, a first metal layer is deposited onto the squared end of an optical fiber, followed by a layer of a dielectric material and a second metal layer. The laser pulse generates a plasma in the first metal layer, but the plasma is kept away from the second metal layer by the dielectric layer until the pressure reaches the point where shearing occurs.

  12. Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowlandRevolutionizing theLaser Driven

  13. Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

  14. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry of laser driven shock waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolme, Cynthia Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental measurement technique of ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) was developed for measuring material motion and changes in optical properties of samples under laser driven shock loading. Ultrafast dynamic ...

  15. Direct Visualization of Laser-Driven Focusing Shock Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezeril, Thomas

    Direct real-time visualization and measurement of laser-driven shock generation, propagation, and 2D focusing in a sample are demonstrated. A substantial increase of the pressure at the convergence of the cylindrical ...

  16. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  17. The Argonne laser-driven D target: Recent developments and progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedchak, J.A.; Bailey, K.; Cummings, W.J. [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first direct measurements of nuclear tensor polarization p{sub zz} in a laser-driven polarized D target have been performed at Argonne. We present p{sub zz} and electron polarization P{sub e} data taken at a magnetic field of 600 G in the optical pumping cell. These results are highly indicative that spin-temperature equilibrium is achieved in the system. To prevent spin relaxation of D and K atoms as well as the molecular recombination of D atoms, the walls of the laser-driven D target are coated with organosilane compounds. We discuss a new coating technique, the {open_quotes}afterwash{close_quotes}, developed at Argonne which has yielded stable atomic fraction results when the coating is exposed to K. We also present new coating techniques for glass and Cu substrates.

  18. Attosecond Thomson-scattering x-ray source driven by laser-based electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China) [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Ma, Y. Y. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China) [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Song, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. C. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of producing attosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering of laser light off laser-driven relativistic electron beams is investigated. For a ?200-as, tens-MeV electron bunch produced with laser ponderomotive-force acceleration in a plasma wire, exceeding 10{sup 6} photons/s in the form of ?160 as pulses in the range of 3–300 keV are predicted, with a peak brightness of ?5 × 10{sup 20} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1% bandwidth). Our study suggests that the physical scheme discussed in this work can be used for an ultrafast (attosecond) x-ray source, which is the most beneficial for time-resolved atomic physics, dubbed “attosecond physics.”.

  19. Proposed Laser-driven, Dielectric Microstructure Few-cm Long Undulator for Attosecond Coherent X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plettner, T; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents the concept of an all-dielectric laser-driven undulator for the generation of coherent X-rays. The proposed laser-driven undulator is expected to produce internal deflection forces equivalent to a several-Tesla magnetic field acting on a speed-of-light particle. The key idea for this laser-driven undulator is its ability to provide phase synchronicity between the deflection force and the electron beam for a distance that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The potential advantage of this undulator is illustrated with a possible design example that assumes a small laser accelerator which delivers a 2 GeV, 1 pC, 1 kHz electron bunch train to a 10 cm long, 1/2 mm period laser-driven undulator. Such an undulator could produce coherent X-ray pulses with {approx}10{sup 9} photons of 64 keV energy. The numerical modeling for the expected X-ray pulse shape was performed with GENESIS, which predicts X-ray pulse durations in the few-attosecond range. Possible applications for nonlinear electromagnetic effects from these X-ray pulses are briefly discussed.

  20. Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra- intense laser pulses S;Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses S. Fourmaux,1,a metallic foils irradiated by ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulses.8­10 Laser-driven ion beams take

  1. Plasmonic Meta-Surface for Efficient Ultra-Short Pulse Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar-Lev, Doron

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser-driven particle accelerator based on plasmonic nano-antennas is proposed and analyzed. The concept utilizes the enhancement and localization of the electric field by nano-antennas to maximize the acceleration gradient and to overcome potential metallic losses. The structure is optimized for accelerating relativistic particles using a femto-second laser source operating at 800nm, and is shown to support the bandwidth of ultra-short laser pulses (up to 16fsec) while providing a high acceleration gradient potentially reaching 11.6GV/m.

  2. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xie, Z.Q.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source having an electron gun for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber of the ion source is described. The ion source has a injection enclosure and a plasma chamber tank. The plasma chamber is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets. The electron gun injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber such that ionization within the plasma chamber occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun. The electron gun has a cathode for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply. A concentric inner conductor and outer conductor carry heating current to a carbon chuck and carbon pusher which hold the cathode in place and also heat the cathode. In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, the electron gun replaces the conventional first stage used in prior electron cyclotron resonance ion generators. 5 figures.

  3. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, J.P.; McCollister, D.R.

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter is disclosed. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof. 4 figs.

  4. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Daryl R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

  5. Proposed few-optical cycle laser-driven particle accelerator structure T. Plettner, P. P. Lu, and R. L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Proposed few-optical cycle laser-driven particle accelerator structure T. Plettner, P. P. Lu, and R importance for future laser-driven particle accelerators. Application of such short pulses for laser-driven particle accelerators appears especially appealing from a gradient and an efficiency point of view

  6. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xie, Zu Q. (El Cerrito, CA); Lyneis, Claude M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10) having an electron gun (52) for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber (18) of the ion source (10). The ion source (10) has a injection enclosure (12) and a plasma chamber tank (14). The plasma chamber (18) is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets (16). The electron gun (52) injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber (18) such that ionization within the plasma chamber (18) occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun (52). The electron gun (52) has a cathode (116) for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply (96) while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply (118). A concentric inner conductor (60) and Outer conductor (62) carry heating current to a carbon chuck (104) and carbon pusher (114) Which hold the cathode (116) in place and also heat the cathode (16). In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10), the electron gun (52) replaces the conventional first stage used in prior art electron cyclotron resonance ion generators.

  7. Studies of laser-driven radiative blast waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, M J; Hansen, J; Edens, A; Ditmire, T; Adams, R; Rambo, P; Ruggles, L; Smith, I; Porter, J

    2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed two sets of experiments looking at laser-driven radiating blast waves. In one set of experiments the effect of a drive laser's passage through a background gas on the hydrodynamical evolution of blast waves was examined. It was found that the laser's passage heats a channel in the gas, creating a region where a portion of the blast wave front had an increased velocity, leading to the formation of a bump-like protrusion on the blast wave. The second set of experiments involved the use of regularly spaced wire arrays to induce perturbations on a blast wave surface. The decay of these perturbations as a function of time was measured for various wave number perturbations and found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  8. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  9. Improved operation of the nonambipolar electron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longmier, Ben; Hershkowitz, Noah [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant improvements have been made to the nonambipolar electron source (NES), a radio frequency (rf) plasma-based electron source that does not rely on electron emission at a cathode surface [B. Longmier, S. Baalrud, and N. Hershkowitz, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 113504 (2006)]. A prototype NES has produced 30 A of continuous electron current, using 2 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) Xe, 1300 W rf power at 13.56 MHz, yielding a 180 times gas utilization factor. A helicon mode transition has also been identified during NES operation with an argon propellant, using 15 SCCM Ar, 1000 W rf, and 100 G magnetic field. This NES technology has the ability to replace hollow cathode electron sources and to enable high power electric propulsion missions, eliminating one of the lifetime restrictions that many ion thrusters have previously been faced with.

  10. Positron source position sensing detector and electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnham, Charles A. (South Essex, MA); Bradshaw, Jr., John F. (Winthrop, MA); Kaufman, David E. (Brockton, MA); Chesler, David A. (Newton Highlands, MA); Brownell, Gordon L. (Cambridge, MA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positron source, position sensing device, particularly with medical applications, in which positron induced gamma radiation is detected using a ring of stacked, individual scintillation crystals, a plurality of photodetectors, separated from the scintillation crystals by a light guide, and high resolution position interpolation electronics. Preferably the scintillation crystals are several times more numerous than the photodetectors with each crystal being responsible for a single scintillation event from a received gamma ray. The light guide will disperse the light emitted from gamma ray absorption over several photodetectors. Processing electronics for the output of the photodetectors resolves the location of the scintillation event to a fraction of the dimension of each photodetector. Because each positron absorption results in two 180.degree. oppositely traveling gamma rays, the detection of scintillation in pairs permits location of the positron source in a manner useful for diagnostic purposes. The processing electronics simultaneously responds to the outputs of the photodetectors to locate the scintillations to the source crystal. While it is preferable that the scintillation crystal include a plurality of stacked crystal elements, the resolving power of the processing electronics is also applicable to continuous crystal scintillators.

  11. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  12. Surface Functionalization of Silicon Nanoparticles Produced by Laser-Driven Pyrolysis of Silane followed by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Mark T.

    Surface Functionalization of Silicon Nanoparticles Produced by Laser-Driven Pyrolysis of Silane nanoparticles with an average diameter as small as 5 nm at high rates (up to 200 mg/h). Etching these particles with a mixture of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and nitric acid (HNO3) reduces their size and passivates their surface

  13. DENSE MATTER IN LASER DRIVEN FUSION ! LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS R.L. Mc Crory and J. Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    irradiation to heat and compress a target containing thermonuclear fuel to fusion conditions. This is stillDENSE MATTER IN LASER DRIVEN FUSION ! LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS R.L. Mc Crory and J. Wilson Laboratory. The high power lasers in quaestion were constructed with laser fusion studies as the goal, i

  14. STUDIES OF LASER-DRIVEN RADIATIVE BLAST WAVES A.D. EDENS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditmire, Todd

    -driven radiating blast waves. In the first set of experiments the effect of a drive laser's passage throughSTUDIES OF LASER-DRIVEN RADIATIVE BLAST WAVES A.D. EDENS1 , T. DITMIRE1 , J.F. HANSEN2 , M a background gas on the hydrodynamical evolution of blast waves was examined. The laser's passage heated

  15. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  16. An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron Laser Afterburner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Block diagram of the free-electron laser afterburner. The2. The particular free-electron laser afterburner with aMicrowave Power Source: Free-Electron Laser Afterburner c.

  17. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSELMAN,M.; DAWSON,W.C.

    2002-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss the present electronics design for the beam current monitor system to be used throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The beam is composed of a micro-pulse structure due to the 402.5MHz RF, and is chopped into mini-pulses of 645ns duration with a 300ns gap, providing a macro-pulse of 1060 mini-pulses repeating at a 60Hz rate. Ring beam current will vary from about 15ma peak during studies, to about 50Amps peak (design to 100 amps). A digital approach to droop compensation has been implemented and initial test results presented.

  18. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSELMAN, M.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be constructed at ORNL is a collaboration of six laboratories. Beam current monitors for SNS will be used to monitor H-minus and H-plus beams ranging from the 15 mA (tune-up in the Front End and Linac) to over 60 A fully accumulated in the Ring. The time structure of the beams to be measured range from 645 nsec ''mini'' bunches, at the 1.05 MHz ring revolution rate, to an overall 1 mS long macro pulse. Beam current monitors (BCMs) for SNS have requirements depending upon their location within the system. The development of a general approach to satisfy requirements of various locations with common components is a major design objective. This paper will describe the development of the beam current monitors and electronics.

  19. Proposal for a High-Brightness Pulsed Electron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotorev, M.; Commins, E.D.; Heifets, S.; Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /SLAC

    2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel scheme for a high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography. A description of the proposed scheme is presented.

  20. Investigation of Ultrafast Laser-Driven Radiative Blast Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Zweiback, J.; Shigemori, K.; Ryutov, D.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Keilty, K. A.; Liang, E.; Remington, B. A.; Ditmire, T.

    2001-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined the evolution of cylindrically symmetric blast waves produced by the deposition of femtosecond laser pulses in gas jets. In high-Z gases radiative effects become important. We observe the production of an ionization precursor ahead of the shock front and deceleration parameters below the adiabatic value of 1/2 (for a cylinder), an effect expected when the blast wave loses energy by radiative cooling. Despite significant radiative cooling, the blast waves do not appear to develop thin shell instabilities expected for strongly radiative waves. This is believed to be due to the stabilizing effect of a relatively thick blast wave shell resulting in part from electron thermal conduction effects.

  1. BROADBAND ANALOG OPTO-ELECTRONIC BLIND SOURCE SEPARATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    -electronic blind source separation Thesis directed by Professor Zoya Popovi´c This thesis addresses the problemBROADBAND ANALOG OPTO-ELECTRONIC BLIND SOURCE SEPARATION by PAUL CARSON SMITH B.E., University of Colorado, 2000 M.S., University of Colorado, 2000 A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School

  2. Electron cyclotron resonance microwave ion sources for thin film processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmas created by microwave absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) are increasingly used for a variety of plasma processes, including both etching and deposition. ECR sources efficiently couple energy to electrons and use magnetic confinement to maximize the probability of an electron creating an ion or free radical in pressure regimes where the mean free path for ionization is comparable to the ECR source dimensions. The general operating principles of ECR sources are discussed with special emphasis on their use for thin film etching. Data on source performance during Cl base etching of Si using an ECR system are presented. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Ion spectrometer composed of time-of-flight and Thomson parabola spectrometers for simultaneous characterization of laser-driven ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, I. W.; Kim, C. M.; Sung, J. H.; Yu, T. J.; Lee, S. K.; Kim, I. J.; Jin, Y.-Y.; Jeong, T. M.; Hafz, N.; Pae, K. H.; Noh, Y.-C.; Ko, D.-K.; Lee, J. [Advanced Photonics Research Institute and Center for Femto-Atto Science and Technology, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yogo, A.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Sagisaka, A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Daito, I. [Advanced Photon Research Center and Photo Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); and others

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion spectrometer, composed of a time-of-flight spectrometer (TOFS) and a Thomson parabola spectrometer (TPS), has been developed to measure energy spectra and to analyze species of laser-driven ions. Two spectrometers can be operated simultaneously, thereby facilitate to compare the independently measured data and to combine advantages of each spectrometer. Real-time and shot-to-shot characterizations have been possible with the TOFS, and species of ions can be analyzed with the TPS. The two spectrometers show very good agreement of maximum proton energy even for a single laser shot. The composite ion spectrometer can provide two complementary spectra measured by TOFS with a large solid angle and TPS with a small one for the same ion source, which are useful to estimate precise total ion number and to investigate fine structure of energy spectrum at high energy depending on the detection position and solid angle. Advantage and comparison to other online measurement system, such as the TPS equipped with microchannel plate, are discussed in terms of overlay of ion species, high-repetition rate operation, detection solid angle, and detector characteristics of imaging plate.

  4. Single shot dynamic ellipsometry mesaurements of laser-driven shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolme, C. A. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 (United States)

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique has been developed to measure the time-resolved position of a laser-driven shock wave and the subsequent material flow. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry, using a chirped femtosecond laser pulse, probes picosecond material dynamics in a single shot by capitalizing on the refractive index changes in the shocked material. For transparent materials, the shock velocity, the particle velocity, and the shocked material's refractive index are extracted. Hugoniot data for poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene-co-vinylidene fluoride) (Kel-F 800) was obtained using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry, and the data agrees well with previous data on macroscopic samples obtained in plate impact gas gun experiments.

  5. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Litzenberg, D. W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup ?15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1?m) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  6. Laser driven single shock compression of fluid deuterium from 45 to 220 GPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Eggert, J; Moon, S; Meyerhofer, D; Collins, G

    2008-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The compression {eta} of liquid deuterium between 45 and 220 GPa under laser-driven shock loading has been measured using impedance matching to an aluminum (Al) standard. An Al impedance match model derived from a best fit to absolute Hugoniot data has been used to quantify and minimize the systematic errors caused by uncertainties in the high-pressure Al equation of state. In deuterium below 100 GPa results show that {eta} {approx_equal} 4.2, in agreement with previous impedance match data from magnetically-driven flyer and convergent-explosive shock wave experiments; between 100 and 220 GPa {eta} reaches a maximum of {approx}5.0, less than the 6-fold compression observed on the earliest laser-shock experiments but greater than expected from simple extrapolations of lower pressure data. Previous laser-driven double-shock results are found to be in good agreement with these single-shock measurements over the entire range under study. Both sets of laser-shock data indicate that deuterium undergoes an abrupt increase in compression at around 110 GPa.

  7. Proposal for a High-Brightness Pulsed Electron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotorev, Max; Commins, Eugene D.; Heifets, Sam; Sannibale,Fernando

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel scheme for a high-brightness pulsedelectron source, which has the potential for many useful applications inelectron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electronscattering experiments, and electron holography. A description of theproposed scheme is presented.

  8. Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety of threats that result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety [4] at UCSD, and help define design windows for the GIMM in a laser-driven IFE power plant of threats that result in damages leading to increased laser absorption, beam quality degradation and reduced

  9. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stirling, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employs crossed electric and magnetic fields to separate the electrons from ions as they are extracted from a negative ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full kinetic energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90.degree. to each other, the electrons are separated from the plasma and remain at approximately the electrical potential of the generator in which they were generated. The electrons migrate from the ion beam path in a precessing motion out of the ion accelerating field region into an electron recovery region provided by a specially designed electron collector electrode. The electron collector electrode is uniformly spaced from a surface of the ion generator which is transverse to the direction of migration of the electrons and the two surfaces are contoured in a matching relationship which departs from a planar configuration to provide an electric field component in the recovery region which is parallel to the magnetic field thereby forcing the electrons to be directed into and collected by the electron collector electrode. The collector electrode is maintained at a potential slightly positive with respect to the ion generator so that the electrons are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply voltage energy.

  10. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zschornack, G., E-mail: g.zschornack@hzdr.de [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany); König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A. [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)] [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF BEAM CHARACTERISTICS FOR PHOTO- ELECTRON BEAM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron beam is expected to be used in a wide field, such as X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering, pulse radiolysis, etc. The laser driven photo cathode rf gun system is...

  12. Generation of 9 MeV -rays by all-laser-driven Compton scattering with second-harmonic laser light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Generation of 9 MeV -rays by all-laser-driven Compton scattering with second-harmonic laser light-harmonic-generated laser light (3 eV) inverse-Compton-scattered from a counterpropagating relativistic (450 MeV) laser in detection. Narrower band- width -rays are generated efficiently by means of inverse Compton scattering (ICS

  13. Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fourmaux, S.; Gnedyuk, S.; Lassonde, P.; Payeur, S.; Pepin, H.; Kieffer, J. C. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Buffechoux, S.; Albertazzi, B. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Capelli, D.; Antici, P. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Sapienza, Universita di Roma, Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Levy, A.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lecherbourg, L.; Marjoribanks, R. S. [Department of Physics and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report optimization of laser-driven proton acceleration, for a range of experimental parameters available from a single ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser system. We have characterized laser-generated protons produced at the rear and front target surfaces of thin solid targets (15 nm to 90 {mu}m thicknesses) irradiated with an ultra-intense laser pulse (up to 10{sup 20} W Dot-Operator cm{sup -2}, pulse duration 30 to 500 fs, and pulse energy 0.1 to 1.8 J). We find an almost symmetric behaviour for protons accelerated from rear and front sides, and a linear scaling of proton energy cut-off with increasing pulse energy. At constant laser intensity, we observe that the proton cut-off energy increases with increasing laser pulse duration, then roughly constant for pulses longer than 300 fs. Finally, we demonstrate that there is an optimum target thickness and pulse duration.

  14. Demonstartion of density dependence of x-ray flux in a laser-driven hohlraum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P E; Rosen, M D; Hammer, J H; Hsing, W S; Glendinning, S G; Turner, R E; Kirkwood, R; Schein, J; Sorce, C; Satcher, J; Hamza, A; Reibold, R A; Hibbard, R; Landen, O; Reighard, A; McAlpin, S; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been conducted using laser-driven cylindrical hohlraums whose walls are machined from Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} foams of 100 mg/cc and 4 g/cc densities. Measurements of the radiation temperature demonstrate that the lower density walls produce higher radiation temperatures than the high density walls. This is the first experimental demonstration of the prediction that this would occur [M. D. Rosen and J. H. Hammer, Phys. Rev. E 72, 056403 (2005)]. For high density walls, the radiation front propagates subsonically, and part of the absorbed energy is wasted by the flow kinetic energy. For the lower wall density, the front velocity is supersonic and can devote almost all of the absorbed energy to heating the wall.

  15. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  16. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, Claudio (UCLA) [UCLA

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  17. Risk Management Plan Electron Beam Ion Source Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management Plan for the Electron Beam Ion Source Project (EBIS) Project # 06-SC-002. There are three specific areas of risk that can be controlled and managed by the EBIS Project team and these are and operations. The BNL ISM clearly indicates that risk management is everybody's business and will be factored

  18. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kA are generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma acceleratedscale laser-plasma accelerator that produces ultra-short (

  19. THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FOR A HIGH-GRADIENT ACCELERATING STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18-23, 1982 THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FOR AAC03-76SF00098 THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FORVariable Parameter Free Electron Laser", to be pub 1 i shed

  20. Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Leung, K.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

  1. Blast Wave Formation by Laser-Sustained Nonequilibrium Plasma in the Laser-Driven In-Tube Accelerator Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sawada, Keisuke [Department of Aeronautics and Space Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sasoh, Akihiro [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the dynamics of laser-produced plasma is essentially important for increasing available thrust force in a gas-driven laser propulsion system such as laser-driven in-tube accelerator. A computer code is developed to explore the formation of expanding nonequilibrium plasma produced by laser irradiation. Various properties of the blast wave driven by the nonequilibrium plasma are examined. It is found that the blast wave propagation is substantially affected by radiative cooling effect for lower density case.

  2. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

  3. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei, E-mail: scmyking-2008@163.com; Ding, Yongkun [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Huang, Yunbao, E-mail: huangyblhy@gmail.com [Mechatronics School of Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  4. Laser-driven platform for generation and characterization of strong quasi-static magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, J J; Giuffrida, L; Forestier-Colleoni, P; Fujioka, S; Zhang, Z; Korneev, Ph; Bouillaud, R; Dorard, S; Batani, D; Chevrot, M; Cross, J; Crowston, R; Dubois, J -L; Gazave, J; Gregori, G; d'Humières, E; Hulin, S; Ishihara, K; Kojima, S; Loyez, E; Marquès, J -R; Morace, A; Nicolaï, Ph; Peyrusse, O; Poyé, A; Raffestin, D; Ribolzi, J; Roth, M; Schaumann, G; Serres, F; Tikhonchuk, V T; Vacar, Ph; Woolsey, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi-static magnetic-fields up to $800\\,$T are generated in the interaction of intense laser pulses (500J, 1ns, 10^{17}W/cm^2) with capacitor-coil targets of different materials. The reproducible magnetic-field was consistently measured by three independent diagnostics: GHz-bandwidth inductor pickup coils (B-dot probes), Faraday rotation of polarized optical laser light and proton beam-deflectometry. The field rise time is consistent with the laser pulse duration, and it has a dipole-like distribution over a characteristic volume of 1mm^3, which is coherent with theoretical expectations. These results demonstrate a very efficient conversion of the laser energy into magnetic fields, thus establishing a robust laser-driven platform for reproducible, well characterized, generation of quasi-static magnetic fields at the kT-level, as well as for magnetization and accurate probing of high-energy-density samples driven by secondary powerful laser or particle beams.

  5. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duris, J. P.; Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  6. Oscillating plasma bubbles. III. Internal electron sources and sinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal electron source has been used to neutralize ions injected from an ambient plasma into a spherical grid. The resultant plasma is termed a plasma 'bubble.' When the electron supply from the filament is reduced, the sheath inside the bubble becomes unstable. The plasma potential of the bubble oscillates near but below the ion plasma frequency. Different modes of oscillations have been observed as well as a subharmonic and multiple harmonics. The frequency increases with ion density and decreases with electron density. The peak amplitude occurs for an optimum current and the instability is quenched at large electron densities. The frequency also increases if Langmuir probes inside the bubble draw electrons. Allowing electrons from the ambient plasma to enter, the bubble changes the frequency dependence on grid voltage. It is concluded that the net space charge density in the sheath determines the oscillation frequency. It is suggested that the sheath instability is caused by ion inertia in an oscillating sheath electric field which is created by ion bunching.

  7. Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source. Progress report, June 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D.H.; Giordano, G.; LeVine, M.J.; Matone, G.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.; Ziegler, W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction of the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) began at Brookhaven in October 1983. When completed, the source will provide intense beams of monochromatic and polarized gamma rays with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. The planned layout of this facility with its experimental areas is shown. The gamma-ray beams will be produced by Compton backscattering uv laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV X-RAY storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at BNL. The X-RAY ring is currently running with 50 mA at 1.7 GeV, and is expected to reach 2.5 GeV by November 1984. There is as yet no firm schedule for operation at 3.0 GeV, although some initial testing should be completed by the end of 1986. The availability of the 210-420 MeV LEGS beam will depend upon these 3 GeV studies.

  8. Note: Simulation and test of a strip source electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iqbal, Munawar, E-mail: muniqbal.chep@pu.edu.pk [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Acedemy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Islam, G. U.; Misbah, I.; Iqbal, O. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Zhou, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Acedemy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present simulation and test of an indirectly heated strip source electron beam gun assembly using Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) electron beam trajectory program. The beam is now sharply focused with 3.04 mm diameter in the post anode region at 15.9 mm. The measured emission current and emission density were 1.12 A and 1.15 A/cm{sup 2}, respectively, that corresponds to power density of 11.5 kW/cm{sup 2}, at 10 kV acceleration potential. The simulated results were compared with then and now experiments and found in agreement. The gun is without any biasing, electrostatic and magnetic fields; hence simple and inexpensive. Moreover, it is now more powerful and is useful for accelerators technology due to high emission and low emittance parameters.

  9. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  10. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  11. Development of a High-Brightness VHF Electron Source at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, Steven M.; Sannibale, Fernando; Staples, John W.; Virostek, Steve P.; Wells, Russell P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VHF ELECTRON SOURCE AT LBNL* S. Lidia # , F. Sannibale, J.S. Virostek, R. Wells, LBNL, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract

  12. Generation and diagnostics of atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma by laser driven plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-4 Johoku, Naka, Hamamatsu, 432-8561 Shizuoka (Japan); Tanaka, Kensaku; Arakawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, 113-0033 Tokyo (Japan); Nomura, Satoshi; Komurasaki, Kimiya [Department of Advanced Energy, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8583 Chiba (Japan)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma was generated by a laser driven plasma wind tunnel. At an ambient pressure of 0.38 MPa, a stable plasma was maintained by a laser power of 1000 W for more than 20 min. The translational temperature was measured using laser absorption spectroscopy with the atomic oxygen line at 777.19 nm. The measured absorption profiles were analyzed by a Voigt function considering Doppler, Stark, and pressure-broadening effects. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, all broadening effects were consistent with each other. The measured temperature ranged from 8500 K to 8900 K.

  13. Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Neil

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceElectron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The proposed facil- ity

  14. Method of electroplating a conversion electron emitting source on implant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Gonzales, Gilbert R. (New York, NY); Adzic, Radoslav (East Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for preparing an implant coated with a conversion electron emitting source (CEES) are disclosed. The typical method includes cleaning the surface of the implant; placing the implant in an activating solution comprising hydrochloric acid to activate the surface; reducing the surface by H.sub.2 evolution in H.sub.2SO.sub.4 solution; and placing the implant in an electroplating solution that includes ions of the CEES, HCl, H.sub.2SO.sub.4, and resorcinol, gelatin, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, before tin plating, a seed layer is formed on the surface. The electroplated CEES coating can be further protected and stabilized by annealing in a heated oven, by passivation, or by being covered with a protective film. The invention also relates to a holding device for holding an implant, wherein the device selectively prevents electrodeposition on the portions of the implant contacting the device.

  15. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  16. Are energetic electrons in the solar wind the source of the outer radiation belt?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    Are energetic electrons in the solar wind the source of the outer radiation belt? Xinlin Li,1 D. N in the solar wind are the source of the outer rela- tivistic electron radiation belt. Though there is some radiation belt, the phase space density of 20-200 keV electrons in the solar wind is not adequate to supply

  17. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  18. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohenberger, M., E-mail: mhoh@lle.rochester.edu; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lee, J. J. [National Security Technologies LLC, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic–a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20–500 keV range–has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ?300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U K{sub ?}). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (?90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  19. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 18 APRIL 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1638 Laser-driven amplification of soft X-rays by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    -resolved laser spectroscopy. Ultra-short pulses can be directly generated with lasers and the wavelength range--it is necessary to extend the wavelength range into the X-ray regime while preserving the ultra-short pulseARTICLES PUBLISHED ONLINE: 18 APRIL 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1638 Laser-driven amplification

  20. RF-driven ion source with a back-streaming electron dump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwan, Joe; Ji, Qing

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel ion source is described having an improved lifetime. The ion source, in one embodiment, is a proton source, including an external RF antenna mounted to an RF window. To prevent backstreaming electrons formed in the beam column from striking the RF window, a back streaming electron dump is provided, which in one embodiment is formed of a cylindrical tube, open at one end to the ion source chamber and capped at its other end by a metal plug. The plug, maintained at the same electrical potential as the source, captures these backstreaming electrons, and thus prevents localized heating of the window, which due to said heating, might otherwise cause window damage.

  1. Production of Neutrinos and Secondary Electrons in Cosmic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. -Y. Huang; M. Pohl

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the individual contribution to secondary lepton production in hadronic interactions of cosmic rays (CRs) including resonances and heavier secondaries. For this purpose we use the same ethodology discussed earlier \\cite{Huang07}, namely the Monte Carlo particle collision code DPMJET3.04 to determine the multiplicity spectra of various secondary particles with leptons as the final decay states, that result from inelastic collisions of cosmic-ray protons and Helium nuclei with the interstellar medium of standard composition. By combining the simulation results with parametric models for secondary particle (with resonances included) for incident cosmic-ray energies below a few GeV, where DPMJET appears unreliable, we thus derive production matrices for all stable secondary particles in cosmic-ray interactions with energies up to about 10 PeV. We apply the production matrices to calculate the radio synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons in a young shell-type SNR, RX J1713.7-3946, which is a measure of the age, the spectral index of hadronic cosmic rays, and most importantly the magnetic field strength. We find that the multi-mG fields recently invoked to explain the X-ray flux variations are unlikely to extend over a large fraction of the radio-emitting region, otherwise the spectrum of hadronic cosmic rays in the energy window 0.1-100 GeV must be unusually hard. We also use the production matrices to calculate the muon event rate in an IceCube-like detector that are induced by muon neutrinos from high-energy $\\gamma$-ray sources such as RX J1713.7-3946, Vela Jr. and MGRO J2019+37. At muon energies of a few TeV, or in other word, about 10 TeV neutrino energy, an accumulation of data over about five to ten years would allow testing the hadronic origin of TeV $\\gamma$-rays.

  2. ATF Plasma Sources for Wakefield Electron Acceleration ATF User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Sources at ATF Ablative discharge capillary Gas-filled capillary Gas jet Plasma Sources: Ablative discharge capillary +20 kV DC 1k 1M HV generator (20kV,...

  3. Extraction of a steady state electron beam from HCD (hollow cathode discharge) plasmas for EBIS (electron beam ion source) applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.; Prelec, K.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments to extract high brightness electron beams from hollow cathode discharge plasmas are now in progress. A unique feature of these plasmas, which in principle can facilitate the extraction of large current low emittance electron beams, is the existence of a relatively high energy electron population with a very narrow energy spread. This electron population was identified in a self-extraction experiment, which yielded a 35 eV, 600 mA electron beam with parallel energy spread of less than 0.5 eV. Preliminary, crude application of 2.5 kV extraction voltage yielded a steady state electron beam current of 1.2 A. The end result of this endeavor would be an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) with an electron beam current of 6 A. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, G.R.

    1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  5. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  6. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  7. Report on the development of a radio-frequency photo electron source with superconducting niobium cavity (SRF gun realization)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teichert, J; Büttig, H; Hempel, R; Janssen, D; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Möller, K; Murcek, P; Schneider, C; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Xiang, R; Kamps, T; Lipka, D; Stephan, J; Lehmann, W D; Klemz, G; Will, I

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on the development of a radio-frequency photo electron source with superconducting niobium cavity (SRF gun realization)

  8. Laser-driven deflection arrangements and methods involving charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plettner, Tomas (San Ramon, CA); Byer, Robert L. (Stanford, CA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, devices and apparatus are implemented for producing controllable charged particle beams. In one implementation, an apparatus provides a deflection force to a charged particle beam. A source produces an electromagnetic wave. A structure, that is substantially transparent to the electromagnetic wave, includes a physical structure having a repeating pattern with a period L and a tilted angle .alpha., relative to a direction of travel of the charged particle beam, the pattern affects the force of the electromagnetic wave upon the charged particle beam. A direction device introduces the electromagnetic wave to the structure to provide a phase-synchronous deflection force to the charged particle beam.

  9. Low energy Beam Tracking Under Scattering for a Cold Electron Source in Manchester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appleby, R; Harvey, M; Jones, M; Kyle, B; Mete, O; Murray, A; Xia, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality electron beams, with high spatial and tempo- ral resolution, have an important use in electron diffraction experiments to probe and study the constituents of matter. A cold electron source is being developed based on elec- tron ionisation from an atom cloud trapped by using AC magneto-optical methods in the University of Manchester. The technique will produce bunches of electrons well suited for high precision and single shot electron diffraction. In this paper issues of modelling at low energies for this state of art electron source with very low energy spread are presented, with a focus on newly developed tools to model the scat- tering in the meshes used to support the extraction electric fields. The dependence on emittance growth on mesh wire thickness is studied.

  10. A parametric study of the source rate for outer radiation belt electrons using a Kalman filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    A parametric study of the source rate for outer radiation belt electrons using a Kalman filter Q increasingly popular to describe the outer radiation belt energetic electron environment. We use a Kalman included. We augment the Kalman filter to include the intensity of local acceleration in the state vector

  11. Hybrid single-electron transistor as a source of quantized electric current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    system is that hybrid tunnel junctions suppress tunnelling in an energy range determined by the gapLETTERS Hybrid single-electron transistor as a source of quantized electric current JUKKA P. PEKOLA of a hybrid normal-metal­ superconductor turnstile in the form of a one-island single- electron transistor

  12. Wiggler, undulator, and free-electron laser-radiation sources development at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, H.; Krinsky, S.; Luccio, A.; Pellegrini, C.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is presented of the special radiation sources development at the NSLS for incorporation in a 2.5 GeV X-ray storage ring and a 700 MeV vuv storage ring. This includes a superconducting high field multipole wiggler, lambda/sub c/ = 0.5A; a permanent magnet wiggler, lambda/sub c/ = 2.0A; a maximum photon energy undulator (5 to 7 keV); an undulator for a soft X-ray line or continuum spectrum and a free electron laser source tunable in the 2500 to 4500A region. Source characteristics and status of development are given. In addition, the incorporation of a backscattered Compton photon source is being studied and relevant parameters are presented.

  13. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  14. On the role of electron energy distribution function in double frequency heating of electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schachter, L., E-mail: lsch@tandem.nipne.ro; Dobrescu, S. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania)] [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Stiebing, K. E. [Institut für Kernphysik der J. W. Goethe Universität, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)] [Institut für Kernphysik der J. W. Goethe Universität, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Double frequency heating (DFH) is a tool to improve the output of highly charged ions particularly from modern electron cyclotron resonance ion source installations with very high RF-frequencies. In order to gain information on the DFH-mechanism and on the role of the lower injected frequency we have carried out a series of dedicated experiments where we have put emphasis on the creation of a discrete resonance surface also for this lower frequency. Our well-established method of inserting an emissive MD (metal-dielectric) liner into the plasma chamber of the source is used in these experiments as a tool of investigation. In this way, the electron temperature and density for both ECR zones is increased in a controlled manner, allowing conclusions on the role of the change of the electron-energy-distribution function with and without DFH.

  15. Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. K. Sinclair; P. A. Adderley; B. M. Dunham; J. C. Hansknecht; P. Hartmann; M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; M. Steigerwald

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2?105???C/cm2 and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

  16. Electron Bunch Profile Reconstruction in the Few fs Regime using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartolini, R.; /Oxford U., JAI /Diamond Light Source /SLAC; Clarke, C.; /SLAC; Delerue, N; /Oxford U., JAI /Diamond Light Source /SLAC; Doucas, G; Reichold, A; /Oxford U., JAI

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced accelerators for fourth generation light sources based on high brightness linacs or laser-driven wakefield accelerators will operate with intense, highly relativistic electron bunches that are only a few fs long. Diagnostic techniques for the determination of temporal profile of such bunches are required to be non invasive, single shot, economic and with the required resolution in the fs regime. The use of a radiative process such as coherent Smith-Purcell radiation (SPR), is particularly promising with this respect. In this technique the beam is made to radiate a small amount of electromagnetic radiation and the temporal profile is reconstructed from the measured spectral distribution of the radiation. We summarise the advantages of SPR and present the design parameters and preliminary results of the experiments at the FACET facility at SLAC. We also discuss a new approach to the problem of the recovery of the 'missing phase', which is essential for the accurate reconstruction of the temporal bunch profile.

  17. ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE AS SOURCES OF {sup 60}Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanajo, Shinya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Bernhard, E-mail: shinya.wanajo@nao.ac.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis of the radionuclide {sup 60}Fe in electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe). The nucleosynthetic results are based on a self-consistent, two-dimensional simulation of an ECSN as well as models in which the densities are systematically increased by some factors (low-entropy models). {sup 60}Fe is found to be appreciably made in neutron-rich ejecta during the nuclear quasi-equilibrium phase with greater amounts being produced in the lower-entropy models. Our results, combining them with the yields of core-collapse supernovae in the literature, suggest that ECSNe account for at least 4%-30% of live {sup 60}Fe in the Milky Way. ECSNe co-produce neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 48}Ca, {sup 50}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, some light trans-iron elements, and possibly weak r-process elements including some radionuclides such as {sup 93}Zr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 107}Pd, whose association with {sup 60}Fe might have been imprinted in primitive meteorites or in the deep ocean crust on the Earth.

  18. A low energy ion source for electron capture spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusche, C., E-mail: tusche@mpi-halle.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät II, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design of an ion source for the production of single and double charged Helium ions with kinetic energies in the range from 300 eV down to 5 eV. The construction is based on a commercial sputter ion gun equipped with a Wien-filter for mass/charge separation. Retardation of the ions from the ionizer potential (2 keV) takes place completely within the lens system of the sputter gun, without modification of original parts. For 15 eV He{sup +} ions, the design allows for beam currents up to 30 nA, limited by the space charge repulsion in the beam. For He{sup 2+} operation, we obtain a beam current of 320?pA at 30 eV, and 46 pA at 5 eV beam energy, respectively. In addition, operating parameters can be optimized for a significant contribution of metastable He*{sup +} (2s) ions.

  19. Commissioning of the Electron Line of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Dose Rate Measurements and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana Leitner, M; Bauer, J.M.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, H.; /SLAC; Sanami, T.; /SLAC /KEK, Tsukuba; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy) is the world's first hard X-ray Free Electron Laser machine. It uses high energy electrons delivered by a linac to create ultrafast and brilliant X-ray pulses that can be used as a 'high-speed' camera to obtain images of atoms and molecules. LCLS is a pioneer machine and, as such, its design has encountered unprecedented challenges, the solutions to which will benefit future facilities of its kind across the globe. This article describes the radiation protection aspects of LCLS electron beamlines. Special emphasis is put on the successful commissioning of the LCLS electron line, where, for all examined loss sources, the measured prompt and residual dose rates are in agreement with or below the values predicted through detailed Monte Carlo simulations, used earlier to design the shielding.

  20. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perucchi, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); INSTM UdR Trieste-ST, Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Allaria, E. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Lupi, S. [CNR-IOM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', P.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  1. Simulation of parameter scaling in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas using the GEM code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cluggish, B.; Zhao, L.; Kim, J. S. [FAR-TECH, Inc., 3550 General Atomics Court, MS 15-155, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although heating power and gas pressure are two of the two of primary experimental ''knobs'' available to users of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, there is still no clear understanding of how they interact in order to provide optimal plasma conditions. FAR-TECH, Inc. has performed a series of simulations with its generalized electron cyclotron resonance ion source model in which the power and pressure were varied over a wide range. Analysis of the numerical data produces scaling laws that predict the plasma parameters as a function of the power and pressure. These scaling laws are in general agreement with experimental data.

  2. Electron emission in a source-collector sheath system: A kinetic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizopoulou, N., E-mail: nikoleta.rizopoulou06@imperial.ac.uk; Coppins, M.; Bacharis, M. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Robinson, A. P. L. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical source-collector sheath system describes a plasma that forms between a Maxwellian source and an absorbing wall. The plasma is assumed to be collisionless and without ionization. Two distinct areas are being formed: the collector sheath, an ion-rich region in contact with the absorbing boundary, and the source sheath, which is an electron-rich area near the Maxwellian source. In this work, we study a modified version of the classical source-collector sheath system, where the wall is no longer absorbing but emits electrons. As a result, we have two different types of collector sheath, one where a potential well is formed and one without a potential well. We examine the effect of electron emission for a range of conditions for the plasma and the emitted electrons. In the first part of this work, we study the problem analytically, and in the second, using our kinetic Vlasov code, Yggdrasil. The simulation results are in very good agreement with the predictions of our theoretical model.

  3. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vondrasek, R.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 e?A of {sup 202}Hg{sup 29+} and 3.0 e?A of {sup 202}Hg{sup 31+} from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  4. Ultraviolet stimulated electron source for use with low energy plasma instrument calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Kevin; Harper, Ron; Funsten, Herb; MacDonald, Elizabeth [Space Science and Applications, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed and demonstrated a versatile, compact electron source that can produce a mono-energetic electron beam up to 50 mm in diameter from 0.1 to 30 keV with an energy spread of <10 eV. By illuminating a metal cathode plate with a single near ultraviolet light emitting diode, a spatially uniform electron beam with 15% variation over 1 cm{sup 2} can be generated. A uniform electric field in front of the cathode surface accelerates the electrons into a beam with an angular divergence of <1 Degree-Sign at 1 keV. The beam intensity can be controlled from 10 to 10{sup 9} electrons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

  5. Production of energetic neutral particles and low energy electrons from four anode rods ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostafa, O. A.; El-Khabeary, H.; Abdel Reheem, A. M. [Accelerators and Ion Sources Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority P.N.13759, Inchas, Cairo (Egypt)] [Accelerators and Ion Sources Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority P.N.13759, Inchas, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The factors affecting the energetic neutral current, the low energy electron current, and the positive ion current emerging from a four-anode-rods ion source have been studied using argon gas. The neutral and electron current were measured using a simple, new technique. It was found that the energetic neutral current and the electron current depend on the positive ion current and the gas pressure. The ratio of the neutral and electron current to the positive ion current increases by increasing the gas pressure. Also it was found that at a pressure equal to 9 × 10{sup ?4} mmHg, the ratio of the neutral to the positive ion current reaches 2.34 while the ratio of the electron current to the positive ion current reaches 1.7.

  6. Ultraviolet stimulated electron source for use with low energy plasma instrument calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Kevin; Funsten, Herb; MacDonald, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the development of a versatile, compact, low to medium energy electron source. A collimated, monoenergetic beam of electrons, up to 50 mm in diameter, is produced with energies ranging from 0.03 to 30 keV. A uniform electron beam profile is generated by illuminating a metal cathode plate with a near ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diode (LED). A parallel electric field accelerates the electrons away from the cathode plate towards a grounded grid. The beam intensity can be controlled from 10 - 10^9 electrons cm-2 s-1 and the angular divergence of the beam is less than 1 degree FWHM for energies greater than 1 keV.

  7. LITHIUM PLASMA SOURCES FOR ACCELERATION AND FOCUSING OF ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON BEAMSi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LITHIUM PLASMA SOURCES FOR ACCELERATION AND FOCUSING OF ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON BEAMSi P beam focusing (plasma lens). The Li vapor with a density in the 2Ã?1015 cm-3 range is produced in a heat to a focusing strength in excess of 6Ã?105 G/cm. A shorter section of plasma (L25 cm) can be used as an effective

  8. Source: "Careers for Electrical Engineers and Computer Scientists" Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers HISTORICAL OVERVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Source: "Careers for Electrical Engineers and Computer Scientists" © Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers HISTORICAL OVERVIEW PREPARED BY THE IEEE HISTORY CENTER RUTGERS UNIVERSITY ELECTRICITY IN THE 1880s The organization of the electrical engineering profession in America in the1880s

  9. Field-Emission Properties in the ERL-Electron Source Vaibhav Kukreja

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    Field-Emission Properties in the ERL-Electron Source Vaibhav Kukreja Department of Physics, Cornell field emission poses many risks to the function and the structure of the gun. We have tested five electrodes with different composition and surface treatment. In this paper, we will discuss their emission

  10. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  11. Investigation of an electron beam evaporative source: Part 1, Theory; Part 2, Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, J.S.; Self, S.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory for evaluating the performance parameters of linear electron beam evaporative source is presented. The electron beam is considered to be generated from a linear gun and its trajectory is curved by a uniform magnetic field onto a target. A model has been developed to estimate the trajectory of the electron beam. The performance of the electron gun is characterized by two coefficients: {alpha}, the divergence effect of the beam as it enters into the electric field free space region, and {Beta}, the space charge parameter, which is proportional to the magnitude of the current density of the beam. These two parameters determine the location (angular position) of the beam waist and the current density at the target. In addition, neutralization of the electron space charge by vapor ions generated near the target is considered. A discussion is also given of the shape of the depression in the surface of the molten metal, which is due to the pressure on the surface associated with the momentum recoil from the evaporative vapor flux. By relating the characteristic depth and width of the depression to magnitude and the shape of the pressure profile, useful analytical and numerical results are presented for a given pressure profile. The implication of the results for the design of electron beam evaporative sources are also discussed. Measurements are discussed a the end of the paper. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  12. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roychowdhury, P., E-mail: pradipr@barc.gov.in; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, ?2 to ?4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup ?3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  13. Microwave electron cyclotron electron resonance (ECR) ion source with a large, uniformly distributed, axially symmetric, ECR plasma volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alton, Gerald D. (Kingston, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source includes a primary mirror coil disposed coaxially around a vacuum vessel in which a plasma is induced and introducing a solenoidal ECR-producing field throughout the length of the vacuum vessel. Radial plasma confinement is provided by a multi-cusp, multi-polar permanent magnet array disposed azimuthally around the vessel and within the primary mirror coil. Axial confinement is provided either by multi-cusp permanent magnets at the opposite axial ends of the vessel, or by secondary mirror coils disposed on opposite sides of the primary coil.

  14. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Development of an electron gun for an ERL based light source in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimori, N.; Nagai, R.; Iijima, H.; Hajima, R. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Honda, Y.; Muto, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kuriki, M. [Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Yamamoto, M.; Okumi, S.; Nakanishi, T. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a prototype DC photoemission electron gun for a future energy recovery linac (ERL) based light source in Japan. The prototype gun is operated at up to 250 kV and is designed to deliver up to 50 mA beam current. A diagnostic beam line for emittance and bunch length measurements has been constructed. We have also designed a new 500 kV DC gun which is capable of producing up to 10 mA electron current with emittance lower than 1 mm-mrad. The high voltage terminal will be isolated by ten ceramics stacked in series. The new gun will satisfy performance required as an injector for the compact ERL, which will be constructed at KEK site as a prototype of the future ERL light source.

  16. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  17. Growth of silicon-on-insulator films using a line-source electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A swept line-source electron beam has been used to study unseeded Si-on-insulator crystallization at beam scan speeds of 150 to 1500 cm/s. For a particular sample configuration a maximum linear crystallization velocity of approx. 350 cm/s was observed. At higher sweep speeds, competing nucleation occurred at intervals across the film. Both the limit in crystallization velocity and the intervals between nucleation are tentatively explained by a simple model.

  18. Improved low-energy, electron-spin-polarized {sup 4}He{sup +} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, D.L.; Lancaster, J.C.; Kontur, F.J.; Popple, R.A.; Dunning, F.B.; Walters, G.K. [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, Houston, Texas, 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, Houston, Texas, 77251-1892 (United States)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent improvements to a source of electron-spin-polarized {sup 4}He{sup +} ions based on an optically pumped, rf-excited helium discharge are described that have resulted in ion polarizations P{sub +} of {approximately}0.18 at currents of {approximately}1 nA and in an increase of over an order of magnitude in the quality factor P{sub +}{sup 2}I. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron as metal vapor supply for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weichsel, T., E-mail: tim.weichsel@fep.fraunhofer.de; Hartung, U.; Kopte, T. [Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology, 01277 Dresden (Germany)] [Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Zschornack, G. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany)] [Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany); Kreller, M.; Silze, A. [DREEBIT GmbH, 01900 Grossroehrsdorf (Germany)] [DREEBIT GmbH, 01900 Grossroehrsdorf (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron device has been developed. The magnetron is acting as a metal vapor supply for an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. FEM simulation of magnetic flux density was used to ensure that there is no critical interaction between both magnetic fields of magnetron and ECR ion source. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy measurements show an increase in electron density by one order of magnitude from 1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup ?3} to 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup ?3}, when the magnetron plasma is exposed to the magnetic mirror field of the ECR ion source. Electron density enhancement is also indicated by magnetron plasma emission photography with a CCD camera. Furthermore, photographs visualize the formation of a localized loss-cone - area, when the magnetron is operated at magnetic mirror field conditions. The inverted cylindrical magnetron supplies a metal atom load rate of R > 1 × 10{sup 18} atoms/s for aluminum, which meets the demand for the production of a milliampere Al{sup +} ion beam.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder ion source simulation by MCBC and GEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J. S.; Zhao, L.; Cluggish, B. P.; Bogatu, I. N.; Pardo, R. [FAR-TECH, Inc., 3550 General Atomics Court 15-155, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulation results by the GEM and MCBC codes are presented, along with a comparison with experiments for beam capture dynamics and parameter studies of charge state distribution (CSD) of electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder ion sources. First, steady state plasma profiles are presented by GEM with respect to key experimental parameters such as rf power and gas pressure. As rf power increases, electron density increases by a small amount and electron energy by a large amount. The central electrostatic potential dip also increased. Next, MCBC is used to trace injected beam ions to obtain beam capture profiles. Using the captured ion profiles, GEM obtains a CSD of beam ions. As backscattering can be significant, capturing the ions near the center of the device enhances the CSD. The effect of rf power on the beam CSD is mainly due to different steady states plasmas. Example cases are presented assuming that the beam ions are small enough not to affect the plasma.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT PHOTO-INJECTOR WITH RFFOCUSING LENS FOR SHORT PULSE ELECTRON SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabenhofer, Alexander [Northern Illinois University; Eaton, Douglas W. [ScandiNova systems AB, Uppsala, Sweden

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For development of compact ultrafast electron source system, we are currently designing a short-pulse RF-gun with RF focusing structure by means of a series of comprehensive modeling analysis processes. EM design of a 2.5 cell resonant cavity with input coupler, acceleration dynamics of photo-emitted electron bunch, EM design of RF-lens with input coupler, and phasespace analysis of focused electron bunch are systematically examined with multi-physics simulators. All the features of the 2.856 GHz cavity geometry were precisely engineered for acceleration energies ranging from 100 keV to 500 keV (safety limited) to be powered by our 5 MW S-band klystron. The klystron (Thales TH2163) and modulator system (ScandiNova K1 turnkey system) were successfully installed and tested. Performance tests of the klystron system show peak output power > 5 MW, as per operation specifications. At the quasi-relativistic energies, the electron source is capable of generating 100fC – 1 pC electron bunch with pulse duration close to 30 fs – 1 ps and transverse size of a few hundred microns. PIC simulations have shown that the electron bunch undergoes fast RF acceleration, rapidly reaching the desired energies, which can be controlled by tuning RF injection phase and input driving power. It has been shown that it is possible to also focus/compress the bunch longitudinally using a RF-lens, which would allow us to control the temporal resolution of the system as well. While our primary analysis has been performed on a 2.5 cell design, we are also looking into half-cell (single cavity) design that is expected to provide the same range of beam energy with a simple configuration.

  2. Enhancement of ion current from the TRIPS source by means of different electron donors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Torrisi, L.; Mascali, D.; Passarello, S.; Galata, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell'Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of measurements were carried out with the TRasco Intense Proton Source (TRIPS) to determine the effectiveness of different materials as electron donors. It is well known that the use of boron nitride (BN) disks inside the plasma chamber increases the current extracted from microwave discharge ion sources, generating additional electrons. In the past, one of the two disks was replaced by a 40 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating over the extraction electrode, which gave some increase of current, but after less than 200 h was heavily damaged. The tests here reported concern three different options: (a) thicker Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer (100 {mu}m) deposited over the extraction electrode; a 1-mm-thick aluminium foil over which an alumina layer is deposited, inserted in the plasma chamber; a 5-mm-thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tube embedded in the plasma chamber of the TRIPS source (the outer diameter of the tube being slightly smaller than the inner diameter of the chamber). The tests were carried out in the same conditions as for magnetic field topology and only rf power and gas input were variable. Special attention was paid to the proton fraction. In fact, a higher proton fraction can be considered as a signature of the higher availability of electrons in the plasma. With the thick alumina tube not only was a better current and proton fraction observed but also a lower beam ripple and better stability.

  3. Design and testing of an electron cyclotron resonance heating ion source for use in high field compact superconducting cyclotrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artz, Mark E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of axial injection of a high brightness beam from an Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source into a high magnetic field cyclotron. Axial injection from an ion ...

  4. Estimation of the electron density and radiative energy losses in a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potanin, E. P., E-mail: potanin@imp.kiae.ru; Ustinov, A. L. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The parameters of a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge were calculated. The analysis was performed as applied to an ion cyclotron resonance system designed for separation of calcium isotopes. The plasma electrons in the source were heated by gyrotron microwave radiation in the zone of the inhomogeneous magnetic field. It was assumed that, in such a combined trap, the energy of the extraordinary microwave propagating from the high-field side was initially transferred to a small group of resonance electrons. As a result, two electron components with different transverse temperatures-the hot resonance component and the cold nonresonance component-were created in the plasma. The longitudinal temperatures of both components were assumed to be equal. The entire discharge space was divided into a narrow ECR zone, where resonance electrons acquired transverse energy, and the region of the discharge itself, where the gas was ionized. The transverse energy of resonance electrons was calculated by solving the equations for electron motion in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Using the law of energy conservation and the balance condition for the number of hot electrons entering the discharge zone and cooled due to ionization and elastic collisions, the density of hot electrons was estimated and the dependence of the longitudinal temperature T{sub e Parallel-To} of the main (cold) electron component on the energy fraction {beta} lost for radiation was obtained.

  5. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A. [Centro NAST, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'G. Occhialini', Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, Universita di Padova (Italy); Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Platt, S. P. [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancs. PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  6. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asaji, T; Uchida, T; Minezaki, H; Ishihara, S; Racz, R; Muramatsu, M; Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Kato, Y; Yoshida, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C60 has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C60 was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  7. Silicon-on-insulator structures formed by a line-source electron beam: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A line-source electron beam has been used to melt and recrystallize isolated Si layers to form Si-on-insulator structures. Heat flow calculations for these layered structures have been developed which correctly predict the observed recrystallization. Using sample sweep speeds of 100--600 cm/s and peak power densities up to 75 kW/cm/sup 2/ in the 1 x 20-mm beam, we have obtained single-crystal areas as large as 50 x 350 ..mu..m. Seed openings to the substrate are used to control the orientation of the regrowth and the heat flow in the recrystallization film.

  8. Philips Light Sources & Electronics is Developing an Efficient, Smaller, Cost-Effective Family of LED Drivers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Philips Light Sources & Electronics is developing a new family of LED drivers that are more efficient and cost-effective as well as smaller in size than currently available drivers. The new drivers are switch-mode power supplies that are similar to today's drivers, but with an improved design. In addition, they have a different topology—boost plus LLC—for wattages of 40W and above, but they retain the commonly used flyback topology at lower wattages.

  9. Low-energy, electron-spin-polarized {sup 4}He{sup +} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, D.L.; Lancaster, J.C.; Popple, R.A.; Dunning, F.B.; Walters, G.K. [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas77251-1892 (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A source of low-energy, electron-spin-polarized {sup 4}He{sup +} ions based on an optically pumped, rf-excited helium discharge is described. Ion polarizations P{sub +} of {approximately}0.13 are achieved at beam currents of {approximately}0.1nA, decreasing to {approximately}0.09 at currents of {approximately}0.5nA. Ion beam energies as low as 10 eV have been realized, with an energy spread of {approx_lt}3eV full width half maximum. The ion polarization can be reversed (P{sub +}{r_arrow}{minus}P{sub +}) simply by changing the sense of circular polarization of the optical pumping radiation. The source is suitable for use in a wide variety of applications including surface physics studies. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Electron Beam Energy Chirp Control with a Rectangular Corrugated Structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bane, Karl; Ding, Yantao; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Maxwell, Timothy; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam energy chirp is an important parameter that affects the bandwidth and performance of a linac-based, free-electron laser. In this paper we study the wakefields generated by a beam passing between at metallic plates with small corrugations, and then apply such a device as a passive dechirper for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) energy chirp control with a multi-GeV and femtosecond electron beam. Similar devices have been tested in several places at relatively low energies (#24;100 MeV) and with relatively long bunches (> 1ps). In the parameter regime of the LCLS dechirper, with the corrugation size similar to the gap between the plates, the analytical solutions of the wakefields are no longer applicable, and we resort to a #12;field matching program to obtain the wakes. Based on the numerical calculations, we #12;fit the short-range, longitudinal wakes to simple formulas, valid over a large, useful parameter range. Finally, since the transverse wakefields - both dipole and quadrupole-are strong, we compute and include them in beam dynamics simulations to investigate the error tolerances when this device is introduced in the LCLS.

  11. Electron Beam Energy Chirp Control with a Rectangular Corrugated Structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bane, Karl; Ding, Yantao; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Maxwell, Timothy; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam energy chirp is an important parameter that affects the bandwidth and performance of a linac-based, free-electron laser. In this paper we study the wakefields generated by a beam passing between at metallic plates with small corrugations, and then apply such a device as a passive dechirper for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) energy chirp control with a multi-GeV and femtosecond electron beam. Similar devices have been tested in several places at relatively low energies (#24;100 MeV) and with relatively long bunches (> 1ps). In the parameter regime of the LCLS dechirper, with the corrugation size similar tomore »the gap between the plates, the analytical solutions of the wakefields are no longer applicable, and we resort to a #12;field matching program to obtain the wakes. Based on the numerical calculations, we #12;fit the short-range, longitudinal wakes to simple formulas, valid over a large, useful parameter range. Finally, since the transverse wakefields - both dipole and quadrupole-are strong, we compute and include them in beam dynamics simulations to investigate the error tolerances when this device is introduced in the LCLS.« less

  12. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON RESONANCE DISCHARGE AS A SOURCE FOR HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM IONS PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of controlled thermonuclear fusion. Plasma sources are acknowledged to be among the most efficient sources

  13. VOLUME 87, NUMBER 8 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 20 AUGUST 2001 Investigation of Ultrafast Laser-Driven Radiative Blast Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditmire, Todd

    . This is believed to be due to the stabilizing effect of a relatively thick blast wave shell resulting in part from of Ultrafast Laser-Driven Radiative Blast Waves M.J. Edwards,1 A. J. MacKinnon,1 J. Zweiback,1 K. Shigemori,2 D blast waves produced by the deposition of femtosecond laser pulses in gas jets. In high-Z gases

  14. Upgrade of the extraction system of permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, M.; Peng, S. X.; Song, Z. Z.; Yuan, Z. X.; Zhou, Q. F.; Lu, P. N.; Xu, R.; Zhao, J.; Yu, J. X.; Chen, J. E.; Guo, Z. Y.; Lu, Y. R. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ren, H. T. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of new ion extraction electrodes have been designed for the permanent magnetic electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Peking University to improve beam quality and transmission. PBGUNS has been used to optimize the extraction electrodes and simulate the beam behavior at the extraction region. The experiments showed that with the new system, the beam half divergence angle can be less than 40 mrad and the normalized rms emittance is about 0.13{pi} mm mrad when the extracted current is 100 mA at 50 keV in pulse mode. The voltage of the suppression electrode has great effect on beam divergence. The effect of the microwave power and gas flow is also studied.

  15. Si-on-Insulator formation using a line-source electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A line-source electron beam has been used to melt and recrystallize isolated Si layers to form Si-on-Insulator structures, and the process is simulated by heat flow calculations. Using sample sweep speeds of 100 to 600 cm/s and peak power densities up to 75 kW/cm/sup 2/ in the 1 x 20 mm beam, we have obtained single-crystal areas as large as 50 x 350 ..mu..m. Seed openings to the substrate are used to control the orientation of the regrowth and the heat flow in the recrystallizing film. A finite-element heat flow code has been developed which correctly simulates the experimental results and which allows the calculation of untried sample configurations.

  16. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershkowitz, Noah (Madison, WI); Longmier, Benjamin (Madison, WI); Baalrud, Scott (Madison, WI)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  17. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source of Electron Acceptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Jaisi, Deb P.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ji, Junfeng

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study was conducted to understand if Fe (III) in loess sediments is available for microbial respiration by using a common metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, CN32. The loess samples were collected from three different sites: St. Louis (Peoria), Missouri, USA; Huanxia (HX) and Yanchang (YCH), Shanxi Province of China. Wet chemical analyses indicated that the total Fe concentration for the three samples was 1.69%, 2.76%, and 3.29%, respectively, of which 0.48%, 0.67%, and 1.27% was Fe(III). All unreduced loess sediments contained iron oxides and phyllosilicates (smectite, illite, chlorite, vermiculite), in addition to common minerals such as quartz, feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, and dolomite. Bioreduction experiments were performed at a loess concentration of 20 mg/mL using lactate as the sole electron donor, Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in non-growth (bicarbonate buffer) and growth (M1) media with a cell concentration of ~2.8 x 107 and 2.1 x 107 cells/mL, respectively. The unreduced and bioreduced solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy, diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) methods. Despite many similarities among the three loess samples, the extent and rate of Fe (III) reduction varied significantly. For example, in presence of AQDS the extent of reduction in the non-growth experiment was 25% in HX, 34% in Peoria, and 38% in YCH. The extent of reduction in the growth experiment was 72% in HX, 94% in Peoria, and 56% in YCH. The extent of bioreduction was lower in absence of AQDS. Overall, AQDS and the M1 growth medium significantly enhanced the rate and extent of bioreduction. Fe(III) in iron oxides and Fe(III)-containing phyllosilicates was bioreduced. Biogenic illite, siderite, and vivianite formed. The results of this study suggest that Fe (III) in loess sediments represents a potentially important source of electron acceptors to support microbial activity in dry environments.

  18. Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drentje, A G; Uchida, T; Rácz, R; Biri, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses.One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions (i.e., radial directions) that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six side electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable,...

  19. Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drentje, A. G., E-mail: a.g.drentje@rug.nl; Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan)] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Uchida, T. [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe-shi 350-8585 (Japan)] [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe-shi 350-8585 (Japan); Rácz, R.; Biri, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), H-2026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary)] [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), H-2026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses. One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions – i.e., radial directions – that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six “side” electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable, off-axis side electrode was applied in technically two versions. The measurements show indeed a decrease of ionic losses but different effectivities as compared to the biased disk.

  20. Plasma studies of the permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Peking University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, H. T.; Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Xu, Y.; Zhao, J.; Lu, P. N.; Chen, J.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, T.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At Peking University (PKU) we have developed several 2.45 GHz Permanent Magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources for PKUNIFTY, SFRFQ, Coupled RFQ and SFRFQ, and Dielectric-Wall Accelerator (DWA) projects (respectively, 50 mA of D{sup +}, 10 mA of O{sup +}, 10 mA of He{sup +}, and 50 mA of H{sup +}). In order to improve performance of these ion sources, it is necessary to better understand the principal factors that influence the plasma density and the atomic ion fraction. Theoretical analysis about microwave transmission and cut-off inside the discharge chamber were carried out to study the influence of the discharge chamber diameters. As a consequence, experimental studies on plasma density and ion fraction with different discharge chamber sizes have been carried out. Due to the difficulties in measuring plasma density inside the discharge chamber, the output beam current was measured to reflect the plasma density. Experimental results show that the plasma density increases to the maximum and then decreases significantly as the diameter changed from 64 mm to 30 mm, and the atomic ion fraction has the same tendency. The maximum beam intensity was obtained with the diameter of 35 mm, but the maximum atomic ion fraction with a diameter of 40 mm. The experimental results are basically accordant with the theoretical calculation. Details are presented in this paper.

  1. Permanent magnet electron beam ion source/trap systems with bakeable magnets for improved operation conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, M., E-mail: mike.schmidt@dreebit.com [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany); Zschornack, G.; Kentsch, U.; Ritter, E. [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany)] [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic system of a Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS) generating the necessary magnetic field with a new type of permanent magnet made of high energy density NdFeB-type material operable at temperatures above 100?°C has been investigated and tested. The employment of such kind of magnets provides simplified operation without the time-consuming installation and de-installation procedures of the magnets for the necessary baking of the ion source after commissioning and maintenance work. Furthermore, with the use of a new magnetization technique the geometrical filling factor of the magnetic Dresden EBIS design could be increased to a filling factor of 100% leading to an axial magnetic field strength of approximately 0.5 T exceeding the old design by 20%. Simulations using the finite element method software Field Precision and their results compared with measurements are presented as well. It could be shown that several baking cycles at temperatures higher than 100?°C did not change the magnetic properties of the setup.

  2. Direct laser acceleration of electrons in free-space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbajo, Sergio; Wong, Liang Jie; Miller, R J Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact laser-driven accelerators are versatile and powerful tools of unarguable relevance on societal grounds for the diverse purposes of science, health, security, and technology because they bring enormous practicality to state-of-the-art achievements of conventional radio-frequency accelerators. Current benchmarking laser-based technologies rely on a medium to assist the light-matter interaction, which impose material limitations or strongly inhomogeneous fields. The advent of few cycle ultra-intense radially polarized lasers has materialized an extensively studied novel accelerator that adopts the simplest form of laser acceleration and is unique in requiring no medium to achieve strong longitudinal energy transfer directly from laser to particle. Here we present the first observation of direct longitudinal laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons that undergo highly-directional multi-GeV/m accelerating gradients. This demonstration opens a new frontier for direct laser-driven particle accelerati...

  3. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-..mu..m laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ and 1 x 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  4. SOURCE?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is an open-source code package designed to be a common, low-cost, standardized tool...

  5. Recent development of RIKEN 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higurashi, Y., E-mail: higurasi@riken.jp; Ohnishi, J.; Ozeki, K.; Kidera, M.; Nakagawa, T. [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama (Japan)] [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two years, we have tried to improve the performance of the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using several methods. For the production of U vapor, we chose the sputtering method because it is possible to install a large amount of material inside the plasma chamber and thus achieve long-term operation without a break, although it is assumed that the beam intensity is weaker than in the oven technique. We also used an aluminum chamber instead of a stainless steel one. Using these methods, we successfully produced ?180 e?A of U{sup 35+} and ?230 e?A of U{sup 33+} at the injected radio frequency (RF) power of ?4 kW (28 GHz). Very recently, to further increase the beam intensity of U{sup 35+}, we have started to develop a high temperature oven and have successfully produced a highly charged U ion beam. In this contribution, we report on the beam intensity of highly charged U ions as a function of various parameters (RF power and sputtering voltage) and discuss the effects of these parameters on the beam stability in detail.

  6. Another shock for the Bullet cluster, and the source of seed electrons for radio relics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimwell, Timothy W; Brown, Shea; Feretti, Luigina; Gaensler, B M; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Lage, Craig; Srinivasan, Raghav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With Australia Telescope Compact Array observations, we detect a highly elongated Mpc-scale diffuse radio source on the eastern periphery of the Bullet cluster 1E0657-55.8, which we argue has the positional, spectral and polarimetric characteristics of a radio relic. This powerful relic (2.3+/-0.1 x 10^25 W Hz^-1) consists of a bright northern bulb and a faint linear tail. The bulb emits 94% of the observed radio flux and has the highest surface brightness of any known relic. Exactly coincident with the linear tail we find a sharp X-ray surface brightness edge in the deep Chandra image of the cluster -- a signature of a shock front in the hot intracluster medium (ICM), located on the opposite side of the cluster to the famous bow shock. This new example of an X-ray shock coincident with a relic further supports the hypothesis that shocks in the outer regions of clusters can form relics via diffusive shock (re-)acceleration. Intriguingly, our new relic suggests that seed electrons for reacceleration are coming...

  7. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferracin, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the design of a N b S n superconducting magnet system for aNbjSn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron5 C H 1 1 2 3 1 . Nb Sn superconducting magnets for electron

  8. Light Well: ATunable Free-Electron Light Source on a Chip K. F. MacDonald,1,* Y. H. Fu,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Light Well: ATunable Free-Electron Light Source on a Chip G. Adamo,1 K. F. MacDonald,1,* Y. H. Fu,2 metal-dielectric structure creates a new type of tunable, nanoscale radiation source--a ``light well''. In the reported demonstration, tunable light is generated at an intensity of $200 W=cm2 as electrons with energies

  9. Studies of Charge Exchange in a High?Pressure Pulsed Electron Impact Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, D. K. Sen; Hierl, Peter M.; Franklin, J. L.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high pressure pulsed ion source has been used in a time?of?flight mass spectrometer in order to study the charge exchangereactions in Ar–H2 and Ar–D2 systems using the ion source in the ?ermák mode of operation. As the source was used in a pulsed...

  10. Electronic temperatures, densities, and plasma x-ray emission of a 14.5 GHz electron-cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumberidze, A.; Szabo, C. I.; Indelicato, P.; Isac, J.-M.; Le Bigot, E.-O. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6 Case 74, 4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Trassinelli, M.; Adrouche, N.; Haranger, F.; Lamour, E.; Merot, J.; Prigent, C.; Rozet, J.-P.; Vernhet, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Campus Boucicaut, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a systematic study of the bremsstrahlung emission from the electrons in the plasma of a commercial 14.5 GHz electron-cyclotron resonance ion source. The electronic spectral temperature and the product of ionic and electronic densities of the plasma are measured by analyzing the bremsstrahlung spectra recorded for several rare gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) as a function of the injected power. Within our uncertainty, we find an average temperature of {approx_equal}48 keV above 100 W, with a weak dependency on the injected power and gas composition. Charge state distributions of extracted ion beams have been determined as well, providing a way to disentangle the ionic density from the electronic density. Moreover x-ray emission from highly charged argon ions in the plasma has been observed with a high-resolution mosaic-crystal spectrometer, demonstrating the feasibility for high-precision measurements of transition energies of highly charged ions, in particular, of the magnetic dipole (M1) transition of He-like of argon ions.

  11. Laser-driven flyer plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for producing high velocity flyer plates involving placing a layer of dielectric material between a first metal foil and a second metal foil. With laser irradiation through an optical substrate, the first metal foil forms a plasma in the area of the irradiation, between the substrate and the solid portion of the first metal foil. When the pressure between the substrate and the foil reaches the stress limit of the dielectric, the dielectric will break away and launch the flyer plate out of the second metal foil. The mass of the flyer plate is controlled, as no portion of the flyer plate is transformed into a plasma.

  12. Wakefield acceleration in atmospheric plasmas: a possible source of MeV electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrayás, M; Seviour, R; Trueba, J L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense electromagnetic pulses interacting with a plasma can create a wake of plasma oscillations. Electrons trapped in such oscillations can be accelerated under certain conditions to very high energies. We study the conditions for the wakefield acceleration to produce MeV electrons in atmospheric plasmas. This mechanism may explain the origin of MeV or runaway electrons needed in the current theories for the production of Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes.

  13. Correspondence: Email: shinn@jlab.org; Telephone: 757 269 7565; FAX: 757 269 5519 High Average Power Free-Electron Lasers -A New Laser Source for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Free-Electron Lasers - A New Laser Source for Materials Processing Michelle D. Shinn Thomas the status of our DOD-funded project to upgrade the FEL to 10 kW in the mid IR. Keywords: Free-electron laser, one type of laser can meet these requirements: a free-electron laser (FEL) using a superconducting

  14. Operation of an ungated diamond field-emission array cathode in a L-band radiofrequency electron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Accelerator Physics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Brau, C. A.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Mendenhall, M. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Choi, B. K. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Blomberg, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, H. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Jarvis, J. [Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medford, New York 11763 (United States); Prieto, P.; Reid, J. [Accelerator Division, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of ?10{sup 6} diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15?mA was reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed.

  15. Accelerator-based neutron source using a cold deuterium target with degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, R. E.; Ordonez, C. A. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron generator is considered in which a beam of tritons is incident on a hypothetical cold deuterium target with degenerate electrons. The energy efficiency of neutron generation is found to increase substantially with electron density. Recent reports of potential targets are discussed.

  16. Case studies in the digital fabrication of open-source consumer electronic products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellis, David Adley

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the effects of digital fabrication on the design, production, and customization of consumer electronic devices. It does so through a series of three case studies - a radio, a pair of speakers, and a ...

  17. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erin K. Field; Robin Gerlach; Sridhar Viamajala; Laura K. Jennings; Alfred B. Cunningham; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at Department of Energy (DOE) and other contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the DOE site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in hexavalent chromium remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction. These chemical species are likely to be present in these terrestrial environments during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that there were a number of interactions between these compounds that influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. The type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. When an electron shuttle, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was present in the system, reduction rates increased significantly. Biologically reduced AQDS (AHDS) reduced Cr(VI) almost instantaneously. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II) which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems is the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that is Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  18. Scaling relations and parameters for 1 Angstrom FEL. [Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, L.H.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds great promise as a tunable source of coherent radiation. At the present, the shortest wavelength achieved by an FEL is 2500 {Angstrom}. However, as recent progress in the development of laser driven photocathode electron guns has provided electron beams with lower and lower emittance and higher and higher current, it has become clear that FEL's with much shorter wavelength can be achieved. An FEL operating below 1000 {Angstrom} will yield important advances in fields such as photochemistry, atomic and molecular physics. An FEL with wavelength of 30 {Angstrom} will bring new era to the development of holography of living cells. And, if an FEL with 1 {Angstrom} wavelength can be developed, its impact on solid physics, molecular biology, and many other fields can hardly be exaggerated. We first describe our electron distribution model: a waterbag transverse phase space distribution and a Gaussian energy distribution. This model is widely used in simulations, and is rather close to reality. Then we describe the dispersion relation derived from the Vlasov-Maxwell equations, and its solution, expressed in scaled form. We compare the variational approximation with several simulation codes. Then we compare with exact results which we have derived for a parallel electron beam with finite beam size and energy spread. We explain the scaling relations, and give examples to show how system parameters scale when the FEL wavelength is reduced. Then, applying these scaling relations, we derive a list of preliminary system parameters for a 1 {Angstrom} FEL. As an example, we apply our analytical calculation to optimize one set of parameters derived from the scaling relations. Finally, as a conclusion we discuss the implication of the list of parameters for a 1{Angstrom} FEL. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X. [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S. [Institute of Atomic Energy Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Shiragata Shirakane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  20. No Universality for Electron's Power-Law Index (p) in Gamma-Ray Bursts and Other Relativistic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. -F. Shen; P. Kumar; E. L. Robinson

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) prompt emission is believed to be from highly relativistic electrons accelerated in relativistic shocks. From the GRB high-energy power-law spectral indices $\\beta$ observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Large Area Detectors (LAD), we determine the spectral index, $p$, of the electrons' energy distribution. Both the theoretical calculations and numerical simulations of the particle acceleration in relativistic shocks show that $p$ has a universal value $\\approx 2.2-2.3$. We show that the observed distribution of $p$ during GRBs is not consistent with a $\\delta$-function distribution or an universal $p$ value, with the width of the distribution $\\ge$ 0.54. The distributions of $p$ during X-ray afterglows are also investigated and found to be inconsistent with a $\\delta$-function distribution. The $p$-distributions in blazars and pulsar wind nebulae are also broad, inconsistent with a $\\delta$-function distribution.

  1. A Parametric Study of Electron Extraction from a Low Frequency Inductively Coupled RF-Plasma Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cathode is closed only by the ion current to the cathode chamber wall. The extraction of electrons from the rf through this opening is larger than the ion saturation current to the chamber wall, then the maximum by the plasma density in the cathode chamber, the ion Bohm velocity at the sheath edge and the surface area

  2. Design of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for medium charge state light ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Button, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Sydney, NSW 2234 (Australia); Milford, G. N. [University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization we are developing a new isotope ratio mass spectrometer based on the measurement of multiple charge state ions. We have carried out a review of our existing ECR ion source and identified a number of design flaws. For the new instrument, we are producing a new ECR source and have refined the design, in particular by using 3D simulations to improve the magnetic confinement field and by a combination of simulations and experiments to improve the design of the microwave coupling.

  3. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma chamber studies using a network analyzer as a loaded cavity probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toivanen, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Kauppinen, J.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae 40500 (Finland); Lyneis, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and first results utilizing a network analyzer as a loaded cavity probe to study the resonance properties of a plasma filled electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma chamber are presented. The loaded cavity measurements have been performed using a dual port technique, in which two separate waveguides were used simultaneously. One port was used to ignite and sustain the plasma with a microwave source operating around 11 GHz and the other was used to probe the cavity properties with the network analyzer using a frequency range around 14 GHz. The first results obtained with the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS demonstrate that the presence of plasma has significant effects on the resonance properties of the cavity. With plasma the frequency dependent behavior is strongly damped and this trend strengthens with increasing microwave power.

  4. Plasma studies on electron cyclotron resonance light ion source at CEA/Saclay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyckees, S.; Delferriere, O.; Duperrier, R.; Harrault, F.; Tuske, O. [CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SACM/LEDA, F-91191-Gif/Yvette (France)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By the 90s, the CEA has undertaken to develop the production of intense light ion beams from unconfined ECR plasma. Today, three sources for IPHI, SPIRAL2, and IFMIF projects (respectively, 100 mA of H{sup +}, 8 mA of D{sup +}, and 140 mA of D{sup +}) are installed at CEA/Saclay. In order to improve performances and decrease dimensions of these sources, it is necessary to better understand the mechanisms involved in the production and extraction of particles. As a consequence, theoretical and experimental studies are being carried out. We present a theoretical study based on SOLMAXP, a home-made particle-in-cell code. The aim is to investigate the possibility of reducing the plasma chamber size without loss of beam characteristics. This code has been validated by beam intensity measurements on a permanent magnet based source, producing a proton beam of 30 mA at 40 kV on the test bench BETSI. In order to reduce experimentally the dimensions of plasma chamber, a new source, named ALISES with variable plasma chamber volume, is under assembly.

  5. Runaway electrons as a source of impurity and reduced fusion yield in the dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerner, Eric J.; Yousefi, Hamid R. [LPPFusion, Inc., 128 Lincoln Blvd., Middlesex, New Jersey 08846 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impurities produced by the vaporization of metals in the electrodes may be a major cause of reduced fusion yields in high-current dense plasma focus devices. We propose here that a major, but hitherto-overlooked, cause of such impurities is vaporization by runaway electrons during the breakdown process at the beginning of the current pulse. This process is sufficient to account for the large amount of erosion observed in many dense plasma focus devices on the anode very near to the insulator. The erosion is expected to become worse with lower pressures, typical of machines with large electrode radii, and would explain the plateauing of fusion yield observed in such machines at higher peak currents. Such runaway electron vaporization can be eliminated by the proper choice of electrode material, by reducing electrode radii and thus increasing fill gas pressure, or by using pre-ionization to eliminate the large fields that create runaway electrons. If these steps are combined with monolithic electrodes to eliminate arcing erosion, large reductions in impurities and large increases in fusion yield may be obtained, as the I{sup 4} scaling is extended to higher currents.

  6. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  7. Development of a new superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for operations up to 18 GHz at LBNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, D. Z., E-mail: zqxie@lbl.gov; Benitez, J. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M.; Phair, L. W.; Strohmeier, M. M.; Thuillier, T. P.; Todd, D. S. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Caspi, S.; Prestemon, S. O. [Accelerator Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Accelerator Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) is under development at LBNL to harness the winding techniques of a closed-loop sextupole coil for the next generation ECRIS and to enhance the capability of the 88-in. cyclotron facility. The proposed ECRIS will use a superconducting closed-loop sextupole coil to produce the radial field and a substantial portion of the axial field. The field strengths of the injection, central and extraction regions are adjusted by a three solenoids outside the closed-loop sextupole coil. In addition to maintaining the typical ECRIS magnetic field configuration, this new source will also be able to produce a dustpan-like minimum-B field to explore possible ECRIS performance enhancement. The dustpan-like minimum-B field configuration has about the same strengths for the maximum axial field at the injection region and the maximum radial pole fields at the plasma chamber walls but it can be substantially lower at the extraction region. The dustpan-like minimum-B will have a field maximum B{sub max} ? 2.6 T for operations up to 18 GHz with a ratio of B{sub max}/B{sub res} ? 4 and higher ratios for lower frequencies. The field maxima of this new source can reach over 3 T both at the injection and the plasma chamber walls which could also support operation at 28 GHz. The source will be built of cryogen-free with the magnets directly cooled by cryo-coolers to simplify the cryostat structure. The source design features will be presented and discussed.

  8. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S., E-mail: santanu1@physics.iitd.ac.in [Nanostech Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-16 (India); Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Jha, M.; Ganguli, A. K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-16 (India); Schmidt, H. [Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schulze, S. [Solid Surfaces Analysis, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schmidt, O. G. [Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB{sub 6}-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB{sub 6} coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films.

  9. Electron cyclotron resonant multicusp magnetic field microwave plasma source for electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahimene, M.; Mahoney, L.; Asmussen, J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of electrodeless microwave ion and plasma sources has been a recent, very active research project at Michigan State University. The results are efficient, compact microwave discharge configurations that operate at low pressures (0.5 mtorr to 100 mtorr) and efficiently produce low energy ions and free radicals and broad ion beams for oxidation, deposition, and etching experiments. The microwave discharge technology developed for these applications may be useful for application in electric propulsion. This paper reviews this microwave applicator technology and indicates how it may be extended to higher power levels and applied to electric propulsion systems. 12 references.

  10. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, W., E-mail: luwang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 73000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Cao, R.; Ruan, L. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Institute of Electrical Engineering, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, X. Z.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 73000 (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 73000 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0–1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper.

  11. Development of a high-temperature oven for the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohnishi, J., E-mail: ohnishi@riken.jp; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Ozeki, K.; Nakagawa, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have been developing the 28 GHz ECR ion source in order to accelerate high-intensity uranium beams at the RIKEN RI-beam Factory. Although we have generated U{sup 35+} beams by the sputtering method thus far, we began developing a high-temperature oven with the aim of increasing and stabilizing the beams. Because the oven method uses UO{sub 2}, a crucible must be heated to a temperature higher than 2000?°C to supply an appropriate amount of UO{sub 2} vapor to the ECR plasma. Our high-temperature oven uses a tungsten crucible joule-heated with DC current of approximately 450 A. Its inside dimensions are ?11 mm × 13.5 mm. Since the crucible is placed in a magnetic field of approximately 3 T, it is subject to a magnetic force of approximately 40 N. Therefore, we used ANSYS to carefully design the crucible, which was manufactured by machining a tungsten rod. We could raise the oven up to 1900?°C in the first off-line test. Subsequently, UO{sub 2} was loaded into the crucible, and the oven was installed in the 28 GHz ECR ion source and was tested. As a result, a U{sup 35+} beam current of 150 ?A was extracted successfully at a RF power of approximately 3 kW.

  12. Design and characterization of 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with magnetron magnetic field configuration for high flux of hyperthermal neutral beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seong Bong [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Chul; Yoo, Suk Jae [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source with a magnetron magnetic field configuration was developed to meet the demand of a hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) flux on a substrate of more than 1x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for industrial applications. The parameters of the operating pressure, ion density, electron temperature, and distance between the neutralization plate and the substrate for the HNB source are specified in a theoretical analysis. The electron temperature and the ion density are measured to characterize the ECR HNB source using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The parameters of the ECR HNB source are in good agreement with the theoretically specified parameters.

  13. Superconducting magnet performance for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jin Yong [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of) [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Won, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mswon@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)] [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung Chul [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jung Keun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)] [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting magnet for use in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The superconducting magnet is comprised of three solenoids and a hexapole magnet. According to the design value, the solenoid magnets can generate a mirror field, resulting in axial magnetic fields of 3.6 T at the injection area and 2.2 T at the extraction region. A radial field strength of 2.1 T can also be achieved by hexapole magnet on the plasma chamber wall. NbTi superconducting wire was used in the winding process following appropriate techniques for magnet structure. The final assembly of the each magnet involved it being vertically inserted into the cryostat to cool down the temperature using liquid helium. The performance of each solenoid and hexapole magnet was separately verified experimentally. The construction of the superconducting coil, the entire magnet assembly for performance testing and experimental results are reported herein.

  14. Conceptual design of first toroidal electron cyclotron resonance ion source and modeling of ion extraction from it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caliri, C; Volpe, F A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) progressed to higher and higher ion currents and charge states by adopting stronger magnetic fields (beneficial for confinement) and proportionally higher ECR frequencies. Further improvements would require the attainment of "triple products" of density, temperature and confinement time comparable with major fusion experiments. For this, we propose a new, toroidal rather than linear, ECRIS geometry, which would at the same time improve confinement and make better use of the magnetic field. Ion extraction is more complicated than from a linear device, but feasible, as our modelling suggests: single-particle tracings showed successful extraction by at least two techniques, making use respectively of a magnetic extractor and of ExB drifts. Additional techniques are briefly discussed.

  15. A mode converter to generate a Gaussian-like mode for injection into the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyneis, C., E-mail: CMLyneis@lbl.gov; Benitez, J.; Hodgkinson, A.; Strohmeier, M.; Todd, D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Plaum, B. [Institut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie (IGVP), Stuttgart (Germany)] [Institut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie (IGVP), Stuttgart (Germany); Thuillier, T. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des martyrs 38026 Grenoble cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des martyrs 38026 Grenoble cedex (France)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources use gyrotrons at either 24 or 28 GHz for ECR heating. In these systems, the microwave power is launched into the plasma using the TE{sub 01} circular waveguide mode. This is fundamentally different and may be less efficient than the typical rectangular, linearly polarized TE{sub 10} mode used for launching waves at lower frequencies. To improve the 28 GHz microwave coupling in VENUS, a TE{sub 01}-HE{sub 11} mode conversion system has been built to test launching HE{sub 11} microwave power into the plasma chamber. The HE{sub 11} mode is a quasi-Gaussian, linearly polarized mode, which should couple strongly to the plasma electrons. The mode conversion is done in two steps. First, a 0.66 m long “snake” converts the TE{sub 01} mode to the TE{sub 11} mode. Second, a corrugated circular waveguide excites the HE{sub 11} mode, which is launched directly into the plasma chamber. The design concept draws on the development of similar devices used in tokamaks and stellerators. The first tests of the new coupling system are described below.

  16. X-ray spectroscopy of warm and hot electron components in the CAPRICE source plasma at EIS testbench at GSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mascali, D., E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Neri, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, – Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, – Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Maimone, F.; Maeder, J.; Tinschert, K.; Spaedtke, K. P.; Rossbach, J.; Lang, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Romano, F. P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, – Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy) [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, – Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Musumarra, A.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, – Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy) [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, – Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental campaign aiming to detect X radiation emitted by the plasma of the CAPRICE source – operating at GSI, Darmstadt – has been carried out. Two different detectors (a SDD – Silicon Drift Detector and a HpGe – hyper-pure Germanium detector) have been used to characterize the warm (2–30 keV) and hot (30–500 keV) electrons in the plasma, collecting the emission intensity and the energy spectra for different pumping wave frequencies and then correlating them with the CSD of the extracted beam measured by means of a bending magnet. A plasma emissivity model has been used to extract the plasma density along the cone of sight of the SDD and HpGe detectors, which have been placed beyond specific collimators developed on purpose. Results show that the tuning of the pumping frequency considerably modifies the plasma density especially in the warm electron population domain, which is the component responsible for ionization processes: a strong variation of the plasma density near axis region has been detected. Potential correlations with the charge state distribution in the plasma are explored.

  17. Nonlinear Pulse Propagation and Phase Velocity of Laser-Driven Plasma Waves C. B. Schroeder, C. Benedetti, E. Esarey, and W. P. Leemans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    of high-quality GeV electron beams in centimeter-scale plasmas [2], the dynamics of the acceler- ated- ing length (distance for a relativistic particle to move out of an accelerating phase) and, hence=cm2 , or a0 * 1, to drive large ampli- tude plasma waves for particle acceleration. In the nonlinear

  18. Ultra-low emittance beam generation using two-color ionization injection in a CO2 laser-driven plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C B; Bulanov, S S; Chen, M; Esarey, E; Geddes, C G R; Vay, J -L; Yu, L -L; Leemans, W P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-low emittance (tens of nm) beams can be generated in a plasma accelerator using ionization injection of electrons into a wakefield. An all-optical method of beam generation uses two laser pulses of different colors. A long-wavelength drive laser pulse (with a large ponderomotive force and small peak electric field) is used to excite a large wakefield without fully ionizing a gas, and a short-wavelength injection laser pulse (with a small ponderomotive force and large peak electric field), co-propagating and delayed with respect to the pump laser, to ionize a fraction of the remaining bound electrons at a trapped wake phase, generating an electron beam that is accelerated in the wake. The trapping condition, the ionized electron distribution, and the trapped bunch dynamics are discussed. Expressions for the beam transverse emittance, parallel and orthogonal to the ionization laser polarization, are presented. An example is shown using a 10-micron CO2 laser to drive the wake and a frequency-doubled Ti:Al2...

  19. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Heimann, P. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Krupin, O. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kelez, N. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics and CFEL, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  20. Development of a microwave ion and plasma source immersed in a multicusp electron-cyclotron-resonant magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahimene, M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental development and test of an electrodeless microwave (2.45 GHz)-generated plasma and ion source in a discharge pressure range of 6 x 10 /sup -4/-5 x 10/sup -1/ Torr and relatively low power (80-350 W CW) are presented. Also presented is a semi-empirical model applicable to low-pressure microwave discharges with no static magnetic field. Initial experiments studied the properties of variable diffusion length (0.43-1.22 cm) disk-shaped discharges generated and maintained in a cylindrical microwave resonant-cavity applicator for argon and oxygen gases without a static magnetic field. These discharges were characterized by measuring plasma densities and electron temperatures using a Langmuir double probe for different experimental conditions. The measured plasma densities and electron temperatures ranged for 8 x 10/sup 10/ to 5 x 10 /sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ and 2 x 10/sup 4/ to 8 x 10/sup 4/ /sup 0/K, respectively. The ion temperature was less than 500 /sup 0/K. Ion beams were extracted from these discharges using single and double grids. Argon ion-beam currents densities were measured to be 3.0 mA/cm/sup 2/ for the single grid and 5.8 mA/cm/sup 2/ for the double grids with a maximum extraction voltage of 1.7 kV. This applicator was then retrofitted with magnets to study the effect of a multicusp static magnetic field. Using this concept, a new cylindrical microwave applicator was designed and tested.

  1. Feasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chamber to be able to change ion species on a pulse by pulse basis. The optimal plasma drift length variesFeasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea... Takeshi Kanesue Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear

  2. Cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy for diagnostics of high harmonics of the extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser light source at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.-J.; Fukuzawa, H.; Pruemper, G.; Ueda, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Okunishi, M.; Shimada, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Motomura, K.; Saito, N. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Iwayama, H.; Nagaya, K.; Yao, M. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Rudenko, A. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL, D-22607, Hamburg (Germany); Ullrich, J. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL, D-22607, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck-Insitut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Foucar, L. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Czasch, A.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Nagasono, M.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); and others

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy apparatus dedicated to the experiments using the extreme-ultraviolet light pulses at the free-electron laser facility, SPring-8 Compact SASE Source test accelerator, in Japan and used it to measure spatial distributions of fundamental, second, and third harmonics at the end station.

  3. IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 29, NO. 8, AUGUST 2008 867 On the Source of Jitter in a Room-Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Hooman

    IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 29, NO. 8, AUGUST 2008 867 On the Source of Jitter in a Room infrared photon detector was studied by exploring the relation between lateral charge transfer and jitter. The jitter of the device was measured to be 15 ps at room temperature. The jitter was almost independent

  4. Note: A novel normalization scheme for laser-based plasma x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, B. B.; Sun, D. R.; Tao, Y., E-mail: taoy@ihep.ac.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, S. S. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100090 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A kHz repetition rate laser pump-X-ray probe system for ultrafast X-ray diffraction is set up based on a laser-driven plasma X-ray source. A simple and reliable normalization approach has been developed to minimize the impact of large X-ray pulse intensity fluctuation on data quality. It utilizes one single X-ray area detector to record both sample and reference signals simultaneously. Performance of this novel normalization method is demonstrated in reflectivity oscillation measurement of a superlattice sample at sub-ps resolution.

  5. ANTHEM: a two-dimensional multicomponent self-consistent hydro-electron transport code for laser-matter interaction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ANTHEM code for the study of CO/sub 2/-laser-generated transport is outlined. ANTHEM treats the background plasma as coupled Eulerian thermal and ion fluids, and the suprathermal electrons as either a third fluid or a body of evolving collisional PIC particles. The electrons scatter off the ions; the suprathermals drag against the thermal background. Self-consistent E- and B-fields are computed by the Implicit Moment Method. The current status of the code is described. Typical output from ANTHEM is discussed with special application to Augmented-Return-Current CO/sub 2/-laser-driven targets.

  6. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  7. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  8. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  9. Estimates of the absorbed fraction of energy for various electron source and target regions in the upper respiratory tract 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvo, Sebastian

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author would like to thank committee members Drs. Wesley Bolch and John Poston of thc Nuclear Engineering Department, Dr. Keith Eckerman of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Nuclear Engineering Department, and Dr. Michael Walker... INFORMATION MATERIALS AND METHODS . The Model Used in This Study EGS4 Code RESULTS . Source in Tracheal Airway Source on Tracheal Airway Surface Source on Carinal Ridge Surface Source in Airways of Main Bronchi and Bifurcation Zone DISCUSSION...

  10. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. Theseleft) showing the laser (red), plasma wake density (purple-

  11. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, G.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi (India); Baskaran, R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Kukrety, S. [Department of Physics, Kirori Mal College, Delhi University (India)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005); D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006)]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  12. Searches for short-baseline electron-neutrino oscillations in the SAGE and BOREXINO experiments involving artificial neutrino sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbachev, V. V., E-mail: vvgor_gfb1@mail.ru; Veretenkin, E. P.; Gavrin, V. N.; Dan’shin, S. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Knodel, T. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of the SAGE and BOREXINO experiments with {sup 51}Cr artificial neutrino sources for searches for and determination of parameters of short-baseline oscillations.

  13. All-laser-driven, MeV-energy X-ray source for detection of SNM Sudeep Banerjee, Nathan Powers, Vidya Ramanathan, Nathaniel Cunningham, Nate Chandler-Smith, Shouyuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    , Vidya Ramanathan, Nathaniel Cunningham, Nate Chandler-Smith, Shouyuan Chen, Bradley Shadwick and Donald

  14. Experimental demonstration of longitudinal beam phase space linearizer in a free-electron laser facility by corrugated structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of residual linear energy chirp and intrinsic nonlinear energy curvature in the relativistic electron beam from radiofrequency linear accelerator is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons itself in the corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ~10,000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by about 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  15. High density laser-driven target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindl, John D. (San Ramon, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high density target for implosion by laser energy composed of a central quantity of fuel surrounded by a high-Z pusher shell with a low-Z ablator-pusher shell spaced therefrom forming a region filled with low-density material.

  16. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohsuka, Shinji, E-mail: ohsuka@crl.hpk.co.jp [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsu-cho, Nishi-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 431-1202 (Japan); Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); Nakano, Tomoyasu [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); Ray-Focus Co. Ltd., 6009 Shinpara, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-0003 (Japan); Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen K? x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-?m scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  17. X-ray-optical cross-correlator for gas-phase experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schorb, S.; Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Bionta, M. R.; Coffee, R. N.; Swiggers, M.; Carron, S.; Castagna, J.-C.; Bozek, J. D.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Bostedt, C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Gorkhover, T. [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Erk, B.; Boll, R.; Schmidt, C.; Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. med. Forschung, Jahnstr. 29, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rouzee, A. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-optical pump-probe experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have so far been limited to a time resolution of 280 fs fwhm due to timing jitter between the accelerator-based free-electron laser (FEL) and optical lasers. We have implemented a single-shot cross-correlator for femtosecond x-ray and infrared pulses. A reference experiment relying only on the pulse arrival time information from the cross-correlator shows a time resolution better than 50 fs fwhm (22 fs rms) and also yields a direct measurement of the maximal x-ray pulse length. The improved time resolution enables ultrafast pump-probe experiments with x-ray pulses from LCLS and other FEL sources.

  18. Operation of Lanzhou all permanent electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 2 on 320 kV platform with highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, W., E-mail: luwang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, J. Y.; Kang, L.; Liu, H. P.; Li, H.; Li, J. D.; Sun, L. T.; Ma, X. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 320 kV platform for multi-discipline research with highly charged ions is a heavy ion beam acceleration instrument developed by Institute of Modern Physics, which is dedicated to basic scientific researches such as plasma, atom, material physics, and astrophysics, etc. The platform has delivered ion beams of 400 species for 36?000 h. The average operation time is around 5000 h/year. With the beams provided by the platform, lots of outstanding progresses were made in various research fields. The ion source of the platform is an all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source, LAPECR2 (Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source No. 2). The maximum axial magnetic fields are 1.28 T at injection and 1.07 T at extraction, and the radial magnetic field is up to 1.21 T at the inner wall of the plasma chamber. The ion source is capable to produce low, medium, and high charge state gaseous and metallic ion beams, such as H{sup +}, {sup 40}Ar{sup 8+}, {sup 129}Xe{sup 30+}, {sup 209}Bi{sup 33+}, etc. This paper will present the latest result of LAPECR2 and the routine operation status for the high voltage platform.

  19. Waveguide slot-excited long racetrack electron cyclotron resonance plasma source for roll-to-roll (scanning) processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, H.-J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a SLot-excited ANtenna (SLAN) long racetrack ECR plasma source that is utilized for roll-to-roll plasma processing such as thin film encapsulation of large-area OLED (organic light emitting diode) panel or modification of fabric surfaces. This source is designed to be long, and to operate under high density uniform plasma with sub-milli-torr pressures. The above features are accomplished by a slot-excited long racetrack resonator with a toroidal geometry of magnetic field ECR configuration, and reinforced microwave electric distributions along the central region of plasma chamber. Also, a new feature has been added to the source. This is to employ a tail plunger, which allows the microwave electric field and the uniformity of the plasma profile to be easily adjustable. We have successfully generated Ar plasmas operating with the microwave power of 0.5–3 kW in the pressure range of 0.2–10 mTorr. The plasma is uniform (<10%) in the direction of the straight track and has a Gaussian profile in the roll-to-roll (scanning) direction. In addition, it is shown that the tail plunger could adjust the plasma profile in order to obtain plasma uniformity. Furthermore, based on the results, we suggest a newly designed up-scaled racetrack-SLAN source.

  20. A Beat Frequency RF Modulator for Generation of Low Repetition Rate Electron Microbunches for the CEBAF Polarized Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Musson; Reza Kazimi; Benard Poelker; Joseph Grames; John Hansknecht

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber-based drive lasers now produce all of the spin-polarized electron beams at CEBAF/Jefferson Lab. The flexibility of these drive lasers, combined with the existing three-beam CEBAF photoinjector Chopper, provides a means to implement a beat frequency technique to produce long time intervals between individual electron microbunches (tens of nanoseconds) by merely varying the nominal 499 MHz drive laser frequency by < 20%. This submission describes the RF Laser modulator that uses a divider and heterodyne scheme to maintain coherence with the accelerator Master Oscillator (MO), while providing delay resolution in increments of 2ns. Some possible uses for such a beam are discussed as well as intended future development.

  1. High-resolution total-cross-section measurements for electron scattering from Ar, Kr, and Xe employing a threshold-photoelectron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurokawa, M.; Kitajima, M.; Toyoshima, K.; Kishino, T.; Odagiri, T. [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Ito, K. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute total cross sections for electron scattering from Ar and Xe at electron energies ranging from 7 meV to 20 eV were obtained with the experimental technique employing the threshold-photoelectron source. The measured total cross sections are in good agreement with those obtained by other groups down to 100 meV, above which several experimental works have been reported. Scattering lengths for electron scattering from Ar, Kr, and Xe were determined from the present total cross sections and our recent results for Kr using the modified effective range theory. The values of the scattering length obtained in the present analysis differ from the values determined from the previous swarm experiments and beam experiments. The resonant structures in the total cross sections due to Feshbach resonances of Ar, Kr, and Xe with an improved energy resolution were also measured. Analyses of the resonant structure were carried out based on the spin-dependent resonant scattering theory in order to determine the values of the natural width of Feshbach resonances of Ar, Kr, and Xe precisely.

  2. Radiation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

  3. Progress on the Construction of the 100 MeV / 100 kW Electron Linac for the NSC KIPT Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-Long, Chi; Guo-Xi, Pei; Shu-Hong, Wang; Jian-She, Cao; Mi, Hou; Wei-Bin, Liu; Zu-Sheng, Zhou; Feng-Li, Zhao; Rong, Liu; Xiang-Cheng, Kong; Jing-Xia, Zhao; Chang-Dong, Deng; Hong, Song; Jin-Tong, Liu; Xu-Wen, Dai; Jun-Hui, Yue; Qi, Yang; Da-Yong, He; Xiang, He; Qi, Le; Xiao-Ping, Li; Lin, Wang; Xiang-Jian, Wang; Hui-Zhou, Ma; Xiao-Yan, Zhao; Yan-Feng, Sui; Hai-Sheng, Guo; Chuang-Xin, Ma; Jian-Bing, Zhao; Peng, Chen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IHEP, China is constructing a 100 MeV / 100 kW electron Linac for NSC KIPT, Ukraine. This linac will be used as the driver of a neutron source based on a subcritical assembly. In 2012, the injector part of the accelerator was pre-installed as a testing facility in the experimental hall #2 of IHEP. The injector beam and key hardware testing results were met the design goal. Recently, the injector testing facility was disassembled and all of the components for the whole accelerator have been shipped to Ukraine from China by ocean shipping. The installation of the whole machine in KIPT will be started in June, 2013. The construction progress, the design and testing results of the injector beam and key hardware are presented.

  4. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I{sub FC} by the mobile plate tuner. The I{sub FC} is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I{sub FC} and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I{sub FC} when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  5. A liquid-helium-free superconducting coil system forming a flat minimum-magnetic-field distribution of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi, E-mail: yoshida.kennichi71@jaea.go.jp; Nara, Takayuki; Saitoh, Yuichi; Yokota, Watalu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat distribution of the minimum magnetic field (flat-B{sub min}) of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is expected to perform better in highly charged ion production than classical B{sub min}. To form a flat-B{sub min} structure with a liquid helium-free superconducting device, a coil system of seven coils with four current leads has been designed. The lead number was reduced by connecting the plural coils in series to maintain the flat-B{sub min} structure even when the coil currents are changed for adjustment. This coil system can be operated with a helium-free cryostat, since the estimation of heat from the leads to the coils is nearly equivalent to the existing superconducting ECRIS of a similar type.

  6. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  7. Preliminary Report on the Evaluation of an Electron-Positron Collider as a source of Monoenergetic Photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, James E.; Campbell, Luke W.

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Active interrogation methods are being investigated to detect shielded special nuclear material (SNM). These approaches utilize either neutron or photon beams to excite the SNM in concert with either neutron or gamma ray detectors to observe the stimulated emissions. The two primary methodologies with photon beams are photofission and nuclear resonance florescence (NRF). Photofission requires photons energies of 7-10 MeV while NRF requires photon energies around 2 MeV. For both techniques, photons that are not in the appropriate energy band, e.g. the low energy tail of a Bremsstrahlung photon beam, contribute unwanted additional radiation dose to cargo. Typically less than 10% of the photons are in the usable energy band. The additional photon production generates a commensurate amount of additional radiation dose in the source and target areas, impacting shielding requirements and/or dose to operators and equipment and at the expense of a similar increase in power consumption. Hence it is highly desirable to produce narrow energy (“monoenergetic”) photon beams with tunable energy in the range of ~2-20 MeV.

  8. Material optimization for a polarized electron source from strained GaAs:Be grown on an InGaP pseudosubstrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi, W.G.; Tu, C.W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report material optimization for a polarized electron source from strained GaAs:Be grown on an In{sub {ital x}{sub 0}}Ga{sub 1{minus}{ital x}{sub 0}}P pseudosubstrate, i.e., a fully relaxed In{sub {ital x}{sub 0}}Ga{sub 1{minus}{ital x}{sub 0}}P buffer layer on a GaP substrate, whereby the large lattice mismatch between the In{sub {ital x}{sub 0}}Ga{sub 1{minus}{ital x}{sub 0}}P and the GaP was relieved by a linearly graded In{sub {ital x}}Ga{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}P buffer layer. By changing the In composition {ital x}{sub 0} in the In{sub {ital x}{sub 0}}Ga{sub 1{minus}{ital x}{sub 0}}P, strained GaAs:Be active layers with various lattice mismatch were obtained, and the effect of growth conditions on the residual strain in GaAs as well as the strain-induced enhancement of electron-spin polarization were studied. The results show that the residual strain in the GaAs layer is very sensitive to the growth temperatures, and that by choosing the right growth conditions, the strain in GaAs can be maintained even when the film exceeds its theoretical critical layer thickness. Enhanced electron-spin polarization has been observed from samples with larger strain. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  9. A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Karmakar, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Dechoudhury, S.; Mondal, M.; Pandey, H. K.; Lavanyakumar, D.; Mandi, T. K.; Dutta, D. P.; Kundu Roy, T.; Bhowmick, D.; Sanyal, D.; Srivastava, S. C. L.; Ray, A.; Ali, Md. S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Sector-1, Block-AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhattacharjee, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kolkata Centre, III/LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms/molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms/molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of {sup 14}O (71 s), {sup 42}K (12.4 h), {sup 43}K (22.2 h), and {sup 41}Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 10{sup 3} particles per second (pps). About 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} pps of 1.4 MeV {sup 14}O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

  10. Robust relativistic electron mirrors in laser wakefields for enhanced Thomson backscattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mu, Jie; Li, Fei-Yu; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Min [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Sheng, Zheng-Ming [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China) [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Zhang, Jie [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China) [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    By adopting an up-ramp density profile, we propose to generate relativistic electron mirrors from laser-driven underdense plasma waves, which are insensitive to finite thermal temperature within a certain range. Along the density ramp, premature wavebreaking due to thermal effects is shown to be well mitigated. Under sufficiently high amplitudes of wake excitation, overcritical dense electron mirrors can pile up when approaching the end of the up-ramp. The consequent mirror speed can be stably driven to the group velocity of the laser propagating in a corresponding uniform plasma. Compared with using purely uniform but thermal plasmas, the present thermal-insensitive mirrors can provide enhanced scattering efficiency and spectral upshift for a counter-propagating probe pulse. These observations are confirmed by multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. A table-top laser-based source of femtosecond, collimated, ultra-relativistic positron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sarri; W. Schumaker; A. Di Piazza; M. Vargas; B. Dromey; M. E. Dieckmann; V. Chvykov; A. Maksimchuk; V. Yanovsky; Z. H. He; B. X. Hou; J. A. Nees; A. G. R. Thomas; C. H. Keit; M. Zepf; K. Krushelnick

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of ultra-relativistic positron beams with short duration ($\\tau_{e^+} \\leq 30$ fs), small divergence ($\\theta_{e^+} \\simeq 3$ mrad), and high density ($n_{e^+} \\simeq 10^{14} - 10^{15}$ cm$^{-3}$) from a fully optical setup is reported. The detected positron beam propagates with a high-density electron beam and $\\gamma$-rays of similar spectral shape and peak energy, thus closely resembling the structure of an astrophysical leptonic jet. It is envisaged that this experimental evidence, besides the intrinsic relevance to laser-driven particle acceleration, may open the pathway for the small-scale study of astrophysical leptonic jets in the laboratory.

  12. Final report for the NSF/DOE partnership in basic plasma science grant DE-FG02-06ER54906 '?Laser-driven collisionless shocks in the Large Plasma Device'?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, Christoph [UCLA, CA (United States); Gekelman, W. [UCLA, CA (United States); Winske, D. [LANL, NM (United States); Larsen, D. [LLNL, CA (United States)

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed several thousand high-energy laser shots in the LAPD to investigate the dynamics of an exploding laser-produced plasma in a large ambient magneto-plasma. Debris-ions expanding at super-Alfvenic velocity (up to MA=1.5) expel the ambient magnetic field, creating a large (> 20 cm) diamagnetic cavity. We observed field compressions of up to B/B{sub 0} = 1.5 at the edge of the bubble, consistent with the MHD jump conditions, as well as localized electron heating at the edge of the bubble. Two-dimensional hybrid simulations reproduce these measurements well and show that the majority of the ambient ions are energized by the magnetic piston to super-Alfvenic speeds and swept outside the bubble volume. Nonlinear shear-Alfven waves ({delta}B/B{sub 0} > 25%) are radiated from the cavity with a coupling efficiency of 70% from magnetic energy in the bubble to the wave. While the data is consistent with a weak magneto-sonic shock, the experiments were severely limited by the low ambient plasma densities (10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}). 2D hybrid simulations indicate that future experiments with the new LAPD plasma source and densities in excess of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} will drive full-blown collisionless shocks with MA>10 over several c/wpi and shocked Larmor radii. In a separate experiment at the LANL Trident laser facility we have performed a proof-of-principle experiment at higher densities to demonstrate key elements of collisionless shocks in laser-produced magnetized plasmas with important implications to NIF. Simultaneously we have upgraded the UCLA glass-laser system by adding two large amplitude disk amplifiers from the NOVA laser and boost the on-target energy from 30 J to up to 1 kJ, making this one of the world’s largest university-scale laser systems. We now have the infrastructure in place to perform novel and unique high-impact experiments on collision-less shocks at the LAPD.

  13. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 26 P HY S I CA L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 28 JUNE 1999 LaserDriven Atomic Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and by the wind force Fw caused by the reflection of conduction electrons from these atoms. Since F d usually, as schematically depicted in Fig. 1, by exerting on it the wind force Fw , due to the absorption of electron are driven by the direct force F d due to the external field that is locally modified at the atomic site

  14. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 26 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 28 JUNE 1999 Laser-Driven Atomic Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the direct force Fd due to the external field that is locally modified at the atomic site, and by the wind in Fig. 1, by exerting on it the wind force Fw, due to the absorption of electron momenta. The direct force Fw caused by the reflection of conduction electrons from these atoms. Since Fd usually dominates

  15. Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) Laser Sources Used as Drive Lasers for Photoinjectors for High-Gain, Free Electron Lasers (FELs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    for High-Gain, Free Electron Lasers (FELs) By David Leonard Demske Scholarly paper submitted In partial Milchberg #12;- 1 - Abstract The realization of extremely high gain, and high power in Free Electron Lasers laser arrangements to extract electron bunches from photocathodes. The performance of FELs depends

  16. Multi-MeV electron acceleration by sub-terawatt laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goers, A J; Feder, L; Miao, B; Salehi, F; Milchberg, H M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate laser-plasma acceleration of high charge electron beams to the ~10 MeV scale using ultrashort laser pulses with as little energy as 10 mJ. This result is made possible by an extremely dense and thin hydrogen gas jet. Total charge up to ~0.5 nC is measured for energies >1 MeV. Acceleration is correlated to the presence of a relativistically self-focused laser filament accompanied by an intense coherent broadband light flash, associated with wavebreaking, which can radiate more than ~3% of the laser energy in a sub-femtosecond bandwidth consistent with half-cycle optical emission. Our results enable truly portable applications of laser-driven acceleration, such as low dose radiography, ultrafast probing of matter, and isotope production.

  17. Photoemission Electron Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoscale surface structures ( 8 nm) via electron emission induced by ultraviolet and laser light sources. The PEEM is applied to surface science studies of individual...

  18. Part 2: Coherent emission from Free Electron Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lawr, Whit. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp, high-order harmonic...

  19. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  20. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 4, APRIL 2008 1795 Reaching Criterion of a Three-Phase Voltage-Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Sudip K.

    is useful for analyzing the global stability of multiphase inverters, potentially leading to advanced of a Three-Phase Voltage-Source Inverter Operating With Passive and Nonlinear Loads and Its Impact on Global functions (CLFs) to analyze the impacts of passive (RL and RC) and nonlinear (diode rectifier) loads

  2. A study on prevention of an electric discharge at an extraction electrode of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishii, Y., E-mail: Ando.Yasuto@ct.MitsubishiElectric.co.jp; Kawasaki, S. [Energy Systems Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, 1-1-2 Wadasaki-cho, Hyogo-ku, Kobe 652-8555 (Japan)] [Energy Systems Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, 1-1-2 Wadasaki-cho, Hyogo-ku, Kobe 652-8555 (Japan); Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Uchida, T. [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Center, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe 350-8585 (Japan) [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Center, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe 350-8585 (Japan); Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe 350-8585 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact ECR ion source has utilized for carbon radiotherapy. In order to increase beam intensity with higher electric field at the extraction electrode and be better ion supply stability for long periods, electric geometry and surface conditions of an extraction electrode have been studied. Focusing attention on black deposited substances on the extraction electrode, which were observed around the extraction electrode after long-term use, the relation between black deposited substances and the electrical insulation property is investigated. The black deposited substances were inspected for the thickness of deposit, surface roughness, structural arrangement examined using Raman spectroscopy, and characteristics of electric discharge in a test bench, which was set up to simulate the ECR ion source.

  3. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  4. Terahertz radiation as a bunch diagnostic for laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Filip, Catalin; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Fubiani, Gwenael; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are reported from two measurement techniques (semiconductor switching and electro-optic sampling) that allow temporal characterization of electron bunches produced by a laser-driven plasma-based accelerator. As femtosecond electron bunches exit the plasma-vacuum interface, coherent transition radiation (at THz frequencies) is emitted. Measuring the properties of this radiation allows characterization of the electron bunches. Theoretical work on the emission mechanism is presented, including a model that calculates the THz wave form from a given bunch profile. It is found that the spectrum of the THz pulse is coherent up to the 200 {micro}m thick crystal (ZnTe) detection limit of 4 THz, which corresponds to the production of sub-50 fs (rms) electron bunch structure. The measurements demonstrate both the shot-to-shot stability of bunch parameters that are critical to THz emission (such as total charge and bunch length), as well as femtosecond synchronization among bunch, THz pulse, and laser beam.

  5. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction evaluation of thermal deoxidation of chemically cleaned Si, SiGe, and Ge layers for solid-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a study on the thermal evolution of the reflection high-energy electron diffraction pattern of chemically cleaned (001)-oriented Si, Ge, and SiGe surfaces, associating observed changes in the reconstructions with the desorption of known residual contaminants for Si and Ge surfaces. The implications of residual oxides prior to epitaxy on stacking fault densities in the grown films are presented. Further evidence for the two-phase nature of oxides on SiGe surfaces is provided, demonstrating that it is necessary to heat a SiGe surface up to the thermal deoxidation temperature of a Si surface to obtain stacking fault-free growth.

  6. Influence of microwave driver coupling design on plasma density at Testbench for Ion sources Plasma Studies, a 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megía-Macías, A.; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A. [E.S.S. Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain)] [E.S.S. Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain); Cortázar, O. D., E-mail: dcortazar@essbilbao.org [E.S.S. Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain); Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, ETSII, C.J. Cela s/n, 13170 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative study of two microwave driver systems (preliminary and optimized) for a 2.45 GHz hydrogen Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma generator has been conducted. The influence on plasma behavior and parameters of stationary electric field distribution in vacuum, i.e., just before breakdown, along all the microwave excitation system is analyzed. 3D simulations of resonant stationary electric field distributions, 2D simulations of external magnetic field mapping, experimental measurements of incoming and reflected power, and electron temperature and density along the plasma chamber axis have been carried out. By using these tools, an optimized set of plasma chamber and microwave coupler has been designed paying special attention to the optimization of stationary electric field value in the center of the plasma chamber. This system shows a strong stability on plasma behavior allowing a wider range of operational parameters and even sustaining low density plasma formation without external magnetic field. In addition, the optimized system shows the capability to produce values of plasma density four times higher than the preliminary as a consequence of a deeper penetration of the magnetic resonance surface in relative high electric field zone by keeping plasma stability. The increment of the amount of resonance surface embedded in the plasma under high electric field is suggested as a key factor.

  7. Single shot cell irradiations with laser-driven protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humble, N.; Schmid, T. E.; Zlobinskaya, O.; Wilkens, J. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München (Germany); Allinger, K.; Hilz, P.; Ma, W.; Reinhardt, S. [Physics Department, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)] [Physics Department, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany); Bin, J.; Kiefer, D.; Schreiber, J. [Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); Drexler, G. A.; Friedl, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beams are relevant for radiobiological studies in basic research and for application in tumor therapy. Here we present a method to generate nanosecond proton bunches with single shot doses of up to 7 Gray by a tabletop high-power laser. Although in their infancy, laser-ion accelerators allow studying fast radiobiological processes at small-scale laboratories as exemplarily demonstrated by measurements of the relative biological effectiveness of protons in human tumor cells.

  8. Transition state theory for laser-driven reactions Shinnosuke Kawai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -6045, USA Thomas Bartsch Department of Mathematical Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3. This is the aim of the present paper. Recent work by Bartsch et al.19­21 on TST for time-dependent problems has

  9. Sinterable powders from laser driven reactions : final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haggerty, John Scarseth

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely fine, uniform ceramic powders have been synthesized from Sil4 NH3 and C2H4 gas phase reactants that are heated by absorbing optical energy emitted from a C02 laser. Resulting Si, Si3N4 and SiC powders have been ...

  10. Laser-Driven Shock Compression Studies of Planetary Compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spaulding, Dylan Kenneth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 µm of Au and a 10-12 µm polyimide (CH) ablation layer, astypically a vapor-deposited polyimide-type plastic (CH), 10-

  11. Laser-Driven Shock Compression Studies of Planetary Compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spaulding, Dylan Kenneth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. The presence of ‘waste heat’ signifies that temperatureiot " PdV V 1 n go Hu P 0 ‘Waste’ Heat h Pressure P 1 Volumeunder the chord, resulting in ‘waste heat’ which raises the

  12. Fast neutron production from lithium converters and laser driven protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, M.; Jiang, S.; Wertepny, D.; Orban, C.; Morrison, J.; Willis, C.; McCary, E.; Balencourt, P.; Snyder, J.; Chowdhury, E.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Bang, W.; Gaul, E.; Dyer, G.; Ditmire, T. [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments to generate neutrons from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction with 60 J, 180 fs laser pulses have been performed at the Texas Petawatt Laser Facility at the University of Texas at Austin. The protons were accelerated from the rear surface of a thin target membrane using the target-normal-sheath-acceleration mechanism. The neutrons were generated in nuclear reactions caused by the subsequent proton bombardment of a pure lithium foil of natural isotopic abundance. The neutron energy ranged up to 2.9 MeV. The total yield was estimated to be 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons per steradian. An extreme ultra-violet light camera, used to image the target rear surface, correlated variations in the proton yield and peak energy to target rear surface ablation. Calculations using the hydrodynamics code FLASH indicated that the ablation resulted from a laser pre-pulse of prolonged intensity. The ablation severely limited the proton acceleration and neutron yield.

  13. Using laser-driven neutrons to stop nuclear smugglers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUserHadoop

  14. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biri, S; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide bandwidth (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effec...

  15. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC; Rudakov, F.M.; /Brown U.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC; Cardoza, J.D.; /Brown U.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; /SLAC; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  16. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  17. Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and so on. On all of these, the dangling bonds on the outer surfaces are terminated by hydrogen atoms. Because of their potential to possess novel properties of both diamond and...

  18. Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid TurnerExperimental Capabilities NIF

  19. Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid TurnerExperimental Capabilities NIFDiamondoid

  20. Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential ApplicationYu, James CowinPhysicsDiamondoid

  1. Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential ApplicationYu, James

  2. Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential ApplicationYu, JamesDiamondoid Monolayers as

  3. Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential ApplicationYu, JamesDiamondoid Monolayers

  4. Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential ApplicationYu, JamesDiamondoid MonolayersDiamondoid

  5. Electron radiography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  6. No Slide Title

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (STELLA I and II) * High Gain Harmonic Generation (FEL) currently active experiments: * Compton Scattering of ps Electron and CO 2 Beams * Laser Driven Cyclotron Autoresonance...

  7. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

    1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures. 6 figs.

  8. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.J.; Prelec, K.

    1990-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source. 2 figs.

  9. DOCUMENTATION OF ELECTRONIC In-text Citations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    DOCUMENTATION OF ELECTRONIC SOURCES IN MLA In-text Citations In-text citations in MLA format of the message. Other Resources about On-line Citations 1.ONLINE! - Using MLA Style to Cite and Document Sources

  10. Electron Accelerator ight it be possible to com-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    to micron wave- lengths for a laser-driven particle ac- celerator. In essence, a linear accel- erator micro- and nanoscale manuf&ring tech- niques to produce tabletop or even pocket-size particle-energyelectrons are acceler- ators costing millions if not billions of dollars that are availableto a very limited clientele

  11. Electron-Electron Bremsstrahlung Emission and the Inference of Electron Flux Spectra in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduard P. Kontar; A. Gordon Emslie; Anna Maria Massone; Michele Piana; John C. Brown; Marco Prato

    2007-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Although both electron-ion and electron-electron bremsstrahlung contribute to the hard X-ray emission from solar flares, the latter is normally ignored. Such an omission is not justified at electron (and photon) energies above $\\sim 300$ keV, and inclusion of the additional electron-electron bremsstrahlung in general makes the electron spectrum required to produce a given hard X-ray spectrum steeper at high energies. Unlike electron-ion bremsstrahlung, electron-electron bremsstrahlung cannot produce photons of all energies up to the maximum electron energy involved. The maximum possible photon energy depends on the angle between the direction of the emitting electron and the emitted photon, and this suggests a diagnostic for an upper cutoff energy and/or for the degree of beaming of the accelerated electrons. We analyze the large event of January 17, 2005 observed by RHESSI and show that the upward break around 400 keV in the observed hard X-ray spectrum is naturally accounted for by the inclusion of electron-electron bremsstrahlung. Indeed, the mean source electron spectrum recovered through a regularized inversion of the hard X-ray spectrum, using a cross-section that includes both electron-ion and electron-electron terms, has a relatively constant spectral index $\\delta$ over the range from electron kinetic energy $E = 200$ keV to $E = 1$ MeV. However, the level of detail discernible in the recovered electron spectrum is not sufficient to determine whether or not any upper cutoff energy exists.

  12. Free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  13. Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisognano, Joseph J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bissen, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bosch, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Efremov, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Eisert, D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Fisher, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Green, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Jacobs, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Keil, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kleman, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Rogers, G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Severson, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Yavuz, D. D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna [JLAB; Hovater, J. Curtis [JLAB; Plawski, Tomasz [JLAB; Powers, Thomas J. [JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Wisconsin has completed fabrication and commissioning of a low frequency (199.6 MHz) superconducting electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator (QWR) cavity. Its concept was optimized to be the source for a CW free electron laser facility. The gun design includes active tuning and a high temperature superconducting solenoid. We will report on the status of the Wisconsin SRF electron gun program, including commissioning experience and first beam measurements.

  14. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  15. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

    1983-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

  16. The Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, A.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1--1.9-GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. The facility is scheduled to begin operating in April 1993. In this paper we describe the progress in the design, construction, and commissioning of the accelerator systems, insertion devices, and beamlines. Companion presentations at this conference give more detail of specific components in the ALS, and describe the activities towards establishing an exciting user program. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Ultrasonically driven nanomechanical single-electron shuttle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    fabricate are nanomechanical electron shuttles with a back gate, which is not used in the work presented can be excited so that the gold island oscillates between the source and drain electrodes, which between source and drain, the oscillating island can transport electrons from one electrode to the other

  18. A pulsed electron gun for ultrafast electron diffraction at surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janzen, A.; Krenzer, B.; Heinz, O.; Zhou, P.; Thien, D.; Hanisch, A.; Meyer zu Heringdorf, F.-J.; Linde, D. von der; Horn von Hoegen, M. [Department of Physics and Centre for Nanointegration (CeNIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of a pulsed electron gun for ultrafast reflection high-energy electron diffraction experiments at surfaces is reported. Special emphasis is placed on the characterization of the electron source: a photocathode, consisting of a 10 nm thin Au film deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Electron pulses are generated by the illumination of the film with ultraviolet laser pulses of femtosecond duration. The photoelectrons are emitted homogeneously across the photocathode with an energy distribution of 0.1 eV width. After leaving the Au film, the electrons are accelerated to kinetic energies of up to 15 keV. Focusing is accomplished by an electrostatic lens. The temporal resolution of the experiment is determined by the probing time of the electrons traveling across the surface which is about 30 ps. However, the duration of the electron pulses can be reduced to less than 6 ps.

  19. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthimion, P.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

  20. Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count theLienertLift Forces in a Light

  1. Hot electron production and heating by hot electrons in fast ignitor research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Key, M.H.; Estabrook, K.; Hammel, B. [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an experimental study of the physics of fast ignition the characteristics of the hot electron source at laser intensities up to 10(to the 20th power) Wcm{sup -2} and the heating produced at depth by hot electrons have been measured. Efficient generation of hot electrons but less than the anticipated heating have been observed.

  2. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolstad, J.O.

    1984-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  3. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  4. Europium oxide as a perfect electron spin filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Tiffany S. (Tiffany Suzanne), 1980-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Essential to the emergence of spin-based electronics is a source of highly polarized electron spins. Conventional ferromagnets have at best a spin polarization P-50%. Europium monoxide is a novel material capable of ...

  5. Computer Optimized Design of Electron Guns John David

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the operating voltage, current, beam size and shape, magnetic focusing cir- cuit, power supply, and operational Introduction Electron guns are used in many vacuum electron devices to convert electrical power into an electron beam. Electron beam devices include RF sources for numerous applications such as communications

  6. Electron Exchange and Conduction in Nontronite from First-Principles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Conduction in Nontronite from First-Principles. Abstract: Fe-bearing clay minerals serve as an important source and sink for electrons in redox reactions in various...

  7. Effects of non-local electron transport in one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations of shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marocchino, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma 00161 (Italy)] [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma 00161 (Italy)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In some regions of a laser driven inertial fusion target, the electron mean-free path can become comparable to or even longer than the electron temperature gradient scale-length. This can be particularly important in shock-ignited (SI) targets, where the laser-spike heated corona reaches temperatures of several keV. In this case, thermal conduction cannot be described by a simple local conductivity model and a Fick's law. Fluid codes usually employ flux-limited conduction models, which preserve causality, but lose important features of the thermal flow. A more accurate thermal flow modeling requires convolution-like non-local operators. In order to improve the simulation of SI targets, the non-local electron transport operator proposed by Schurtz-Nicolaï-Busquet [G. P. Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] has been implemented in the DUED fluid code. Both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) simulations of SI targets have been performed. 1D simulations of the ablation phase highlight that while the shock profile and timing might be mocked up with a flux-limiter; the electron temperature profiles exhibit a relatively different behavior with no major effects on the final gain. The spike, instead, can only roughly be reproduced with a fixed flux-limiter value. 1D target gain is however unaffected, provided some minor tuning of laser pulses. 2D simulations show that the use of a non-local thermal conduction model does not affect the robustness to mispositioning of targets driven by quasi-uniform laser irradiation. 2D simulations performed with only two final polar intense spikes yield encouraging results and support further studies.

  8. Dispersion compensation for attosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Peter; Baumgarten, Cory; Batelaan, Herman; Centurion, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a device to compensate for the dispersion of attosecond electron pulses. The device uses only static electric and magnetic fields and therefore does not require synchronization to the pulsed electron source. Analogous to the well-known optical dispersion compensator, an electron dispersion compensator separates paths by energy in space. Magnetic fields are used as the dispersing element, while a Wien filter is used for compensation of the electron arrival times. We analyze a device with a size of centimeters, which can be applied to ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy, and fundamental studies.

  9. Resonant electron-CF collision processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trevisan, Cynthia S.; Orel, Ann E.; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic structure methods are combined with variationalfixed-nuclei electron scattering calculations and nuclear dynamicsstudies to characterize resonant vibrational excitation and electronattachment processes in collisions between low-energy electrons and CFradicals. Several low-lying negative ion states are found which give riseto strong vibrational excitation and which are expected to dominate thelow-energy electron scattering cross sections. We have also studiedseveral processes which could lead to production of negative ions (F- andC-), However, in contrast to other recent predictions, we do not find CFin itsground state to be a significant source of negative ion productionwhen interacting with thermal electrons.

  10. Electron tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suyama, Motohiro (Hamamatsu, JP); Fukasawa, Atsuhito (Hamamatsu, JP); Arisaka, Katsushi (Los Angeles, CA); Wang, Hanguo (North Hills, CA)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  11. Radiochemical Transformation of High Pressure Methane under Gamma, Electron, and Neutron Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens, Jeffrey Tyler

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical effects of irradiation on high pressure methane and noble gas mixtures were investigated using gamma, electron beam, and neutron irradiation sources. The gamma source used was the La-140 source from the Nuclear Science Center (NSC...

  12. Direct photoetching of polymers using radiation of high energy density from a table-top extreme ultraviolet plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barkusky, Frank; Bayer, Armin; Peth, Christian; Mann, Klaus [Laser-Laboratorium-Goettingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to perform material interaction studies with intense extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation, a Schwarzschild mirror objective coated with Mo/Si multilayers was adapted to a compact laser-driven EUV plasma source utilizing a solid Au target. By 10x demagnified imaging of the plasma a maximum pulse energy density of {approx}0.73 J/cm{sup 2} at a wavelength of 13.5 nm can be achieved in the image plane of the objective at a pulse duration of 8.8 ns. In this paper we present EUV photoetching rates measured for polymethyl methacrylate, polycarbonate, and polytetrafluoroethylene at various fluence levels. A linear dependence between etch depth and applied EUV pulse number could be observed without the necessity for any incubation pulses. By evaluating the slope of these data, etch rates were determined, revealing also a linear behavior for low fluences. A threshold energy density could not be observed. The slope of the linear etch regime as well as deviations from the linear trend at higher energy densities are discussed and compared to data known from deep UV laser ablation. Furthermore, the surface roughness of the structured polymers was measured by atomic force microscopy and compared to the nonirradiated polymer surface, indicating a rather smooth etch process (roughness increase of 20%-30%). The different shapes of the etch craters observed for the three polymers at high energy densities can be explained by the measured fluence dependence of the etch rates, having consequences for the proper use of polymer ablation for beam profiling of focused EUV radiation.

  13. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  14. Two-electron coherence and time-bin entanglement detection in electron quantum optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Thibierge; D. Ferraro; B. Roussel; C. Cabart; A. Marguerite; G. Fève; P. Degiovanni

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering and studying few-electron states in ballistic conductors is a key step towards understanding entanglement in quantum electronic systems. In this Letter, we introduce the intrinsic two-electron coherence of an electronic source in quantum Hall edge channels and relate it to two-electron wavefunctions and to current noise in an Hanbury Brown--Twiss interferometer. Inspired by the analogy with photon quantum optics, we propose to measure the intrinsic two-electron coherence of a source using low-frequency current correlation measurements at the output of a Franson interferometer. To illustrate this protocol, we discuss how it can distinguish between a time-bin entangled pure state and a statistical mixture of time shifted electron pairs.

  15. A Polarized Positron Source for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumas, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, IN2P3/CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier-INP, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Grames, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Voutier, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, IN2P3/CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier-INP, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact polarized positron source for Jefferson Lab is discussed. This scheme relies upon a high polarization (85%), high current (1 mA), low-energy (<100 MeV) electron beam to generate polarized positrons in a conversion target via polarized bremsstrahlung and pair creation. GEANT4 is used to simulate source distributions suitable for a CEBAF-like injector with positron polarization approx60% and nano-Ampere intensity. An experiment to test this scheme is outlined.

  16. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

  17. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

  18. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  19. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  20. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL Sealed Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Sealed Source Contamination Incident October 13, 2011 #12;2 Cesium (Cs-137) Source Failure On September 28th @ ~1600 contamination event discovered · Two Radiological Contamination was from a Cs-137 (265 micro-curie) "sealed source" used to test area radiation monitors. · Source

  1. Single-Shot Femtosecond Electron Diffraction with Laser-Accelerated Electrons: Experimental Demonstration of Electron Pulse Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokita, Shigeki; Hashida, Masaki; Inoue, Shunsuke; Nishoji, Toshihiko; Otani, Kazuto; Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-7501 (Japan)

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first experimental demonstration of longitudinal compression of laser-accelerated electron pulses. Accelerated by a femtosecond laser pulse with an intensity of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, an electron pulse with an energy of around 350 keV and a relative momentum spread of about 10{sup -2} was compressed to a 500-fs pulse at a distance of about 50 cm from the electron source by using a magnetic pulse compressor. This pulse was used to generate a clear diffraction pattern of a gold crystal in a single shot. This method solves the space-charge problem in ultrafast electron diffraction.

  2. Catalog of supersoft X-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Greiner

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog comprises an up-to-date (December 1999) list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s), binary supersoft X-ray sources. This electronic version (including the accompannying Web-pages) supersedes the printed version of Greiner (1996).

  3. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  4. ELECTRONIC WARFARE NOVEMBER 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 3-36 ELECTRONIC WARFARE NOVEMBER 2012 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release Electronic Warfare Contents Page PREFACE..............................................................................................................iv Chapter 1 ELECTRONIC WARFARE OVERVIEW ............................................................ 1

  5. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab; Bishofberger, Kip; /Los Alamos; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; /Fermilab; Kozub, Sergei; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab /SLAC /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  6. Theoretical Examination of Transfer Cavities in a Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govil, R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",A.M. Sessler, "The Free-Electron Laser as a Power Source for

  7. Common Analysis of the Relativistic Klystron and the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the standing-wave free-electron laser on the same footingSessler, A.M. , "The Free Electron Laser as a Power SourceNew Version of a Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",

  8. Constraints on photon pulse duration from longitudinal electron beam diagnostics at a soft X-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ray free-electron laser C. Behrens1 , N. Gerasimova1 , Ch. Gerth1 , B. Schmidt1 , E.A. Schneidmiller1 , S, Ukraine (Dated: February 28, 2012) The successful operation of X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), like the Linac Coherent Light Source or the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH), makes unprecedented research

  9. Electronic dendrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sauer, deceased, Ronald H. (late of Richland, WA); Beedlow, Peter A. (Kennewick, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a dendrometer for use on soft stemmed herbaceous plants. The dendrometer uses elongated jaws to engage the plant stem securely but without appreciable distortion or collapse of the stem. A transducer made of flexible, noncorrodible and temperature stable material spans between the jaws which engage the plant stem. Strain gauges are attached at appropriate locations on a transducer member and are connected to a voltage source and voltmeter to monitor changes in plant stem size. A microprocessor can be used to integrate the plant stem size information with other relevant environmental parameters and the data can be recorded on magnetic tape or used in other data processing equipment.

  10. Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shurter; Roger Philips (Los Alamos, NM), Devlin; David James (Santa Fe, NM), Moody; Nathan Andrew (Los Alamos, NM), Taccetti; Jose Martin (Santa Fe, NM), Russell; Steven John (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

  11. Unraveling resistive versus collisional contributions to relativistic electron beam stopping power in cold-solid and in warm-dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vauzour, B. [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France) [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Debayle, A. [ETSI Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain) [ETSI Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Vaisseau, X.; Hulin, S.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; D'Humières, E.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Santos, J. J., E-mail: santos.joao@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Baton, S. D.; Yahia, V. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Batani, D. [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France) [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy); Honrubia, J. J. [ETSI Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)] [ETSI Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Jarrot, L. C. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Benocci, R.; Volpe, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy); and others

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on laser-driven relativistic electron beam propagation through aluminum samples, which are either solid and cold or compressed and heated by laser-induced shock. A full numerical description of fast electron generation and transport is found to reproduce the experimental absolute K{sub ?} yield and spot size measurements for varying target thicknesses, and to sequentially quantify the collisional and resistive electron stopping powers. The results demonstrate that both stopping mechanisms are enhanced in compressed Al samples and are attributed to the increase in the medium density and resistivity, respectively. For the achieved time- and space-averaged electronic current density, ?j{sub h}??8×10{sup 10}?A/cm{sup 2} in the samples, the collisional and resistive stopping powers in warm and compressed Al are estimated to be 1.5?keV/?m and 0.8?keV/?m, respectively. By contrast, for cold and solid Al, the corresponding estimated values are 1.1?keV/?m and 0.6?keV/?m. Prospective numerical simulations involving higher j{sub h} show that the resistive stopping power can reach the same level as the collisional one. In addition to the effects of compression, the effect of the transient behavior of the resistivity of Al during relativistic electron beam transport becomes progressively more dominant, and for a significantly high current density, j{sub h}?10{sup 12}?A/cm{sup 2}, cancels the difference in the electron resistive stopping power (or the total stopping power in units of areal density) between solid and compressed samples. Analytical calculations extend the analysis up to j{sub h}=10{sup 14}?A/cm{sup 2} (representative of the full-scale fast ignition scenario of inertial confinement fusion), where a very rapid transition to the Spitzer resistivity regime saturates the resistive stopping power, averaged over the electron beam duration, to values of ?1?keV/?m.

  12. Portable thermo-photovoltaic power source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Krawetz, Barton (Idaho Falls, ID); Barklund, C. Rodger (Idaho Falls, ID); Seifert, Gary D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) device for generation of electrical power for use in portable electronic devices. A TPV power source is constructed to provide a heat source chemical reactor capable of using various fuels, such as liquid hydrocarbons, including but not limited to propane, LPG, butane, alcohols, oils and diesel fuels to generate a source of photons. A reflector dish guides misdirected photon energy from the photon source toward a photovoltaic array. A thin transparent protector sheet is disposed between the photon source and the array to reflect back thermal energy that cannot be converted to electricity, and protect the array from thermal damage. A microlens disposed between the protector sheet and the array further focuses the tailored band of photon energy from the photon source onto an array of photovoltaic cells, whereby the photon energy is converted to electrical power. A heat recuperator removes thermal energy from reactor chamber exhaust gases, preferably using mini- or micro-bellows to force air and fuel past the exhaust gases, and uses the energy to preheat the fuel and oxidant before it reaches the reactor, increasing system efficiency. Mini- or micro-bellows force ambient air through the system both to supply oxidant and to provide cooling. Finally, an insulator, which is preferably a super insulator, is disposed around the TPV power source to reduce fuel consumption, and to keep the TPV power source cool to the touch so it can be used in hand-held devices.

  13. Negative hydrogen ion sources for accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Peters, J.; /DESY; Sherman, J.; /Los Alamos

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of H{sup -} ion sources are in use at accelerator laboratories around the world. A list of these ion sources includes surface plasma sources with magnetron, Penning and surface converter geometries as well as magnetic-multipole volume sources with and without cesium. Just as varied is the means of igniting and maintaining magnetically confined plasmas. Hot and cold cathodes, radio frequency, and microwave power are all in use, as well as electron tandem source ignition. The extraction systems of accelerator H{sup -} ion sources are highly specialized utilizing magnetic and electric fields in their low energy beam transport systems to produce direct current, as well as pulsed and/or chopped beams with a variety of time structures. Within this paper, specific ion sources utilized at accelerator laboratories shall be reviewed along with the physics of surface and volume H{sup -} production in regard to source emittance. Current research trends including aperture modeling, thermal modeling, surface conditioning, and laser diagnostics will also be discussed.

  14. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, A. S. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacLaren, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Graham, P. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Seugling, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Satcher, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klingmann, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Comley, A. J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Marrs, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glendinning, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Castor, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sain, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Back, C. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hund, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di#11;usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  15. Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators: Wakefield excitation, channel guiding, and laser triggered particle injection*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    particle injection* W. P. Leemans,,a) P. Volfbeyn, K. Z. Guo, and S. Chattopadhyay Ernest Orlando Lawrence-based injection of particles into a plasma wake, are presented. Details of the experimental program at Lawrence for the accel- erating fields as well as guiding for the laser, and a suitable laser driver. The most

  16. Nonlinear pulse propagation and phase velocity of laser-driven plasma waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a relativistically-intense short-pulse laser in un- derdensevelocity driven by a short-pulse laser is intrinsicallya 0 ? 1) short-pulse (k p L ? 1) laser in an underdense (k

  17. Impedance-matching experiments using high-pressure, laser-driven shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veeser, L.R.; Reeves, G.A.; Holmes, N.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Anderson, R.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power laser was used to produce shock waves with pressures of 300 to 700 GPa. A series of impedance-matching experiments on aluminum-copper systems with 10% accuracy indicate several areas in which the experiment can be improved to reduce the errors. Several such improvements are now being made, including upgrading both the laser and recording systems and modifying the target characterization techniques.

  18. Quantification of Uncertainties Due to Opacities in a Laser-Driven Radiative-Shock Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hetzler, Adam C

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    problem of interest screens out parameters that are not important to the QOIs. We employ a Bayesian Multivariate Adaptive Regression Spline (BMARS) emulator for this sensitivity analysis. The high dimension of the input space and large number of samples...

  19. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hessling, T.; Blazevic, A.; Stoehlker, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 {mu}m were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved.

  20. A threshold for laser-driven linear particle acceleration in unbounded vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Liang Jie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We hypothesize that a charged particle in unbounded vacuum can be substantially accelerated by a force linear in the electric field of a propagating electromagnetic wave only if the accelerating field is capable of bringing ...

  1. Instability, mixing, and transition to turbulence in a laser-driven counterflowing shear experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Fincke, J. R.; Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Keiter, P. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a turbulence experiment conducted at the Omega Laser Facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)

  2. Generation of Quasi-Perpendicular Collisionless Shocks by a Laser-Driven Magnetic Piston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaeffer, Derek

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    123 A.1 NI cRIO Architecture . . . . . . . . .116 A.1 Schematic of the NI cRIO123 viii A.2 cRIO Driver Architecture B Software Development

  3. First time nuclear material detection by one short-pulse-laser-driven neutron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurien, Susan

    counters; one detector containing a 2 kg sample of depleted uranium, and the other one empty for background comparison. A single shot interrogation of the depleted uranium sample, showed a clear signal from the delayed neutrons in the detector with uranium, compared with the background, and with the typical time

  4. First time nuclear material detection by one short-pulse-laser-driven

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofof Energy FirstFirst round of

  5. First time nuclear material detection by one short-pulse-laser-driven

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget »TraveleBooks FindFirst Proof

  6. Analysis of 3-panel and 4-panel microscale ionization sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natarajan, Srividya; Parker, Charles B.; Glass, Jeffrey T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Piascik, Jeffrey R.; Gilchrist, Kristin H. [Center for Materials and Electronic Technologies, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Stoner, Brian R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Center for Materials and Electronic Technologies, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two designs of a microscale electron ionization (EI) source are analyzed herein: a 3-panel design and a 4-panel design. Devices were fabricated using microelectromechanical systems technology. Field emission from carbon nanotube provided the electrons for the EI source. Ion currents were measured for helium, nitrogen, and xenon at pressures ranging from 10{sup -4} to 0.1 Torr. A comparison of the performance of both designs is presented. The 4-panel microion source showed a 10x improvement in performance compared to the 3-panel device. An analysis of the various factors affecting the performance of the microion sources is also presented. SIMION, an electron and ion optics software, was coupled with experimental measurements to analyze the ion current results. The electron current contributing to ionization and the ion collection efficiency are believed to be the primary factors responsible for the higher efficiency of the 4-panel microion source. Other improvements in device design that could lead to higher ion source efficiency in the future are also discussed. These microscale ion sources are expected to find application as stand alone ion sources as well as in miniature mass spectrometers.

  7. Separation phenomenon in the Windowless Gaseous Tritium Source of KATRIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharipov, Felix

    Separation phenomenon in the Windowless Gaseous Tritium Source of KATRIN experiment. Ternary separa- tion. In the KATRIN experiment, in order to analyze the spectrum of electrons emmited by Tritium decay, it is very important to know the concentration distribution of Tritium along the source

  8. DC source assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  9. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  10. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  11. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  12. Collisional relaxation of electrons in a warm plasma and accelerated nonthermal electron spectra in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontar, E P; Emslie, A G; Bian, N H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending previous studies of nonthermal electron transport in solar flares which include the effects of collisional energy diffusion and thermalization of fast electrons, we present an analytic method to infer more accurate estimates of the accelerated electron spectrum in solar flares from observations of the hard X-ray spectrum. Unlike for the standard cold-target model, the spatial characteristics of the flaring region, especially the necessity to consider a finite volume of hot plasma in the source, need to be taken into account in order to correctly obtain the injected electron spectrum from the source-integrated electron flux spectrum (a quantity straightforwardly obtained from hard X-ray observations). We show that, for a given source-integrated electron flux spectrum, the overall power in the injected electrons could be reduced by an order of magnitude or more relative to its cold-target value. Indeed, the extent of electron thermalization can be significant enough to nullify the need to introduce an...

  13. PROGRESS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAM SOURCES...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be used to produce femto- seconds coherent IR radiation, or femto-seconds X-ray by laser Compton scattering. Photoelectron beam can also be used to drive FEL. 5 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT...

  14. ILC Electron Source Gets Help from JLab | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall link toall2,

  15. Transmission-mode imaging in the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staniewicz, Lech Thomas Leif

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    to convert mov- ing electrons into visible light or by photographic plates for image recording. This type of electron microscope has been retrospectively called a transmis- sion electron microscope, or TEM - this is in contrast to other methods of electron... -built devices, but they are not used in SEMs and as such will not be detailed here. 1.2.3 Electron Sources There are two main types of electron sources - thermionic and field-emission. They differ in the manner by which they produce free electrons - thermionic...

  16. Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

  17. Booster Synchrotron | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron volts (7 GeV) in one-half second. (By comparison, the electron beam that lights a TV screen is only 25,000 electron volts.) The electrons are now traveling at...

  18. Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttram, Malcolm T. (Sandia Park, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); O'Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Chow, Weng W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

  19. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, C.G.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider,"E.Esarey, and W.P.Leemans, "Free-electron laser driven bythe LBNL laser-plasma accelerator," in Proc. Adv. Acc. Con.

  20. Calculation of external dose from distributed source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a relatively simple calculational method, called the point kernel method (Fo68), for estimating external dose from distributed sources that emit photon or electron radiations. The principles of the point kernel method are emphasized, rather than the presentation of extensive sets of calculations or tables of numerical results. A few calculations are presented for simple source geometries as illustrations of the method, and references and descriptions are provided for other caluclations in the literature. This paper also describes exposure situations for which the point kernel method is not appropriate and other, more complex, methods must be used, but these methods are not discussed in any detail.

  1. Results of the free electron laser oscillation experiments on the ACO storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    989 Results of the free electron laser oscillation experiments on the ACO storage ring P. Elleaume. Abstract. 2014 A storage ring free-electron laser oscillator has been operated above threshold at a visible] or from a free electron laser. The free electron laser (F.E.L.) is a very promising source of coherent

  2. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  3. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Bryan W. (Livermore, CA)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  4. Relativistic Electron Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marvel, Robert E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an undergraduate laboratory experiment to make independent measurements of the momentum and kinetic energy of relativistic electrons from a \\beta -source. The momentum measurements are made with a magnetic spectrometer and a silicon surface-barrier detector is used to measure the kinetic energy. A plot of the kinetic energy as a function of momentum compared to the classical and relativistic predictions clearly shows the relativistic nature of the electrons. Accurate values for the rest mass of the electron and the speed of light are also extracted from the data.

  5. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander Ranking Member SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION...

  6. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR)...

  7. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR) 2.101 AND 3.104 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 (enter date here, centered revised template...

  8. Publications | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research at the APS. It is the official source for listing APS-related journal articles, conference proceedings and papers, dissertations, books, book chapters, technical reports,...

  9. Electrical/Electronic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology The Division of Engineering of Science in Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology Get ready for a dynamic career in Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology. Possible applications

  10. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-Wiggler Free-Electron-Laser Oscillat.ion. Phys. :_.The Los Alamos Free Electron Laser: Accelerator Perfoemance.First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser. Phys . __ Rev~.

  11. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, W.B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984). Colson, W. B. , "Free electron laser theory," Ph.D.aspects of the free electron laser," Laser Handbook i,Quant. Elect. Bendor Free Electron Laser Conference, Journal

  12. Chapter 9: Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieler, Helmuth G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Armstrong Contents Electronics 9.1 Introduction 9.2measurements 9.11 Digital electronics 9.11.1 Logic elementsProblems page 1 vii Electronics This chapter was contributed

  13. Design considerations for the free-electron laser with the self...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Design considerations for the free-electron laser with the self-seeding and current-enhanced SASE 1 Alexander Zholents Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory...

  14. The `excess' of primary cosmic ray electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang Li; Zhao-Qiang Shen; Bo-Qiang Lu; Tie-Kuang Dong; Yi-Zhong Fan; Lei Feng; Si-Ming Liu; Jin Chang

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    With the accurate cosmic ray (CR) electron and positron spectra (denoted as $\\Phi_{\\rm e^{-}}$ and $\\Phi_{\\rm e^{+}}$, respectively) measured by AMS-02 collaboration, the difference between the electron and positron fluxes (i.e., $\\Delta \\Phi=\\Phi_{\\rm e^{-}}-\\Phi_{\\rm e^{+}}$), dominated by the propagated primary electrons, can be reliably inferred. In the standard model, the spectrum of propagated primary CR electrons at energies $\\geq 30$ GeV softens with the increase of energy. The absence of any evidence for such a continuous spectral softening in $\\Delta \\Phi$ strongly suggests a significant `excess' of primary CR electrons and at energies of $100-400$ GeV the identified excess component has a flux comparable to that of the observed positron excess. Middle-age but `nearby' supernova remnants (e.g., Monogem and Geminga) are favored sources for such an excess.

  15. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has...

  16. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

  17. Electron Microscopy Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Center Argonne Home > EMC > EMC Home Electron Microscopy Center Web Site has moved This page has moved to http:www.anl.govcnmgroupelectron-microscopy-cente...

  18. Analysis Of Application Of Electronics In Exploration And Exploitation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electronics In Exploration And Exploitation Of Geothermal-Energy Sources In India Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Analysis Of...

  19. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  20. Lithium ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Prabir K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. RoyUSA Abstract A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion

  1. Sources of the Radio Background Considered

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Stawarz, L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

  2. Neutron sources and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  3. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  4. Piezotube borehole seismic source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daley, Tom M; Solbau, Ray D; Majer, Ernest L

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric borehole source capable of permanent or semipermanent insertion into a well for uninterrupted well operations is described. The source itself comprises a series of piezoelectric rings mounted to an insulative mandrel internally sized to fit over a section of well tubing, the rings encased in a protective housing and electrically connected to a power source. Providing an AC voltage to the rings will cause expansion and contraction sufficient to create a sonic pulse. The piezoelectric borehole source fits into a standard well, and allows for uninterrupted pass-through of production tubing, and other tubing and electrical cables. Testing using the source may be done at any time, even concurrent with well operations, during standard production.

  5. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  6. Advanced Light Source control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Cork, C.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Ritchie, A.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation 1--2 GeV synchrotron radiation source designed to provide ports for 60 beamlines. It uses a 50 MeV electron linac and 1.5 GeV, 1 Hz, booster synchrotron for injection into a 1--2 GeV storage ring. Interesting control problems are created because of the need for dynamic closed beam orbit control to eliminate interaction between the ring tuning requirements and to minimize orbit shifts due to ground vibrations. The extremely signal sensitive nature of the experiments requires special attention to the sources of electrical noise. These requirements have led to a control system design which emphasizes connectivity at the accelerator equipment end and a large I/O bandwidth for closed loop system response. Not overlooked are user friendliness, operator response time, modeling, and expert system provisions. Portable consoles are used for local operation of machine equipment. Our solution is a massively parallel system with >120 Mbits/sec I/O bandwidth and >1500 Mips computing power. At the equipment level connections are made using over 600 powerful Intelligent Local Controllers (ILC-s) mounted in 3U size Eurocard slots using fiber-optic cables between rack locations. In the control room, personal computers control and display all machine variables at a 10 Hz rate including the scope signals which are collected though the control system. Commercially available software and industry standards are used extensively. Particular attention is paid to reliability, maintainability and upgradeability. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Extension's Role as an Information Source and Channel among Northeast Texas Farmers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triplett, Brian Lee 1968-

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    of television and radio as information sources. The Internet was the only electronic information source agreed to as useful by responding farmers. The lowest ranking electronic media source was social media. iii The most common type of contact between.... Respondents felt that eXtension would increase the accessibility of Extension programming, should be publicized more by local Extension offices, and would make Cooperative Extension more popular. Internet use among farmers was found to be influenced by age...

  8. Low energy electron irradiation of an apple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brescia, Giovanni Batista

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation. A software package, MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), was used to simulate an electron beam irradiation with a 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 MeV sources on an apple modeled by interconnecting two spheres. The apple radii were 4.4 cm (perpendicular to its axis...

  9. Advanced RF power sources for linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to maintain a reasonable over-all length at high center-of-mass energy, the main linac of an electron-positron linear collider must operate at a high accelerating gradient. For copper (non-superconducting) accelerator structures, this implies a high peak power per unit length and a high peak power per RF source, assuming a limited number of discrete sources are used. To provide this power, a number of devices are currently under active development or conceptual consideration: conventional klystrons with multi-cavity output structures, gyroklystrons, magnicons, sheet-beam klystrons, multiple-beam klystrons and amplifiers based on the FEL principle. To enhance the peak power produced by an rf source, the SLED rf pulse compression scheme is currently in use on existing linacs, and new compression methods that produce a flatter output pulse are being considered for future linear colliders. This paper covers the present status and future outlook for the more important rf power sources and pulse compression systems. It should be noted that high gradient electron linacs have applications in addition to high-energy linear colliders; they can, for example, serve as compact injectors for FEL`s and storage rings.

  10. Plasma diagnostic tools for optimizing negative hydrogen ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fantz, U.; Falter, H.D.; Franzen, P.; Speth, E.; Hemsworth, R.; Boilson, D.; Krylov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); CEA-Cadarache, EURATOM Association, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Association EURATOM-DCU, PRL/NCST, Glasnevin, Dublin 13 (Ireland); RRC Kurchatov Institute, 1 Kurchatov Square, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The powerful diagnostic tool of optical emission spectroscopy is used to measure the plasma parameters in negative hydrogen ion sources based on the surface mechanism. Results for electron temperature, electron density, atomic-to-molecular hydrogen density ratio, and gas temperature are presented for two types of sources, a rf source and an arc source, which are currently under development for a neutral beam heating system of ITER. The amount of cesium in the plasma volume is obtained from cesium radiation: the Cs neutral density is five to ten orders of magnitude lower than the hydrogen density and the Cs ion density is two to three orders of magnitude lower than the electron density in front of the grid. It is shown that monitoring of cesium lines is very useful for monitoring the cesium balance in the source. From a line-ratio method negative ion densities are determined. In a well-conditioned source the negative ion density is of the same order of magnitude as the electron density and correlates with extracted current densities.

  11. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Electronics, Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SCHOOL OF Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science IS IN YOUR HANDS THE FUTURE #12;SCHOOL OF Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science2 CAREERS IN ELECTRONICS, ELECTRICAL Belfast. Ranked among the top 100 in the world for Electrical and Electronic Engineering (QS World

  13. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  14. Single electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Asner; R. F. Bradley; L. de Viveiros; P. J. Doe; J. L. Fernandes; M. Fertl; E. C. Finn; J. A. Formaggio; D. Furse; A. M. Jones; J. N. Kofron; B. H. LaRoque; M. Leber; E. L. McBride; M. L. Miller; P. Mohanmurthy; B. Monreal; N. S. Oblath; R. G. H. Robertson; L. J Rosenberg; G. Rybka; D. Rysewyk; M. G. Sternberg; J. R. Tedeschi; T. Thummler; B. A. VanDevender; N. L. Woods

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta elec- tron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

  15. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an illumination source comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interstices thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon. 1 fig.

  16. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An illumination source is disclosed comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interstices thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon. 1 fig.

  17. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An illumination source comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interticies thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon.

  18. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An illumination source comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interticies thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon.

  19. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  20. Nonponderomotive electron acceleration in ultrashort surface-plasmon fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racz, Peter; Dombi, Peter [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Konkoly-Thege M. ut 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nonponderomotive nature of ultrafast plasmonic electron acceleration in strongly decaying electromagnetic fields generated by few-cycle and single-cycle femtosecond laser pulses. We clearly identify the conditions contributing to nonponderomotive acceleration and establish fundamental scaling laws and carrier-envelope phase effects. These all-optically accelerated compact, femtosecond electron sources can be utilized in contemporary ultrafast methods.

  1. ION SOURCES FOR CYCLOTRONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These utilize lasers, plasma focus, sparks, and ex­ plodingextractor voltage A plasma focus device has been used byf n a s Fig. 22: The plasma focus high charge state source

  2. A surface ionization source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

  3. A surface ionization source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  5. Galactic Superluminal Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. A. Harmon

    1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of X-ray sources was clearly established with the discovery of highly relativistic radio jets from the galactic sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40. Both of these objects have given us a broader view of black holes and the formation of jets, yet they also show the complexity of the accretion environment near relativistic objects. The fast apparent motion of the jets, their luminosity and variability, their high energy spectrum, and approximate scaling to the behavior of active galactic nuclei, certainly warrant the description "microquasar". I present a review of the observational data on these sources, and discuss where we stand on a physical picture of GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40 as taken from multi-wavelength studies. I also point out other galactic sources which share some of the properties of the microquasars, and what to look for as a high energy "signature" in future observations.

  6. Computerized Energy Information Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, D.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many computerized files of energy- and energy conservation-related information are currently available through commercial and governmental sources such as Lockheed Information Systems, System Development Corporation, and DOE/RECON. Private...

  7. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, WA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Grabner, R. Fred (Brentwood, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

  8. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  10. Study of an hybrid positron source using channeling for CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dadoun, O; Chehab, R; Poirier, F; Rinolfi, L; Strakhovenko, V; Variola, A; Vivoli, A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLIC study considers the hybrid source using channeling as the baseline for positron production. The hybrid source uses a few GeV electron beam impinging on a crystal tungsten radiator. With the tungsten crystal oriented on its axis it results an intense, relatively low energy photon beam due mainly to channeling radiation. Those photons are then impinging on an amorphous tungsten target producing positrons by e+e? pair creation. In this note the optimization of the positron yield and the peak energy deposition density in the amorphous target are studied according to the distance between the crystal and the amorphous targets, the primary electron energy and the amorphous target thickness.

  11. Models of radiofrequency coupling for negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavenago, M.; Petrenko, S. [INFN-LNL, viale dell'Universita n.2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency heating for ICP (inductively coupled plasma) ion sources depends on the source operating pressure, the presence or absence of a Faraday shield, the driver coil geometry, the frequency used, and the magnetic field configuration: in negative ion source a magnetic filter seems necessary for H{sup -} survival. The result of single particle simulations showing the possibility of electron acceleration in the preglow regime and for reasonable driver chamber radius (15 cm) is reported, also as a function of the static external magnetic field. An effective plasma conductivity, depending not only from electron density, temperature, and rf field but also on static magnetic field is here presented and compared to previous models. Use of this conductivity and of multiphysics tools for a plasma transport and heating model is shown and discussed for a small source.

  12. Development of a hydraulic borehole seismic source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, R.P.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a 5 year, $10 million Sandia/Industry project to develop an advanced borehole seismic source for use in oil and gas exploration and production. The development Team included Sandia, Chevron, Amoco, Conoco, Exxon, Raytheon, Pelton, and GRI. The seismic source that was developed is a vertically oriented, axial point force, swept frequency, clamped, reaction-mass vibrator design. It was based on an early Chevron prototype, but the new tool incorporates a number of improvements which make it far superior to the original prototype. The system consists of surface control electronics, a special heavy duty fiber optic wireline and draw works, a cablehead, hydraulic motor/pump module, electronics module, clamp, and axial vibrator module. The tool has a peak output of 7,000 lbs force and a useful frequency range of 5 to 800 Hz. It can operate in fluid filled wells with 5.5-inch or larger casing to depths of 20,000 ft and operating temperatures of 170 C. The tool includes fiber optic telemetry, force and phase control, provisions to add seismic receiver arrays below the source for single well imaging, and provisions for adding other vibrator modules to the tool in the future. The project yielded four important deliverables: a complete advanced borehole seismic source system with all associated field equipment; field demonstration surveys funded by industry showing the utility of the system; industrial sources for all of the hardware; and a new service company set up by their industrial partner to provide commercial surveys.

  13. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  14. Recent advances in vacuum arc ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, I.G.; Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.; Oks, E.M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense beams of metal ions can be formed from a vacuum arc ion source. Broadbeam extraction is convenient, and the time-averaged ion beam current delivered downstream can readily be in the tens of milliamperes range. The vacuum arc ion source has for these reasons found good application for metallurgical surface modification--it provides relatively simple and inexpensive access to high dose metal ion implantation. Several important source developments have been demonstrated recently, including very broad beam operation, macroparticle removal, charge state enhancement, and formation of gaseous beams. The authors have made a very broad beam source embodiment with beam formation electrodes 50 cm in diameter, producing a beam of width {approximately}35 cm for a nominal beam area of {approximately}1,000 cm{sup 2}, and a pulsed Ti beam current of about 7 A was formed at a mean ion energy of {approximately}100 keV. Separately, they`ve developed high efficiency macroparticle-removing magnetic filters and incorporated such a filter into a vacuum arc ion source so as to form macroparticle-free ion beams. Jointly with researchers at the High Current Electronics Institute at Tomsk, Russia, and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung at Darmstadt, Germany, they`ve developed a compact technique for increasing the charge states of ions produced in the vacuum arc plasma and thus providing a simple means of increasing the ion energy at fixed extractor voltage. Finally, operation with mixed metal and gaseous ion species has been demonstrated. Here, they briefly review the operation of vacuum marc ion sources and the typical beam and implantation parameters that can be obtained, and describe these source advances and their bearing on metal ion implantation applications.

  15. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power, thereby preventing the exposure of the anode to the full arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  16. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1983-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  17. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

  18. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mofjeld, and A.J. Venturato, Puget Sound Tsunami Sources -Pub. Co. , 2006, pp 205-217 Puget Sound Tsunami Sources -Military Dept. , 2002, 25 pp Puget Sound Tsunami Sources -

  19. Dual source heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  20. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  1. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  2. Matter & Energy Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    See also: Matter & Energy Electronics· Detectors· Technology· Construction· Sports Science Electronic Tongue Tastes Wine Variety, Vintage (Aug. 12, 2008) -- You don't need a wine expert to Advance

  3. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  4. Measurements of bremsstrahlung spectra of Lanzhou ECR Ion Source No. 3 (LECR3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, H.Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Ma, X.W.; Zhang, S.F.; Feng, W.T.; Zhu, X.L.; Zhang, Z.M.; He, W.; Sun, L.T.; Feng, Y.C.; Cao, Y.; Li, J.Y.; Li, X.X.; Wang, H.; Ma, B.H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China) and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China) and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China) and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to diagnose the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma, electron bremsstrahlung spectra were measured by a HPGe detector on Lanzhou ECR Ion Source No. 3 at IMP. The ion source was operated with argon under various working conditions, including different microwave power, mixing gas, extraction high voltage (HV), and so on. Some of the measured spectra are presented in this article. The dependence of energetic electron population on mixing gas and extraction HV is also described. Additionally, we are looking forward to further measurements on SECRAL (Superconducting ECR Ion Source with Advanced design at Lanzhou)

  5. Electrons from Muon Decay in Bound State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid M. Djilkibaev; Rostislav V. Konoplich

    2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a study of the muon decay in orbit (DIO) contribution to the signal region of muon - electron conversion. Electrons from DIO are the dominant source of background for muon - electron conversion experiments because the endpoint of DIO electrons is the same as the energy of electrons from elastic muon - electron conversion. The probability of DIO contribution to the signal region was considered for a tracker with Gaussian resolution function and with a realistic resolution function obtained in the application of pattern recognition and momentum reconstruction Kalman filter based procedure to GEANT simulated DIO events. It is found that the existence of non Gaussian tails in the realistic resolution function does not lead to a significant increase in DIO contribution to the signal region. The probability of DIO contribution to the calorimeter signal was studied in dependence on the resolution, assuming a Gaussian resolution function of calorimeter. In this study the geometrical acceptance played an important role, suppressing DIO contribution of the intermediate range electrons from muon decay in orbit.

  6. Achromatic and Isochronous Electron Beam Transport for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengtsson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers," LBL-28880 Preprint (Thirteenth mtemational Free Electron Laser Conference, SantaTransport for Tunable Free Electron Lasers 1. Bengtsson and

  7. Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the...

  8. Neutrinos in the Electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Koschmieder

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We will show that one half of the rest mass of the electron is equal to the sum of the rest masses of electron neutrinos and that the other half of the rest mass of the electron is given by the energy in the sum of electric oscillations. With this composition we can explain the rest mass, the electric charge, the spin and the magnetic moment of the electron.

  9. Dark Energy and Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the light of recent developments in Dark Energy, we consider the electron in a such a background field and show that at the Compton wavelength the electron is stable, in that the Cassini inward pressure exactly counterbalances the outward Coulomb repulsive pressure thus answering a problem of the earlier electron theory.

  10. Single-electron shuttle based on a silicon quantum dot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. W. Chan; M. Mottonen; A. Kemppinen; N. S. Lai; K. Y. Tan; W. H. Lim; A. S. Dzurak

    2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on single-electron shuttling experiments with a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dot at 300 mK. Our system consists of an accumulated electron layer at the Si/SiO_2 interface below an aluminum top gate with two additional barrier gates used to deplete the electron gas locally and to define a quantum dot. Directional single-electron shuttling from the source and to the drain lead is achieved by applying a dc source-drain bias while driving the barrier gates with an ac voltage of frequency f_p. Current plateaus at integer levels of ef_p are observed up to f_p = 240 MHz operation frequencies. The observed results are explained by a sequential tunneling model which suggests that the electron gas may be heated substantially by the ac driving voltage.

  11. Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1991-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) interim policy and to provide guidance for sealed radioactive source accountability. The directive does not cancel any directives. Extended by DOE N 5400.10 to 12-24-93 & Extended by DOE N 5400.12 to 12-24-94.

  12. Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice extends DOE N 5400.9, Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability, of 12-24-91, until 12-24-95, unless sooner superseded or rescinded. The contents of DOE N 5400.9 will be updated and incorporated in the revised DOE O 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers.

  13. Funding Source Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Funding Source General Research Agricultural Experiment Station Instruction Public Service,145,610$ 3,716,162DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE $ 1,799,873 $ 8,322,303 $ 30,128,910 $ 0$ 85,000$ 2,127 $ 0$ 4,920,977$ 0US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE / HATCH $ 0 $ 0 $ 4,920,977 $ 15,348,823FOUNDATION

  14. Detecting Illicit Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Joseph C.; Coursey, Bert; Carter, Michael

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialized instruments have been developed to detect the presence of illicit radioactive sources that may be used by terrorists in radiation dispersal devices, so-called ''dirty bombs'' or improvised nuclear devices. This article discusses developments in devices to detect and measure radiation.

  15. Identification of the ECR zone in the SWISSCASE ECR ion source M. Bodendorfer a,b,*, K. Altwegg a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    resonance Ion source ECR ion source a b s t r a c t The magnetic field of the permanent magnet electron simulated and experimentally investigated. For the first time the magnetized volume qualified for electron calculations in ECR related applications such as ECR ion engines and ECR ion implanters. Ã? 2008 Elsevier B

  16. Spallation Neutron Source ring vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mapes, M.; Hseuh, H.C.; Rank, J.; Smart, L.; Todd, R.; Weiss, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source ring, which is presently being commissioned at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is designed to accumulate high-intensity protons. Ultrahigh vacuum of 10{sup -9} torr is required in the accumulator ring to minimize beam-residual gas ionization. To reduce the secondary-electron yield and the associated electron cloud instability, the ring vacuum chambers are coated with titanium nitride (TiN). In order to minimize radiation exposure, quick-disconnect chain clamp flanges are used in some areas where radiation levels are expected to be high. This article describes the design, fabrication, assembly, and vacuum processing of the ring and beam transport vacuum systems, as well as the associated vacuum instrumentation.

  17. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Neil

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  18. Transport of energetic electrons in a magnetically expanding helicon double layer plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Kazunori [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Department of Electronic Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod; Cox, Wes [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Hatakeyama, Rikizo [Department of Electronic Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Peripheral magnetic field lines extending from the plasma source into the diffusion chamber are found to separate two regions of Maxwellian electron energy probability functions: the central, ion-beam containing region with an electron temperature of 5 eV, and region near the chamber walls with electrons at 3 eV. Along the peripheral field lines a bi-Maxwellian population with a hot tail at 9 eV is shown to both originate from electrons in the source traveling downstream across the double layer and correspond to a local maximum in ion and electron densities.

  19. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solution-Processed Graphene Electronics,” Nano Letters, vol.applications,” Organic Electronics, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 249-design in organic electronics by dual-gate technology,” in

  20. THE POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM FOR THE ACCELERATING COLUMN OF THE 2 MEV ELECTRON COOLER FOR COSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    a high-energy electron beam. The power supply for the accelerating column of the electron cooling systemTHE POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM FOR THE ACCELERATING COLUMN OF THE 2 MEV ELECTRON COOLER FOR COSY D controlled voltage source for 60 kV, 1mA and an additional supply for the solenoids of the magnetic system

  1. Frequency shifting in free-electron lasers G. Shvets and J. S. Wurtele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Frequency shifting in free-electron lasers G. Shvets and J. S. Wurtele Plasma Fusion Center 1993; accepted 30 September 1993) Frequency shifting in free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators investigation. Free- electron laser sources have been proposed' with an ex- tremely tight requirement

  2. JLAB Electron Driver Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazimi, Reza [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Several schemes have been proposed for adding a positron beam option at the Continuous Electron Beam Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB). They involve using a primary beam of electrons or gamma rays striking a target to produce a positron beam. At JLAB electron beams are produced and used in two different accelerators, CEBAF and the JLAB FEL (Free Electron Laser). Both have low emittance and energy spread. The CEBAF beam is polarized. The FEL beam is unpolarized but the injector can produce a higher current electron beam. In this paper we describe the characteristics of these beams and the parameters relevant for positron production.

  3. Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poelker, Matthew [JLAB

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today's CEBAF polarized source operating at ~ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

  4. Electron thermal conductivity owing to collisions between degenerate electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the thermal conductivity of electrons produced by electron-electron Coulomb scattering in a strongly degenerate electron gas taking into account the Landau damping of transverse plasmons. The Landau damping strongly reduces this conductivity in the domain of ultrarelativistic electrons at temperatures below the electron plasma temperature. In the inner crust of a neutron star at temperatures T scattering and becomes competitive with the the electron conductivity due to scattering of electrons by impurity ions.

  5. Proceedings of the 10th international workshop on ECR ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, F W; Kirkpatrick, M I [eds.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Recent Developments and Future Projects on ECR Ion Sources; Operation of the New KVI ECR Ion Source at 10 GHz; Operational Experience and Status of the INS SF-ECR Ion Source; Results of the New ECR4'' 14.5 GHz ECRIS; Preliminary Performance of the AECR; Experimental Study of the Parallel and Perpendicular Particle Losses from an ECRIS Plasma; Plasma Instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated Ion Sources; The Hyperbolic Energy Analyzer; Status of ECR Source Development; The New 10 GHz CAPRICE Source; First Operation of the Texas A M ECR Ion Source; Recent Developments of the RIKEN ECR Ion Sources; The 14 GHz CAPRICE Source; Characteristics and Potential Applications of an ORNL Microwave ECR Multicusp Plasma Ion Source; ECRIPAC: The Production and Acceleration of Multiply Charged Ions Using an ECR Plasma; ECR Source for the HHIRF Tandem Accelerator; Feasibility Studies for an ECR-Generated Plasma Stripper; Production of Ion Beams by using the ECR Plasmas Cathode; A Single Stage ECR Source for Efficient Production of Radioactive Ion Beams; The Single Staged ECR Source at the TRIUMF Isotope Separator TISOL; The Continuous Wave, Optically Pumped H{sup {minus}} Source; The H{sup +} ECR Source for the LAMPF Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source; Present Status of the Warsaw CUSP ECR Ion Source; An ECR Source for Negative Ion Production; GYRAC-D: A Device for a 200 keV ECR Plasma Production and Accumulation; Status Report of the 14.4 GHZ ECR in Legnaro; Status of JYFL-ECRIS; Report on the Uppsala ECRIS Facility and Its Planned Use for Atomic Physics; A 10 GHz ECR Ion Source for Ion-Electron and Ion-Atom Collision Studies; and Status of the ORNL ECR Source Facility for Multicharged Ion Collision Research.

  6. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  7. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Stöhr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  8. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-2099 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-2099 (United States); Beaurepaire, B.; Malka, V.; Faure, J. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  9. Status of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.; Berg, W.; Fuja, R.; Grelick, A.; Mavrogenes, G.; Nassiri, A.; Russell, T.; Wesolowski, W.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2856-MHz S-band, 450-MeV electron/positron linear accelerator is the first part of the injector for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) 7-GeV storage ring. Construction of the APS linac is currently nearing completion, and commissioning will begin in July 1993. The linac and its current status are discussed in this paper.

  10. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, Joseph D. (Boulder, CO)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  11. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, J.D.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  12. Theory and Design of Smith-Purcell Semiconductor Terahertz Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Don DeeWayne

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    difficulties reaching the THz, and no THz device of any type operates on the full range at room temperature. This dissertation proposes a novel semiconductor source which utilizes the transferred-electron (Gunn) effect and the Smith-Purcell effect to operate...

  13. Test of potential homogeneity in the KATRIN gaseous tritium source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rysavy

    2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    83mKr is supposed to be used to study the properties of the windowless gaseous tritium source of the experiment KATRIN. In this work we deduce the amount of 83mKr which is necessary to determine possible potential inhomogeneities via conversion-electron-line broadening.

  14. Compact Gamma-ray Source Technology Development Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Rusnak, B

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on the applicability of current accelerator and laser technologies to the construction of compact, narrow bandwidth, gamma-ray sources for DHS missions in illicit materials detection. It also identifies research and development areas in which advancement will directly benefit these light sources. In particular, we review the physics of Compton scattering based light sources and emphasize the source properties most important to Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) applications of interest. The influences of laser and electron beam properties on the light source are examined in order to evaluate the utility of different technologies for this application. Applicable bulk and fiber-based laser systems and laser recirculation technologies are discussed and Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerator (linac) technologies are examined to determine the optimal frequency and pulse formats achievable.

  15. Technique to prepare metallic multi-point field emission sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuyama, F.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is proposed which enables one to fabricate multi-point field emission sources of bakeable structure. The technique is based on the cathodic growth of metallic needle crystal from metal carbonyl vapors and has so far been confirmed to provide emission sources of W, Mo, and Mo/sub 2/C. The field emission sources prepared by this technique are highly resistive to thermal treatment and actually yield field ions possessing satisfactory intensities when used as the ion sources of a field ion mass spectrometer. It is believed that the application of these field emission sources is not restricted to mass spectrometry but can be extended to other ion and electron optical systems. The technique may thus open new areas in field emission technology.

  16. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  17. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larson, Ronald A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Hall, Harold J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stoddard, Billy D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davis, Sean G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Conrad, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  18. Evaluated teletherapy source library

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Evaluated Teletherapy Source Library (ETSL) is a system of hardware and software that provides for maintenance of a library of useful phase space descriptions (PSDs) of teletherapy sources used in radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The PSDs are designed to be used by PEREGRINE, the all-particle Monte Carlo dose calculation system. ETSL also stores other relevant information such as monitor unit factors (MUFs) for use with the PSDs, results of PEREGRINE calculations using the PSDs, clinical calibration measurements, and geometry descriptions sufficient for calculational purposes. Not all of this information is directly needed by PEREGRINE. It also is capable of acting as a repository for the Monte Carlo simulation history files from which the generic PSDs are derived.

  19. Spallation-neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaudon, A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of particular interest for neutron-physics studies are spallation-neutron sources (SNSs) using intense proton beams with energies in the GeV range. Some SNSs already provide average fluxes of thermal and cold neutrons comparable with those of high-flux reactors. Most SNSs are pulsed with high peak fluxes that can be used with the powerful time-of-flight (TOF) method. Also, SNSs could be developed to much higher performance.

  20. High current ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  1. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggs, S; Eshraqi, M; Hahn, H; Jansson, A; Lindroos, M; Ponton, A; Rathsman, K; Trahern, G; Bousso, S; Calaga, R; Devanz, G; Duperrier, R D; Eguia, J; Gammino, S; Moller, S P; Oyon, C; Ruber, R.J.M.Y.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a 5 MW, 2.5 GeV long pulse proton linac, to be built and commissioned in Lund, Sweden. The Accelerator Design Update (ADU) project phase is under way, to be completed at the end of 2012 by the delivery of a Technical Design Report. Improvements to the 2003 ESS design will be summarised, and the latest design activities will be presented.

  2. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW`s) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  3. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  4. Capillary discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, III, Howard Albert

    2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

  5. Open-Source GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Burk, Thomas E [University of Minnesota; Lime, Steve [Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The components making up an Open Source GIS are explained in this chapter. A map server (Sect. 30.1) can broadly be defined as a software platform for dynamically generating spatially referenced digital map products. The University of Minnesota MapServer (UMN Map Server) is one such system. Its basic features are visualization, overlay, and query. Section 30.2 names and explains many of the geospatial open source libraries, such as GDAL and OGR. The other libraries are FDO, JTS, GEOS, JCS, MetaCRS, and GPSBabel. The application examples include derived GIS-software and data format conversions. Quantum GIS, its origin and its applications explained in detail in Sect. 30.3. The features include a rich GUI, attribute tables, vector symbols, labeling, editing functions, projections, georeferencing, GPS support, analysis, and Web Map Server functionality. Future developments will address mobile applications, 3-D, and multithreading. The origins of PostgreSQL are outlined and PostGIS discussed in detail in Sect. 30.4. It extends PostgreSQL by implementing the Simple Feature standard. Section 30.5 details the most important open source licenses such as the GPL, the LGPL, the MIT License, and the BSD License, as well as the role of the Creative Commons.

  6. Control of Inverter-Connected Sources in Autonomous Microgrids Ian A. Hiskens Eric M. Fleming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    microturbines [1], fuel cells [2], and renewable sources such as solar and wind power [3], [4]. This list. Microturbines operate at very high frequency. Grid connection therefore requires a power electronic interface

  7. A Bias Removal Technique for Blind Source Separation With Noisy Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Scott C.

    , Dallas, TX 75275 USA. Voice: (214) 768­3113. FAX: (214) 768­3573. Electronic mail address: douglas@seas.smu.edu. World Wide Web URL: http://www.seas.smu.edu/ee/. #12; 1 Introduction Blind source separation

  8. Storage Ring | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electron Storage Ring The 7-GeV electrons are injected into the 1104-m-circumference storage ring, a circle of more than 1,000 electromagnets and associated equipment, located...

  9. Linear Accelerator | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photo below). Selective phasing of the electric field accelerates the electrons to 450 million volts (MeV). At 450 MeV, the electrons are relativistic: they are traveling at...

  10. Reversible electron beam heating for suppression of microbunching instabilities at free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrens, Christopher; Xiang, Dao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., "heating" the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) in front and behind a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread will be introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then will be eliminated in the second T...

  11. SSRL Light Source Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR E Q U E N C4 October,3333

  12. Photon Source Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid NanosheetsStudying thePhotoinduced electronPhoton

  13. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Comby, G.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  14. Invited Article: Characterization of background sources in space-based time-of-flight mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, J. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Gloeckler, G.; Lundgren, R. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Orlando, T. M.; McLain, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, 225 North Ave NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Steiger, R. von [International Space Science Institute, Hallerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland and Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For instruments that use time-of-flight techniques to measure space plasma, there are common sources of background signals that evidence themselves in the data. The background from these sources may increase the complexity of data analysis and reduce the signal-to-noise response of the instrument, thereby diminishing the science value or usefulness of the data. This paper reviews several sources of background commonly found in time-of-flight mass spectrometers and illustrates their effect in actual data using examples from ACE-SWICS and MESSENGER-FIPS. Sources include penetrating particles and radiation, UV photons, energy straggling and angular scattering, electron stimulated desorption of ions, ion-induced electron emission, accidental coincidence events, and noise signatures from instrument electronics. Data signatures of these sources are shown, as well as mitigation strategies and design considerations for future instruments.

  15. Electron caustic lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, S. M.; Zheng, C. X.; Tang, W. X.; Paganin, D. M.; Jesson, D. E. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Fu, J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A maskless method of electron beam lithography is described which uses the reflection of an electron beam from an electrostatic mirror to produce caustics in the demagnified image projected onto a resist-coated wafer. By varying the electron optics, e.g. via objective lens defocus, both the morphology and dimensions of the caustic features may be controlled, producing a range of bright and tightly focused projected features. The method is illustrated for line and fold caustics and is complementary to other methods of reflective electron beam lithography.

  16. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Retsky, Michael W. (Trumbull, CT)

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  17. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindroos M.; Calaga R.; Bousson S.; Danared H.; Devanz G. et al

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  18. Compact ion accelerator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source includes a conductive substrate, the substrate including a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips formed on the substrate. A conductive catalytic coating is formed on the nanostructures and substrate for dissociation of a molecular species into an atomic species, the molecular species being brought in contact with the catalytic coating. A target electrode placed apart from the substrate, the target electrode being biased relative to the substrate with a first bias voltage to ionize the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips and attract the ionized atomic species from the substrate in the direction of the target electrode.

  19. Sources Sought Announcement

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMay 20102 | NationalThis SOURCES SOUGHT

  20. Plasma Sources Sci. Technol.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996) A213-A225. Printed in the UK4Sources

  1. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection

  2. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection

  3. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.1

  4. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.1

  5. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.150.1

  6. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.150.1

  7. Photon Source Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid NanosheetsStudying thePhotoinducedPhoton Source

  8. Energy Sources: Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVAC | DepartmentSource |  Why Hydrogen? * Fossil

  9. A wide bandwidth free-electron laser with mode locking using current modulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kur, E.; Dunning, D. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A. A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (Univ. of Strathclyde); (STFC Daresbury Lab.); (LBNL)

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new scheme for mode locking a free-electron laser amplifier is proposed based on electron beam current modulation. It is found that certain properties of the original concept, based on the energy modulation of electrons, are improved including the spectral brightness of the source and the purity of the series of short pulses. Numerical comparisons are made between the new and old schemes and between a mode-locked free-electron laser and self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser. Illustrative examples using a hypothetical mode-locked free-electron laser amplifier are provided. The ability to generate intense coherent radiation with a large bandwidth is demonstrated.

  10. Self-bunching electron guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mako, F.; Len, L. K.; Peter, W. [FM Technologies. Inc., 10529-B Braddock Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22032 (United States)

    1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on three electron gun projects that are aimed at power tube and injector applications. The purpose of the work is to develop robust electron guns which produce self-bunched, high-current-density beams. We have demonstrated cold emission, long life, and tolerance to contamination. The cold emission process is based on secondary electron emission. FMT has studied this resonant bunching process which gives rise to high current densities (0.01-5 kA/cm{sup 2}), high charge bunches (up to 100 nC/bunch), and short pulses (1-100 ps) for frequencies from 1 to 12 GHz. The beam pulse width is nominally {approx}5% of the rf period. The first project is the L-Band Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG). Measurements show {approx}40 ps long micro-bunches at {approx}20 A/cm{sup 2} without contamination due to air exposure. Lifetime testing has been carried out for about 18 months operating at 1.25 GHz for almost 24 hours per day at a repetition rate of 300 Hz and 5 {mu}s-long macro-pulses. About 5.8x10{sup 13} micro-bunches or {approx}62,000 coulombs have passed through this gun and it is still working fine. The second project, the S-Band MPG{sup {dagger}}, is now operational. It is functioning at a frequency of 2.85 GHz, a repetition rate of 30 Hz, with a 2 {mu}s-long macro-pulse. It produces about 150 A/cm{sup 2}. The third project involves the construction of a 34.2 GHz frequency-multiplied source driven by an X-Band MPG. Analytical work has been carried out on this device, and we are ready to proceed with design, fabrication, and testing.

  11. Electronic Mail Analysis Capability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes the pilot program to test the Department of Energy (DOE) Electronic Mail Analysis Capability (EMAC), which will be used to monitor and analyze outgoing and incoming electronic mail (e-mail) from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and DOE laboratories that are engaged in nuclear weapons design or work involving special nuclear material. No cancellation.

  12. Simulating Electron Clouds in Heavy-Ion Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik,A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a concern for most accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly-, weakly-, and un-magnetized. They describe their approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. They present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam and an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrates the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  13. Physics design of a cold neutron source for KIPT neutron source facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. It is based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility with low enriched uranium fuel, using the existing electron accelerators at KIPT of Ukraine [1]. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100-KW electron beam, which has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, with a natural uranium target [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron beam experiments and material studies are also included. Over the past two-three decades, structures with characteristic lengths of 100 {angstrom} and correspondingly smaller vibrational energies have become increasingly important for both science and technology [3]. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructures can be well matched by neutrons with longer vibrational wavelength and lower energy. In the accelerator-driven subcritical facility, most of the neutrons are generated from fission reactions with energy in the MeV range. They are slowed down to the meV energy range through scattering reactions in the moderator and reflector materials. However, the fraction of neutrons with energies less than 5 meV in a normal moderator spectrum is very low because of up-scattering caused by the thermal motion of moderator or reflector molecules. In order to obtain neutrons with energy less than 5 meV, cryogenically cooled moderators 'cold neutron sources' should be used to slow down the neutrons. These cold moderators shift the neutron energy spectrum down because the thermal motion of moderator molecules as well as the up-scattering is very small, which provides large gains in intensity of low energy neutrons, E < 5 meV. The accelerator driven subcritical facility is designed with a provision to add a cryogenically cooled moderator system. This cold neutron source could provide the neutrons beams with lower energy, which could be utilized in scattering experiment and material structures analysis. This study describes the performed physics analyses to define and characterize the cold neutron source of the KIPT neutron source facility. The cold neutron source is designed to optimize the cold neutron brightness to the experimental instruments outside the radial heavy concrete shield of the facility. Liquid hydrogen or solid methane with 20 K temperature is used as a cold moderator. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX [4], with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data libraries, is utilized to calculate the cold neutron source performance and estimate the nuclear heat load to the cold moderator. The surface source generation capability of MCNPX code has been used to provide the possibility of analyzing different design configurations and perform design optimization analyses with reasonable computer resources. Several design configurations were analyzed and their performance were characterized and optimized.

  14. Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mitchell, John; Gibson, Murray; Young, Linda; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Upgrade to Advanced Photon Source announced by Department Of Energy. Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ivZ

  15. Electrons and Mirror Symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Krishna (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutral weak force between an electron and a target particle, mediated by the Z boson, can be isolated by measuring the fractional change under a mirror reflection of the scattering probability of relativistic longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized targets. This technique yields neutral weak force measurements at a length scale of 1 femtometer, in contrast to high energy collider measurements that probe much smaller length scales. Study of the variation of the weak force over a range of length scales provides a stringent test of theory, complementing collider measurements. We describe a recent measurement of the neutral weak force between two electrons by the E158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. While the weak force between an electron and positron has been extensively studied, that between two electrons had never directly been measured. We conclude by discussing prospects for even more precise measurements at future facilities.

  16. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM); Young, Lloyd M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  17. Technical Report Ultrafast X-ray Science at the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    1 Technical Report Ultrafast X-ray Science at the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source Kelly J. Gaffney ultrafast phenomena. These techniques involve excitation of a sample with an ultrafast laser pump pulse, USA The ultrafast, high brightness x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources of the future have

  18. Feedback from Clustered Sources During Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roban Hultman Kramer; Zoltan Haiman; S. Peng Oh

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The reionization history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshift (z > 6) was likely strongly shaped by several global feedback processes. Because the earliest ionizing sources formed at the locations of the rare density peaks, their spatial distribution was strongly clustered. Here we demonstrate that this clustering significantly boosts the impact of feedback processes operating at high redshift. We build a semi-analytical model to include feedback and clustering simultaneously, and apply this model to the suppression of star-formation in minihalos due to photoionization. The model is built on the excursion-set-based formalism of Furlanetto, Zaldarriaga and Hernquist (2004), which incorporates the clustering of ionizing sources, and which we here extend to include suppression of star formation in minihalos. We find that clustering increases the mean HII bubble size by a factor of several, and it dramatically increases the fraction of minihalos that are suppressed, by a factor of up to 60 relative to a randomly distributed population. This enhanced suppression can significantly reduce the electron scattering optical depth, as required by the three-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We argue that source clustering is likely to similarly boost the importance of a variety of other feedback mechanisms.

  19. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radley, Ian (Glenmont, NY); Bievenue, Thomas J. (Delmar, NY); Burdett, John H. (Charlton, NY); Gallagher, Brian W. (Guilderland, NY); Shakshober, Stuart M. (Hudson, NY); Chen, Zewu (Schenectady, NY); Moore, Michael D. (Alplaus, NY)

    2008-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  20. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  1. Thulium-170 heat source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  2. Multiple source heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  3. Helicon wave excitation to produce energetic electrons for manufacturing semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molvik, Arthur W. (Livermore, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Fremont, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helicon plasma source is controlled by varying the axial magnetic field or rf power controlling the formation of the helicon wave. An energetic electron current is carried on the wave when the magnetic field is 90 G; but there is minimal energetic electron current when the magnetic field is 100 G in one particular plasma source. Similar performance can be expected from other helicon sources by properly adjusting the magnetic field and power to the particular geometry. This control for adjusting the production of energetic electrons can be used in the semiconductor and thin-film manufacture process. By applying energetic electrons to the insulator layer, such as silicon oxide, etching ions are attracted to the insulator layer and bombard the insulator layer at higher energy than areas that have not accumulated the energetic electrons. Thus, silicon and metal layers, which can neutralize the energetic electron currents will etch at a slower or non-existent rate. This procedure is especially advantageous in the multilayer semiconductor manufacturing because trenches can be formed that are in the range of 0.18-0.35 mm or less.

  4. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); Esarey, Eric (Chevy Chase, MD); Kim, Joon K. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention.

  5. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, D.; Esarey, E.; Kim, J.K.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention. 21 figs.

  6. Helicon wave excitation to produce energetic electrons for manufacturing semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molvik, A.W.; Ellingboe, A.R.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A helicon plasma source is controlled by varying the axial magnetic field or rf power controlling the formation of the helicon wave. An energetic electron current is carried on the wave when the magnetic field is 90 G; but there is minimal energetic electron current when the magnetic field is 100 G in one particular plasma source. Similar performance can be expected from other helicon sources by properly adjusting the magnetic field and power to the particular geometry. This control for adjusting the production of energetic electrons can be used in the semiconductor and thin-film manufacture process. By applying energetic electrons to the insulator layer, such as silicon oxide, etching ions are attracted to the insulator layer and bombard the insulator layer at higher energy than areas that have not accumulated the energetic electrons. Thus, silicon and metal layers, which can neutralize the energetic electron currents will etch at a slower or non-existent rate. This procedure is especially advantageous in the multilayer semiconductor manufacturing because trenches can be formed that are in the range of 0.18--0.35 mm or less. 16 figs.

  7. Aerogels for electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to their other exceptional properties, aerogels also exhibit unusual dielectric and electronic properties due to their nano-sized structures and high porosities. For example, aerogels have the lowest dielectric constants measured for a solid material (having values approaching 1.0); they have exceptionally high dielectric resistivities and strengths (i.e., ability to insulate very high voltages); they exhibit low dielectric loss at microwave frequencies; and some aerogels are electrically conductive and photoconductive. These properties are being exploited to provide the next generation of materials for energy storage, low power consumption, and ultra-fast electronics. We are working toward adapting these unusual materials for microelectronic applications, particularly, making thin aerogel films for dielectric substrates and for energy storage devices such as supercapacitors. Measurements are presented in this paper for the dielectric and electronic properties of aerogels, including the dielectric constant, loss factor, dielectric and electrical conductivity, volume resistivity, and dielectric strength. We also describe methods to form and characterize thin aerogel films which are being developed for numerous electronic applications. Finally, some of the electronic applications proposed for aerogels are presented. Commercialization of aerogels for electronics must await further feasibility, prototype development, and cost studies, but they are one of the key materials and are sure to have a major impact on future electronics.

  8. Final Technical Report- Back-gate Field Emission-based Cathode RF Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, Gary; Martin, Allen; Noonan, John

    2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective was to complete the design of an electron gun which utilizes a radio frequency (RF) power source to apply a voltage to a field emission (FE) cathode, a so called cold cathode, in order to produce an electron beam. The concept of the RF electron gun was originally conceived at Argonne National Laboratory but never reduced to practice. The research allowed the completion of the design based upon the integration of the FE electron source. Compared to other electron guns, the RF gun is very compact, less than one third the size of other comparable guns, and produces a high energy (to several MeV), high quality, high power electron beam with a long focal length with high repetition rates. The resultant electron gun may be used in welding, materials processing, analytical equipment and waste treatment.

  9. Self-bunching electron guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mako, F.M.; Len, L.K. [FM Technologies, Inc., 10529-B Braddock Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22032 (United States)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on three electron gun projects that are aimed at power tube and injector applications. The purpose of the work is to develop robust electron guns which produce self-bunched, high-current-density beams. We have demonstrated, in a microwave cavity, self-bunching, cold electron emission, long life, and tolerance to contamination. The cold process is based on secondary electron emission. FMT has studied using simulation codes the resonant bunching process which gives rise to high current densities (0.01{endash}5 kA/cm{sup 2}), high charge bunches (up to 500 nC/bunch), and short pulses (1{endash}100 ps) for frequencies from 1 to 12 GHz. The beam pulse width is nominally {approximately}5{percent} of the {ital rf} period. The first project is the L-Band Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG). Measurements show {approximately}40 ps long micro-bunches at {approximately}20 A/cm{sup 2} without contamination due to air exposure. Lifetime testing has been carried out for about 18 months operating at 1.25 GHz for almost 24 hours per day at a repetition rate of 300 Hz and 5 {mu}s-long macro-pulses. Approximately 5.8{times}10{sup 13} micro-bunches or 62,000 coulombs have passed through this gun and it is still working fine. The second project, the S-Band MPG, is now operational. It is functioning at a frequency of 2.85 GHz, a repetition rate of 30 Hz, with a 2 {mu}s-long macro-pulse. It produces about 45 A in the macro-pulse. The third project is a 34.2 GHz frequency-multiplied source driven by an X-Band MPG. A point design was performed at an {ital rf} output power of 150 MW at 34.2 GHz. The resulting system efficiency is 53{percent} and the gain is 60 dB. The system efficiency includes the input cavity efficiency, input driver efficiency (a 50 MW klystron at 11.4 GHz), output cavity efficiency, and the post-acceleration efficiency. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Measurement of coherence length and incoherent source size of hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, So Yeong; Hong, Chung Ki [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jun, E-mail: limjun@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the spatial coherence length and incoherent source size of a hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II, the stored electron energy of which has been increased from 2.5 GeV to 3 GeV. The coherence length was determined by single-slit measurement of the visibility of the Fresnel diffraction pattern. The correlated incoherent source size was cross-checked for three different optics: the single slit, beryllium parabolic compound refractive lenses, and the Fresnel zone plate. We concluded that the undulator beamline has an effective incoherent source size (FWHM) of 540 ?m (horizontal) × 50 ?m (vertical)

  11. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  12. Self-heating simulation of GaN-based metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors including hot electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Peide "Peter"

    Self-heating simulation of GaN-based metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors the results of self-heating simulations of the GaN-based MOS-HEMTs, including hot electron and quantum effects of the gate and source/drain extension lengths on both the output performance and self-heating is discussed

  13. KAPPA DISTRIBUTION MODEL FOR HARD X-RAY CORONAL SOURCES OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar flares produce hard X-ray emission, the photon spectrum of which is often represented by a combination of thermal and power-law distributions. However, the estimates of the number and total energy of non-thermal electrons are sensitive to the determination of the power-law cutoff energy. Here, we revisit an 'above-the-loop' coronal source observed by RHESSI on 2007 December 31 and show that a kappa distribution model can also be used to fit its spectrum. Because the kappa distribution has a Maxwellian-like core in addition to a high-energy power-law tail, the emission measure and temperature of the instantaneous electrons can be derived without assuming the cutoff energy. Moreover, the non-thermal fractions of electron number/energy densities can be uniquely estimated because they are functions of only the power-law index. With the kappa distribution model, we estimated that the total electron density of the coronal source region was {approx}2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. We also estimated without assuming the source volume that a moderate fraction ({approx}20%) of electrons in the source region was non-thermal and carried {approx}52% of the total electron energy. The temperature was 28 MK, and the power-law index {delta} of the electron density distribution was -4.3. These results are compared to the conventional power-law models with and without a thermal core component.

  14. Linkping University Electronic Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    do so. Beyond Ph.D. theses, 41 Licentiate theses (of 61 in total) were published electronically-Press to 640, 208 and 4794 Ph.D., Licentiate and Undergraduate theses, respectively. Conference Proceedings

  15. VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1, 2013 VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL U.S. Department of Energy (FE-34) Office of Fossil Energy Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Attn: Natural Gas Reports P.O. Box 44375...

  16. Electron Microscope Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven Lab is home to one of only a few Scanning Transmision Electron Microscope (STEM) machines in the world and one of the few that can image single heavy atoms.

  17. VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    39 MacDougal Street, Third Floor * New York, New York 10012 * (212) 992-8932 * www.policyintegrity.org March 21, 2011 VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION Office of the General Counsel US...

  18. VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL U.S. Department of Energy (FE-34) Office of Fossil Energy Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Attn: Natural Gas Reports P.O. Box 44375...

  19. 3D Printing Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    Login Register Home Videos Jobs Games 3D Printing Electronics Design Software Designer Edge for 3D Printing · -- B6 Sigma Labs (ticker SGLB) is not the same company as Sigma Technologies

  20. Toward pure electronic spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovi?, Vladimir, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis is summarized the progress toward completing our understanding of the Rydberg system of CaF and developing Pure Electronic Spectroscopy. The Rydberg system of CaF possesses a paradigmatic character due to ...