National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for laser interferometer gravitational-wave

  1. Phase-coherent mapping of gravitational-wave backgrounds using ground-based laser interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph D. Romano; Stephen R. Taylor; Neil J. Cornish; Jonathan Gair; Chiara M. F. Mingarelli; Rutger van Haasteren

    2015-05-27

    We extend the formalisms developed in Gair et al. and Cornish and van Haasteren to create maps of gravitational-wave backgrounds using a network of ground-based laser interferometers. We show that in contrast to pulsar timing arrays, which are insensitive to half of the gravitational-wave sky (the curl modes), a network of ground-based interferometers is sensitive to both the gradient and curl components of the background. The spatial separation of a network of interferometers, or of a single interferometer at different times during its rotational and orbital motion around the Sun, allows for recovery of both components. We derive expressions for the response functions of a laser interferometer in the small-antenna limit, and use these expressions to calculate the overlap reduction function for a pair of interferometers. We also construct maximum-likelihood estimates of the + and x-polarization modes of the gravitational-wave sky in terms of the response matrix for a network of ground-based interferometers, evaluated at discrete times during Earth's rotational and orbital motion around the Sun. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach for some simple simulated backgrounds (a single point source and spatially-extended distributions having only grad or curl components), calculating maximum-likelihood sky maps and uncertainty maps based on the (pseudo)inverse of the response matrix. The distinction between this approach and standard methods for mapping gravitational-wave power is also discussed.

  2. Interferometer Techniques for Gravitational-Wave Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlotte Bond; Daniel Brown; Andreas Freise; Kenneth Strain

    2015-12-04

    Several km-scale gravitational-wave detectors have been constructed world wide. These instruments combine a number of advanced technologies to push the limits of precision length measurement. The core devices are laser interferometers of a new kind; developed from the classical Michelson topology these interferometers integrate additional optical elements, which significantly change the properties of the optical system. Much of the design and analysis of these laser interferometers can be performed using well-known classical optical techniques; however, the complex optical layouts provide a new challenge. In this review we give a textbook-style introduction to the optical science required for the understanding of modern gravitational wave detectors, as well as other high-precision laser interferometers. In addition, we provide a number of examples for a freely available interferometer simulation software and encourage the reader to use these examples to gain hands-on experience with the discussed optical methods.

  3. Relating gravitational wave constraints from primordial nucleosynthesis, pulsar timing, laser interferometers, and the CMB: implications for the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham A. Boyle; Alessandra Buonanno

    2007-08-18

    We derive a general master equation relating the gravitational-wave observables r and Omega_gw(f). Here r is the tensor-to-scalar ratio, constrained by cosmic-microwave-background (CMB) experiments; and Omega_gw(f) is the energy spectrum of primordial gravitational-waves, constrained e.g. by pulsar-timing measurements, laser-interferometer experiments, and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). Differentiating the master equation yields a new expression for the tilt d(ln Omega_gw(f))/d(ln f). The relationship between r and Omega_gw(f) depends sensitively on the uncertain physics of the early universe, and we show that this uncertainty may be encapsulated (in a model-independent way) by two quantities: w_hat(f) and nt_hat(f), where nt_hat(f) is a certain logarithmic average over nt(k) (the primordial tensor spectral index); and w_hat(f) is a certain logarithmic average over w_tilde(a) (the effective equation-of-state in the early universe, after horizon re-entry). Here the effective equation-of-state parameter w_tilde(a) is a combination of the ordinary equation-of-state parameter w(a) and the bulk viscosity zeta(a). Thus, by comparing constraints on r and Omega_gw(f), one can obtain (remarkably tight) constraints in the [w_hat(f), nt_hat(f)] plane. In particular, this is the best way to constrain (or detect) the presence of a ``stiff'' energy component (with w > 1/3) in the early universe, prior to BBN. Finally, although most of our analysis does not assume inflation, we point out that if CMB experiments detect a non-zero value for r, then we will immediately obtain (as a free by-product) a new upper bound w_hat < 0.55 on the logarithmically averaged effective equation-of-state parameter during the ``primordial dark age'' between the end of inflation and the start of BBN.

  4. Analysis of spatial mode sensitivity of gravitational wave interferometer and targeted search for gravitational radiation from the Crab pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betzwieser, Joseph (Joseph Charles)

    2008-01-01

    Over the last several years the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has been making steady progress in improving the sensitivities of its three interferometers, two in Hanford, Washington, and one ...

  5. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of “Violin-Mode” resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level “Violin-Mode” (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent “noise-gain peaking” arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes’ two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m{sup ?1}(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/?Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  6. Broadband detuned Sagnac interferometer for future generation gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voronchev, N V; Danilishin, S L

    2015-01-01

    Broadband suppression of quantum noise below the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL) becomes a top-priority problem for the future generation of large-scale terrestrial detectors of gravitational waves, as the interferometers of the Advanced LIGO project, predesigned to be quantum-noise-limited in the almost entire detection band, are phased in. To this end, among various proposed methods of quantum noise suppression or signal amplification, the most elaborate approach implies a so-called *xylophone* configuration of two Michelson interferometers, each optimised for its own frequency band, with a combined broadband sensitivity well below the SQL. Albeit ingenious, it is a rather costly solution. We demonstrate that changing the optical scheme to a Sagnac interferometer with weak detuned signal recycling and frequency dependent input squeezing can do almost as good a job, as the xylophone for significantly lower spend. We also show that the Sagnac interferometer is more robust to optical loss in filter cavity, used f...

  7. Broadband detuned Sagnac interferometer for future generation gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Voronchev; S. P. Tarabrin; S. L. Danilishin

    2015-03-05

    Broadband suppression of quantum noise below the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL) becomes a top-priority problem for the future generation of large-scale terrestrial detectors of gravitational waves, as the interferometers of the Advanced LIGO project, predesigned to be quantum-noise-limited in the almost entire detection band, are phased in. To this end, among various proposed methods of quantum noise suppression or signal amplification, the most elaborate approach implies a so-called *xylophone* configuration of two Michelson interferometers, each optimised for its own frequency band, with a combined broadband sensitivity well below the SQL. Albeit ingenious, it is a rather costly solution. We demonstrate that changing the optical scheme to a Sagnac interferometer with weak detuned signal recycling and frequency dependent input squeezing can do almost as good a job, as the xylophone for significantly lower spend. We also show that the Sagnac interferometer is more robust to optical loss in filter cavity, used for frequency dependent squeezed vacuum injection, than an analogous Michelson interferometer, thereby reducing building cost even more.

  8. The Response of a Two-Element Radio Interferometer to Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kipp Cannon

    2003-11-20

    This document presents a ray-optics analysis of the response of a two-element radio interferometer to the presence of a plane gravitational wave. A general expression for the differential phase observed between the two receiving stations as a result of an arbitrary gravitational wave is determined, as well as the specific responses to monochromatic and black hole ring-down waveforms. Finally, the possibility of gravitational wave detection via this mechanism is discussed in the context of interferometer noise.

  9. Gravitational-wave Detection With Matter-wave Interferometers Based On Standing Light Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongfeng Gao; Peng Ju; Baocheng Zhang; Mingsheng Zhan

    2011-03-25

    We study the possibility of detecting gravitational-waves with matter-wave interferometers, where atom beams are split, deflected and recombined totally by standing light waves. Our calculation shows that the phase shift is dominated by terms proportional to the time derivative of the gravitational wave amplitude. Taking into account future improvements on current technologies, it is promising to build a matter-wave interferometer detector with desired sensitivity.

  10. Quantum Noise in Differential-type Gravitational-wave Interferometer and Signal Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Nishizawa; Seiji Kawamura; Masa-aki Sakagami

    2007-06-03

    There exists the standard quantum limit (SQL), derived from Heisenberg's uncertainty relation, in the sensitivity of laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors. However, in the context of a full quantum-mechanical approach, SQL can be overcome using the correlation of shot noise and radiation-pressure noise. So far, signal recycling, which is one of the methods to overcome SQL, is considered only in a recombined-type interferometer such as Advanced-LIGO, LCGT, and GEO600. In this paper, we investigated quantum noise and the possibility of signal recycling in a differential-type interferometer. As a result, we found that signal recycling is possible and creates at most three dips in the sensitivity curve of the detector. Then, taking advantage of the third additional dip and comparing the sensitivity of a differential-type interferometer with that of a next-generation Japanese GW interferometer, LCGT, we found that SNR of inspiral binary is improved by a factor of 1.43 for neutron star binary, 2.28 for 50 M_sun black hole binary, and 2.94 for 100 M_sun black hole binary. We also found that power recycling to increase laser power is possible in our signal-recycling configuration of a detector.

  11. FIRST SEARCHES FOR OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS TO GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE CANDIDATE EVENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Nancy

    During the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate ...

  12. Searching for stochastic gravitational waves using co-located interferometric detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fotopoulos, Nickolas

    2006-01-01

    Despite their intrinsic advantages due to co-location, the two LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) Hanford interferometers have not been used in the search for the stochastic gravitational wave ...

  13. Arm-length stabilisation for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors using frequency-doubled auxiliary lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam J. Mullavey; Bram J. J. Slagmolen; John Miller; Matthew Evans; Peter Fritschel; Daniel Sigg; Sam J. Waldman; Daniel A. Shaddock; David E. McClelland

    2011-12-14

    Residual motion of the arm cavity mirrors is expected to prove one of the principal impediments to systematic lock acquisition in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. We present a technique which overcomes this problem by employing auxiliary lasers at twice the fundamental measurement frequency to pre-stabilise the arm cavities' lengths. Applying this approach, we reduce the apparent length noise of a 1.3 m long, independently suspended Fabry-Perot cavity to 30 pm rms and successfully transfer longitudinal control of the system from the auxiliary laser to the measurement laser.

  14. Triple Michelson Interferometer for a Third-Generation Gravitational Wave Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Freise; S. Chelkowski; S. Hild; W. Del Pozzo; A. Perreca; A. Vecchio

    2009-03-05

    The upcoming European design study `Einstein gravitational-wave Telescope' represents the first step towards a substantial, international effort for the design of a third-generation interferometric gravitational wave detector. It is generally believed that third-generation instruments might not be installed into existing infrastructures but will provoke a new search for optimal detector sites. Consequently, the detector design could be subject to fewer constraints than the on-going design of the second generation instruments. In particular, it will be prudent to investigate alternatives to the traditional L-shaped Michelson interferometer. In this article, we review an old proposal to use three Michelson interferometers in a triangular configuration. We use this example of a triple Michelson interferometer to clarify the terminology and will put this idea into the context of more recent research on interferometer technologies. Furthermore the benefits of a triangular detector will be used to motivate this design as a good starting point for a more detailed research effort towards a third-generation gravitational wave detector.

  15. Laser-interferometric Detectors for Gravitational Wave Background at 100 MHz : Detector Design and Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Nishizawa; Seiji Kawamura; Tomotada Akutsu; Koji Arai; Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Daisuke Tatsumi; Erina Nishida; Masa-aki Sakagami; Takeshi Chiba; Ryuichi Takahashi; Naoshi Sugiyama

    2008-01-30

    Recently, observational searches for gravitational wave background (GWB) have developed and given direct and indirect constraints on the energy density of GWB in a broad range of frequencies. These constraints have already rejected some theoretical models of large GWB spectra. However, at 100 MHz, there is no strict upper limit from direct observation, though the indirect limit by He4 abundance due to big-bang nucleosynthesis exists. In this paper, we propose an experiment with laser interferometers searching GWB at 100 MHz. We considered three detector designs and evaluated the GW response functions of a single detector. As a result, we found that, at 100 MHz, the most sensitive detector is the design, a so-called synchronous recycling interferometer, which has better sensitivity than an ordinary Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometer by a factor of 3.3 at 100 MHz. We also give the best sensitivity achievable at 100 MHz with realistic experimental parameters.

  16. LOCALIZATION OF SHORT DURATION GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENTS WITH THE EARLY ADVANCED LIGO AND VIRGO DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Essick, Reed Clasey

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important ...

  17. The search for gravitational wave bursts in data from the second LIGO science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterji, Shourov Keith

    2005-01-01

    The network of detectors comprising the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) are among a new generation of detectors that seek to make the first direct observation of gravitational waves. While providing ...

  18. Scientific Potential of DECIGO Pathfinder and Testing GR with Space-Borne Gravitational Wave Interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi

    2013-02-11

    DECIGO Pathfinder (DPF) has an ability to detect gravitational waves from galactic intermediate-mass black hole binaries. If the signal is detected, it would be possible to determine parameters of the binary components. Furthermore, by using future space-borne gravitational wave interferometers, it would be possible to test alternative theories of gravity in the strong field regime. In this review article, we first explain how the detectors like DPF and DECIGO/BBO work and discuss the expected event rates. Then, we review how the observed gravitational waveforms from precessing compact binaries with slightly eccentric orbits can be calculated both in general relativity and in alternative theories of gravity. For the latter, we focus on Brans-Dicke and massive gravity theories. After reviewing these theories, we show the results of the parameter estimation with DPF using the Fisher analysis. We also discuss a possible joint search of DPF and ground-based interferometers. Then, we show the results of testing alternative theories of gravity using future space-borne interferometers. DECIGO/BBO would be able to place 4--5 orders of magnitude stronger constraint on Brans-Dicke theory than the solar system experiment. This is still 1--2 orders of magnitude stronger than the future solar system mission such as ASTROD I. On the other hand, LISA should be able to put 4 orders of magnitude more stringent constraint on the mass of the graviton than the current solar system bound. DPF may be able to place comparable constraint on the massive gravity theories as the solar system bound. We also discuss the prospects of using eLISA and ASTROD-GW in testing alternative theories of gravity. The bounds using eLISA are similar to the LISA ones, but ASTROD-GW performs the best in constraining massive gravity theories among all the gravitational wave detectors considered in this article.

  19. Arm-length stabilisation for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors using frequency-doubled auxiliary lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullavey, Adam J.

    Residual motion of the arm cavity mirrors is expected to prove one of the principal impediments to systematic lock acquisition in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. We present a technique which overcomes this ...

  20. Novel approaches to Newtonian noise suppression in interferometric gravitational wave detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter-Jones, Nicholas R

    2011-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) attempts to detect ripples in the curvature of spacetime using two large scale interferometers. These detectors are several kilometer long Michelson interferometers ...

  1. Development of techniques for quantum-enhanced laser-interferometric gravitational-wave detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goda, Keisuke

    2007-01-01

    A detailed theoretical and experimental study of techniques necessary for quantum-enhanced laser- interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detectors was carried out. The basic theory of GWs and laser-interferometric GW ...

  2. Creep events and creep noise in gravitational-wave interferometers: basic formalism and stationary limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    In gravitational-wave interferometers, test masses are suspended on thin fibers which experience considerable tension stress. Sudden microscopic stress release in a suspension fiber, which I call a 'creep event', would excite motion of the test mass that would be coupled to the interferometer's readout. The random test-mass motion due to a time-sequence of creep events is referred to as 'creep noise'. In this paper I present an elasto-dynamic calculation for the test-mass motion due to a creep event. I show that within a simple suspension model, the main coupling to the optical readout occurs via a combination of a "dc" horizontal displacement of the test mass, and excitation of the violin and pendulum modes, and not, as was thought previously, via lengthening of the fiber. When the creep events occur sufficiently frequently and their statistics is time-independent, the creep noise can be well-approximated by a stationary Gaussian random process. I derive the functional form of the creep noise spectral densit...

  3. Creep events and creep noise in gravitational-wave interferometers: basic formalism and stationary limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri Levin

    2012-12-05

    In gravitational-wave interferometers, test masses are suspended on thin fibers which experience considerable tension stress. Sudden microscopic stress release in a suspension fiber, which I call a 'creep event', would excite motion of the test mass that would be coupled to the interferometer's readout. The random test-mass motion due to a time-sequence of creep events is referred to as 'creep noise'. In this paper I present an elasto-dynamic calculation for the test-mass motion due to a creep event. I show that within a simple suspension model, the main coupling to the optical readout occurs via a combination of a "dc" horizontal displacement of the test mass, and excitation of the violin and pendulum modes, and not, as was thought previously, via lengthening of the fiber. When the creep events occur sufficiently frequently and their statistics is time-independent, the creep noise can be well-approximated by a stationary Gaussian random process. I derive the functional form of the creep noise spectral density in this limit, with the restrictive assumption that the creep events are statistically independent from each other.

  4. Probability distribution function for inclinations of merging compact binaries detected by gravitational wave interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Seto

    2014-10-20

    We analytically discuss probability distribution function (PDF) for inclinations of merging compact binaries whose gravitational waves are coherently detected by a network of ground based interferometers. The PDF would be useful for studying prospects of (1) simultaneously detecting electromagnetic signals (such as gamma-ray-bursts) associated with binary mergers and (2) statistically constraining the related theoretical models from the actual observational data of multi-messenger astronomy. Our approach is similar to Schutz (2011), but we explicitly include the dependence of the polarization angles of the binaries, based on the concise formulation given in Cutler and Flanagan (1994). We find that the overall profiles of the PDFs are similar for any networks composed by the second generation detectors (Advanced-LIGO, Advanced-Virgo, KAGRA, LIGO-India). For example, 5.1% of detected binaries would have inclination angle less than 10 degree with at most 0.1% differences between the potential networks. A perturbative expression is also provided for generating the PDFs with a small number of parameters given by directional averages of the quantity $\\epsilon$ that characterises the asymmetry of network sensitivities to incoming two orthogonal polarization modes.

  5. Low Frequency Gravitational Wave Detection With Ground Based Atom Interferometer Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaibi, W; Canuel, B; Bertoldi, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below few Hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows to reduce the Newtonian Noise (NN) which limits all ground based GW detectors below few Hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of factor 2 could be achieved, and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a 10-fold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below $1\\times 10^{-19}/ \\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ in the $ 0.3-3 \\ \\text{Hz}$ frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity o...

  6. Laser-Ranging Long Baseline Differential Atom Interferometers for Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiow, Sheng-wey; Yu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    High sensitivity differential atom interferometers are promising for precision measurements in science frontiers in space, including gravity field mapping for Earth science studies and gravitational wave detection. We propose a new configuration of twin atom interferometers connected by a laser ranging interferometer (LRI-AI) to provide precise information of the displacements between the two AI reference mirrors and a means to phase-lock the two independent interferometer lasers over long distances, thereby further enhancing the feasibility of long baseline differential atom interferometers. We show that a properly implemented LRI-AI can achieve equivalent functionality to the conventional differential atom interferometer measurement system. LRI-AI isolates the laser requirements for atom interferometers and for optical phase readout between distant locations, thus enabling optimized allocation of available laser power within a limited physical size and resource budget. A unique aspect of LRI-AI also enables...

  7. Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N

    2011-01-01

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

  8. Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam

    2012-02-23

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

  9. Application of asymptotic expansions for maximum likelihood estimators errors to gravitational waves from binary mergers: The single interferometer case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanolin, M.; Vitale, S.; Makris, N.

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we apply to gravitational waves (GW) from the inspiral phase of binary systems a recently derived frequentist methodology to calculate analytically the error for a maximum likelihood estimate of physical parameters. We use expansions of the covariance and the bias of a maximum likelihood estimate in terms of inverse powers of the signal-to-noise ration (SNR)s where the square root of the first order in the covariance expansion is the Cramer Rao lower bound (CRLB). We evaluate the expansions, for the first time, for GW signals in noises of GW interferometers. The examples are limited to a single, optimally oriented, interferometer. We also compare the error estimates using the first two orders of the expansions with existing numerical Monte Carlo simulations. The first two orders of the covariance allow us to get error predictions closer to what is observed in numerical simulations than the CRLB. The methodology also predicts a necessary SNR to approximate the error with the CRLB and provides new insight on the relationship between waveform properties, SNR, dimension of the parameter space and estimation errors. For example the timing match filtering can achieve the CRLB only if the SNR is larger than the Kurtosis of the gravitational wave spectrum and the necessary SNR is much larger if other physical parameters are also unknown.

  10. Sensitivity and noise analysis of 4 km laser interferometric gravitational wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikari, Rana, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Around the world, efforts are underway to commission several kilometer-scale laser interferometers to detect gravitational radiation. In the United States, there are two collocated interferometers in Hanford, Washington ...

  11. SEARCHING FOR A STOCHASTIC BACKGROUND OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES WITH THE LASER INTERFEROMETER GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Nelson

    . Bayer,8 K. Belczynski,12 J. Betzwieser,8 P. Beyersdorf,13 B. Bhawal,1 I. A. Bilenko,14 G. Billingsley,1. Kozak,1 B. Krishnan,7 P. Kwee,27 P. K. Lam,5 M. Landry,9 B. Lantz,13 A. Lazzarini,1 B. Lee,11 M. Lei,1 V

  12. Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2010-02-03

    The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO), in NM, can detect photon bounces from retro-reflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference - only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations/turbulence (gravitational waves) in the flow of the dynamical 3-space relative to local systems/observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an effective "gravitational wave" detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave/turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

  13. Initial Condition of Relic Gravitational Waves Constrained by LIGO S6 and Multiple Interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie-Wen Chen; Yang Zhang; Wen Zhao; Ming-Lei Tong

    2015-05-21

    The relic gravitational wave (RGW) generated during the inflation depends on the initial condition via the amplitude, the spectral index $n_t$ and the running index $\\alpha_t$. CMB observations so far have only constrained the tensor-scalar ratio $r$, but not $n_t$ nor $\\alpha_t$. Complementary to this, the ground-based interferometric detectors working at $\\sim 10^2$Hz are able to constrain the spectral indices that influence the spectrum sensitively at high frequencies. In this work we give a proper normalization of the analytical spectrum at the low frequency end, yielding a modification by a factor of $\\sim 1/50$ to the previous treatment. We calculate the signal-noise ratios (SNR) for various ($n_t,\\alpha_t$) at fixed $r=0.2$ by S6 of LIGO H-L, and obtain the observational upper limit on the running index $\\alpha_tmodels with $\\alpha_t>0.01364$.

  14. Radiation Pressure Induced Instabilities in Laser Interferometric Detectors of Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Pai; S. V. Dhurandhar; P. Hello; J-Y. Vinet

    2000-11-28

    The large scale interferometric gravitational wave detectors consist of Fabry-Perot cavities operating at very high powers ranging from tens of kW to MW for next generations. The high powers may result in several nonlinear effects which would affect the performance of the detector. In this paper, we investigate the effects of radiation pressure, which tend to displace the mirrors from their resonant position resulting in the detuning of the cavity. We observe a remarkable effect, namely, that the freely hanging mirrors gain energy continuously and swing with increasing amplitude. It is found that the `time delay', that is, the time taken for the field to adjust to its instantaneous equilibrium value, when the mirrors are in motion, is responsible for this effect. This effect is likely to be important in the optimal operation of the full-scale interferometers such as VIRGO and LIGO.

  15. Emission of Gravitational Waves from a Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedwardt Winterberg

    2015-03-27

    The failure of the laser-interferometer gravitational wave antennas to measure the tiny changes of lengths many orders of magnitude smaller than the diameter of a proton raises the question of whether the reason for this failure is a large gravitational wave background noise, and if so, where this background noise is coming from. It is conjectured that it comes from gravitational waves emitted from a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in the center of the sun, with the large magnetic field from this dynamo shielded by thermomagnetic currents in the tachocline. Using the moon as a large Weber bar, these gravitational waves could possibly be detected by the Poisson diffraction into the center of the lunar shadow during a total solar eclipse.

  16. Searching for a Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves with LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Cepeda, C; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cutler, C; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Vine, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Dickson, J; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Frey, R E; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hoang, P; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Hua, W; Huttner, S; Ingram, D; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Khalili, F Ya; Khan, A; Kim, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Mukherjee, S; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Newton, G; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M V; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sanchodela-Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Sheard, B; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P; Somiya, K; Speake, C; Spjeld, O; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sun, K; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Vigeland, S; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitbeck, D M; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Yunes, N; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zur Mühlen, H

    2006-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has performed the fourth science run, S4, with significantly improved interferometer sensitivities with respect to previous runs. Using data acquired during this science run, we place a limit on the amplitude of a stochastic background of gravitational waves. For a frequency independent spectrum, the new limit is $\\Omega_{\\rm GW} < 6.5 \\times 10^{-5}$. This is currently the most sensitive result in the frequency range 51-150 Hz, with a factor of 13 improvement over the previous LIGO result. We discuss complementarity of the new result with other constraints on a stochastic background of gravitational waves, and we investigate implications of the new result for different models of this background.

  17. Beyond the Second Generation of Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Hild

    2011-11-27

    This article gives an overview of potential upgrades of second generation gravitational wave detectors and the required key technologies to improve the limiting noise sources. In addition the baseline design of the Einstein Telescope, a European third generation gravitational wave observatory, is briefly discussed.

  18. Angular instability due to radiation pressure in the LIGO gravitational wave detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiichi Hirose; Keita Kawabe; Daniel Sigg; Rana Adhikari; Peter R. Saulson

    2009-08-31

    We observed the effect of radiation pressure on the angular sensing and control system of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) interferometer's core optics at LIGO Hanford Observatory. This is the first measurement of this effect in a complete gravitational wave interferometer. Only one of the two angular modes survives with feedback control, since the other mode is suppressed when the control gain is sufficiently large. We developed a mathematical model to understand the physics of the system. This model matches well the dynamics that we observe.

  19. A search of the Orion spur for continuous gravitational waves using a "loosely coherent" algorithm on data from LIGO interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D V; Andersen, M; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Ashton, G; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Branco, V; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M D; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J M; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Germain, V; Ghosh, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J R; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez, J; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hoelscher-Obermaier, J; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F

    2015-01-01

    We report results of a wideband search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars within the Orion spur towards both the inner and outer regions of our Galaxy. As gravitational waves interact very weakly with matter, the search is unimpeded by dust and concentrations of stars. One search disk (A) is $6.87^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $20^\\textrm{h}10^\\textrm{m}54.71^\\textrm{s}+33^\\circ33'25.29"$, and the other (B) is $7.45^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $8^\\textrm{h}35^\\textrm{m}20.61^\\textrm{s}-46^\\circ49'25.151"$. We explored the frequency range of 50-1500 Hz and frequency derivative from $0$ to $-5\\times 10^{-9}$ Hz/s. A multi-stage, loosely coherent search program allowed probing more deeply than before in these two regions, while increasing coherence length with every stage. Rigorous followup parameters have winnowed initial coincidence set to only 70 candidates, to be examined manually. None of those 70 candidates proved to be consistent with an isolated gravitational wave em...

  20. Hidden photon measurements using the long-baseline cavity of laser interferometric gravitational-wave detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Inoue; Koji Ishidoshiro

    2015-09-28

    We suggest a new application for the long-baseline and high powered cavities in a laser-interferometric gravitational-wave~(GW) detector to search for WISPs (weakly interacting sub-eV particles), such as a hidden U(1) gauge boson, called the hidden-sector photon. It is based on the principle of a light shining through the wall experiment, adapted to the laser with a wavelength of 1064 or 532 nm. The transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer is assumed as a detector, which the dark rate and efficiency are assumed as $0.000001~\\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ and 0.75, respectively. The TES bolometer is sufficiently sensitive to search for the low-mass hidden-sector photons. We assume that the reconversion cavity is mounted on the reconversion region of hidden-sector photons, which number of reflection and length are assumed as 1000 and 10, 100, and 1000m. We found that the second-point-five and the second generation GW experiments, such as KAGRA and Advanced LIGO with a regeneration cavity and TES bolometers. The expected lower bounds with these experiments wit the reconverted mirror are set on the coupling constant $\\chi = 2 \\times 10^{-9}$ for hidden-sector photon with a mass of $2 \\times 10^{-5}$ eV within 95% confidence level. The third generation detector, Einstein Telescope, will reach $\\chi = 1 \\times 10^{-9}$ at a mass of $1 \\times 10^{-5}$ eV within 95% confidence level. Although the operation and construction of the RC will demand dedicated optical configurations, the cavities used in GW detection are expected to measure the strong potential for finding the hidden-sector photons.

  1. A search of the Orion spur for continuous gravitational waves using a "loosely coherent" algorithm on data from LIGO interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. B. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. V. Amariutei; M. Andersen; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; N. Arnaud; G. Ashton; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; S. E. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; B. K. Berger; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Birney; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; V. Branco; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; P. Brockill; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; C. C. Buchanan; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; E. Capocasa; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; J. Casanueva Diaz; C. Casentini; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; L. Cerboni Baiardi; G. Cerretani; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Cheng; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. G. Collette; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; L. Conti; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. B. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. T. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; T. Dal Canton; M. D. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; N. S. Darman; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. P. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. C. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; M. Di Giovanni; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. E. Dwyer; T. B. Edo; M. C. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. M. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. C. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. M. Evans; R. Everett; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; H. A. G. Gabbard; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. G. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; V. Germain; A. Ghosh; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. R. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; J. Gonzalez; A. Gopakumar; N. A. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. E. Gossan; M. Gosselin; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; A. Gupta; M. K. Gupta; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. J. Hacker; B. R. Hall; E. D. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Haney; M. M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. J. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; J. Hennig; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; J. Hoelscher-Obermaier; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. A. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; S. Huang; E. A. Huerta; D. Huet; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh

    2015-10-14

    We report results of a wideband search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars within the Orion spur towards both the inner and outer regions of our Galaxy. As gravitational waves interact very weakly with matter, the search is unimpeded by dust and concentrations of stars. One search disk (A) is $6.87^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $20^\\textrm{h}10^\\textrm{m}54.71^\\textrm{s}+33^\\circ33'25.29"$, and the other (B) is $7.45^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $8^\\textrm{h}35^\\textrm{m}20.61^\\textrm{s}-46^\\circ49'25.151"$. We explored the frequency range of 50-1500 Hz and frequency derivative from $0$ to $-5\\times 10^{-9}$ Hz/s. A multi-stage, loosely coherent search program allowed probing more deeply than before in these two regions, while increasing coherence length with every stage. Rigorous followup parameters have winnowed initial coincidence set to only 70 candidates, to be examined manually. None of those 70 candidates proved to be consistent with an isolated gravitational wave emitter, and 95% confidence level upper limits were placed on continuous-wave strain amplitudes. Near $169$ Hz we achieve our lowest 95% CL upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ of $6.3\\times 10^{-25}$, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of $3.4\\times 10^{-24}$ for all polarizations and sky locations.

  2. LIGO and the Search for Gravitational Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Norna A.

    2006-10-16

    Gravitational waves, predicted to exist by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity but as yet undetected, are expected to be emitted during violent astrophysical events such as supernovae, black hole interactions and the coalescence of compact binary systems. Their detection and study should lead to a new branch of astronomy. However the experimental challenge is formidable: ground-based detection relies on sensing displacements of order 10{sup -18} m over a frequency range of tens of hertz to a few kHz. There is currently a large international effort to commission and operate long baseline interferometric detectors including those that comprise LIGO - the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory - in the USA. In this talk I will give an introduction to the topic of gravitational wave detection and in particular review the status of the LIGO project which is currently taking data at its design sensitivity. I will also look to the future to consider planned improvements in sensitivity for such detectors, focusing on Advanced LIGO, the proposed upgrade to the LIGO project.

  3. No evidence for the blue-tilted power spectrum of relic gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing-Guo Huang; Sai Wang

    2015-02-09

    In this paper, we constrain the tilt of the power spectrum of relic gravitational waves by combining the data from BICEP2/Keck array and Planck (BKP) and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Waves Observatory (LIGO). From the data of BKP B-modes, the constraint on the tensor tilt is $n_t=0.66^{+1.83}_{-1.44}$ at the $68%$ confidence level. By further adding the LIGO upper limit on the energy density of gravitational waves, the constraint becomes $n_t=-0.76^{+1.37}_{-0.52}$ at the $68%$ confidence level. We conclude that there is no evidence for a blue-tilted power spectrum of relic gravitational waves and either sign of the index of tensor power spectrum is compatible with the data.

  4. *Corresponding author. Email: m-salit@northwestern.edu Application of Fast Light in Gravitational Wave Detection with Interferometers and Resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    has been observed indirectly, by monitoring the change in the orbital frequency of neutron stars in a binary system (PSR1913+16) as they lose energy via gravitational radiation. However, GWs have not yet the sensitivities of these detectors. For example, the Advanced LIGO system will employ better mirrors, higher laser

  5. Numerical wave optics and the lensing of gravitational waves by globular clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Moylan; David E. McClelland; Susan M. Scott; Antony C. Searle; G. V. Bicknell

    2007-10-16

    We consider the possible effects of gravitational lensing by globular clusters on gravitational waves from asymmetric neutron stars in our galaxy. In the lensing of gravitational waves, the long wavelength, compared with the usual case of optical lensing, can lead to the geometrical optics approximation being invalid, in which case a wave optical solution is necessary. In general, wave optical solutions can only be obtained numerically. We describe a computational method that is particularly well suited to numerical wave optics. This method enables us to compare the properties of several lens models for globular clusters without ever calling upon the geometrical optics approximation, though that approximation would sometimes have been valid. Finally, we estimate the probability that lensing by a globular cluster will significantly affect the detection, by ground-based laser interferometer detectors such as LIGO, of gravitational waves from an asymmetric neutron star in our galaxy, finding that the probability is insignificantly small.

  6. Arm-Locking with the GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Ira Thorpe; Kirk McKenzie

    2015-10-09

    Arm-locking is a technique for stabilizing the frequency of a laser in an inter-spacecraft interferometer by using the spacecraft separation as the frequency reference. A candidate technique for future space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), arm-locking has been extensive studied in this context through analytic models, time-domain simulations, and hardware-in-the-loop laboratory demonstrations. In this paper we show the Laser Ranging Interferometer instrument flying aboard the upcoming Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission provides an appropriate platform for an on-orbit demonstration of the arm-locking technique. We describe an arm-locking controller design for the GRACE-FO system and a series of time-domain simulations that demonstrate its feasibility. We conclude that it is possible to achieve laser frequency noise suppression of roughly two orders of magnitude around a Fourier frequency of 1Hz with conservative margins on the system's stability. We further demonstrate that `pulling' of the master laser frequency due to fluctuating Doppler shifts and lock acquisition transients is less than $100\\,$MHz over several GRACE-FO orbits. These findings motivate further study of the implementation of such a demonstration.

  7. Data Quality Studies of Enhanced Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jessica McIver; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

    2012-04-11

    Data quality assessment plays an essential role in the quest to detect gravitational wave signals in data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Interferometer data contains a high rate of noise transients from the environment, the detector hardware, and the detector control systems. These transients severely limit the statistical significance of gravitational wave candidates of short duration and/or poorly modeled waveforms. This paper describes the data quality studies that have been performed in recent LIGO and Virgo observing runs to mitigate the impact of transient detector artifacts on the gravitational wave searches.

  8. Arm-Locking with the GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2015-01-01

    Arm-locking is a technique for stabilizing the frequency of a laser in an inter-spacecraft interferometer by using the spacecraft separation as the frequency reference. A candidate technique for future space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), arm-locking has been extensive studied in this context through analytic models, time-domain simulations, and hardware-in-the-loop laboratory demonstrations. In this paper we show the Laser Ranging Interferometer instrument flying aboard the upcoming Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission provides an appropriate platform for an on-orbit demonstration of the arm-locking technique. We describe an arm-locking controller design for the GRACE-FO system and a series of time-domain simulations that demonstrate its feasibility. We conclude that it is possible to achieve laser frequency noise suppression of roughly two orders of magnitude around a Fourier frequency of 1Hz with conservative margins...

  9. FIRST SEARCHES FOR OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS TO GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE CANDIDATE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P. [LIGO - California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Adams, C. [LIGO - Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Adams, T. [Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M. [Nikhef, Science Park, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aggarwal, N. [LIGO - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Aguiar, O. D. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12227-010 - Săo José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Allocca, A. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Amador Ceron, E. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2014-03-01

    During the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  10. Environmental Effects for Gravitational-wave Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Barausse; Vitor Cardoso; Paolo Pani

    2015-01-07

    The upcoming detection of gravitational waves by terrestrial interferometers will usher in the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. This will be particularly true when space-based detectors will come of age and measure the mass and spin of massive black holes with exquisite precision and up to very high redshifts, thus allowing for better understanding of the symbiotic evolution of black holes with galaxies, and for high-precision tests of General Relativity in strong-field, highly dynamical regimes. Such ambitious goals require that astrophysical environmental pollution of gravitational-wave signals be constrained to negligible levels, so that neither detection nor estimation of the source parameters are significantly affected. Here, we consider the main sources for space-based detectors -- the inspiral, merger and ringdown of massive black-hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspirals -- and account for various effects on their gravitational waveforms, including electromagnetic fields, cosmological evolution, accretion disks, dark matter, "firewalls" and possible deviations from General Relativity. We discover that the black-hole quasinormal modes are sharply different in the presence of matter, but the ringdown signal observed by interferometers is typically unaffected. The effect of accretion disks and dark matter depends critically on their geometry and density profile, but is negligible for most sources, except for few special extreme mass-ratio inspirals. Electromagnetic fields and cosmological effects are always negligible. We finally explore the implications of our findings for proposed tests of General Relativity with gravitational waves, and conclude that environmental effects will not prevent the development of precision gravitational-wave astronomy.

  11. Gravitational Waves on Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2004-03-12

    We consider a gravitational wave of arbitrary frequency incident on a normal or a super-conductor. The gravitationally induced fields inside the conductor are derived. The outward propagating EM waves are calculated for a low frequency wave on a small sphere and for a high frequency wave incident on a large disk. We estimate for both targets the GW to EM conversion efficiencies and also the magnitude of the superconductor's phase perturbation.

  12. Open Issues in the search for gravitational wave transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Lindy L

    2010-01-01

    The LIGO-Virgo network of kilometer-scale laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors reached a major milestone with the successful operation of LIGO's fifth (S5) and Virgo's first (VSR1) science runs during 2005-2007. ...

  13. Gravitational Wave Emission from Galactic Radio Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. de Freitas Pacheco; J. E. Horvath

    1997-04-15

    We consider in this work continuous gravitational wave (GW) emission from non-axisymmetric radio pulsars. We treat in some detail the observational issues related to the known radio pulsar sample with the aim of unveiling the actual number of sources contributing to GW, which are likely to be the main contributors of GWs. It is shown that the operation of spheroidal GW detectors and full-size interferometers could detect this component of the radiation or impose useful limits on the effective oblateness of young radio pulsars.

  14. High-frequency corrections to the detector response and their effect on searches for gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rakhmanov; J. D. Romano; J. T. Whelan

    2008-08-28

    Searches for gravitational waves with km-scale laser interferometers often involve the long-wavelength approximation to describe the detector response. The prevailing assumption is that the corrections to the detector response due to its finite size are small and the errors due to the long-wavelength approximation are negligible. Recently, however, Baskaran and Grishchuk (2004 Class. Quantum Grav. 21 4041) found that in a simple Michelson interferometer such errors can be as large as 10 percent. For more accurate analysis, these authors proposed to use a linear-frequency correction to the long wavelength approximation. In this paper we revisit these calculations. We show that the linear-frequency correction is inadequate for certain locations in the sky and therefore accurate analysis requires taking into account the exact formula, commonly derived from the photon round-trip propagation time. Also, we extend the calculations to include the effect of Fabry-Perot resonators in the interferometer arms. Here we show that a simple approximation which combines the long-wavelength Michelson response with the single-pole approximation to the Fabry-Perot transfer function produces rather accurate results. In particular, the difference between the exact and the approximate formulae is at most 2-3 percent for those locations in the sky where the detector response is greater than half of its maximum value. We analyse the impact of such errors on detection sensitivity and parameter estimation in searches for periodic gravitational waves emitted by a known pulsar, and in searches for an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background. At frequencies up to 1 kHz, the effect of such errors is at most 1-2 percent. For higher frequencies, or if more accuracy is required, one should use the exact formula for the response.

  15. Plans for the LIGO-TAMA Joint Search for Gravitational Wave Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick J. Sutton; Masaki Ando; Patrick Brady; Laura Cadonati; Alessandra Di Credico; Stephen Fairhurst; Lee Samuel Finn; Nobuyuki Kanda; Erik Katsavounidis; Sergey Klimenko; Albert Lazzarini; Szabolcs Marka; John W. C. McNabb; Saikat Ray Majumder; Peter R. Saulson; Hideyuki Tagoshi; Hirotaka Takahashi; Ryutaro Takahashi; Daisuke Tatsumi; Yoshiki Tsunesada; S. E. Whitcomb

    2004-12-28

    We describe the plans for a joint search for unmodelled gravitational wave bursts being carried out by the LIGO and TAMA collaborations using data collected during February-April 2003. We take a conservative approach to detection, requiring candidate gravitational wave bursts to be seen in coincidence by all four interferometers. We focus on some of the complications of performing this coincidence analysis, in particular the effects of the different alignments and noise spectra of the interferometers.

  16. Frequency noise and intensity noise of next-generation gravitational-wave detectors with RF/DC readout schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Somiya; Y. Chen; S. Kawamura; N. Mio

    2007-01-29

    The sensitivity of next-generation gravitational-wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and LCGT should be limited mostly by quantum noise with an expected technical progress to reduce seismic noise and thermal noise. Those detectors will employ the optical configuration of resonant-sideband-extraction that can be realized with a signal-recycling mirror added to the Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometer. While this configuration can reduce quantum noise of the detector, it can possibly increase laser frequency noise and intensity noise. The analysis of laser noise in the interferometer with the conventional configuration has been done in several papers, and we shall extend the analysis to the resonant-sideband-extraction configuration with the radiation pressure effect included. We shall also refer to laser noise in the case we employ the so-called DC readout scheme.

  17. Gravitational waves: a foundational review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. G. Pereira

    2015-05-27

    The standard linear approach to the gravitational waves theory is critically reviewed. Contrary to the prevalent understanding, it is pointed out that this theory contains many conceptual and technical obscure issues that require further analysis.

  18. Breaking of parallelograms in presence of torsion: an equivalent alternative approach to detect gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayeh, S; Arbabi, S; Ghominejad, M

    2015-01-01

    The equations for gravitational plane waves produced by a typical binary system as a solution of linear approximation of Einstein equations is derived. The dynamics of the corresponding gravitational field is analyzed in a 4-dimensional space-time manifold, endowed with a metric and taking into account the torsion. In this context, the geometrical reason of the existence of torsion due to the presence of gravitational waves, as an asymmetry of connection coefficients with respect of the swapping of indices's is highlighted. In a laser interferometer gravitational detector The delay time between the arrivals of the two laser beams traveling back and forth along the two arms of in presence of gravitational waves, is interpreted from this point of view. The geometrical interpretation of torsion, links this delay time to the breaking of the parallelogram formed by the trajectories of the laser beams in space-time. This delay is calculated for a typical NS-NS binary pulsar in two specific orientations with respect...

  19. Upper and lower limits on the Crab pulsar's astrophysical parameters set from gravitational wave observations by LIGO: braking index and energy considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Santostasi

    2008-07-16

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO) has recently reached the end of its fifth science run (S5), having collected more than a year worth of data. Analysis of the data is still ongoing but a positive detection of gravitational waves, while possible, is not realistically expected for most likely sources. This is particularly true for what concerns gravitational waves from known pulsars. In fact, even under the most optimistic (and not very realistic) assumption that all the pulsar's observed spin-down is due to gravitational waves, the gravitational wave strain at earth from all the known isolated pulsars (with the only notable exception of the Crab pulsar) would not be strong enough to be detectable by existing detectors. By August 2006, LIGO had produced enough data for a coherent integration capable to extract signal from noise that was weaker than the one expected from the Crab pulsar's spin-down limit. No signal was detected, but beating the spin-down limit is a considerable achievement for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). It is customary to translate the upper limit on strain from a pulsar into a more astrophysically significant upper limit on ellipticity. Once the spin-down limit has been beaten, it is possible to release the constraint that all the spin-down is due to gravitational wave emission. A more complete model with diverse braking mechanisms can be used to set limits on several astrophysical parameters of the pulsar. This paper shows possible values of such parameters for the Crab pulsar given the current limit on gravitational waves from this neutron star.

  20. Thermal-noise-limited underground interferometer CLIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Agatsuma; Koji Arai; Masa-Katsu Fujimoto; Seiji Kawamura; Kazuaki Kuroda; Osamu Miyakawa; Shinji Miyoki; Masatake Ohashi; Toshikazu Suzuki; Ryutaro Takahashi; Daisuke Tatsumi; Souichi Telada; Takashi Uchiyama; Kazuhiro Yamamoto; CLIO collaborators

    2010-01-29

    We report on the current status of CLIO (Cryogenic Laser Interferometer Observatory), which is a prototype interferometer for LCGT (Large Scale Cryogenic Gravitational-Wave Telescope). LCGT is a Japanese next-generation interferometric gravitational wave detector featuring the use of cryogenic mirrors and a quiet underground site. The main purpose of CLIO is to demonstrate a reduction of the mirror thermal noise by cooling the sapphire mirrors. CLIO is located in an underground site of the Kamioka mine, 1000 m deep from the mountain top, to verify its advantages. After a few years of commissioning work, we have achieved a thermal-noise-limited sensitivity at room temperature. One of the main results of noise hunting was the elimination of thermal noise caused by a conductive coil-holder coupled with a pendulum through magnets.

  1. Power filters for gravitational wave bursts: network operation for source position estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Sylvestre

    2003-04-30

    A method is presented to generalize the power detectors for short bursts of gravitational waves that have been developed for single interferometers so that they can optimally process data from a network of interferometers. The performances of this method for the estimation of the position of the source are studied using numerical simulations.

  2. Mother templates for gravitational wave chirps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Sathyaprakash

    2000-10-11

    Templates used in a search for binary black holes and neutron stars in gravitational wave interferometer data will have to be computed on-line since the computational storage and retrieval costs for the template bank are too expensive. The conventional dimensionless variable $T=(c^3/Gm)t,$ where $m$ is the total mass of a binary, in the time-domain and a not-so-conventional velocity-like variable $v=(\\pi Gm f)^{1/3}$ in the Fourier-domain, render the phasing of the waves independent of the total mass of the system enabling the construction of {\\it mother templates} that depend only on the mass ratio of a black hole binary. Use of such mother templates in a template bank will bring about a reduction in computational costs up to a factor of 10 and a saving on storage by a factor of 100.

  3. Gravitational waves from merging compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Scott A.

    Largely motivated by the development of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors, our understanding of merging compact binaries and the gravitational waves they generate has improved dramatically in recent years. ...

  4. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Pitkin; Stuart Reid; Sheila Rowan; Jim Hough

    2011-07-25

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free craft in space. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems in operation around the world - LIGO (USA), Virgo (Italy/France), TAMA300 and LCGT (Japan), and GEO600 (Germany/U.K.) - and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer. A review of recent science runs from the current generation of ground-based detectors will be discussed, in addition to highlighting the astrophysical results gained thus far. Looking to the future, the major upgrades to LIGO (Advanced LIGO), Virgo (Advanced Virgo), LCGT and GEO600 (GEO-HF) will be completed over the coming years, which will create a network of detectors with significantly improved sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves. Beyond this, the concept and design of possible future "third generation" gravitational wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope (ET), will be discussed.

  5. Design of a Quantum Source of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGW) and Test Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, G

    2004-01-01

    The generation of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGW) has been identified as the required breakthrough that will lead to new forms of space propulsion. Many techniques have been devised to generate HFGW, but most of them exhibit marginal efficiency, therefore the power emitted in form of gravitational waves (GW) is orders of magnitude lower than the input power. The gravitational wave counterpart of the LASER, termed Gravitational-wave LASER or "GASER" is the quantum approach to the efficient generation of gravitational waves. Electrons, protons, muons, etc, all have charge and mass, if accelerated they usually lose energy through the very fast electric and magnetic channels, this causes a negligible emission through the gravitational channel. Quantum systems can be engineered to forbid electric and magnetic transitions, therefore the gravitational spin-2 transitions can take place. A class of active materials, suitable for making a GASER based on electronic transitions in the solid state, is identified...

  6. Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-05-19

    Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

  7. Sub-SQL Sensitivity via Optical Rigidity in Advanced LIGO Interferometer with Optical Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Ya. Khalili; V. I. Lazebny; S. P. Vyatchanin

    2005-11-02

    The ``optical springs'' regime of the signal-recycled configuration of laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors is analyzed taking in account optical losses in the interferometer arm cavities. This regime allows to obtain sensitivity better than the Standard Quantum Limits both for a free test mass and for a conventional harmonic oscillator. The optical losses restrict the gain in sensitivity and achievable signal-to-noise ratio. Nevertheless, for parameters values planned for the Advanced LIGO gravitational-wave detector, this restriction is insignificant.

  8. Gravitational waves from perturbed stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeria Ferrari

    2011-05-09

    Non radial oscillations of neutron stars are associated with the emission of gravitational waves. The characteristic frequencies of these oscillations can be computed using the theory of stellar perturbations, and they are shown to carry detailed information on the internal structure of the emitting source. Moreover, they appear to be encoded in various radiative processes, as for instance in the tail of the giant flares of Soft Gamma Repeaters. Thus, their determination is central to the theory of stellar perturbation. A viable approach to the problem consists in formulating this theory as a problem of resonant scattering of gravitational waves incident on the potential barrier generated by the spacetime curvature. This approach discloses some unexpected correspondences between the theory of stellar perturbations and the theory of quantum mechanics, and allows us to predict new relativistic effects.

  9. Impact of backscattered light in a squeezing-enhanced interferometric gravitational-wave detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chua, S.?S.?Y.

    Squeezed states of light have been recently used to improve the sensitivity of laser-interferometric gravitational-wave detectors beyond the quantum limit. To completely establish quantum engineering as a realistic option ...

  10. Gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: hexagonal template placement and its efficiency in detecting physical signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Cokelaer

    2007-06-29

    Matched filtering is used to search for gravitational waves emitted by inspiralling compact binaries in data from the ground-based interferometers. One of the key aspects of the detection process is the design of a template bank that covers the astrophysically pertinent parameter space. In an earlier paper, we described a template bank that is based on a square lattice. Although robust, we showed that the square placement is over-efficient, with the implication that it is computationally more demanding than required. In this paper, we present a template bank based on an hexagonal lattice, which size is reduced by 40% with respect to the proposed square placement. We describe the practical aspects of the hexagonal template bank implementation, its size, and computational cost. We have also performed exhaustive simulations to characterize its efficiency and safeness. We show that the bank is adequate to search for a wide variety of binary systems (primordial black holes, neutron stars and stellar mass black holes) and in data from both current detectors (initial LIGO, Virgo and GEO600) as well as future detectors (advanced LIGO and EGO). Remarkably, although our template bank placement uses a metric arising from a particular template family, namely stationary phase approximation, we show that it can be used successfully with other template families (e.g., Pade resummation and effective one-body approximation). This quality of being effective for different template families makes the proposed bank suitable for a search that would use several of them in parallel (e.g., in a binary black hole search). The hexagonal template bank described in this paper is currently used to search for non-spinning inspiralling compact binaries in data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

  11. A Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with the Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329 Using the LIGO Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2005-06-24

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than 150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around 250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h_RSS = 6E-21 Hz^{-1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs.

  12. An electromagnetic analog of gravitational wave memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lydia Bieri; David Garfinkle

    2013-09-10

    We present an electromagnetic analog of gravitational wave memory. That is, we consider what change has occurred to a detector of electromagnetic radiation after the wave has passed. Rather than a distortion in the detector, as occurs in the gravitational wave case, we find a residual velocity (a "kick") to the charges in the detector. In analogy with the two types of gravitational wave memory ("ordinary" and "nonlinear") we find two types of electromagnetic kick.

  13. Gravitational wave in Lorentz violating gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Li; Zhe Chang

    2012-04-01

    By making use of the weak gravitational field approximation, we obtain a linearized solution of the gravitational vacuum field equation in an anisotropic spacetime. The plane-wave solution and dispersion relation of gravitational wave is presented explicitly. There is possibility that the speed of gravitational wave is larger than the speed of light and the casuality still holds. We show that the energy-momentum of gravitational wave in the ansiotropic spacetime is still well defined and conserved.

  14. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul D. Lasky

    2015-08-26

    Neutron stars are excellent emitters of gravitational waves. Squeezing matter beyond nuclear densities invites exotic physical processes, many of which violently transfer large amounts of mass at relativistic velocities, disrupting spacetime and generating copious quantities of gravitational radiation. I review mechanisms for generating gravitational waves with neutron stars. This includes gravitational waves from radio and millisecond pulsars, magnetars, accreting systems and newly born neutron stars, with mechanisms including magnetic and thermoelastic deformations, various stellar oscillation modes and core superfluid turbulence. I also focus on what physics can be learnt from a gravitational wave detection, and where additional research is required to fully understand the dominant physical processes at play.

  15. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasky, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Neutron stars are excellent emitters of gravitational waves. Squeezing matter beyond nuclear densities invites exotic physical processes, many of which violently transfer large amounts of mass at relativistic velocities, disrupting spacetime and generating copious quantities of gravitational radiation. I review mechanisms for generating gravitational waves with neutron stars. This includes gravitational waves from radio and millisecond pulsars, magnetars, accreting systems and newly born neutron stars, with mechanisms including magnetic and thermoelastic deformations, various stellar oscillation modes and core superfluid turbulence. I also focus on what physics can be learnt from a gravitational wave detection, and where additional research is required to fully understand the dominant physical processes at play.

  16. Gravitational-wave sensitivity curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, C. J.; Cole, R. H.; Berry, C. P. L.

    2014-12-08

    timing residual of 100 ns. 4.4.3. SKA. The next great advancement in radio astronomy shall come with the completion of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA; Dewdney et al 2009). This shall greatly increase the sensitivity of pulsar timing (Kramer et al 2004... by producing plots that consistently compare different detectors. Similar figures can be generated on-line for general use at http://rhcole.com/apps/GWplotter. Keywords: gravitational waves, black holes, pulsar timing, pulsar timing arrays PACS numbers: 04...

  17. Selection of linear-cavity fibre laser radiation using a reflection interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terentyev, V S; Simonov, V A [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31

    We consider the use of a two-mirror multibeam reflection interferometer as a selector of linear-cavity single-mode fibre laser radiation and present experimental data on continuous wavelength tuning of an erbium-doped fibre laser. Conditions are found for single-longitudinal-mode operation of the fibre laser cavity using a reflection interferometer, with the possibility of broadband wavelength tuning. (control of laser pulse parameters)

  18. Interaction of gravitational waves with matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cetoli; C. J. Pethick

    2011-10-03

    We develop a unified formalism for describing the interaction of gravitational waves with matter that clearly separates the effects of general relativity from those due to interactions in the matter. Using it, we derive a general expression for the dispersion of gravitational waves in matter in terms of correlation functions for the matter in flat spacetime. The self energy of a gravitational wave is shown to have contributions analogous to the paramagnetic and diamagnetic contributions to the self energy of an electromagnetic wave. We apply the formalism to some simple systems - free particles, an interacting scalar field, and a fermionic superfluid.

  19. The Gravitational Wave International Committee Roadmap: The future of gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Marx; Karsten Danzmann; James Hough; Kazuaki Kuroda; David McClelland; Benoit Mours; Sterl Phinney; Sheila Rowan; B. Sathyaprakash; Flavio Vetrano; Stefano Vitale; Stan Whitcomb; Clifford Will

    2011-11-24

    Gravitational wave science is on the verge of direct observation of the waves predicted by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and opening the exciting new field of gravitational wave astronomy. In the coming decades, ultra-sensitive arrays of ground-based instruments and complementary spaced-based instruments will observe the gravitational wave sky, inevitably discovering entirely unexpected phenomena while providing new insight into many of the most profound astrophysical phenomena known. in July 2007 the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC) initiated the development of a strategic roadmap for the field of gravitational wave science with a 30-year horizon. The goal of this roadmap is to serve the international gravitational wave community and its stakeholders as a tool for the development of capabilities and facilities needed to address the exciting scientific opportunities on the intermediate and long-term horizons.

  20. The Gravitational Wave International Committee Roadmap: The future of gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave science is on the verge of direct observation of the waves predicted by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and opening the exciting new field of gravitational wave astronomy. In the coming decades, ultra-sensitive arrays of ground-based instruments and complementary spaced-based instruments will observe the gravitational wave sky, inevitably discovering entirely unexpected phenomena while providing new insight into many of the most profound astrophysical phenomena known. in July 2007 the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC) initiated the development of a strategic roadmap for the field of gravitational wave science with a 30-year horizon. The goal of this roadmap is to serve the international gravitational wave community and its stakeholders as a tool for the development of capabilities and facilities needed to address the exciting scientific opportunities on the intermediate and long-term horizons.

  1. Gravitational wave detection using pulsars: status of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. B. Hobbs; M. Bailes; N. D. R. Bhat; S. Burke-Spolaor; D. J. Champion; W. Coles; A. Hotan; F. Jenet; L. Kedziora-Chudczer; J. Khoo; K. J. Lee; A. Lommen; R. N. Manchester; J. Reynolds; J. Sarkissian; W. van Straten; S. To; J. P. W. Verbiest; D. Yardley; X. P. You

    2008-12-15

    The first direct detection of gravitational waves may be made through observations of pulsars. The principal aim of pulsar timing array projects being carried out worldwide is to detect ultra-low frequency gravitational waves (f ~ 10^-9 to 10^-8 Hz). Such waves are expected to be caused by coalescing supermassive binary black holes in the cores of merged galaxies. It is also possible that a detectable signal could have been produced in the inflationary era or by cosmic strings. In this paper we review the current status of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project (the only such project in the Southern hemisphere) and compare the pulsar timing technique with other forms of gravitational-wave detection such as ground- and space-based interferometer systems.

  2. Gravitational wave memory in de Sitter spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieri, Lydia; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-01-01

    We examine gravitational wave memory in the case where sources and detector are in an expanding cosmology. For simplicity, we treat the case where the cosmology is de Sitter spacetime, and discuss the possibility of generalizing our results to the case of a more realistic cosmology. We find results very similar to those of gravitational wave memory in an asymptotically flat spacetime, but with the magnitude of the effect multiplied by a redshift factor.

  3. Gravitational-wave cosmology across 29 decades in frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul D. Lasky; Chiara M. F. Mingarelli; Tristan L. Smith; John T. Giblin Jr.; Eric Thrane; Daniel J. Reardon; Robert Caldwell; Matthew Bailes; N. D. Ramesh Bhat; Sarah Burke-Spolaor; William Coles; Shi Dai; James Dempsey; George Hobbs; Matthew Kerr; Yuri Levin; Richard N. Manchester; Stefan Os?owski; Vikram Ravi; Pablo A. Rosado; Ryan M. Shannon; Renée Spiewak; Willem van Straten; Lawrence Toomey; Jingbo Wang; Linqing Wen; Xiaopeng You; Xingjiang Zhu

    2015-11-18

    Quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field in the early Universe, amplified by inflation, produce a primordial gravitational-wave background across a broad frequency band. We derive constraints on the spectrum of this gravitational radiation, and hence on theories of the early Universe, by combining experiments that cover 29 orders of magnitude in frequency. These include Planck observations of cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization power spectra and lensing, together with baryon acoustic oscillations and big bang nucleosynthesis measurements, as well as new pulsar timing array and ground-based interferometer limits. While individual experiments constrain the gravitational-wave energy density in specific frequency bands, the combination of experiments allows us to constrain cosmological parameters, including the inflationary spectral index, $n_t$, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$. Results from individual experiments include the most stringent nanohertz limit of the primordial background to date from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, $\\Omega_{\\rm gw}(f)<2.3\\times10^{-10}$. Observations of the cosmic microwave background alone limit the gravitational-wave spectral index at 95\\% confidence to $n_t\\lesssim5$ for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of $r = 0.11$. However, the combination of all the above experiments limits $n_t<0.36$. Future Advanced LIGO observations are expected to further constrain $n_t<0.34$ by 2020. When cosmic microwave background experiments detect a non-zero $r$, our results will imply even more stringent constraints on $n_t$ and hence theories of the early Universe.

  4. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a “Violin-Mode” shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V. [SUPA (Scottish Universities Physics Alliance), Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect “Violin-Mode” (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a “synthesized split photodiode” detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC “shadow notch” outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing “jitter” at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/?Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  5. Searches for continuous gravitational waves from nine young supernova remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barclay, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio,, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dartez, L; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fuentes-Tapia, S; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Hee, S; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A

    2014-01-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth LIGO science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of ten. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering F-statistic. We found no credible gravitational-wave signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as $4\\times10^{-25}$ on intrinsic strain, $2\\times10^{-7}$ on fiducial ellipticity, and $4\\times10^{-5}$ on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  6. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitkin, Matthew; Rowan, Sheila; Hough, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free craft in space. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems in operation around the world - LIGO (USA), Virgo (Italy/France), TAMA300 and LCGT (Japan), and GEO600 (Germany/U.K.) - and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer. A review of recent science runs from the current generation of ground-based detectors will be discussed, in addition to highlighting the astrophysical results gained thus far. Looking to the future, the major upgrades to LIGO (Advanced LIGO), Virgo (Advanced Virgo), LCGT and GEO600 ...

  7. Searches for continuous gravitational waves from nine young supernova remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; S. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; Th. S. Bauer; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; M. Benacquista; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; S. Buchman; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio, Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; C. Cutler; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; L. Dartez; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; X. Fan; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; S. Fuentes-Tapia; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. Hacker; E. D. Hall; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; S. Hee; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; G. Heinzel; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; A. Idrisy; N. Indik; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; G. Islas; J. C. Isler; T. Isogai; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; S. Jawahar; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman

    2014-12-18

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth LIGO science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of ten. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering F-statistic. We found no credible gravitational-wave signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as $4\\times10^{-25}$ on intrinsic strain, $2\\times10^{-7}$ on fiducial ellipticity, and $4\\times10^{-5}$ on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  8. Maximum gravitational-wave energy emissible in magnetar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; Benjamin J. Owen

    2011-02-16

    Recent searches of gravitational-wave (GW) data raise the question of what maximum GW energies could be emitted during gamma-ray flares of highly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars). The highest energies (\\sim 10^{49} erg) predicted so far come from a model [K. Ioka, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 327, 639 (2001)] in which the internal magnetic field of a magnetar experiences a global reconfiguration, changing the hydromagnetic equilibrium structure of the star and tapping the gravitational potential energy without changing the magnetic potential energy. The largest energies in this model assume very special conditions, including a large change in moment of inertia (which was observed in at most one flare), a very high internal magnetic field, and a very soft equation of state. Here we show that energies of 10^{48}-10^{49} erg are possible under more generic conditions by tapping the magnetic energy, and we note that similar energies may also be available through cracking of exotic solid cores. Current observational limits on gravitational waves from magnetar fundamental modes are just reaching these energies and will beat them in the era of advanced interferometers.

  9. The gravitational wave symphony of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Sathyaprakash

    2002-07-10

    The new millennium will see the upcoming of several ground-based interferometric gravitational wave antennas. Within the next decade a space-based antenna may also begin to observe the distant Universe. These gravitational wave detectors will together operate as a network taking data continuously for several years, watching the transient and continuous phenomena occurring in the deep cores of astronomical objects and dense environs of the early Universe where gravity was extremely strong and highly non-linear. The network will listen to the waves from rapidly spinning non-axisymmetric neutron stars, normal modes of black holes, binary black hole inspiral and merger, phase transitions in the early Universe, quantum fluctuations resulting in a characteristic background in the early Universe. The gravitational wave antennas will open a new window to observe the dark Universe unreachable via other channels of astronomical observations.

  10. Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

    2012-05-11

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

  11. Design of a Quantum Source of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGW) and Test Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Fontana

    2004-10-04

    The generation of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGW) has been identified as the required breakthrough that will lead to new forms of space propulsion. Many techniques have been devised to generate HFGW, but most of them exhibit marginal efficiency, therefore the power emitted in form of gravitational waves (GW) is orders of magnitude lower than the input power. The gravitational wave counterpart of the LASER, termed Gravitational-wave LASER or "GASER" is the quantum approach to the efficient generation of gravitational waves. Electrons, protons, muons, etc, all have charge and mass, if accelerated they usually lose energy through the very fast electric and magnetic channels, this causes a negligible emission through the gravitational channel. Quantum systems can be engineered to forbid electric and magnetic transitions, therefore the gravitational spin-2 transitions can take place. A class of active materials, suitable for making a GASER based on electronic transitions in the solid state, is identified along with their relevant physical properties. Means for creating coherence and population inversion and means to increase the emission probability are described. The expected performances of the device are derived from quantum gravitational theories. Additional properties of the active materials are considered to enforce the theoretical foundation of the device. A proof-of-concept device, operating at about 1 THz, is described. Experiments are proposed as a natural starting point of the research.

  12. Gravitational waves induced by spinor fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Kaixi

    2015-01-01

    In realistic model-building, spinor fields with various masses are present. During inflation, spinor field may induce gravitational waves as a second order effect. In this paper, we calculate the contribution of single massive spinor field to the power spectrum of primordial gravitational wave by using retarded Green propagator. We find that the correction is scale-invariant and of order $H^4/M_P^4$ for arbitrary spinor mass $m_{\\psi}$. Additionally, we also observe that when $m_\\psi \\gtrsim H$, the dependence of correction on $m_\\psi/H$ is nontrivial.

  13. Gravitational waves induced by spinor fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaixi Feng; Yun-Song Piao

    2015-09-03

    In realistic model-building, spinor fields with various masses are present. During inflation, spinor field may induce gravitational waves as a second order effect. In this paper, we calculate the contribution of single massive spinor field to the power spectrum of primordial gravitational wave by using retarded Green propagator. We find that the correction is scale-invariant and of order $H^4/M_P^4$ for arbitrary spinor mass $m_{\\psi}$. Additionally, we also observe that when $m_\\psi \\gtrsim H$, the dependence of correction on $m_\\psi/H$ is nontrivial.

  14. On the Vacuum Propagation of Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao Liu

    2007-06-05

    We show that, for any local, causal quantum field theory which couples covariantly to gravity, and which admits Minkowski spacetime vacuum(a) invariant under the inhomogeneous proper orthochronous Lorentz group, plane gravitational waves propagating in such Minkowski vacuum(a) do not dissipate energy or momentum via quantum field theoretic effects.

  15. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  16. On the Energy of Rotating Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahram Mashhoon; James C. McClune; Enrique Chavez; Hernando Quevedo

    1996-09-06

    A class of solutions of the gravitational field equations describing vacuum spacetimes outside rotating cylindrical sources is presented. A subclass of these solutions corresponds to the exterior gravitational fields of rotating cylindrical systems that emit gravitational radiation. The properties of these rotating gravitational wave spacetimes are investigated. In particular, we discuss the energy density of these waves using the gravitational stress-energy tensor.

  17. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Voyatzis; L. Vlahos; S. Ichtiaroglou; D. Papadopoulos

    2005-12-07

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state.

  18. Cosmological inference using gravitational wave observations alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Messenger

    2015-06-22

    Gravitational waves emitted during the coalescence of binary neutron star systems are self-calibrating signals. As such they can provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance to a source without the need for a cosmic distance scale ladder. In general, however, the corresponding redshift measurement needs to be obtained electromagnetically since it is totally degenerate with the total mass of the system. Nevertheless, recent Fisher matrix studies has shown that if information about the equation of state of the neutron stars is available, it is indeed possible to extract redshift information from the gravitational wave signal alone. Therefore, measuring the cosmological parameters in pure gravitational wave fashion is possible. Furthermore, the huge number of sources potentially observable by the Einstein Telescope has led to speculations that the gravitational wave measurement is potentially competitive with traditional methods. The Einstein telescope is a conceptual study for a third generation gravitational wave detector which is designed to yield detections of $10^3-10^7$ binary neutron star systems per year. This study presents the first Bayesian investigation of the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters can be measured using observations of binary neutron star systems by the Einstein Telescope with the one year of observations. We find by direct simulation of $10^3$ detections of binary neutron stars that, within our simplifying assumptions, $H_0,\\Omega_m,\\Omega_\\Lambda,w_0$ and $w_1$ can be measured at the $95\\%$ level with an accuracy of $\\sim 8\\%,65\\%,39\\%,80\\%$ and $90\\%$, respectively. We also find, by extrapolation, that a measurement accuracy comparable with current measurements by Planck is reached for a number of observed events $O(10^{6-7})$

  19. An Efficient Numerical Method for Computing Gravitational Waves Induced by a Particle Moving on Eccentric Inclined Orbits around a Kerr Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryuichi Fujita; Wataru Hikida; Hideyuki Tagoshi

    2009-05-20

    We develop a numerical code to compute gravitational waves induced by a particle moving on eccentric inclined orbits around a Kerr black hole. For such systems, the black hole perturbation method is applicable. The gravitational waves can be evaluated by solving the Teukolsky equation with a point like source term, which is computed from the stress-energy tensor of a test particle moving on generic bound geodesic orbits. In our previous papers, we computed the homogeneous solutions of the Teukolsky equation using a formalism developed by Mano, Suzuki and Takasugi and showed that we could compute gravitational waves efficiently and very accurately in the case of circular orbits on the equatorial plane. Here, we apply this method to eccentric inclined orbits. The geodesics around a Kerr black hole have three constants of motion: energy, angular momentum and the Carter constant. We compute the rates of change of the Carter constant as well as those of energy and angular momentum. This is the first time that the rate of change of the Carter constant has been evaluated accurately. We also treat the case of highly eccentric orbits with $e=0.9$. To confirm the accuracy of our codes, several tests are performed. We find that the accuracy is only limited by the truncation of $\\ell$-, $k$- and $n$-modes, where $\\ell$ is the index of the spin-weighted spheroidal harmonics, and $n$ and $k$ are the harmonics of the radial and polar motion, respectively. When we set the maximum of $\\ell$ to 20, we obtain a relative accuracy of $10^{-5}$ even in the highly eccentric case of $e=0.9$. The accuracy is better for lower eccentricity. Our numerical code is expected to be useful for computing templates of the extreme mass ratio inspirals, which is one of the main targets of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA).

  20. Gravitational waves from cosmological first order phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Rummukainen, Kari; Weir, David

    2015-01-01

    First order phase transitions in the early Universe generate gravitational waves, which may be observable in future space-based gravitational wave observatiories, e.g. the European eLISA satellite constellation. The gravitational waves provide an unprecedented direct view of the Universe at the time of their creation. We study the generation of the gravitational waves during a first order phase transition using large-scale simulations of a model consisting of relativistic fluid and an order parameter field. We observe that the dominant source of gravitational waves is the sound generated by the transition, resulting in considerably stronger radiation than earlier calculations have indicated.

  1. Gravitational waves from cosmological first order phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Hindmarsh; Stephan Huber; Kari Rummukainen; David Weir

    2015-11-14

    First order phase transitions in the early Universe generate gravitational waves, which may be observable in future space-based gravitational wave observatiories, e.g. the European eLISA satellite constellation. The gravitational waves provide an unprecedented direct view of the Universe at the time of their creation. We study the generation of the gravitational waves during a first order phase transition using large-scale simulations of a model consisting of relativistic fluid and an order parameter field. We observe that the dominant source of gravitational waves is the sound generated by the transition, resulting in considerably stronger radiation than earlier calculations have indicated.

  2. Gravitational Wave Tests of General Relativity with the Parameterized Post-Einsteinian Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Cornish; Laura Sampson; Nico Yunes; Frans Pretorius

    2011-08-23

    Gravitational wave astronomy has tremendous potential for studying extreme astrophysical phenomena and exploring fundamental physics. The waves produced by binary black hole mergers will provide a pristine environment in which to study strong field, dynamical gravity. Extracting detailed information about these systems requires accurate theoretical models of the gravitational wave signals. If gravity is not described by General Relativity, analyses that are based on waveforms derived from Einstein's field equations could result in parameter biases and a loss of detection efficiency. A new class of "parameterized post-Einsteinian" (ppE) waveforms has been proposed to cover this eventuality. Here we apply the ppE approach to simulated data from a network of advanced ground based interferometers (aLIGO/aVirgo) and from a future spaced based interferometer (LISA). Bayesian inference and model selection are used to investigate parameter biases, and to determine the level at which departures from general relativity can be detected. We find that in some cases the parameter biases from assuming the wrong theory can be severe. We also find that gravitational wave observations will beat the existing bounds on deviations from general relativity derived from the orbital decay of binary pulsars by a large margin across a wide swath of parameter space.

  3. Gravitational Waves in G4v

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mead, Carver

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational coupling of the propagation four-vectors of matter wave functions is formulated in flat space-time. Coupling at the momentum level rather than at the "force-law" level greatly simplifies many calculations. This locally Lorentz-invariant approach (G4v) treats electromagnetic and gravitational coupling on an equal footing. Classical mechanics emerges from the incoherent aggregation of matter wave functions. The theory reproduces, to first order beyond Newton, the standard GR results for Gravity-Probe B, deflection of light by massive bodies, precession of orbits, gravitational red shift, and total gravitational-wave energy radiated by a circular binary system. Its predictions of total radiated energy from highly eccentric Kepler systems are slightly larger than those of similar GR treatments. G4v predictions differ markedly from those of GR for the gravitational-wave radiation patterns from rotating massive systems, and for the LIGO antenna pattern. The predicted antenna patterns have been shown t...

  4. Gravitational wave diagnosis of a circumbinary disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimitake Hayasaki; Kent Yagi; Takahiro Tanaka; Shin Mineshige

    2012-01-13

    When binary black holes are embedded in a gaseous environment, a rotating disk surrounding them, the so-called circumbinary disk, will be formed. The binary exerts a gravitational torque on the circumbinary disk and thereby the orbital angular momentum is transferred to it, while the angular momentum of the circumbinary disk is transferred to the binary through the mass accretion. The binary undergoes an orbital decay due to both the gravitational wave emission and the binary-disk interaction. This causes the phase evolution of the gravitational wave signal. The precise measurement of the gravitational wave phase thus may provide information regarding the circumbinary disk. In this paper, we assess the detectability of the signature of the binary-disk interaction using the future space-borne gravitational wave detectors such as DECIGO and BBO by the standard matched filtering analysis. We find that the effect of the circumbinary disk around binary black holes in the mass range $6M_sun\\le{M}\\lesssim3\\times10^3M_sun$ is detectable at a statistically significant level in five year observation, provided that gas accretes onto the binary at a rate greater than $\\dot{M}\\sim1.4\\times10^{17} [gs^{-1}] j^{-1}(M/10M_sun)^{33/23}$ with 10% mass-to-energy conversion efficiency, where j represents the efficiency of the angular momentum transfer from the binary to the circumbinary disk. We show that $O(0.1)$ coalescence events are expected to occur in sufficiently dense molecular clouds in five year observation. We also point out that the circumbinary disk is detectable, even if its mass at around the inner edge is by over 10 orders of magnitude less than the binary mass.

  5. Kinks, extra dimensions, and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth, E-mail: r.a.w.gregory@durham.ac.uk [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology and Centre for Particle Theory, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    We investigate in detail the gravitational wave signal from kinks on cosmic (super)strings, including the kinematical effects from the internal extra dimensions. We find that the signal is suppressed, however, the effect is less significant that that for cusps. Combined with the greater incidence of kinks on (super)strings, it is likely that the kink signal offers the better chance for detection of cosmic (super)strings.

  6. Energy-momentum Density of Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir M. Abbassi; Saeed Mirshekari

    2014-11-29

    In this paper, we elaborate the problem of energy-momentum in general relativity by energy-momentum prescriptions theory. Our aim is to calculate energy and momentum densities for the general form of gravitational waves. In this connection, we have extended the previous works by using the prescriptions of Bergmann and Tolman. It is shown that they are finite and reasonable. In addition, using Tolman prescription, exactly, leads to same results that have been obtained by Einstein and Papapetrou prescriptions.

  7. Optimal generalization of power filters for gravitational wave bursts, from single to multiple detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Sylvestre

    2003-08-19

    Searches for gravitational wave signals which do not have a precise model describing the shape of their waveforms are often performed using power detectors based on a quadratic form of the data. A new, optimal method of generalizing these power detectors so that they operate coherently over a network of interferometers is presented. Such a mode of operation is useful in obtaining better detection efficiencies, and better estimates of the position of the source of the gravitational wave signal. Numerical simulations based on a realistic, computationally efficient hierarchical implementation of the method are used to characterize its efficiency, for detection and for position estimation. The method is shown to be more efficient at detecting signals than an incoherent approach based on coincidences between lists of events. It is also shown to be capable of locating the position of the source.

  8. Gravitational Waves in G4v

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver Mead

    2015-03-16

    Gravitational coupling of the propagation four-vectors of matter wave functions is formulated in flat space-time. Coupling at the momentum level rather than at the "force-law" level greatly simplifies many calculations. This locally Lorentz-invariant approach (G4v) treats electromagnetic and gravitational coupling on an equal footing. Classical mechanics emerges from the incoherent aggregation of matter wave functions. The theory reproduces, to first order beyond Newton, the standard GR results for Gravity-Probe B, deflection of light by massive bodies, precession of orbits, gravitational red shift, and total gravitational-wave energy radiated by a circular binary system. Its predictions of total radiated energy from highly eccentric Kepler systems are slightly larger than those of similar GR treatments. G4v predictions differ markedly from those of GR for the gravitational-wave radiation patterns from rotating massive systems, and for the LIGO antenna pattern. The predicted antenna patterns have been shown to be highly distinguishable in the case of continuous gravitational-wave sources, and should therefore be testable as data from Advanced LIGO becomes available over the next few years.

  9. A Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Hannover, Max Planck Inst. Grav. /Australian

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than {approx_equal}150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around {approx_equal}250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h{sub RSS} {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs.

  10. Displacement-noise-free gravitational-wave detection with a single Fabry-Perot cavity: a toy model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey P. Tarabrin; Sergey P. Vyatchanin

    2008-11-07

    We propose a detuned Fabry-Perot cavity, pumped through both the mirrors, as \\textit{a toy model} of the gravitational-wave (GW) detector partially free from displacement noise of the test masses. It is demonstrated that the noise of cavity mirrors can be eliminated, but the one of lasers and detectors cannot. The isolation of the GW signal from displacement noise of the mirrors is achieved in a proper linear combination of the cavity output signals. The construction of such a linear combination is possible due to the difference between the reflected and transmitted output signals of detuned cavity. We demonstrate that in low-frequency region the obtained displacement-noise-free response signal is much stronger than the $f^3_{\\textrm{gw}}$-limited sensitivity of displacement-noise-free interferometers recently proposed by S. Kawamura and Y. Chen. However, the loss of the resonant gain in the noise cancelation procedure results is the sensitivity limitation of our toy model by displacement noise of lasers and detectors.

  11. Resonant Dampers for Parametric Instabilities in Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gras, Slawek; Barsotti, Lisa; Evans, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Advanced gravitational wave interferometric detectors will operate at their design sensitivity with nearly 1MW of laser power stored in the arm cavities. Such large power may lead to the uncontrolled growth of acoustic modes in the test masses due to the transfer of optical energy to the mechanical modes of the arm cavity mirrors. These parametric instabilities have the potential of significantly compromising the detector performance and control. Here we present the design of "acoustic mode dampers" that use the piezoelectric effect to reduce the coupling of optical to mechanical energy. Experimental measurements carried on an Advanced LIGO-like test mass shown a 10-fold reduction in the amplitude of several mechanical modes, thus suggesting that this technique can greatly mitigate the impact of parametric instabilities in advanced detectors.

  12. Evolution of gravitational waves through the cosmological QCD transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik J. Schwarz

    1998-11-06

    The spectrum of gravitational waves that have been produced in inflation is modified during cosmological transitions. Large drops in the number of relativistic particles, like during the QCD transition or at $e^+e^-$ annihilation, lead to steps in the spectrum of gravitational waves. We calculate the transfer function for the differential energy density of gravitational waves for a first-order and for a crossover QCD transition.

  13. Connecting Numerical Relativity and Data Analysis of Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deirdre Shoemaker; Karan Jani; Lionel London; Larne Pekowsky

    2015-03-09

    Gravitational waves deliver information in exquisite detail about astrophysical phenomena, among them the collision of two black holes, a system completely invisible to the eyes of electromagnetic telescopes. Models that predict gravitational wave signals from likely sources are crucial for the success of this endeavor. Modeling binary black hole sources of gravitational radiation requires solving the Eintein equations of General Relativity using powerful computer hardware and sophisticated numerical algorithms. This proceeding presents where we are in understanding ground-based gravitational waves resulting from the merger of black holes and the implications of these sources for the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy.

  14. Resonant Spheres: Multifrequency Detectors of Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Angeles Serrano; J. Alberto Lobo

    1999-11-15

    We discuss the capabilities of spherical antenn\\ae as single multifrequency detectors of gravitational waves. A first order theory allows us to evaluate the coupled spectrum and the resonators readouts when the first and the second quadrupole bare sphere frequencies are simultaneously selected for layout tuning. We stress the existence of non-tuning influences in the second mode coupling causing draggs in the frequency splittings. These URF effects are relevant to a correct physical description of resonant spheres, still more if operating as multifrequency appliances like our PHCA proposal.

  15. Gravitational wave energy spectrum of hyperbolic encounters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo De Vittori; Philippe Jetzer; Antoine Klein

    2012-07-23

    The emission of gravitational waves is studied for a system of massive objects interacting on hyperbolic orbits within the quadrupole approximation following the work of Capozziello et al. Here we focus on the derivation of an analytic formula for the energy spectrum of the emitted waves. We checked numerically that our formula is in agreement with the two limiting cases for which results were already available: for the eccentricity {\\epsilon} = 1, the parabolic case whose spectrum was computed by Berry and Gair, and the large {\\epsilon} limit with the formula given by Turner.

  16. Standing gravitational waves from domain walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merab Gogberashvili; Shynaray Myrzakul; Douglas Singleton

    2009-07-19

    We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of `stiff' matter, i.e. matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact non-linear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

  17. Gravitational wave energy spectrum of hyperbolic encounters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vittori, Lorenzo; Klein, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    The emission of gravitational waves is studied for a system of massive objects interacting on hyperbolic orbits within the quadrupole approximation following the work of Capozziello et al. Here we focus on the derivation of an analytic formula for the energy spectrum of the emitted waves. We checked numerically that our formula is in agreement with the two limiting cases for which results were already available: for the eccentricity {\\epsilon} = 1, the parabolic case whose spectrum was computed by Berry and Gair, and the large {\\epsilon} limit with the formula given by Turner.

  18. Gravitational waves from known pulsars: results from the initial detector era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; S. Deléglise; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe

    2014-04-24

    We present the results of searches for gravitational waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and GEO600 detectors. This gives a total of 195 pulsars including the most recent results described in this paper.

  19. Gravitational-waves from known pulsars: results from the initial detector era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Agathos, M; Affeldt, C; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brüeckner, F; Bulik, T; Buonanno, A; Bulten, H J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cuoco, E; Cunningham, L; D'Antonio, S; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kaw, P; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of searches for gravitational-waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational-wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and G...

  20. Gravitational waves from known pulsars: Results from the initial detector era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P. [LIGO - California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Adams, C. [LIGO - Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Adams, T. [Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M. [Nikhef, Science Park, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aggarwal, N. [LIGO - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Aguiar, O. D. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12227-010 - Săo José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Allocca, A. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ceron, E. Amador [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and The Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-20

    We present the results of searches for gravitational waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and GEO600 detectors. This gives a total of 195 pulsars including the most recent results described in this paper.

  1. Radiative Thermal Noise for Transmissive Optics in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheila Dwyer; Stefan W. Ballmer

    2014-08-07

    Radiative losses have traditionally been neglected in the calculation of thermal noise of transmissive optical elements because for the most commonly used geometries they are small compared to losses due to thermal conduction. We explore the use of such transmissive optical elements in extremely noise-sensitive environments such as the arm cavities of future gravitational-wave interferometers. This drives us to a geometry regime where radiative losses are no longer negligible. In this paper we derive the thermo-refractive noise associated with such radiative losses and compare it to other known sources of thermal noise.

  2. Search algorithm for a gravitational wave signal in association with Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mohanty; Sz. Marka; R. Rahkola; S. Mukherjee; I. Leonor; R. Frey; J. Cannizzo; J. Camp

    2004-07-15

    One of the brightest Gamma Ray Burst ever recorded, GRB030329, occurred during the second science run of the LIGO detectors. At that time, both interferometers at the Hanford, WA LIGO site were in lock and acquiring data. The data collected from the two Hanford detectors was analyzed for the presence of a gravitational wave signal associated with this GRB. This paper presents a detailed description of the search algorithm implemented in the current analysis.

  3. Gravitational Waves and the Scale of Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrdad Mirbabayi; Leonardo Senatore; Eva Silverstein; Matias Zaldarriaga

    2015-04-17

    We revisit alternative mechanisms of gravitational wave production during inflation and argue that they generically emit a non-negligible amount of scalar fluctuations. We find the scalar power is larger than the tensor power by a factor of order $1/\\epsilon^2$. For an appreciable tensor contribution the associated scalar emission completely dominates the zero-point fluctuations of inflaton, resulting in a tensor-to-scalar ratio $r\\sim \\epsilon^2$. A more quantitative result can be obtained if one further assumes that gravitational waves are emitted by localized sub-horizon processes, giving $r_{\\rm max} \\simeq 0.3 \\epsilon^2$. However, $\\epsilon$ is generally time dependent, and this result for $r$ depends on its instantaneous value during the production of the sources, rather than just its average value, somewhat relaxing constraints from the tilt $n_s$. We calculate the scalar 3-point correlation function in the same class of models and show that non-Gaussianity cannot be made arbitrarily small, i.e. $f_{NL} \\geq 1$, independently of the value of $r$. Possible exceptions in multi-field scenarios are discussed.

  4. Transformations of asymptotic gravitational-wave data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Boyle

    2015-09-16

    Gravitational-wave data is gauge dependent. While we can restrict the class of gauges in which such data may be expressed, there will still be an infinite-dimensional group of transformations allowed while remaining in this class, and almost as many different---though physically equivalent---waveforms as there are transformations. This paper presents a method for calculating the effects of the most important transformation group, the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) group, consisting of rotations, boosts, and supertranslations (which include time and space translations as special cases). To a reasonable approximation, these transformations result in simple coupling between the modes in a spin-weighted spherical-harmonic decomposition of the waveform. It is shown that waveforms from simulated compact binaries in the publicly available SXS waveform catalog contain unmodeled effects due to displacement and drift of the center of mass, accounting for mode-mixing at typical levels of 1%. However, these effects can be mitigated by measuring the motion of the system's center of mass, and applying the opposite transformation to the waveform data. More generally, controlling the BMS transformations will be necessary to eliminate the gauge ambiguity inherent in gravitational-wave data for both numerical and analytical waveforms. Open-source code implementing BMS transformations of waveforms is supplied along with this paper.

  5. Relic gravitational waves and the generalized second law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    German Izquierdo; Diego Pavon

    2005-01-12

    The generalized second law of gravitational thermodynamics is applied to the present era of accelerated expansion of the Universe. In spite of the fact that the entropy of matter and relic gravitational waves inside the event horizon diminish, the mentioned law is fulfilled provided that the expression for the entropy density of the gravitational waves satisfies a certain condition.

  6. Gravitational wave astronomy - astronomy of the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Dhurandhar

    2011-04-15

    An enigmatic prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity is gravitational waves. With the observed decay in the orbit of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar agreeing within a fraction of a percent with the theoretically computed decay from Einstein's theory, the existence of gravitational waves was firmly established. Currently there is a worldwide effort to detect gravitational waves with interferometric gravitational wave observatories or detectors and several such detectors have been built or being built. The initial detectors have reached their design sensitivities and now the effort is on to construct advanced detectors which are expected to detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. The era of gravitational wave astronomy has arrived. This article describes the worldwide effort which includes the effort on the Indian front - the IndIGO project -, the principle underlying interferometric detectors both on ground and in space, the principal noise sources that plague such detectors, the astrophysical sources of gravitational waves that one expects to detect by these detectors and some glimpse of the data analysis methods involved in extracting the very weak gravitational wave signals from detector noise.

  7. Energy and Momentum of a Class of Rotating Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif

    2001-02-09

    We calculate energy and momentum for a class of cylindrical rotating gravitational waves using Einstein and Papapetrou's prescriptions. It is shown that the results obtained are reduced to the special case of the cylindrical gravitational waves already available in the literature.

  8. Gravitation Wave Emission from Radio Pulsars Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Regimbau; J. A. de Freitas Pacheco

    2000-05-02

    We report a new pulsar population synthesis based on Monte Carlo techniques, aiming to estimate the contribution of galactic radio pulsars to the continuous gravitational wave emission. Assuming that the rotation periods of pulsars at birth have a Gaussian distribution, we find that the average initial period is 290 ms. The number of objects with periods equal to or less than 0.4 s, and therefore capable of being detected by an interferometric gravitational antenna like VIRGO, is of the order of 5100-7800. With integration times lasting between 2 and 3 yr, our simulations suggest that about two detections should be possible, if the mean equatorial ellipticity of the pulsars is $\\epsilon$ =10$^{-6}$. A mean ellipticity an order of magnitude higher increases the expected number of detections to 12-18, whereas for $\\epsilon < 10^{-6}$, no detections are expected

  9. Generation of high-purity higher-order Laguerre-Gauss beams at high laser power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Carbone; C. Bogan; P. Fulda; A. Freise; B. Willke

    2013-03-14

    We have investigated the generation of highly pure higher-order Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beams at high laser power of order 100W, the same regime that will be used by 2nd generation gravitational wave interferometers such as Advanced LIGO. We report on the generation of a helical type LG33 mode with a purity of order 97% at a power of 83W, the highest power ever reported in literature for a higher-order LG mode.

  10. Noise power spectral density of a fibre scattered-light interferometer with a semiconductor laser source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekseev, A E; Potapov, V T

    2013-10-31

    Spectral characteristics of the noise intensity fluctuations at the output of a scattered-light interferometer, caused by phase fluctuations of semiconductor laser radiation are considered. This kind of noise is one of the main factors limiting sensitivity of interferometric sensors. For the first time, to our knowledge, the expression is obtained for the average noise power spectral density at the interferometer output versus the degree of a light source coherence and length of the scattering segment. Also, the approximate expressions are considered which determine the power spectral density in the low-frequency range (up to 200 kHz) and in the limiting case of extended scattering segments. The expression obtained for the noise power spectral density agrees with experimental normalised power spectra with a high accuracy. (interferometry of radiation)

  11. Gravitational waves from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2015-01-01

    We compute the stochastic gravitational wave production from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation in the early universe, focusing on an effective potential with a logarithmic mass correction that typically arises in gravity mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We find that a significant gravitational wave background can be generated when Q-balls are being formed out of the condensate fragmentation. This gravitational wave background has a distinct multi-peak power spectrum where the trough is closely linked to the supersymmetry breaking scale and whose frequencies are peaked around kHz for TeV supersymmetry breaking.

  12. Gravitational waves from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuang-Yong Zhou

    2015-06-01

    We compute the stochastic gravitational wave production from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation in the early universe, focusing on an effective potential with a logarithmic mass correction that typically arises in gravity mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We find that a significant gravitational wave background can be generated when Q-balls are being formed out of the condensate fragmentation. This gravitational wave background has a distinct multi-peak power spectrum where the trough is closely linked to the supersymmetry breaking scale and whose frequencies are peaked around kHz for TeV supersymmetry breaking.

  13. Gravitational wave generation in power-law inflationary models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo M. Sá; Alfredo B. Henriques

    2008-06-06

    We investigate the generation of gravitational waves in power-law inflationary models. The energy spectrum of the gravitational waves is calculated using the method of continuous Bogoliubov coefficients. We show that, by looking at the interval of frequencies between 10^(-5) and 10^5 Hz and also at the GHz range, important information can be obtained, both about the inflationary period itself and about the thermalization regime between the end of inflation and the beginning of the radiation-dominated era. We thus deem the development of gravitational wave detectors, covering the MHz/GHz range of frequencies, to be an important task for the future.

  14. Correlation between Gamma-Ray bursts and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Tricarico; A. Ortolan; A. Solaroli; G. Vedovato; L. Baggio; M. Cerdonio; L. Taffarello; J. Zendri; R. Mezzena; G. A. Prodi; S. Vitale; P. Fortini; M. Bonaldi; P. Falferi

    2001-01-05

    The cosmological origin of $\\gamma$-ray bursts (GRBs) is now commonly accepted and, according to several models for the central engine, GRB sources should also emit at the same time gravitational waves bursts (GWBs). We have performed two correlation searches between the data of the resonant gravitational wave detector AURIGA and GRB arrival times collected in the BATSE 4B catalog. No correlation was found and an upper limit \\bbox{$h_{\\text{RMS}} \\leq 1.5 \\times 10^{-18}$} on the averaged amplitude of gravitational waves associated with $\\gamma$-ray bursts has been set for the first time.

  15. Energy Contents of Gravitational Waves in Teleparallel Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Sumaira Taj

    2009-10-02

    The conserved quantities, that are, gravitational energy-momentum and its relevant quantities are investigated for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity using the Hamiltonian approach. For both cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves, we obtain definite energy and constant momentum. The constant momentum shows consistency with the results available in General Relativity and teleparallel gravity. The angular momentum for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves also turn out to be constant. Further, we evaluate their gravitational energy-momentum fluxes and gravitational pressure.

  16. Techniques for improving the readout sensitivity of gravitational wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolás de Mateo

    2012-01-01

    The detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from astrophysical sources shows promise as a new method to probe extremely energetic phenomena and test the strong field limit of the general theory of relativity. The era of the ...

  17. Hunting Gravitational Waves with Multi-Messenger Counterparts: Australia's Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. J. Howell; A. Rowlinson; D. M. Coward; P. D. Lasky; D. L. Kaplan; E. Thrane; G. Rowell; D. K. Galloway; Fang Yuan; R. Dodson; T. Murphy; G. C. Hill; I. Andreoni; L. Spitler; A. Horton

    2015-11-10

    The first observations by a worldwide network of advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors offer a unique opportunity for the astronomical community. At design sensitivity, these facilities will be able to detect coalescing binary neutron stars to distances approaching 400 Mpc, and neutron star-black hole systems to 1 Gpc. Both of these sources are associated with gamma ray bursts which are known to emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Gravitational wave detections provide the opportunity for "multi-messenger" observations, combining gravitational wave with electromagnetic, cosmic ray or neutrino observations. This review provides an overview of how Australian astronomical facilities and collaborations with the gravitational wave community can contribute to this new era of discovery, via contemporaneous follow-up observations from the radio to the optical and high energy. We discuss some of the frontier discoveries that will be made possible when this new window to the Universe is opened.

  18. Polarized Gravitational Waves from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiho Kobayashi; Peter Meszaros

    2003-01-24

    Significant gravitational wave emission is expected from gamma-ray bursts arising from compact stellar mergers, and possibly also from bursts associated with fast-rotating massive stellar core collapses. These models have in common a high angular rotation rate, and observations provide evidence for jet collimation of the photon emission, with properties depending on the polar angle, which may also be of relevance for X-ray flashes. Here we consider the gravitational wave emission and its polarization as a function of angle which is expected from such sources. We discuss possible correlations between the burst photon luminosity, or the delay between gravitational wave bursts and X-ray flashes, and the polarization degree of the gravitational waves.

  19. Quantum Foam, Gravity and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, R T

    2003-01-01

    The new information-theoretic Process Physics has shown that space is a quantum foam system with gravity being, in effect, an inhomogeneous in-flow of the quantum foam into matter. The theory predicts that absolute motion with respect to this system should be observable, and it is shown here that absolute motion has been detected in at least seven experiments. As well this experimental data also reveals the existence of a gravitational wave phenomena associated with the in-flow. It is shown that Galilean Relativity and Special Relativity are in fact compatible, contrary to current beliefs: absolute motion actually causes the special relativity effects. The new theory of gravity passes all the tests of the previous Newtonian and General Relativity theories, but in addition resolves the numerous gravitational anomalies such as the spiral galaxy `dark matter' effect, the absence of `dark matter' in elliptical galaxies, the inconsistencies in measuring G, the borehole g anomaly, and others. It is shown that Newto...

  20. IndIGO and LIGO-India: Scope and Plans for Gravitational Wave Research and Precision Metrology in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unnikrishnan, C S

    2015-01-01

    Initiatives by the IndIGO (Indian Initiative in Gravitational Wave Observations) Consortium during the past three years have materialized into concrete plans and project opportunities for instrumentation and research based on advanced interferometer detectors . With the LIGO-India opportunity, this initiative has a taken a promising path towards significant participation in gravitational wave (GW) astronomy and research, and in developing and nurturing precision fabrication and measurement technologies in India. The proposed LIGO-India detector will foster integrated development of frontier GW research in India and will provide opportunity for substantial contributions to global GW research and astronomy. Widespread interest and enthusiasm about these developments in premier research and educational institutions in India lead to the expectation that there will be a grand surge of activity in precision metrology, instrumentation, data handling and computation etc. in the context of LIGO-India. I discuss the sc...

  1. Cosmology with space-based gravitational-wave detectors --- dark energy and primordial gravitational waves ---

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Nishizawa; Kent Yagi; Atsushi Taruya; Takahiro Tanaka

    2012-02-24

    Proposed space-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors such as DECIGO and BBO will detect ~10^6 neutron-star (NS) binaries and determine the luminosity distances to the binaries with high precision. Combining the luminosity distances with cosmologically-induced phase corrections on the GWs, cosmological expansion out to high redshift can be measured without the redshift determinations of host galaxies by electromagnetic observation and be a unique probe for dark energy. On the other hand, such a NS-binary foreground should be subtracted to detect primordial GWs produced during inflation. Thus, the constraining power on dark energy and the detectability of the primordial gravitational waves strongly depend on the detector sensitivity and are in close relation with one another. In this paper, we investigate the constraints on the equation of state of dark energy with future space-based GW detectors with/without identifying the redshifts of host galaxies. We also study the sensitivity to the primordial GWs, properly dealing with the residual of the NS binary foreground. Based on the results, we discuss the detector sensitivity required to achieve the forementioned targeted study of cosmology.

  2. A template bank to search for gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: II. Phenomenological model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Cokelaer

    2007-09-07

    Matched filtering is used to search for gravitational waves emitted by inspiralling compact binaries in data from ground-based interferometers. One of the key aspects of the detection process is the deployment of a set of templates, also called a template bank, to cover the astrophysically interesting region of the parameter space. In a companion paper, we described the template-bank algorithm used in the analysis of LIGO data to search for signals from non-spinning binaries made of neutron star and/or stellar-mass black holes; this template bank is based upon physical template families. In this paper, we describe the phenomenological template bank that was used to search for gravitational waves from non-spinning black hole binaries (from stellar mass formation) in the second, third and fourth LIGO science runs. We briefly explain the design of the bank, whose templates are based on a phenomenological detection template family. We show that this template bank gives matches greater than 95% with the physical template families that are expected to be captured by the phenomenological templates.

  3. First Searches for Optical Counterparts to Gravitational-wave Candidate Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; D'\\iaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E J

    2013-01-01

    During the LIGO and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  4. Enhancing the bandwidth of gravitational-wave detectors with unstable optomechanical filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haixing Miao; Yiqiu Ma; Chunnong Zhao; Yanbei Chen

    2015-05-30

    For gravitational-wave interferometric detectors, there is a tradeoff between the detector bandwidth and peak sensitivity when focusing on the shot noise level. This has to do with the frequency-dependent propagation phase lag (positive dispersion) of the signal. We consider embedding an active unstable filter---a cavity-assisted optomechanical device operating in the instability regime---inside the interferometer to compensate the phase, and using feedback control to stabilize the entire system. We show that this scheme in principle can enhance the bandwidth without sacrificing the peak sensitivity. However, there is one practical difficulty for implementing it due to the thermal fluctuation of the mechanical oscillator in the optomechanical filter, which puts a very stringent requirement on the environmental temperature and the mechanical quality factor.

  5. First Cross-Correlation Analysis of Interferometric and Resonant-Bar Gravitational-Wave Data for Stochastic Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgamy, M; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hamilton, W O; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Miller, P; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moody, V; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nettles, D; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Paik, H J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P

    2007-01-01

    Data from the LIGO Livingston interferometer and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector, taken during LIGO's fourth science run, were examined for cross-correlations indicative of a stochastic gravitational-wave background in the frequency range 850-950 Hz, with most of the sensitivity arising between 905 Hz and 925 Hz. ALLEGRO was operated in three different orientations during the experiment to modulate the relative sign of gravitational-wave and environmental correlations. No statistically significant correlations were seen in any of the orientations, and the results were used to set a Bayesian 90% confidence level upper limit of Omega_gw(f) <= 1.02, which corresponds to a gravitational wave strain at 915 Hz of 1.5e-23/rHz. In the traditional units of h_100^2 Omega_gw(f), this is a limit of 0.53, two orders of magnitude better than the previous direct limit at these frequencies. The method was also validated with successful extraction of simulated signals injected in hardware and software.

  6. Studying Inflation with Future Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryusuke Jinno; Takeo Moroi; Tomo Takahashi

    2014-11-28

    Motivated by recent progress in our understanding of the $B$-mode polarization of cosmic microwave background (CMB), which provides important information about the inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs), we study the possibility to acquire information about the early universe using future space-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors. We perform a detailed statistical analysis to estimate how well we can determine the reheating temperature after inflation as well as the amplitude, the tensor spectral index, and the running of the inflationary gravitational waves. We discuss how the accuracies depend on noise parameters of the detector and the minimum frequency available in the analysis. Implication of such a study on the test of inflation models is also discussed.

  7. Studying inflation with future space-based gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Moroi, Takeo; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: moroi@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent progress in our understanding of the B-mode polarization of cosmic microwave background (CMB), which provides important information about the inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs), we study the possibility to acquire information about the early universe using future space-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors. We perform a detailed statistical analysis to estimate how well we can determine the reheating temperature after inflation as well as the amplitude, the tensor spectral index, and the running of the inflationary gravitational waves. We discuss how the accuracies depend on noise parameters of the detector and the minimum frequency available in the analysis. Implication of such a study on the test of inflation models is also discussed.

  8. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES OF JET PRECESSION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Mouyuan; Liu Tong; Gu Weimin; Lu Jufu, E-mail: tongliu@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2012-06-10

    The physical nature of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is believed to involve an ultra-relativistic jet. The observed complex structure of light curves motivates the idea of jet precession. In this work, we study the gravitational waves of jet precession based on neutrino-dominated accretion disks around black holes, which may account for the central engine of GRBs. In our model, the jet and the inner part of the disk may precess along with the black hole, which is driven by the outer part of the disk. Gravitational waves are therefore expected to be significant from this black-hole-inner-disk precession system. By comparing our numerical results with the sensitivity of some detectors, we find that it is possible for DECIGO and BBO to detect such gravitational waves, particularly for GRBs in the Local Group.

  9. Primordial Gravitational Wave Calculations: Nonlinear vs Linear Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, David

    2015-01-01

    This work is a follow-up to the paper, "Numerical Relativity as a Tool for Studying the Early Universe". In this article, we present the first results of direct numerical simulations of primordial plasma turbulence as it applies to the generation of gravitational waves. We calculate the normalized energy density, strain and degree of polarization of gravitational waves produced by a simulated turbulent plasma similar to what was believed to have existed at the electroweak scale, 246 GeV. This calculation is completed using two numerical codes, one which utilizes full General Relativity calculations based on modified BSSN equations while the other utilizes a linearized approximation of General Relativity. Our results show that there is a significant difference between the spectrum of gravitational waves calculated using a nonlinear code as opposed to that calculated with a linear approximation. This implies that simulations that do not take into account nonlinear effects may not give accurate results.

  10. Primordial Gravitational Wave Calculations: Nonlinear vs Linear Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Garrison

    2015-06-17

    This work is a follow-up to the paper, "Numerical Relativity as a Tool for Studying the Early Universe". In this article, we present the first results of direct numerical simulations of primordial plasma turbulence as it applies to the generation of gravitational waves. We calculate the normalized energy density, strain and degree of polarization of gravitational waves produced by a simulated turbulent plasma similar to what was believed to have existed shortly after the electroweak scale. This calculation is completed using two numerical codes, one which utilizes full General Relativity calculations based on modified BSSN equations while the other utilizes a linearized approximation of General Relativity. Our results show that there is a significant difference between the spectrum of gravitational waves calculated using a nonlinear code as opposed to that calculated with a linear approximation. This implies that simulations that do not take into account nonlinear effects may not give accurate results.

  11. Gravitational-wave Science in the High School Classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Farr; GionMatthias Schelbert; Laura Trouille

    2012-08-20

    This article describes a set of curriculum modifications designed to integrate gravitational-wave science into a high school physics or astronomy curriculum. Gravitational-wave scientists are on the verge of being able to detect extreme cosmic events, like the merger of two black holes, happening hundreds of millions of light years away. Their work has the potential to propel astronomy into a new era by providing an entirely new means of observing astronomical phenomena. Gravitational-wave science encompasses astrophysics, physics, engineering, and quantum optics. As a result, this curriculum exposes students to the interdisciplinary nature of science. It also provides an authentic context for students to learn about astrophysical sources, data analysis techniques, cutting-edge detector technology, and error analysis.

  12. Gauge Invariant Effective Stress-Energy Tensors for Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul R. Anderson

    1996-09-09

    It is shown that if a generalized definition of gauge invariance is used, gauge invariant effective stress-energy tensors for gravitational waves and other gravitational perturbations can be defined in a much larger variety of circumstances than has previously been possible. In particular it is no longer necessary to average the stress-energy tensor over a region of spacetime which is larger in scale than the wavelengths of the waves and it is no longer necessary to restrict attention to high frequency gravitational waves.

  13. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thilo Schuldt; Christian Schubert; Markus Krutzik; Lluis Gesa Bote; Naceur Gaaloul; Jonas Hartwig; Holger Ahlers; Waldemar Herr; Katerine Posso-Trujillo; Jan Rudolph; Stephan Seidel; Thijs Wendrich; Wolfgang Ertmer; Sven Herrmann; André Kubelka-Lange; Alexander Milke; Benny Rievers; Emanuele Rocco; Andrew Hinton; Kai Bongs; Markus Oswald; Matthias Franz; Matthias Hauth; Achim Peters; Ahmad Bawamia; Andreas Wicht; Baptiste Battelier; Andrea Bertoldi; Philippe Bouyer; Arnaud Landragin; Didier Massonnet; Thomas Lévčque; Andre Wenzlawski; Ortwin Hellmig; Patrick Windpassinger; Klaus Sengstock; Wolf von Klitzing; Chris Chaloner; David Summers; Philip Ireland; Ignacio Mateos; Carlos F. Sopuerta; Fiodor Sorrentino; Guglielmo M. Tino; Michael Williams; Christian Trenkel; Domenico Gerardi; Michael Chwalla; Johannes Burkhardt; Ulrich Johann; Astrid Heske; Eric Wille; Martin Gehler; Luigi Cacciapuoti; Norman Gürlebeck; Claus Braxmaier; Ernst Rasel

    2014-12-08

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry, the detection unit, the vacuum system for $10^{-11}$ mbar ultra-high vacuum generation, and the high-suppression factor magnetic shielding as well as the thermal control system. The laser system is based on a hybrid approach using fiber-based telecom components and high-power laser diode technology and includes all laser sources for 2D-MOT, 3D-MOT, ODT, interferometry and detection. Manipulation and switching of the laser beams is carried out on an optical bench using Zerodur bonding technology. The instrument consists of 9 units with an overall mass of 221 kg, an average power consumption of 608 W (819 W peak), and a volume of 470 liters which would well fit on a satellite to be launched with a Soyuz rocket, as system studies have shown.

  14. Correlated noise in networks of gravitational-wave detectors: Subtraction and mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Nelson

    of gravitational-wave detectors [22­25] will probe gravitational-wave energy density several orders of magnitude of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA 2 Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota

  15. Cosmological electromagnetic fields due to gravitational wave perturbations Mattias Marklund*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunsby, Peter

    show that this coupling leads to an initial pulse of electromagnetic waves whose width and amplitude to produce a pulse of gravitationally induced electromagnetic waves. In particular, because of the differentCosmological electromagnetic fields due to gravitational wave perturbations Mattias Marklund

  16. Wide bandwidth dual acoustic gravitational wave detectors M. Bonaldia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    instruments and methods to search for gravitational waves from the universe. Resonant mass "bar" detectors [1 of quanta of vibration at about 1 kHz. However it is commonly accepted in the community that, to enter be achieved. Traditional acoustic detectors are seriously lim- ited in terms of bandwidth (typically to about

  17. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with 39 Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Data from the Second, Third, and Fourth LIGO Runs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Csatorday, P; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Delker, T; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Ding, H; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Logan, J; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Nocera, F; Numata, K; Nutzman, P; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Sazonov, A; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strand, N E; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takahashi, H; Takamori, A

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a search for short-duration gravitational-wave bursts associated with 39 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by gamma-ray satellite experiments during LIGO's S2, S3, and S4 science runs. The search involves calculating the crosscorrelation between two interferometer data streams surrounding the GRB trigger time. We search for associated gravitational radiation from single GRBs, and also apply statistical tests to search for a gravitational-wave signature associated with the whole sample. For the sample examined, we find no evidence for the association of gravitational radiation with GRBs, either on a single-GRB basis or on a statistical basis. Simulating gravitational-wave bursts with sine-gaussian waveforms, we set upper limits on the root-sum-square of the gravitational-wave strain amplitude of such waveforms at the times of the GRB triggers. We also demonstrate how a sample of several GRBs can be used collectively to set constraints on population models. The small number of GRBs and ...

  18. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with 39 Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Data from the Second, Third, and Fourth LIGO Runs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2008-02-01

    We present the results of a search for short-duration gravitational-wave bursts associated with 39 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by gamma-ray satellite experiments during LIGO's S2, S3, and S4 science runs. The search involves calculating the crosscorrelation between two interferometer data streams surrounding the GRB trigger time. We search for associated gravitational radiation from single GRBs, and also apply statistical tests to search for a gravitational-wave signature associated with the whole sample. For the sample examined, we find no evidence for the association of gravitational radiation with GRBs, either on a single-GRB basis or on a statistical basis. Simulating gravitational-wave bursts with sine-gaussian waveforms, we set upper limits on the root-sum-square of the gravitational-wave strain amplitude of such waveforms at the times of the GRB triggers. We also demonstrate how a sample of several GRBs can be used collectively to set constraints on population models. The small number of GRBs and the significant change in sensitivity of the detectors over the three runs, however, limits the usefulness of a population study for the S2, S3, and S4 runs. Finally, we discuss prospects for the search sensitivity for the ongoing S5 run, and beyond for the next generation of detectors.

  19. A real-time laser feedback control method for the three-wave laser source used in the polarimeter-interferometer diagnostic on Joint-TEXT tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, C. Y.; Chen, J. Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.

    2014-12-15

    A three-wave laser polarimeter-interferometer, equipped with three independent far-infrared laser sources, has been developed on Joint-TEXT (J-TEXT) tokamak. The diagnostic system is capable of high-resolution temporal and phase measurement of the Faraday angle and line-integrated density. However, for long-term operation (>10 min), the free-running lasers can lead to large drifts of the intermediate frequencies (?100–?500 kHz/10 min) and decay of laser power (?10%–?20%/10 min), which act to degrade diagnostic performance. In addition, these effects lead to increased maintenance cost and limit measurement applicability to long pulse/steady state experiments. To solve this problem, a real-time feedback control method of the laser source is proposed. By accurately controlling the length of each laser cavity, both the intermediate frequencies and laser power can be simultaneously controlled: the intermediate frequencies are controlled according to the pre-set values, while the laser powers are maintained at an optimal level. Based on this approach, a real-time feedback control system has been developed and applied on J-TEXT polarimeter-interferometer. Long-term (theoretically no time limit) feedback of intermediate frequencies (maximum change less than ±12 kHz) and laser powers (maximum relative power change less than ±7%) has been successfully achieved.

  20. How serious can the stealth bias be in gravitational wave parameter estimation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Vitale; Walter Del Pozzo

    2013-11-08

    The upcoming direct detection of gravitational waves will open a window to probing the strong-field regime of general relativity (GR). As a consequence, waveforms that include the presence of deviations from GR have been developed (e.g. in the parametrized post-Einsteinian approach). TIGER, a data analysis pipeline which builds Bayesian evidence to support or question the validity of GR, has been written and tested. In particular, it was shown recently that data from the LIGO and Virgo detectors will allow to detect deviations from GR smaller than can be probed with Solar System tests and pulsar timing measurements or not accessible with conventional tests of GR. However, evidence from several detections is required before a deviation from GR can be confidently claimed. An interesting consequence is that, should GR not be the correct theory of gravity in its strong field regime, using standard GR templates for the matched filter analysis of interferometer data will introduce biases in the gravitational wave measured parameters with potentially disastrous consequences on the astrophysical inferences, such as the coalescence rate or the mass distribution. We consider three heuristic possible deviations from GR and show that the biases introduced by assuming GR's validity manifest in various ways. The mass parameters are usually the most affected, with biases that can be as large as $30$ standard deviations for the symmetric mass ratio, and nearly one percent for the chirp mass, which is usually estimated with sub-percent accuracy. We conclude that statements about the nature of the observed sources, e.g. if both objects are neutron stars, depend critically on the explicit assumption that GR it the right theory of gravity in the strong field regime.

  1. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for ?=x/? in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman–Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified ?{sub 4}, implying three degrees of freedom for ?=x/?. This compares with two for a canonical embedding of ?=t/?. Also, if one introduces the Ricci tensor formalism to describe a massive graviton arising from the nCS modified gravity, one finds one massive mode after making second-order wave equations, which is compared to five found from the parity-even Einstein–Weyl gravity.

  2. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; M. Kramer; A. G. Lyne

    2007-10-12

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximise sensitivity. For the first time pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 2.6e-25 for PSRJ1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSRJ2124-3358 is less than 10^{-6}. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only 2.2 times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  3. Gravitational Wave Memory of Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norichika Sago; Kunihito Ioka; Takashi Nakamura; Ryo Yamazaki

    2004-11-16

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are now considered as relativistic jets. We analyze the gravitational waves from the acceleration stage of the GRB jets. We show that (i) the point mass approximation is not appropriate if the opening half-angle of the jet is larger than the inverse of the Lorentz factor of the jet, (ii) the gravitational waveform has many step function like jumps, and (iii) the practical DECIGO and BBO may detect such an event if the GRBs occur in Local group of galaxy. We found that the light curve of GRBs and the gravitational waveform are anti-correlated so that the detection of the gravitational wave is indispensable to determine the structure of GRB jets.

  4. Leveraging waveform complexity for confident detection of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanner, Jonah B; Cornish, Neil; Millhouse, Meg; Xhakaj, Enia; Salemi, Francesco; Drago, Marco; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    The recent completion of Advanced LIGO suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) may soon be directly observed. Past searches for gravitational-wave transients have been impacted by transient noise artifacts, known as glitches, introduced into LIGO data due to instrumental and environmental effects. In this work, we explore how waveform complexity, instead of signal-to-noise ratio, can be used to rank event candidates and distinguish short duration astrophysical signals from glitches. We test this framework using a new hierarchical pipeline that directly compares the Bayesian evidence of explicit signal and glitch models. The hierarchical pipeline is shown to have strong performance, and in particular, allows high-confidence detections of a range of waveforms at realistic signal-to-noise ratio with a two detector network.

  5. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  6. Gravitational wave emission and spin-down of young pulsars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    The rotation frequencies of young pulsars are systematically below their theoretical Kepler limit. r-modes have been suggested as a possible explanation for this observation. With the help of semi-analytic expressions that make it possible to assess the uncertainties of the r-mode scenario due to the impact of uncertainties in underlying microphysics, we perform a quantitative analysis of the spin-down and the emitted gravitational waves of young pulsars. We find that the frequency to which r-modes spin-down a young neutron star (NS) is surprisingly insensitive to both the microscopic details and the saturation amplitude. Comparing our result to astrophysical data, we show that for a range of sufficiently large saturation amplitudes r-modes provide a viable spin-down scenario and that all observed young pulsars are very likely already outside the r-mode instability region. Therefore, the most promising sources for gravitational wave detection are unobserved NSs associated with recent supernovae, and we find that advanced LIGO should be able to see several of them. Our analysis shows that despite the coupling of the spin-down and thermal evolution, a power-law spin-down with an effective braking index n {sub rm} ? 7 is realized. Because of this, the gravitational wave strain amplitude is completely independent of both the r-mode saturation amplitude and the microphysics and depends on the saturation mechanism only within some tens of percent. However, the gravitational wave frequency depends on the amplitude, and we provide the required expected timing parameter ranges to look for promising sources in future searches.

  7. Plasma waves driven by gravitational waves in an expanding universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Papadopoulos

    2002-05-22

    In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with zero spatial curvature, we consider the interaction of the gravitational waves with the plasma in the presence of a weak magnetic field. Using the relativistic hydromagnetic equations it is verified that large amplitude magnetosonic waves are excited, assuming that both, the gravitational field and the weak magnetic field do not break the homogeneity and isotropy of the considered FRW spacetime.

  8. Projected Constraints on Lorentz-Violating Gravity with Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devin Hansen; Nicolas Yunes; Kent Yagi

    2014-12-12

    Gravitational waves are excellent tools to probe the foundations of General Relativity in the strongly dynamical and non-linear regime. One such foundation is Lorentz symmetry, which can be broken in the gravitational sector by the existence of a preferred time direction, and thus, a preferred frame at each spacetime point. This leads to a modification in the orbital decay rate of binary systems, and also in the generation and chirping of their associated gravitational waves. We here study whether waves emitted in the late, quasi-circular inspiral of non-spinning, neutron star binaries can place competitive constraints on two proxies of gravitational Lorentz-violation: Einstein-\\AE{}ther theory and khronometric gravity. We model the waves in the small-coupling (or decoupling) limit and in the post-Newtonian approximation, by perturbatively solving the field equations in small deformations from General Relativity and in the small-velocity/weak-gravity approximation. We assume a gravitational wave consistent with General Relativity has been detected with second- and third-generation, ground-based detectors, and with the proposed space-based mission, DECIGO, with and without coincident electromagnetic counterparts. Without a counterpart, a detection consistent with General Relativity of neutron star binaries can only place competitive constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation when using future, third-generation or space-based instruments. On the other hand, a single counterpart is enough to place constraints that are 10 orders of magnitude more stringent than current binary pulsar bounds, even when using second-generation detectors. This is because Lorentz violation forces the group velocity of gravitational waves to be different from that of light, and this difference can be very accurately constrained with coincident observations.

  9. From Microscopic Gravitational Waves to the Quantum Indeterminism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Thuan, Vo

    2015-01-01

    Based on an extended space-time symmetry a new attempt to search for links between general relativity and quantum mechanics is proposed. A simplified cylindrical model of gravitational geometrical dynamics leads to a microscopic geodesic description of strongly curved extradimensional space-time which implies a duality between an emission law of microscopic gravitational waves and the quantum mechanical equations of free elementary particles. Consequently, the Heisenberg indeterminism would originate from the time-space curvatures.

  10. From Microscopic Gravitational Waves to the Quantum Indeterminism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vo Van Thuan

    2015-06-30

    Based on an extended space-time symmetry a new attempt to search for links between general relativity and quantum mechanics is proposed. A simplified cylindrical model of gravitational geometrical dynamics leads to a microscopic geodesic description of strongly curved extradimensional space-time which implies a duality between an emission law of microscopic gravitational waves and the quantum mechanical equations of free elementary particles. Consequently, the Heisenberg indeterminism would originate from the time-space curvatures.

  11. Inhomogeneous High Frequency Expansion-Free Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

    2007-06-18

    We describe a natural inhomogeneous generalization of high frequency plane gravitational waves. The waves are high frequency waves of the Kundt type whose null propagation direction in space-time has vanishing expansion, twist and shear but is not covariantly constant. The introduction of a cosmological constant is discussed in some detail and a comparison is made with high frequency gravity waves having wave fronts homeomorphic to 2-spheres.

  12. An alternative method for calculating the energy of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Sukenik; Jozef Sima

    1999-09-21

    In the expansive nondecelerative universe model, creation of matter occurs due to which the Vaidya metrics is applied. This fact allows for localizing gravitational energy and calculating the energy of gravitational waves using an approach alternative to the well established procedure based on quadrupole formula. Rationalization of the gradual increase in entropy of the Universe using relation describing the total curvature of space-time is given too.

  13. Upper limit map of a background of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L

    2007-01-01

    We searched for an anisotropic background of gravitational waves using data from the LIGO S4 science run and a method that is optimized for point sources. This is appropriate if, for example, the gravitational wave background is dominated by a small number of distinct astrophysical sources. No signal was seen. Upper limit maps were produced assuming two different power laws for the source strain power spectrum. For an f^-3 power law and using the 50 Hz to 1.8 kHz band the upper limits on the source strain power spectrum vary between 1.2e-48 Hz^-1 (100 Hz/f)^3 and 1.2e-47 Hz^-1 (100 Hz /f)^3, depending on the position in the sky. Similarly, in the case of constant strain power spectrum, the upper limits vary between 8.5e-49 Hz^-1 and 6.1e-48 Hz^-1. As a side product a limit on an isotropic background of gravitational waves was also obtained. All limits are at the 90% confidence level. Finally, as an application, we focused on the direction of Sco-X1, the closest low-mass X-ray binary. We compare the upper limi...

  14. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES IN BLACK HOLE FORMING CORE COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; DeBrye, Nicolas; Aloy, Miguel A.; Font, José A.; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2013-12-20

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of collapsing stellar cores. Our initial model consists of a low metallicity rapidly-rotating progenitor which is evolved in axisymmetry with the latest version of our general relativistic code CoCoNuT, which allows for black hole formation and includes the effects of a microphysical equation of state (LS220) and a neutrino leakage scheme to account for radiative losses. The motivation of our study is to analyze in detail the emission of gravitational waves in the collapsar scenario of long gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations show that the phase during which the proto-neutron star (PNS) survives before ultimately collapsing to a black hole is particularly optimal for gravitational wave emission. The high-amplitude waves last for several seconds and show a remarkable quasi-periodicity associated with the violent PNS dynamics, namely during the episodes of convection and the subsequent nonlinear development of the standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). By analyzing the spectrogram of our simulations we are able to identify the frequencies associated with the presence of g-modes and with the SASI motions at the PNS surface. We note that the gravitational waves emitted reach large enough amplitudes to be detected with third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope within a Virgo Cluster volume at rates ? 0.1 yr{sup –1}.

  15. Astrometric Effects of a Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura G. Book; Éanna É. Flanagan

    2012-11-27

    A stochastic gravitational wave background causes the apparent positions of distant sources to fluctuate, with angular deflections of order the characteristic strain amplitude of the gravitational waves. These fluctuations may be detectable with high precision astrometry, as first suggested by Braginsky et al. in 1990. Several researchers have made order of magnitude estimates of the upper limits obtainable on the gravitational wave spectrum \\Omega_gw(f), at frequencies of order f ~ 1 yr^-1, both for the future space-based optical interferometry missions GAIA and SIM, and for VLBI interferometry in radio wavelengths with the SKA. For GAIA, tracking N ~ 10^6 quasars over a time of T ~ 1 yr with an angular accuracy of \\Delta \\theta ~ 10 \\mu as would yield a sensitivity level of \\Omega_gw ~ (\\Delta \\theta)^2/(N T^2 H_0^2) ~ 10^-6, which would be comparable with pulsar timing. In this paper we take a first step toward firming up these estimates by computing in detail the statistical properties of the angular deflections caused by a stochastic background. We compute analytically the two point correlation function of the deflections on the sphere, and the spectrum as a function of frequency and angular scale. The fluctuations are concentrated at low frequencies (for a scale invariant stochastic background), and at large angular scales, starting with the quadrupole. The magnetic-type and electric-type pieces of the fluctuations have equal amounts of power.

  16. Modeling a nonperturbative spinor vacuum interacting with a strong gravitational wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Dzhunushaliev; Vladimir Folomeev

    2015-03-15

    We consider the propagation of strong gravitational waves interacting with a nonperturbative vacuum of spinor fields. To described the latter, we suggest an approximate model. The corresponding Einstein equation has the form of the Schr\\"odinger equation. Its gravitational-wave solution is analogous to the solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for an electron moving in a periodic potential. The general solution for the periodic gravitational waves is found. The analog of the Kronig-Penney model for gravitational waves is considered. It is shown that the suggested gravitational-wave model permits the existence of weak electric charge and current densities concomitant with the gravitational wave. Based on this observation, a possible experimental verification of the model is suggested.

  17. Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binary Black Holes: Theoretical and Experimental Challenges

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    A network of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors (LIGO/VIRGO/GEO/...) is currently taking data near its planned sensitivity. Coalescing black hole binaries are among the most promising, and most exciting, gravitational wave sources for these detectors. The talk will review the theoretical and experimental challenges that must be met in order to successfully detect gravitational waves from coalescing black hole binaries, and to be able to reliably measure the physical parameters of the source (masses, spins, ...).

  18. Computational Approach to Gravitational Waves Forms in Stellar Systems as Complex Structures through Keplerian Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivana Bochicchio; Mariafelicia De Laurentis; Ettore Laserra

    2009-06-26

    In this paper we investigate the gravitational waves emission by stellar dynamical structures as complex systems in the quadrupole approximation considering bounded and unbounded orbits. Precisely, after deriving analytical expressions for the gravitational wave luminosity, the total energy output and gravitational radiation amplitude, we present a computational approach to evaluate the gravitational wave-forms from elliptical, circular, parabolic and hyperbolic orbits as a function of Keplerian parameters.

  19. Sensitivity Comparison of Searches for Binary Black Hole Coalescences with Ground-based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satya Mohapatra; Laura Cadonati; Sarah Caudill; James Clark; Chad Hanna; Sergey Klimenko; Chris Pankow; Ruslan Vaulin; Gabriele Vedovato; Salvatore Vitale

    2014-05-26

    Searches for gravitational-wave transients from binary black hole coalescences typically rely on one of two approaches: matched filtering with templates and morphology-independent excess power searches. Multiple algorithmic implementations in the analysis of data from the first generation of ground-based gravitational wave interferometers have used different strategies for the suppression of non-Gaussian noise transients, and targeted different regions of the binary black hole parameter space. In this paper we compare the sensitivity of three such algorithms: matched filtering with full coalescence templates, matched filtering with ringdown templates and a morphology-independent excess power search. The comparison is performed at a fixed false alarm rate and relies on Monte-carlo simulations of binary black hole coalescences for spinning, non-precessing systems with total mass 25-350 solar mass, which covers the parameter space of stellar mass and intermediate mass black hole binaries. We find that in the mass range of 25 -100 solar mass the sensitive distance of the search, marginalized over source parameters, is best with matched filtering to full waveform templates, to within 10 percent at a false alarm rate of 3 events per year. In the mass range of 100-350 solar mass, the same comparison favors the morphology-independent excess power search to within 20 percent. The dependence on mass and spin is also explored.

  20. Gravitational-wave modes from precessing black-hole binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Boyle; Lawrence E. Kidder; Serguei Ossokine; Harald P. Pfeiffer

    2014-09-22

    Gravitational waves from precessing black-hole binaries exhibit features that are absent in nonprecessing systems. The most prominent of these is a parity-violating asymmetry that beams energy and linear momentum preferentially along or opposite to the orbital angular momentum, leading to recoil of the binary. The asymmetry will appear as amplitude and phase modulations at the orbital frequency. For strongly precessing systems, it accounts for at least 3% amplitude modulation for binaries in the sensitivity band of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors, and can exceed 50% for massive systems. Such asymmetric features are also clearly visible when the waves are decomposed into modes of spin-weighted spherical harmonics, and are inherent in the waves themselves---rather than resulting from residual eccentricity in numerical simulations, or from mode-mixing due to precession. In particular, there is generically no instantaneous frame for which the mode decomposition will have any symmetry. We introduce a method to simplify the expressions for waveforms given in analytical relativity, which can be used to combine existing high-order waveforms for nonprecessing systems with expressions for the precessing contributions, leading to improved accuracy and a unified treatment of precessing and nonprecessing binaries. Using this method, it is possible to clarify the nature and the origins of the asymmetries and show the effects of asymmetry on recoils more clearly. We present post-Newtonian (PN) expressions for the waveform modes that include these terms, complete to the relative 2PN level in spin (proportional to $v^4/c^4$ times a certain combination of the spins). Comparing the results of those expressions to numerical results, we find good qualitative agreement. We also demonstrate how these expressions can be used to efficiently calculate waveforms for gravitational-wave astronomy.

  1. Low-Frequency Sources of Gravitational Waves: A Tutorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. F. Schutz

    1997-10-15

    Gravitational wave detectors in space, particularly the LISA project, can study a rich variety of astronomical systems whose gravitational radiation is not detectable from the ground, because it is emitted in the low-frequency gravitational wave band (0.1 mHz to 1 Hz) that is inaccessible to ground-based detectors. Sources include binary systems in our Galaxy and massive black holes in distant galaxies. The radiation from many of these sources will be so strong that it will be possible to make remarkably detailed studies of the physics of the systems. These studies will have importance both for astrophysics (most notably in binary evolution theory and models for active galaxies) and for fundamental physics. In particular, it should be possible to make decisive measurements to confirm the existence of black holes and to test, with accuracies better than 1%, general relativity's description of them. Other observations can have fundamental implications for cosmology and for physical theories of the unification of forces. In order to understand these conclusions, one must know how to estimate the gravitational radiation produced by different sources. In the first part of this lecture I review the dynamics of gravitational wave sources, and I derive simple formulas for estimating wave amplitudes and the reaction effects on sources of producing this radiation. With these formulas one can estimate, usually to much better than an order of magnitude, the physics of most of the interesting low-frequency sources. In the second part of the lecture I use these estimates to discuss, in the context of the expected sensitivity of LISA, what we can learn by from observations of binary systems, massive black holes, and the early Universe itself.

  2. Black holes and gravitational waves in three-dimensional f(R) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsheng Zhang; Dao-Jun Liu; Xin-Zhou Li

    2014-12-19

    In the three-dimensional pure Einstein gravity, the geometries of the vacuum space-times are always trivial, and gravitational waves (gravitons) are strictly forbidden. For the first time, we find a vacuum circularly symmetric black hole with nontrivial geometries in $f(R)$ gravity theory, in which a true singularity appears. In this frame with nontrivial geometry, a perturbative gravitational wave does exist. Beyond the perturbative level, we make a constructive proof of the existence of a gravitational wave in $f(R)$ gravity, where the Birkhoff-like theorem becomes invalid. We find two classes of exact solutions of circularly symmetric pure gravitational wave radiation and absorption.

  3. Targeted searches for gravitational waves from radio pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Réjean J. Dupuis

    2005-09-06

    An overview of the searches for gravitational waves from radio pulsars with LIGO and GEO is given. We give a brief description of the algorithm used in these targeted searches and provide end-to-end validation of the technique through hardware injections. We report on some aspects of the recent S3/S4 LIGO and GEO search for signals from several pulsars. The gaussianity of narrow frequency bands of S3/S4 LIGO data, where pulsar signals are expected, is assessed with Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. Preliminary results from the S3 run with a network of four detectors are given for pulsar J1939+2134.

  4. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, a C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, a N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C

    2007-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -1.0E-8 Hz/s to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semi-coherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from Short Fourier Transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as "StackSlide", averages normalized power from each SFT. A "weighted Hough" scheme is also developed and used, and which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as "PowerFlux", is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitationa...

  5. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts and Gravitational Waves from Dynamically Formed Merging Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafne Guetta; Luigi Stella

    2008-11-10

    Merging binary systems consisting of two collapsed objects are among the most promising sources of high frequency gravitational wave, GW, signals for ground based interferometers. Double neutron star or black hole/neutron star mergers are also believed to give rise to short hard bursts, SHBs, a subclass of gamma ray bursts. SHBs might thus provide a powerful way to infer the merger rate of two-collapsed object binaries. Under the hypothesis that most SHBs originate from double neutron star or black hole/neutron star mergers, we outline here a method to estimate the incidence of merging events from dynamically formed binaries in globular clusters and infer the corresponding GW event rate that can be detected with Advanced LIGO/Virgo. In particular a sizeable fraction of detectable GW events is expected to be coincident with SHBs. The beaming and redshift distribution of SHBs are reassessed and their luminosity function constrained by using the results from recent SHBs observations. We confirm that a substantial fraction of SHBs goes off at low redshifts, where the merging of systems formed in globular clusters through dynamical interactions is expected.

  6. Performance of a Chirplet-based analysis for gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satya Mohapatra; Zachary Nemtzow; Eric Chassande-Mottin; Laura Cadonati

    2011-11-15

    The gravitational wave (GW) signature of a binary black hole (BBH) coalescence is characterized by rapid frequency evolution in the late inspiral and merger phases. For a system with total mass larger than 100 M_sun, ground based GW detectors are sensitive to the merger phase, and the in-band whitened waveform is a short-duration transient lasting about 10-30 ms. For a symmetric mass system with total mass between 10 and 100 M_sun, the detector is sensitive instead to the inspiral phase and the in-band signal has a longer duration, between 30 ms - 3 s. Omega is a search algorithm for GW bursts that, with the assumption of locally stationary frequency evolution, uses sine-Gaussian wavelets as a template bank to decompose interferometer strain data. The local stationarity of sine-Gaussians induces a performance loss for the detection of lower mass BBH signatures, due to the mismatch between template and signal. We present the performance of a modified version of the Omega algorithm, Chirplet Omega, which allows a linear variation of frequency, to target BBH coalescences. The use of Chirplet-like templates enhances the measured signal-to-noise ratio due to less mismatch between template and data, and increases the detectability of lower mass BBH coalescences. We present the results of a performance study of Chirplet Omega in colored Gaussian noise at initial LIGO sensitivity.

  7. Paired carriers as a way to reduce quantum noise of multi-carrier gravitational-wave detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Korobko; Nikita Voronchev; Haixing Miao; Farid Ya. Khalili

    2014-09-23

    We explore new regimes of laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors with multiple optical carriers which allow to reduce the quantum noise of these detectors. In particular, we show that using two carriers with the opposite detunings, homodyne angles, and squeezing angles, but identical other parameters (the antisymmetric carriers), one can suppress the quantum noise in such a way that its spectrum follows the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL) at low frequencies. Relaxing this antisymmetry condition, it is also possible to slightly overcome the SQL in broadband. Combining several such pairs in the xylophone configuration, it is possible to shape the quantum noise spectrum flexibly.

  8. Harmonic oscillator with time-dependent effective-mass and frequency with a possible application to 'chirped tidal' gravitational waves forces affecting interferometric detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacob Ben-Aryeh

    2008-07-29

    The general theory of time-dependent frequency and time-dependent mass ('effective mass') is described.The general theory for time-dependent harmonic- oscillator is applied in the present research for studying certain quantum effects in the interferometers for detecting gravitational waves.When an astronomical binary system approaches its point of coalescence the gravitational wave intensity and frequency are increasing and this can lead to strong deviations from the simple description of harmonic-oscillations for the interferometric masses on which the mirrors are placed.It is shown that under such condtions the harmonic-oscillations of these masses can be described by mechanical harmonic-oscillators with time-dependent frequency and effective-mass. In the present theoretical model the effective-mass is decreasing with time describing pumping phenomena in which the oscillator amplitude is increasing with time . The quantization of this system is analyzed by the use of the adiabatic approximation. It is found that the increase of the gravitational wave intensity, within the adiabatic approximation, leads to squeezing phenomena where the quantum noise in one quadrature is increased and in the other quadrature is decreased.

  9. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: Qualitative features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghiglieri, J

    2015-01-01

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future ge...

  10. SPINDOWN OF ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS: GRAVITATIONAL WAVES OR MAGNETIC BRAKING?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff, Jan E.; Jaikumar, Prashanth; Chan, Vincent; Ouyed, Rachid

    2012-05-20

    We study the spindown of isolated neutron stars from initially rapid rotation rates, driven by two factors: (1) gravitational wave emission due to r-modes and (2) magnetic braking. In the context of isolated neutron stars, we present the first study including self-consistently the magnetic damping of r-modes in the spin evolution. We track the spin evolution employing the RNS code, which accounts for the rotating structure of neutron stars for various equations of state. We find that, despite the strong damping due to the magnetic field, r-modes alter the braking rate from pure magnetic braking for B {<=} 10{sup 13} G. For realistic values of the saturation amplitude {alpha}{sub sat}, the r-mode can also decrease the time to reach the threshold central density for quark deconfinement. Within a phenomenological model, we assess the gravitational waveform that would result from r-mode-driven spindown of a magnetized neutron star. To contrast with the persistent signal during the spindown phase, we also present a preliminary estimate of the transient gravitational wave signal from an explosive quark-hadron phase transition, which can be a signal for the deconfinement of quarks inside neutron stars.

  11. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: Qualitative features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ghiglieri; M. Laine

    2015-07-17

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  12. Detecting an association between Gamma Ray and Gravitational Wave Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Samuel Finn; Soumya D. Mohanty; Joseph D. Romano

    1999-03-30

    If $\\gamma$-ray bursts (GRBs) are accompanied by gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) the correlated output of two gravitational wave detectors evaluated in the moments just prior to a GRB will differ from that evaluated at times not associated with a GRB. We can test for this difference independently of any model of the GWB signal waveform. If we invoke a model for the GRB source population and GWB radiation spectral density we can find a confidence interval or upper limit on the root-mean-square GWB signal amplitude in the detector waveband. To illustrate we adopt a simple, physically motivated model and estimate that initial LIGO detector observations coincident with 1000 GRBs could lead us to exclude, with 95% confidence, associated GWBs with $h_{RMS} \\gtrsim 1.7 \\times 10^{-22}$. This result does not require the detector noise be Gaussian or that any inter-detector correlated noise be measured or measurable; it does not require advanced or a priori knowledge of the source waveform; and the limits obtained on the wave-strength improve with the number of observed GRBs.

  13. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves in Einstein Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piórkowska, Aleksandra; Biesiada, Marek [Department of Astrophysics and Cosmology, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Zhu, Zong-Hong, E-mail: aleksandra.piorkowska@us.edu.pl, E-mail: marek.biesiada@us.edu.pl, E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Gravitational wave experiments have entered a new stage which gets us closer to the opening a new observational window on the Universe. In particular, the Einstein Telescope (ET) is designed to have a fantastic sensitivity that will provide with tens or hundreds of thousand NS-NS inspiral events per year up to the redshift z = 2. Some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral NS-NS events in the Einstein telescope. Being conservative we consider the lens population of elliptical galaxies. It turns out that depending on the local insipral rate ET should detect from one per decade detection in the pessimistic case to a tens of detections per year for the most optimistic case. The detection of gravitationally lensed source in gravitational wave detectors would be an invaluable source of information concerning cosmography, complementary to standard ones (like supernovae or BAO) independent of the local cosmic distance ladder calibrations.

  14. Testing general relativity with gravitational waves: a reality check

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Vallisneri

    2012-10-05

    The observations of gravitational-wave signals from astrophysical sources such as binary inspirals will be used to test General Relativity for self consistency and against alternative theories of gravity. I describe a simple formula that can be used to characterize the prospects of such tests, by estimating the matched-filtering signal-to-noise ratio required to detect non-General-Relativistic corrections of a given magnitude. The formula is valid for sufficiently strong signals; it requires the computation of a single number, the fitting factor between the General-Relativistic and corrected waveform families; and it can be applied to all tests that embed General Relativity in a larger theory, including tests of individual theories such as Brans-Dicke gravity, as well as the phenomenological schemes that introduce corrections and extra terms in the post-Newtonian phasing expressions of inspiral waveforms. The formula suggests that the volume-limited gravitational-wave searches performed with second-generation ground-based detectors would detect alternative-gravity corrections to General-Relativistic waveforms no smaller than 1-10% (corresponding to fitting factors of 0.9 to 0.99).

  15. On the energy transported by exact plane gravitational-wave solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri N. Obukhov; J. G. Pereira; Guillermo F. Rubilar

    2009-09-24

    The energy and momentum transported by exact plane gravitational-wave solutions of Einstein equations are computed using the teleparallel equivalent formulation of Einstein's theory. It is shown that these waves transport neither energy nor momentum. A comparison with the usual linear plane gravitational-waves solution of the linearized Einstein equation is presented.

  16. Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe using Earth's ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Coughlin; Jan Harms

    2014-06-04

    The search for gravitational waves is one of today's major scientific endeavors. A gravitational wave can interact with matter by exciting vibrations of elastic bodies. Earth itself is a large elastic body whose so-called normal-mode oscillations ring up when a gravitational wave passes. Therefore, precise measurement of vibration amplitudes can be used to search for the elusive gravitational-wave signals. Earth's free oscillations that can be observed after high-magnitude earthquakes have been studied extensively with gravimeters and low-frequency seismometers over many decades leading to invaluable insight into Earth's structure. Making use of our detailed understanding of Earth's normal modes, numerical models are employed for the first time to accurately calculate Earth's gravitational-wave response, and thereby turn a network of sensors that so far has served to improve our understanding of Earth, into an astrophysical observatory exploring our Universe. In this article, we constrain the energy density of gravitational waves to values in the range 0.035 - 0.15 normalized by the critical energy density of the Universe at frequencies between 0.3mHz and 5mHz, using 10 years of data from the gravimeter network of the Global Geodynamics Project that continuously monitors Earth's oscillations. This work is the first step towards a systematic investigation of the sensitivity of gravimeter networks to gravitational waves. Further advance in gravimeter technology could improve sensitivity of these networks and possibly lead to gravitational-wave detection.

  17. A directed search for continuous Gravitational Waves from the Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliá, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E J

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic Center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO's fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semi-coherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first order spindown values down to -7.86 x 10^-8 Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. We place 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center. Reaching ~3.35 x 10^-25 at ~150 Hz, those upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  18. Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe using Earth's ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The search for gravitational waves is one of today's major scientific endeavors. A gravitational wave can interact with matter by exciting vibrations of elastic bodies. Earth itself is a large elastic body whose so-called normal-mode oscillations ring up when a gravitational wave passes. Therefore, precise measurement of vibration amplitudes can be used to search for the elusive gravitational-wave signals. Earth's free oscillations that can be observed after high-magnitude earthquakes have been studied extensively with gravimeters and low-frequency seismometers over many decades leading to invaluable insight into Earth's structure. Making use of our detailed understanding of Earth's normal modes, numerical models are employed for the first time to accurately calculate Earth's gravitational-wave response, and thereby turn a network of sensors that so far has served to improve our understanding of Earth, into an astrophysical observatory exploring our Universe. In this article, we constrain the energy density o...

  19. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  20. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

    2012-04-25

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  1. Gravitational Wave Detection with High Frequency Phonon Trapping Acoustic Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Goryachev; Michael E. Tobar

    2014-10-31

    There are a number of theoretical predictions for astrophysical and cosmological objects, which emit high frequency ($10^6-10^9$~Hz) Gravitation Waves (GW) or contribute somehow to the stochastic high frequency GW background. Here we propose a new sensitive detector in this frequency band, which is based on existing cryogenic ultra-high quality factor quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave cavity technology, coupled to near-quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers at $20$~mK. We show that spectral strain sensitivities reaching $10^{-22}$ per $\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ per mode is possible, which in principle can cover the frequency range with multiple ($>100$) modes with quality factors varying between $10^6-10^{10}$ allowing wide bandwidth detection. Due to its compactness and well established manufacturing process, the system is easily scalable into arrays and distributed networks that can also impact the overall sensitivity and introduce coincidence analysis to ensure no false detections.

  2. Multichannel matched filtering for spherical gravitational wave antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Carlos Filipe Da Silva; Sturani, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    We study the performance of a multidimensional matched filter as a follow-up module of the coherent method recently developed by two of us for the detection of gravitational wave bursts by spherical resonant detectors. We have tested this strategy on the same set of injections used for the coherent method and found that the matched filter sensibly improves the determination of relevant parameters as the arrival time, amplitude, central frequency and arrival direction of the signal. The matched filter also improves the false alarm rate, reducing it roughly by a factor of 3. The hierarchical structure of the whole analysis pipeline allows to obtain these results without a significant increase of the computation time.

  3. Gravitational waves from gamma-ray pulsar glitches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stopnitzky, Elan; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    We use data from pulsar gamma-ray glitches recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope as input to theoretical models of gravitational wave signals the glitches might generate. We find that the typical peak amplitude of the gravity wave signal from gamma-ray pulsar glitches lies between 10{sup –23} and 10{sup –35} in dimensionless units, with peak frequencies in the range of 1 to 1000 Hz, depending on the model. We estimate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for all gamma-ray glitches, and discuss detectability with current gravity wave detectors. Our results indicate that the strongest predicted signals are potentially within reach of current detectors, and that pulsar gamma-ray glitches are promising targets for gravity wave searches by current and next-generation detectors.

  4. Gravitational wave searches with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Van Den Broeck; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration

    2015-05-18

    Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo are expected to make the first direct detections of gravitational waves (GW) in the next several years. Possible types of GW emission include short-duration bursts, signals from the coalescence of compact binaries consisting of neutron stars or black holes, continuous radiation from fast-spinning neutron stars, and stochastic background radiation of a primordial nature or resulting from the superposition of a large number of individually unresolvable sources. We describe the different approaches that have been developed to search for these different types of signals. In this paper we focus on the GW detection methods themselves; multi-messenger searches as well as further science enabled by detections are dealt with in separate contributions to this volume.

  5. Calorimetry of gamma-ray bursts: echos in gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurice H. P. M. van Putten; Amir Levinson

    2001-05-24

    Black holes surrounded by a disk or torus may drive the enigmatic cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Equivalence in poloidal topology to pulsar magnetospheres shows a high incidence of the black hole-luminosity $L_H$ into the surrounding magnetized matter. We argue that this emission is re-radiated into gravitational waves at $L_{GW}\\simeq L_H/3$ in frequencies of order 1kHz, winds and, potentially, MeV neutrinos. The total energy budget and input to the GRB from baryon poor jets are expected to be standard in this scenario, consistent with recent analysis of afterglow data. Collimation of these outflows by baryon rich disk or torus winds may account for the observed spread in opening angles up to about $35^o$. This model may be tested by future LIGO/VIRGO observations.

  6. General polarization modes for the Rosen gravitational wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cropp, Bethan

    2010-01-01

    Strong-field gravitational plane waves are often represented in either the Rosen or Brinkmann forms. While these two metric ansatze are related by a coordinate transformation, so that they should describe essentially the same physics, they rather puzzlingly seem to treat polarization states quite differently. Both ansatze deal equally well with + and X linear polarizations, but there is a qualitative difference in they way they deal with circular, elliptic, and more general polarization states. In this article we will develop a general formalism for dealing with arbitrary polarization states in the Rosen form of the gravitational wave metric, representing an arbitrary polarization by a trajectory in a suitably defined two dimensional hyperbolic plane.

  7. Gravitational wave energy spectrum of a parabolic encounter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. L. Berry; Jonathan R. Gair

    2010-11-18

    We derive an analytic expression for the energy spectrum of gravitational waves from a parabolic Keplerian binary by taking the limit of the Peters and Matthews spectrum for eccentric orbits. This demonstrates that the location of the peak of the energy spectrum depends primarily on the orbital periapse rather than the eccentricity. We compare this weak-field result to strong-field calculations and find it is reasonably accurate (~10%) provided that the azimuthal and radial orbital frequencies do not differ by more than ~10%. For equatorial orbits in the Kerr spacetime, this corresponds to periapse radii of rp > 20M. These results can be used to model radiation bursts from compact objects on highly eccentric orbits about massive black holes in the local Universe, which could be detected by LISA.

  8. Lensing of 21-cm Fluctuations by Primordial Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Book; Marc Kamionkowski; Fabian Schmidt

    2011-12-02

    Weak-gravitational-lensing distortions to the intensity pattern of 21-cm radiation from the dark ages can be decomposed geometrically into curl and curl-free components. Lensing by primordial gravitational waves induces a curl component, while the contribution from lensing by density fluctuations is strongly suppressed. Angular fluctuations in the 21-cm background extend to very small angular scales, and measurements at different frequencies probe different shells in redshift space. There is thus a huge trove of information with which to reconstruct the curl component of the lensing field, allowing tensor-to-scalar ratios conceivably as small as r ~ 10^{-9} - far smaller than those currently accessible - to be probed.

  9. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) sensor using vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung-Woo

    2006-10-30

    This research represents the first effort to apply vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) to the monitoring of interferometric fiber optic sensors. Modulation of the drive current causes thermal tuning of the laser light frequency...

  10. Can laser selffocusing in air replace interferometer siderostats and delay lines?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribak, Erez

    experiments in high-power lasers show that they modulate of the density of air at long ranges, up, depending on the laser power. Two such laser-heated volumes can scatter stellar light into a central station, where they are made to interfere in speckled fringes. Usually the density modulations deflect the light

  11. Prospects for Observing and Localizing Gravitational-Wave Transients with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. B. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; P. A. Altin; D. V. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; N. Arnaud; K. G. Arun; G. Ashton; M. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; S. E. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; D. Barta; J. Bartlett; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; M. Bazzan; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. J. Bell; B. K. Berger; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Birney; S. Biscans; A. Bisht; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; R. M. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; A. Bohe; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; A. Bozzi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; P. Brockill; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; C. C. Buchanan; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; C. Cahillane; J. Calderón Bustillo; T. Callister; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; E. Capocasa; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; J. Casanueva Diaz; C. Casentini; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; L. Cerboni Baiardi; G. Cerretani; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; M. Chan; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; H. Y. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Cheng; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. G. Collette; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; L. Conti; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; S. Cortese; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. B. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. T. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; T. Dal Canton; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; N. S. Darman; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. P. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. De Rosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. C. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; M. Di Giovanni; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. E. Dwyer; T. B. Edo; M. C. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. M. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; W. Engels; R. C. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. M. Evans; R. Everett; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; H. Fair; S. Fairhurst; X. Fan; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Fletcher; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; H. A. G. Gabbard; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. G. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; G. Gaur; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; J. George; L. Gergely; V. Germain; A. Ghosh; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; K. Gill; A. Glaefke; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; J. M. Gonzalez Castro; A. Gopakumar; N. A. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. E. Gossan; M. Gosselin; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; A. C. Green; P. Groot; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; X. Guo; A. Gupta; M. K. Gupta; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. J. Hacker; B. R. Hall; E. D. Hall; G. Hammond; M. Haney; M. M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. J. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; J. Hennig; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; D. E. Holz; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. A. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; S. Huang; E. A. Huerta

    2015-12-21

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. We report our findings for gravitational-wave transients, with particular focus on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron-star systems, which are considered the most promising for multi-messenger astronomy. The ability to localize the sources of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and 90% credible regions can be as large as thousands of square degrees when only two sensitive detectors are operational. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 to 20 square degrees will require at least three detectors of sensitivity within a factor of ~2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should the third LIGO detector be relocated to India as expected, a significant fraction of gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.

  12. Implementation of an F-statistic all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Virgo VSR1 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Borkowski, K; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorosh, O; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S

    2014-01-01

    We present an implementation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic to carry out the first search in data from the Virgo laser interferometric gravitational wave detector for periodic gravitational waves from a priori unknown, isolated rotating neutron stars. We searched a frequency $f_0$ range from 100 Hz to 1 kHz and the frequency dependent spindown $f_1$ range from $-1.6\\,(f_0/100\\,{\\rm Hz}) \\times 10^{-9}\\,$ Hz/s to zero. A large part of this frequency - spindown space was unexplored by any of the all-sky searches published so far. Our method consisted of a coherent search over two-day periods using the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic, followed by a search for coincidences among the candidates from the two-day segments. We have introduced a number of novel techniques and algorithms that allow the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm in the coherent part of the search resulting in a fifty-fold speed-up in computation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic with respect to the algorithm used in the other pipelines. No ...

  13. Prospects for Localization of Gravitational Wave Transients by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brueckner, F; Buckland, K; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A D; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drasco, S; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Engel, R; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gehrels, N; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Haris, K; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kozameh, C; Kremin, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. For concreteness, we focus primarily on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron star (BNS) systems, as the source considered likely to be the most common for detection and also promising for multimessenger astronomy. We find that confident detections will likely require at least 2 detectors operating with BNS sensitive ranges of at least 100 Mpc, while ranges approaching 200 Mpc should give at least ~1 BNS detection per year even under pessimistic predictions of signal rates. The ability to localize the source of the detected signals...

  14. Constraints on Cosmic Strings from the LIGO-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Nancy

    Cosmic strings can give rise to a large variety of interesting astrophysical phenomena. Among them, powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by cusps are a promising observational signature. In this Letter we ...

  15. Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite Doppler velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vutha, Amar C

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves imprint apparent Doppler shifts on the frequency of photons propagating between an emitter and detector of light. This forms the basis of a method to detect gravitational waves using Doppler velocimetry between pairs of satellites. Such detectors, operating in the milli-hertz gravitational frequency band, could lead to the direct detection of gravitational waves. The crucial component in such a detector is the frequency standard on board the emitting and receiving satellites. We point out that recent developments in atomic frequency standards have led to devices that are approaching the sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting sources. The sensitivity of satellites equipped with optical frequency standards for Doppler velocimetry is examined, and a design for a robust, space-capable optical frequency standard is presented.

  16. Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite Doppler velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amar C. Vutha

    2015-06-24

    Gravitational waves imprint apparent Doppler shifts on the frequency of photons propagating between an emitter and detector of light. This forms the basis of a method to detect gravitational waves using Doppler velocimetry between pairs of satellites. Such detectors, operating in the milli-hertz gravitational frequency band, could lead to the direct detection of gravitational waves. The crucial component in such a detector is the frequency standard on board the emitting and receiving satellites. We point out that recent developments in atomic frequency standards have led to devices that are approaching the sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting sources. The sensitivity of satellites equipped with optical frequency standards for Doppler velocimetry is examined, and a design for a robust, space-capable optical frequency standard is presented.

  17. X-Pipeline: an analysis package for autonomous gravitational-wave burst searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Patrick J.

    Autonomous gravitational-wave searches—fully automated analyses of data that run without human intervention or assistance—are desirable for a number of reasons. They are necessary for the rapid identification of ...

  18. EXPLORING SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AS GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE STANDARD SIRENS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Scott A.

    Recent observations support the hypothesis that a large fraction of "short-hard" gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) are associated with the inspiral and merger of compact binaries. Since gravitational-wave (GW) measurements of ...

  19. GravEn: Software for the simulation of gravitational wave detector network response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amber L. Stuver; Lee Samuel Finn

    2006-09-24

    Physically motivated gravitational wave signals are needed in order to study the behaviour and efficacy of different data analysis methods seeking their detection. GravEn, short for Gravitational-wave Engine, is a MATLAB software package that simulates the sampled response of a gravitational wave detector to incident gravitational waves. Incident waves can be specified in a data file or chosen from among a group of pre-programmed types commonly used for establishing the detection efficiency of analysis methods used for LIGO data analysis. Every aspect of a desired signal can be specified, such as start time of the simulation (including inter-sample start times), wave amplitude, source orientation to line of sight, location of the source in the sky, etc. Supported interferometric detectors include LIGO, GEO, Virgo and TAMA.

  20. Energy Momentum Pseudo-Tensor of Relic Gravitational Wave in Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daiqin Su; Yang Zhang

    2012-04-04

    We study the energy-momentum pseudo-tensor of gravitational wave, and examine the one introduced by Landau-Lifshitz for a general gravitational field and the effective one recently used in literature. In short wavelength limit after Brill-Hartle average, both lead to the same gauge invariant stress tensor of gravitational wave. For relic gravitational waves in the expanding universe, we examine two forms of pressure, $p_{gw}$ and $\\mathcal{P}_{gw}$, and trace the origin of their difference to a coupling between gravitational waves and the background matter. The difference is shown to be negligibly small for most of cosmic expansion stages starting from inflation. We demonstrate that the wave equation is equivalent to the energy conservation equation using the pressure $\\mathcal{P}_{gw}$ that includes the mentioned coupling.

  1. Light amplification by gravitational waves in scalar-tensor theories of gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio Faraoni

    1996-02-29

    It is shown that the amplification of a light beam by gravitational waves in scalar-tensor theories of gravity is a first order effect in the wave amplitudes. In general relativity, instead, the effect is only of second order.

  2. Virgo data characterization and impact on gravitational wave searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballinger, T; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardt, A; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P

    2012-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2010 Virgo collected data in coincidence with the LIGO and GEO gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. These data have been searched for GWs emitted by cataclysmic phenomena in the universe, by non-axisymmetric rotating neutron stars or from a stochastic background in the frequency band of the detectors. The sensitivity of GW searches is limited by noise produced by the detector or its environment. It is therefore crucial to characterize the various noise sources in a GW detector. This paper reviews the Virgo detector noise sources, noise propagation, and conversion mechanisms which were identified in the three first Virgo observing runs. In many cases, these investigations allowed us to mitigate noise sources in the detector, or to selectively flag noise events and discard them from the data. We present examples from the joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo GW searches to show how well noise transients and narrow spectral lines have been identified and excluded from the Virgo data. We also discuss how detector c...

  3. Filtering post-Newtonian gravitational waves from coalescing binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Sathyaprakash

    1994-11-15

    Gravitational waves from inspiralling binaries are expected to be detected using a data analysis technique known as {\\it matched filtering.} This technique is applicable whenever the form of the signal is known accurately. Though we know the form of the signal precisely, we will not know {\\it a priori} its parameters. Hence it is essential to filter the raw output through a host of search templates each corresponding to different values of the parameters. The number of search templates needed in detecting the Newtonian waveform characterized by three independent parameters is itself several thousands. With the inclusion of post-Newtonian corrections the inspiral waveform will have four independent parameters and this, it was thought, would lead to an increase in the number of filters by several orders of magnitude---an unfavorable feature since it would drastically slow down data analysis. In this paper I show that by a judicious choice of signal parameters we can work, even when the first post-Newtonian corrections are included, with as many number of parameters as in the Newtonian case. In other words I demonstrate that the effective dimensionality of the signal parameter space does not change when first post-Newtonian corrections are taken into account.

  4. Probing the Inhomogeneous Universe with Gravitational Wave Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi; Atsushi Nishizawa; Chul-Moon Yoo

    2012-04-07

    If we assume that we live in the center of a spherical inhomogeneous universe, we can explain the apparent accelerating expansion of the universe without introducing the unknown dark energy or modifying gravitational theory. Direct measurement of the cosmic acceleration can be a powerful tool in distinguishing $\\Lambda$CDM and the inhomogeneous models. If $\\Lambda$CDM is the correct model, we have shown that DECIGO/BBO has sufficient ability to detect the positive redshift drift of the source by observing gravitational waves from neutron star binaries for 5-10 years. This enables us to rule out any Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) void model with monotonically increasing density profile. Furthermore, by detecting the positive redshift drift at $z\\sim 0$, we can even rule out generic LTB models unless we allow unrealistically steep density gradient at $z\\sim 0$. We also show that the measurement accuracy is slightly improved when we consider the joint search of DECIGO/BBO and the third generation Einstein Telescope. This test can be performed with GW observations alone without any reference to electromagnetic observations.

  5. A Parametrized post-Einsteinian Framework for Gravitational Wave Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Loutrel; Nicolas Yunes; Frans Pretorius

    2014-10-13

    The population of stellar-mass, compact object binaries that merge with non-negligible eccentricity may be large enough to motivate searches with ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Such events could be exceptional laboratories to test General Relativity in the dynamical, strong-field regime, as a larger fraction of the energy is emitted at high-velocities, compared to quasi-circular inspirals. A serious obstacle here, however, is the challenge of computing theoretical waveforms for eccentric systems with the requisite accuracy for use in a matched-filter search. The corresponding waveforms are more a sequence of concentrated bursts of energy emitted near periapse than a continuous waveform. Based on this, an alternative approach, stacking excess power over the set of time-frequency tiles coincident with the bursts, was recently suggested as a more practical (though sub-optimal) detection strategy. The leading-order "observable" that would be inferred from such a detection would be a sequence of discrete numbers characterizing the position and size of each time-frequency tile. In General Relativity, this (possibly large) sequence of numbers is uniquely determined by the small set of parameters describing the binary at formation. In this work, following the spirit of the parameterized post-Einsteinian framework developed for quasi-circular inspiral, we propose a simple, parameterized deformation of the baseline general relativistic burst algorithm for eccentric inspiral events that would allow for model-independent tests of Einstein's theory in this high-velocity, strong-field regime.

  6. Probing Long Gamma Ray Bursts progenitor mass by Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Milano, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a procedure to infer the mass of progenitors and remnants of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB), starting from the observed energy $E_{iso}^{GRB}$ emitted isotropically and considering the associated emission of Gravitational Waves (GW) $ E_{iso}^{GW}$ in the different phases. We assume that the GW energy of the progenitor $E_{PROG}^{GW}$ is emitted partially during a star collapse, and the residual energy is related to the GW energy emitted by the remnant. We take a sample of $237$ Long GRB, and use an hybrid Montecarlo procedure to explore, for each of them, a region of possible solutions of $ E_{iso}^{GW}$ as a function of the masses, radii, oblateness, rotation frequencies of progenitor and remnant and the fraction of energy $k$ emitted as GW by the GRB. We discriminate between a Neutron Star (NS) or Black Hole (BH) for the remnant and obtain interesting values for the GW emitted by the remnant NS or BH, for the conversion factor $k$ of and for the masses and radii of GRB progenitor stars. We ...

  7. Gravitational wave production by rotating primordial black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Ruifeng; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze in detail a rarely discussed question of gravity waves production from evaporating black holes. Evaporating black holes emit gravitons which are at classical level registered as gravity waves. We use the latest constraints on the primordial black hole abundance, and calculate the power emitted in gravitons at the time of their evaporation. We then solve the coupled system of equations that gives us the evolution of the frequency and amplitude of gravity waves during the expansion of the universe. The spectrum of gravitational waves that can be detected today depends on multiple factors: fraction of the total energy density which was occupied by black holes, the epoch in which the black holes are formed, and quantities like mass and angular momentum of evaporating black holes. We conclude that very small primordial black holes which evaporate before the nucleosynthesis emit gravitons whose spectral energy fraction today can be as large as $10^{-5}$. On the other hand, primordial black ...

  8. Dissipation of Modified Entropic Gravitational Energy Through Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2011-11-04

    The phenomenological nature of a new gravitational type interaction between two different bodies derived from Verlinde's entropic approach to gravitation in combination with Sorkin's definition of Universe's quantum information content, is investigated. Assuming that the energy stored in this entropic gravitational field is dissipated under the form of gravitational waves and that the Heisenberg principle holds for this system, one calculates a possible value for an absolute minimum time scale in nature $\\tau=15/16 \\frac{\\Lambda^{1/2}\\hbar G}{c^4}\\sim9.27\\times10^{-105}$ seconds, which is much smaller than the Planck time $t_{P}=(\\hbar G/c^5)^{1/2}\\sim 5.38\\times10^{-44}$ seconds. This appears together with an absolute possible maximum value for Newtonian gravitational forces generated by matter $F_g=32/30\\frac{c^7}{\\Lambda \\hbar G^2}\\sim 3.84\\times 10^{165}$ Newtons, which is much higher than the gravitational field between two Planck masses separated by the Planck length $F_{gP}=c^4/G\\sim1.21\\times10^{44}$ Newtons.

  9. Gravitational waves from preheating in M-flation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashoorioon, Amjad [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Fung, Brandon; Mann, Robert B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Oltean, Marius [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Sheikh-Jabbari, M.M., E-mail: a.ashoorioon@lancaster.ac.uk, E-mail: b6fung@uwaterloo.ca, E-mail: rbmann@uwaterloo.ca, E-mail: moltean@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: jabbari@theory.ipm.ac.ir [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    Matrix inflation, or M-flation, is a string theory motivated inflationary model with three scalar field matrices and gauge fields in the adjoint representation of the U(N) gauge group. One of these 3N{sup 2} scalars appears as the effective inflaton while the rest of the fields (scalar and gauge fields) can play the role of isocurvature fields during inflation and preheat fields afterwards. There is a region in parameter space and initial field values, ''the hilltop region'', where predictions of the model are quite compatible with the recent Planck data. We show that in this hilltop region, if the inflaton ends up in the supersymmetric vacuum, the model can have an embedded preheating mechanism. Couplings of the preheat modes are related to the inflaton self-couplings and therefore are known from the CMB data. Through lattice simulations performed using a symplectic integrator, we numerically compute the power spectra of gravitational waves produced during the preheating stage following M-flation. The preliminary numerical simulation of the spectrum from multi-preheat fields peaks in the GHz band with an amplitude ?{sub gw}h{sup 2}?10{sup ?16}, suggesting that the model has concrete predictions for the ultra-high frequency gravity-wave probes. This signature could be used to distinguish the model from rival inflationary models.

  10. Chiral Imprint of a Cosmic Gauge Field on Primordial Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jannis Bielefeld; Robert R. Caldwell

    2014-12-18

    A cosmological gauge field with isotropic stress-energy introduces parity violation into the behavior of gravitational waves. We show that a primordial spectrum of inflationary gravitational waves develops a preferred handedness, left- or right-circularly polarized, depending on the abundance and coupling of the gauge field during the radiation era. A modest abundance of the gauge field would induce parity-violating correlations of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization patterns that could be detected by current and future experiments.

  11. A directed search for continuous Gravitational Waves from the Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliá; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; S. Deléglise; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endröczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe

    2013-09-27

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic Center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO's fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semi-coherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first order spindown values down to -7.86 x 10^-8 Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. We place 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center. Placing 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center, we reach ~3.35x10^-25 for frequencies near 150 Hz. These upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  12. On The Interaction of Gravitational Waves with Magnetic and Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

    2010-03-02

    The existence of large--scale magnetic fields in the universe has led to the observation that if gravitational waves propagating in a cosmological environment encounter even a small magnetic field then electromagnetic radiation is produced. To study this phenomenon in more detail we take it out of the cosmological context and at the same time simplify the gravitational radiation to impulsive waves. Specifically, to illustrate our findings, we describe the following three physical situations: (1) a cylindrical impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with a magnetic field, (2) an axially symmetric impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with an electric field and (3) a `spherical' impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with a small magnetic field. In cases (1) and (3) electromagnetic radiation is produced behind the gravitational wave. In case (2) no electromagnetic radiation appears after the wave unless a current is established behind the wave breaking the Maxwell vacuum. In all three cases the presence of the magnetic or electric fields results in a modification of the amplitude of the incoming gravitational wave which is explicitly calculated using the Einstein--Maxwell vacuum field equations.

  13. Improved methods for detecting gravitational waves associated with short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Williamson; C. Biwer; S. Fairhurst; I. W. Harry; E. Macdonald; D. Macleod; V. Predoi

    2014-10-22

    In the era of second generation ground-based gravitational wave detectors, short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) will be among the most promising astrophysical events for joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave observation. A targeted search for gravitational wave compact binary merger signals in coincidence with short GRBs was developed and used to analyze data from the first generation LIGO and Virgo instruments. In this paper, we present improvements to this search that enhance our ability to detect gravitational wave counterparts to short GRBs. Specifically, we introduce an improved method for estimating the gravitational wave background to obtain the event significance required to make detections; implement a method of tiling extended sky regions, as required when searching for signals associated to poorly localized GRBs from Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor or the InterPlanetary Network; and incorporate astrophysical knowledge about the beaming of GRB emission to restrict the search parameter space. We describe the implementation of these enhancements and demonstrate how they improve the ability to observe binary merger gravitational wave signals associated with short GRBs.

  14. Swift Pointing and the Association Between Gamma-Ray Bursts and Gravitational-Wave Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Samuel Finn; Badri Krishnan; Patrick J. Sutton

    2003-04-11

    The currently accepted model for gamma-ray burst phenomena involves the violent formation of a rapidly rotating solar mass black hole. Gravitational waves should be associated with the black-hole formation, and their detection would permit this model to be tested, the black hole progenitor (e.g., coalescing binary or collapsing stellar core) identified, and the origin of the gamma rays (within the expanding relativistic fireball or at the point of impact on the interstellar medium) located. Even upper limits on the gravitational-wave strength associated with gamma-ray bursts could constrain the gamma-ray burst model. To do any of these requires joint observations of gamma-ray burst events with gravitational and gamma-ray detectors. Here we examine how the quality of an upper limit on the gravitational-wave strength associated with gamma-ray burst observations depends on the relative orientation of the gamma-ray-burst and gravitational-wave detectors, and apply our results to the particular case of the Swift Burst-Alert Telescope (BAT) and the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors. A result of this investigation is a science-based ``figure of merit'' that can be used, together with other mission constraints, to optimize the pointing of the Swift telescope for the detection of gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts.

  15. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse physics.

  16. Probing the size of extra dimension with gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi; Norihiro Tanahashi; Takahiro Tanaka

    2011-12-28

    In Randall-Sundrum II (RS-II) braneworld model, it has been conjectured according to the AdS/CFT correspondence that brane-localized black hole (BH) larger than the bulk AdS curvature scale $\\ell$ cannot be static, and it is dual to a four dimensional BH emitting the Hawking radiation through some quantum fields. In this scenario, the number of the quantum field species is so large that this radiation changes the orbital evolution of a BH binary. We derived the correction to the gravitational waveform phase due to this effect and estimated the upper bounds on $\\ell$ by performing Fisher analyses. We found that DECIGO/BBO can put a stronger constraint than the current table-top result by detecting gravitational waves from small mass BH/BH and BH/neutron star (NS) binaries. Furthermore, DECIGO/BBO is expected to detect 10$^5$ BH/NS binaries per year. Taking this advantage, we found that DECIGO/BBO can actually measure $\\ell$ down to $\\ell=0.33 \\mu$m for 5 year observation if we know that binaries are circular a priori. This is about 40 times smaller than the upper bound obtained from the table-top experiment. On the other hand, when we take eccentricities into binary parameters, the detection limit weakens to $\\ell=1.5 \\mu$m due to strong degeneracies between $\\ell$ and eccentricities. We also derived the upper bound on $\\ell$ from the expected detection number of extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) with LISA and BH/NS binaries with DECIGO/BBO, extending the discussion made recently by McWilliams. We found that these less robust constraints are weaker than the ones from phase differences.

  17. Gravitational Wave Memory from Gamma Ray Bursts' Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofek Birnholtz; Tsvi Piran

    2013-06-18

    While the possible roles of GRBs' progenitors as Gravitational Waves (GW) sources have been extensively studied, little attention has been given to the jet itself as a GW source. We expect the jet's acceleration to produce a GW Memory signal. While all relativistic jet models display anti-beaming of GW radiation away from the jet axis, thus radiating away from directions of GRBs' gamma radiation, this effect is not overwhelming. The decrease of the signal amplitude towards the cone of gamma-ray detectability is weak, and for some models and parameters the GW signal reaches a significant amplitude for much of the gamma-ray cone. Thus both signals may be jointly detected. We find different waveforms and fourier signatures for uniform jets and structured jet models - thus offering a method of using GW signatures to probe the internal structure and acceleration of GRB jets. The GW signal peaks just outside the jet (core) of a uniform (structuted) jet. Within the jet (core) the GW signal displays wiggles, due to a polarization effect; thus for a uniform jet, the peak amplitude accompanies a smoother signal than the peak of a structured jet. For the most probable detection angle and for typical GRB parameters, we expect frequencies < ~600Hz and amplitudes h~10^-25. Our estimates of the expected signals suggest that the signals are not strong enough for a single cluster of DECIGO nor for aLIGO's sensitivities. However, sensitivies of ~10^-25/sqrt(Hz) in the DECIGO band should suffice to detect typical long GRBs at 2Gpc and short GRBs at 200Mpc, implying a monthly event of a long GRB and a detection of a short GRB every decade. In addition, we expect much more frequent detection of GW from GRBs directed away from us, including orphan afterglows. The ultimate DECIGO sensitivy should increase the range and enable detecting these signals in all models even to high cosmological z.

  18. Gravitational-wave emission from compact Galactic binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samaya Nissanke; Michele Vallisneri; Gijs Nelemans; Thomas A. Prince

    2012-10-09

    Compact Galactic binaries where at least one member is a white dwarf or neutron star constitute the majority of individually detectable sources for future low-frequency space-based gravitational-wave (GW) observatories; they also form an unresolved continuum, the dominant Galactic foreground at frequencies below a few mHz. Due to the paucity of electromagnetic observations, the majority of studies of Galactic-binary populations so far have been based on population-synthesis simulations. However, recent surveys have reported several new detections of white-dwarf binaries, providing new constraints for population estimates. In this article, we evaluate the impact of revised local densities of interacting white-dwarf binaries on future GW observations. Specifically: we consider five scenarios that explain these densities with different assumptions on the formation of interacting systems; we simulate corresponding populations of detached and interacting white-dwarf binaries; we estimate the number of individually detectable GW sources and the magnitude of the confusion-noise foreground, as observed by space-based detectors with 5- and 1-Mkm arms. We confirm earlier estimates of thousands of detached-binary detections, but project only few ten to few hundred detections of interacting systems. This reduction is partly due to our assessment of detection prospects, based on the iterative identification and subtraction of bright sources with respect to both instrument and confusion noise. We also confirm earlier estimates for the confusion-noise foreground, except in one scenario that explains smaller local densities of interacting systems with smaller numbers of progenitor detached systems.

  19. Identifying the Host Galaxy of Gravitational Wave Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura K Nuttall; Patrick J Sutton

    2011-11-29

    One of the goals of the current LIGO-GEO-Virgo science run is to identify transient gravitational wave (GW) signals in near real time to allow follow-up electromagnetic (EM) observations. An EM counterpart could increase the confidence of the GW detection and provide insight into the nature of the source. Current GW-EM campaigns target potential host galaxies based on overlap with the GW sky error box. We propose a new statistic to identify the most likely host galaxy, ranking galaxies based on their position, distance, and luminosity. We test our statistic with Monte Carlo simulations of GWs produced by coalescing binaries of neutron stars (NS) and black holes (BH), one of the most promising sources for ground-based GW detectors. Considering signals accessible to current detectors, we find that when imaging a single galaxy, our statistic correctly identifies the true host ~20% to ~50% of the time, depending on the masses of the binary components. With five narrow-field images the probability of imaging the true host increases to ~50% to ~80%. When collectively imaging groups of galaxies using large field-of-view telescopes, the probability improves to ~30% to ~60% for a single image and to ~70% to ~90% for five images. For the advanced generation of detectors (c. 2015+), and considering binaries within 100 Mpc (the reach of the galaxy catalogue used), the probability is ~40% for one narrow-field image, ~75% for five narrow-field images, ~65% for one wide-field image, and ~95% for five wide-field images, irrespective of binary type.

  20. Synergy of short gamma ray burst and gravitational wave observations: Constraining the inclination angle of the binary and possible implications for off-axis gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Arun; Hideyuki Tagoshi; Chandra Kant Mishra; Archana Pai

    2014-12-15

    Compact binary mergers are the strongest candidates for the progenitors of Short Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRBs). If a gravitational wave (GW) signal from the compact binary merger is observed in association with a SGRB, such a synergy can help us understand many interesting aspects of these bursts. We examine the accuracies with which a world wide network of gravitational wave interferometers would measure the inclination angle (the angle between the angular momentum axis of the binary and the observer's line of sight) of the binary. We compare the projected accuracies of GW detectors to measure the inclination angle of double neutron star (DNS) and neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binaries for different astrophysical scenarios. We find that a 5 detector network can measure the inclination angle to an accuracy of $\\sim 5.1 (2.2)$ degrees for a DNS(NS-BH) system at 200 Mpc if the direction of the source as well as the redshift is known electromagnetically. We argue as to how an accurate estimation of the inclination angle of the binary can prove to be crucial in understanding off-axis GRBs, the dynamics and the energetics of their jets, and help the searches for (possible) orphan afterglows of the SGRBs.

  1. Reheating signature in the gravitational wave spectrum from self-ordering scalar fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Takashi Hiramatsu; Jun'ichi Yokoyama

    2015-09-28

    We investigate the imprint of reheating on the gravitational wave spectrum produced by self-ordering of multi-component scalar fields after a global phase transition. The equation of state of the Universe during reheating, which usually has different behaviour from that of a radiation-dominated Universe, affects the evolution of gravitational waves through the Hubble expansion term in the equations of motion. This gives rise to a different power-law behavior of frequency in the gravitational wave spectrum. The reheating history is therefore imprinted in the shape of the spectrum. We perform $512^3$ lattice simulations to investigate how the ordering scalar field reacts to the change of the Hubble expansion and how the reheating effect arises in the spectrum. We also compare the result with inflation-produced gravitational waves, which has a similar spectral shape, and discuss whether it is possible to distinguish the origin between inflation and global phase transition by detecting the shape with future direct detection gravitational wave experiments such as DECIGO.

  2. Numerical simulations of acoustically generated gravitational waves at a first order phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Hindmarsh; Stephan J. Huber; Kari Rummukainen; David J. Weir

    2015-04-13

    We present details of numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation produced by a first order {thermal} phase transition in the early universe. We confirm that the dominant source of gravitational waves is sound waves generated by the expanding bubbles of the low-temperature phase. We demonstrate that the sound waves have a power spectrum with power-law form between the scales set by the average bubble separation (which sets the length scale of the fluid flow $L_\\text{f}$) and the bubble wall width. The sound waves generate gravitational waves whose power spectrum also has a power-law form, at a rate proportional to $L_\\text{f}$ and the square of the fluid kinetic energy density. We identify a dimensionless parameter $\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW}$ characterising the efficiency of this "acoustic" gravitational wave production whose value is $8\\pi\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW} \\simeq 0.8 \\pm 0.1$ across all our simulations. We compare the acoustic gravitational waves with the standard prediction from the envelope approximation. Not only is the power spectrum steeper (apart from an initial transient) but the gravitational wave energy density is generically two orders of magnitude or more larger.

  3. An all-sky search for long-duration gravitational wave transients with LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. B. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. V. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; N. Arnaud; K. G. Arun; G. Ashton; M. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; S. E. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; D. Barta; J. Bartlett; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; M. Bazzan; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. J. Bell; B. K. Berger; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Birney; S. Biscans; A. Bisht; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; R. M. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; A. Bohe; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; A. Bozzi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; P. Brockill; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; C. C. Buchanan; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; C. Cahillane; J. Calderón Bustillo; T. Callister; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; E. Capocasa; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; J. Casanueva Diaz; C. Casentini; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; L. Cerboni Baiardi; G. Cerretani; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; M. Chan; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; H. Y. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Cheng; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. G. Collette; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; L. Conti; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; S. Cortese; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. B. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. T. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; T. Dal Canton; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; N. S. Darman; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. P. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. De Rosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. C. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; M. Di Giovanni; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. E. Dwyer; T. B. Edo; M. C. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. M. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; W. Engels; R. C. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. M. Evans; R. Everett; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; H. Fair; S. Fairhurst; X. Fan; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Fletcher; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; V. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; H. A. G. Gabbard; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. G. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; G. Gaur; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; J. George; L. Gergely; V. Germain; A. Ghosh; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; K. Gill; A. Glaefke; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; J. M. Gonzalez Castro; A. Gopakumar; N. A. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. E. Gossan; M. Gosselin; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; A. C. Green; P. Groot; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; X. Guo; A. Gupta; M. K. Gupta; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. J. Hacker; B. R. Hall; E. D. Hall; G. Hammond; M. Haney; M. M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. J. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; J. Hennig; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; D. E. Holz; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. A. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; S. Huang

    2015-11-13

    We present the results of a search for long-duration gravitational wave transients in two sets of data collected by the LIGO Hanford and LIGO Livingston detectors between November 5, 2005 and September 30, 2007, and July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010, with a total observational time of 283.0 days and 132.9 days, respectively. The search targets gravitational wave transients of duration 10 - 500 seconds in a frequency band of 40 - 1000 Hz, with minimal assumptions about the signal waveform, polarization, source direction, or time of occurrence. All candidate triggers were consistent with the expected background; as a result we set 90% confidence upper limits on the rate of long-duration gravitational wave transients for different types of gravitational wave signals. We also report upper limits on the source rate density per year per Mpc^3 for specific signal models. These are the first results from an all-sky search for unmodeled long-duration transient gravitational waves.

  4. A Bayesian approach to multi-messenger astronomy: identification of gravitational-wave host galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, XiLong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2014-11-01

    We present a general framework for incorporating astrophysical information into Bayesian parameter estimation techniques used by gravitational wave data analysis to facilitate multi-messenger astronomy. Since the progenitors of transient gravitational wave events, such as compact binary coalescences, are likely to be associated with a host galaxy, improvements to the source sky location estimates through the use of host galaxy information are explored. To demonstrate how host galaxy properties can be included, we simulate a population of compact binary coalescences and show that for ?8.5% of simulations within 200 Mpc, the top 10 most likely galaxies account for a ?50% of the total probability of hosting a gravitational wave source. The true gravitational wave source host galaxy is in the top 10 galaxy candidates ?10% of the time. Furthermore, we show that by including host galaxy information, a better estimate of the inclination angle of a compact binary gravitational wave source can be obtained. We also demonstrate the flexibility of our method by incorporating the use of either the B or K band into our analysis.

  5. Gravitational waves from Sco X-1: A comparison of search methods and prospects for detection with advanced detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messenger, C; Crowder, S G; Dergachev, V; Galloway, D K; Goetz, E; Jonker, R J G; Lasky, P D; Meadors, G D; Melatos, A; Premachandra, S; Riles, K; Sammut, L; Thrane, E H; Whelan, J T; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) is potentially the most luminous source of continuous gravitational-wave radiation for interferometers such as LIGO and Virgo. For low-mass X-ray binaries this radiation would be sustained by active accretion of matter from its binary companion. With the Advanced Detector Era fast approaching, work is underway to develop an array of robust tools for maximizing the science and detection potential of Sco X-1. We describe the plans and progress of a project designed to compare the numerous independent search algorithms currently available. We employ a mock-data challenge in which the search pipelines are tested for their relative proficiencies in parameter estimation, computational efficiency, robust- ness, and most importantly, search sensitivity. The mock-data challenge data contains an ensemble of 50 Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) type signals, simulated within a frequency band of 50-1500 Hz. Simulated detector noise was generated assuming the expected best strain sens...

  6. 1852 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 23, No. 23 / December 1, 1998 Quantum noise in a continuous-wave laser-diode-pumped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    .3280. High-power, low-noise lasers are required for laser interferometric gravitational-wave detection1 of optical amplification and the potential need for power-noise reduction by use of passive mode filtering with a premode cleaner9 after the power amplifier. Laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors typically

  7. Prospects for joint radio telescope and gravitational wave searches for astrophysical transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Predoi; J. Clark; T. Creighton; E. Daw; S. Fairhurst; I. S. Heng; J. Kanner; T. Regimbau; P. Shawhan; X. Siemens; P. Sutton; A. Vecchio; D. White; G. Woan

    2009-12-02

    The radio skies remain mostly unobserved when it comes to transient phenomena. The direct detection of gravitational waves will mark a major milestone of modern astronomy, as an entirely new window will open on the universe. Two apparently independent phenomena can be brought together in a coincident effort that has the potential to boost both searches. In this paper we will outline the scientific case that stands behind these future joint observations and will describe the methods that might be used to conduct the searches and analyze the data. The targeted sources are binary systems of compact objects, known to be strong candidate sources for gravitational waves. Detection of transients coincident in these two channels would be a significant smoking gun for first direct detection of gravitational waves, and would open up a new field for characterization of astrophysical transients involving massive compact objects.

  8. Chance Estimations for Detecting Gravitational Waves with LIGO/Virgo Associated with Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Dietz

    2009-04-02

    Short Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRB) are believed to originate from the merger of two compact objects. If this scenario is correct, SGRB will be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves, detectable by current or planned GW detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo. No detection of a gravitational wave has been made up to date. In this paper I will use a set of SGRB with observed redshifts to fit a model describing the cumulative number of SGRB as a function of redshift, to determine the rate of such merger events in the nearby universe. These estimations will be used to make probability statements about detecting a gravitational wave associated with a short gamma ray burst during the latest science run of LIGO/Virgo. Chance estimations for the enhanced and advanced detectors will also be made, and a comparison between the rates deduced from this work will be compared to the existing literature.

  9. Parameter-space metric for all-sky semicoherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wette, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars is primarily limited by the finite availability of computing resources. Semicoherent searches are a widely-used method of maximizing sensitivity to gravitational-wave pulsars at fixed computing cost: the data from a gravitational-wave detector are partitioned into a number of segments, each segment is coherently analyzed, and the analysis results from each segment are summed together. The generation of template banks for the coherent analysis of each segment, and for the summation, requires knowledge of the metrics associated with the coherent and semicoherent parameter spaces respectively. We present a useful approximation to the semicoherent parameter-space metric, analogous to that presented in Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)] for the coherent metric. The new semicoherent metric is compared to previous work in Pletsch [Phys. Rev. D 82, 042002 (2010)], and Brady and Creighton [Phys. Rev. D 61, 082001 (2000)]. We find that semi...

  10. Gravitational Wave Emission From a Binary Black Hole System in Presence of an Accretion Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    1996-03-21

    We study time evolution and gravitational wave emission properties of a black hole orbiting {\\it inside} an accretion disk surrounding a massive black hole. We simultaneously solve the structure equations of the accretion disk in presence of heating, cooling and viscosity as well as the equations governing the companion orbit. The deviation from Keplerian distribution of angular momentum of the disk due to pressure and advection effects causes a significant exchange of angular momentum between the disk and the companion. This significantly affects the gravitational wave emission properties from the binary system. We show that when the companion is light, the effect is extremely important and must be taken into account while interpreting gravitational wave signals from such systems.

  11. Effect of squeezing on parameter estimation of gravitational waves emitted by compact binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan Lynch; Salvatore Vitale; Lisa Barsotti; Matthew Evans; Sheila Dwyer

    2014-11-06

    The LIGO gravitational wave (GW) detectors will begin collecting data in 2015, with Virgo following shortly after. The use of squeezing has been proposed as a way to reduce the quantum noise without increasing the laser power, and has been successfully tested at one of the LIGO sites and at GEO in Germany. When used in Advanced LIGO without a filter cavity, the squeezer improves the performances of detectors above about 100 Hz, at the cost of a higher noise floor in the low frequency regime. Frequency-dependent squeezing, on the other hand, will lower the noise floor throughout the entire band. Squeezing technology will have a twofold impact: it will change the number of expected detections and it will impact the quality of parameter estimation for the detected signals. In this work we consider three different GW detector networks, each utilizing a different type of squeezer, all corresponding to plausible implementations. Using LALInference, a powerful Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm, we study how each of these networks estimates the parameters of GW signals emitted by compact binary systems, and compare the results with a baseline advanced LIGO-Virgo network. We find that, even in its simplest implementation, squeezing has a large positive impact: the sky error area of detected signals will shrink by about 30% on average, increasing the chances of finding an electromagnetic counterpart to the GW detection. Similarly, we find that the measurability of tidal deformability parameters for neutron stars in binaries increases by about 30%, which could aid in determining the equation of state of neutron stars. The degradation in the measurement of the chirp mass, as a result of the higher low-frequency noise, is shown to be negligible when compared to systematic errors.

  12. Prospects for Localization of Gravitational Wave Transients by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; Y. Bao; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brueckner; K. Buckland; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. D. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; T. Denker; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; S. Drasco; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endröczi; R. Engel; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. A. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; N. Gehrels; G. Gelencser; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; K. Haris; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Keitel; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov

    2013-04-02

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. For concreteness, we focus primarily on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron star (BNS) systems, as the source considered likely to be the most common for detection and also promising for multimessenger astronomy. We find that confident detections will likely require at least 2 detectors operating with BNS sensitive ranges of at least 100 Mpc, while ranges approaching 200 Mpc should give at least ~1 BNS detection per year even under pessimistic predictions of signal rates. The ability to localize the source of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and can be as large as thousands of square degrees with only 2 sensitive detectors operating. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 sq deg to 20 sq deg will require at least 3 detectors of sensitivity within a factor of ~2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should one of the LIGO detectors be relocated in India as expected, many gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.

  13. Multivariate Classification with Random Forests for Gravitational Wave Searches of Black Hole Binary Coalescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul T. Baker; Sarah Caudill; Kari A. Hodge; Dipongkar Talukder; Collin Capano; Neil J. Cornish

    2014-12-19

    Searches for gravitational waves produced by coalescing black hole binaries with total masses $\\gtrsim25\\,$M$_\\odot$ use matched filtering with templates of short duration. Non-Gaussian noise bursts in gravitational wave detector data can mimic short signals and limit the sensitivity of these searches. Previous searches have relied on empirically designed statistics incorporating signal-to-noise ratio and signal-based vetoes to separate gravitational wave candidates from noise candidates. We report on sensitivity improvements achieved using a multivariate candidate ranking statistic derived from a supervised machine learning algorithm. We apply the random forest of bagged decision trees technique to two separate searches in the high mass $\\left( \\gtrsim25\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\right)$ parameter space. For a search which is sensitive to gravitational waves from the inspiral, merger, and ringdown (IMR) of binary black holes with total mass between $25\\,$M$_\\odot$ and $100\\,$M$_\\odot$, we find sensitive volume improvements as high as $70_{\\pm 13}-109_{\\pm 11}$\\% when compared to the previously used ranking statistic. For a ringdown-only search which is sensitive to gravitational waves from the resultant perturbed intermediate mass black hole with mass roughly between $10\\,$M$_\\odot$ and $600\\,$M$_\\odot$, we find sensitive volume improvements as high as $61_{\\pm 4}-241_{\\pm 12}$\\% when compared to the previously used ranking statistic. We also report how sensitivity improvements can differ depending on mass regime, mass ratio, and available data quality information. Finally, we describe the techniques used to tune and train the random forest classifier that can be generalized to its use in other searches for gravitational waves.

  14. Gravitational Waves from Quasi-Circular Black Hole Binaries in Dynamical Chern-Simons Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi; Nicolas Yunes; Takahiro Tanaka

    2013-02-07

    Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity cannot be strongly constrained with current experiments because it reduces to General Relativity in the weak-field limit. This theory, however, introduces modifications in the non-linear, dynamical regime, and thus, it could be greatly constrained with gravitational waves from the late inspiral of black hole binaries. We complete the first self-consistent calculation of such gravitational waves in this theory. For favorable spin-orientations, advanced ground-based detectors may improve existing solar-system constraints by 6 orders of magnitude.

  15. Titania-doped tantala/silica coatings for gravitational-wave detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory M. Harry; Matthew R. Abernathy; Andres E. Becerra-Toledo; Helena Armandula; Eric Black; Kate Dooley; Matt Eichenfield; Chinyere Nwabugwu; Akira Villar; D. R. M. Crooks; Gianpietro Cagnoli; Jim Hough; Colin R. How; Ian MacLaren; Peter Murray; Stuart Reid; Sheila Rowan; Peter H. Sneddon; Martin M Fejer; Roger Route; Steven D. Penn; Patrick Ganau; Jean-Marie Mackowski; Christophe Michel; Laurent Pinard; Alban Remillieux

    2006-10-01

    Reducing thermal noise from optical coatings is crucial to reaching the required sensitivity in next generation interferometric gravitational-waves detectors. Here we show that adding TiO$_2$ to Ta$_2$O$_5$ in Ta$_2$O$_5$/SiO$_2$ coatings reduces the internal friction and in addition present data confirming it reduces thermal noise. We also show that TiO$_2$-doped Ta$_2$O$_5$/SiO$_2$ coatings are close to satisfying the optical absorption requirements of second generation gravitational-wave detectors.

  16. Is the Spectrum of Gravitational Waves the "Holy Grail" of Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert H. Brandenberger

    2011-04-18

    It is often said that detecting a spectrum of primordial gravitational waves via observing B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background is the "Holy Grail" of inflation. The purpose of this short note is to point out that it is indeed of immense scientific interest to search for a signal of gravitational waves in B-mode polarization. However, rather than proving that inflation is the right paradigm of early universe cosmology, a positive signal of direct primordial B-mode polarization might well be due to other sources than inflation. In fact, a careful characterization of the spectrum of B-mode polarization might even falsify the inflationary paradigm.

  17. Is the Spectrum of Gravitational Waves the "Holy Grail" of Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenberger, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    It is often said that detecting a spectrum of primordial gravitational waves via observing B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background is the "Holy Grail" of inflation. The purpose of this short note is to point out that it is indeed of immense scientific interest to search for a signal of gravitational waves in B-mode polarization. However, rather than proving that inflation is the right paradigm of early universe cosmology, a positive signal of direct primordial B-mode polarization might well be due to other sources than inflation. In fact, a careful characterization of the spectrum of B-mode polarization might even falsify the inflationary paradigm.

  18. Detection of Gravitational Wave Emission by Supermassive Black Hole Binaries Through Tidal Disruption Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayasaki, Kimitake

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers produce binaries of supermassive black holes, which emit gravitational waves prior to their coalescence. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to study the tidal disruption of stars by such a binary in the final centuries of its life. We find that the gas stream of the stellar debris moves chaotically in the binary potential and forms accretion disks around both black holes. The accretion light curve is modulated over the binary orbital period owing to relativistic beaming. This periodic signal allows to detect the decay of the binary orbit due to gravitational wave emission by observing two tidal disruption events that are separated by more than a decade.

  19. Results of the IGEC-2 search for gravitational wave bursts during 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astone, P.; Babusci, D.; Giordano, G.; Marini, A.; Modestino, G.; Quintieri, L.; Ronga, F.; Baggio, L.; Bassan, M.; Fafone, V.; Moleti, A.; Bignotto, M.; Cerdonio, M.; Conti, L.; Drago, M.; Liguori, N.; Bonaldi, M.; Falferi, P.; Vinante, A.; Camarda, M.

    2007-11-15

    The network of resonant bar detectors of gravitational waves resumed coordinated observations within the International Gravitational Event Collaboration (IGEC-2). Four detectors are taking part in this Collaboration: ALLEGRO, AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS. We present here the results of the search for gravitational wave bursts over 6 months during 2005, when IGEC-2 was the only gravitational wave observatory in operation. The implemented network data analysis is based on a time coincidence search among AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS; ALLEGRO data was reserved for follow-up studies. The network amplitude sensitivity to bursts improved by a factor {approx_equal}3 over the 1997-2000 IGEC observations; the wider sensitive band also allowed the analysis to be tuned over a larger class of waveforms. Given the higher single-detector duty factors, the analysis was based on threefold coincidence, to ensure the identification of any single candidate of gravitational waves with high statistical confidence. The false detection rate was as low as 1 per century. No candidates were found.

  20. Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO. Rakhmanov,33 S. R. Rao,11 K. Rawlins,12 S. Ray-Majumder,38 V. Re,32 D. Redding,11,b M. W. Regehr,11,b

  1. Numerical simulations of acoustically generated gravitational waves at a first order phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Rummukainen, Kari; Weir, David J

    2015-01-01

    We present details of numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation produced by a first order {thermal} phase transition in the early universe. We confirm that the dominant source of gravitational waves is sound waves generated by the expanding bubbles of the low-temperature phase. We demonstrate that the sound waves have a power spectrum with power-law form between the scales set by the average bubble separation (which sets the length scale of the fluid flow $L_\\text{f}$) and the bubble wall width. The sound waves generate gravitational waves whose power spectrum also has a power-law form, at a rate proportional to $L_\\text{f}$ and the square of the fluid kinetic energy density. We identify a dimensionless parameter $\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW}$ characterising the efficiency of this "acoustic" gravitational wave production whose value is $8\\pi\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW} \\simeq 0.8 \\pm 0.1$ across all our simulations. We compare the acoustic gravitational waves with the standard prediction from the envelope appr...

  2. Signal photon flux generated by high-frequency relic gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Li; Sai Wang; Hao Wen

    2015-08-26

    The power spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations $\\mathcal{P}_t$ increases rapidly in high frequency region if the spectral index $n_t>0$. It is shown that the amplitude of relic gravitational wave $h_t$($5\\times10^9$Hz) varies from $10^{-36}$ to $10^{-25}$ while $n_t$ varies from $-6.25\\times 10^{-3}$ to $0.87$. High frequency gravitational waves detector that is proposed by F.-Y. Li detects gravitational waves through observing the perturbed photon flux that is generated by interaction between the relic gravitational waves and electromagnetic system. It is shown that the perturbative photon flux $N_x^1$($5\\times10^9$Hz) varies from $1.40\\times10^{-4}\\rm s^{-1}$ to $2.85\\times10^{7}\\rm s^{-1}$ while $n_t$ varies from $-6.25\\times 10^{-3}$ to $0.87$. Correspondingly, the ratio of the transverse perturbative photon flux $N_x^1$ to the background photon flux varies from $10^{-28}$ to $10^{-16}$.

  3. Reheating signature in the gravitational wave spectrum from self-ordering scalar fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the imprint of reheating on the gravitational wave spectrum produced by self-ordering of multi-component scalar fields after a global phase transition. The equation of state of the Universe during reheating, which usually has different behaviour from that of a radiation-dominated Universe, affects the evolution of gravitational waves through the Hubble expansion term in the equations of motion. This gives rise to a different power-law behavior of frequency in the gravitational wave spectrum. The reheating history is therefore imprinted in the shape of the spectrum. We perform $512^3$ lattice simulations to investigate how the ordering scalar field reacts to the change of the Hubble expansion and how the reheating effect arises in the spectrum. We also compare the result with inflation-produced gravitational waves, which has a similar spectral shape, and discuss whether it is possible to distinguish the origin between inflation and global phase transition by detecting the shape with future direc...

  4. Search for gravitational waves associated with the InterPlanetary Network short gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Search for gravitational waves associated with the InterPlanetary Network short gamma ray bursts V with short gamma ray bursts detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. The IPN localisation of short gamma ray bursts is limited to extended error

  5. Testing gravitational parity violation with coincident gravitational waves and short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Yunes; Richard O'Shaughnessy; Benjamin J. Owen; Stephon Alexander

    2010-05-18

    Gravitational parity violation is a possibility motivated by particle physics, string theory and loop quantum gravity. One effect of it is amplitude birefringence of gravitational waves, whereby left and right circularly-polarized waves propagate at the same speed but with different amplitude evolution. Here we propose a test of this effect through coincident observations of gravitational waves and short gamma-ray bursts from binary mergers involving neutron stars. Such gravitational waves are highly left or right circularly-polarized due to the geometry of the merger. Using localization information from the gamma-ray burst, ground-based gravitational wave detectors can measure the distance to the source with reasonable accuracy. An electromagnetic determination of the redshift from an afterglow or host galaxy yields an independent measure of this distance. Gravitational parity violation would manifest itself as a discrepancy between these two distance measurements. We exemplify such a test by considering one specific effective theory that leads to such gravitational parity-violation, Chern-Simons gravity. We show that the advanced LIGO-Virgo network and all-sky gamma-ray telescopes can be sensitive to the propagating sector of Chern-Simons gravitational parity violation to a level roughly two orders of magnitude better than current stationary constraints from the LAGEOS satellites.

  6. Gravitational Waves versus X and Gamma Ray Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. G. Oliveira; Jorge A. Rueda; Remo Ruffini

    2014-03-28

    The recent progress in the understanding the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst, GRB 090227B, allows to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X and Gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst.

  7. Fast-light for astrophysics: super-sensitive gyroscopes and gravitational wave detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    Fast-light for astrophysics: super-sensitive gyroscopes and gravitational wave detectors M. SALIT with slow- and fast-light materials, and show that the fast-light material-filled cavities, which can function as `white light cavities', have properties useful for astrophysical applications such as enhancing

  8. Evolution of high-frequency gravitational waves in some cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otakar Svitek; Jiri Podolsky

    2006-09-18

    We investigate Isaacson's high-frequency gravitational waves which propagate in some relevant cosmological models, in particular the FRW spacetimes. Their time evolution in Fourier space is explicitly obtained for various metric forms of (anti--)de Sitter universe. Behaviour of high-frequency waves in the anisotropic Kasner spacetime is also described.

  9. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsotti, Lisa

    This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

  10. Postprocessing methods used in the search for continuous gravitational-wave signals from the Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berit Behnke; Maria Alessandra Papa; Reinhard Prix

    2015-02-14

    The search for continuous gravitational-wave signals requires the development of techniques that can effectively explore the low-significance regions of the candidate set. In this paper we present the methods that were developed for a search for continuous gravitational-wave signals from the Galactic Center [1]. First, we present a data-selection method that increases the sensitivity of the chosen data set by 20%-30% compared to the selection methods used in previous directed searches. Second, we introduce postprocessing methods that reliably rule out candidates that stem from random fluctuations or disturbances in the data. In the context of [J. Aasi et al., Phys. Rev. D 88, 102002 (2013)] their use enabled the investigation of candidates three standard deviations below the loudest expected candidate in Gaussian noise from the entire search. Such low-significance regions had not been explored in continuous gravitational-wave searches before. We finally present a new procedure for deriving upper limits on the gravitational-wave amplitude, which is several times faster with respect to the standard injection-and-search approach commonly used.

  11. Proposed searches for candidate sources of gravitational waves in a nearby core-collapse supernova survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heo, Jeon-Eun; Lee, Dae-Sub; Kong, In-Taek; Lee, Sang-Hoon; van Putten, Maurice H P M; Della Valle, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational wave bursts in the formation of neutron stars and black holes in energetic core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are of potential interest to LIGO-Virgo and KAGRA. Events nearby are readily discovered using moderately sized telescopes. CC-SNe are competitive with mergers of neutron stars and black holes, if the fraction producing an energetic output in gravitational waves exceeds about 1\\%. This opportunity motivates the design of a novel Sejong University Core-CollapsE Supernova Survey (SUCCESS), to provide triggers for follow-up searches for gravitational waves. It is based on the 76 cm Sejong University Telescope (SUT) for weekly monitoring of nearby star-forming galaxies, i.e., M51, M81-M82 and Blue Dwarf Galaxies from the Unified Nearby Galaxy Catalog with an expected yield of a few hundred per year. Optical light curves will be resolved for the true time-of-onset for probes of gravitational waves by broadband time-sliced matched filtering.

  12. A new gravitational wave generation algorithm for particle perturbations of the Kerr spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enno Harms; Sebastiano Bernuzzi; Alessandro Nagar; Anil Zenginoglu

    2014-11-25

    We present a new approach to solve the 2+1 Teukolsky equation for gravitational perturbations of a Kerr black hole. Our approach relies on a new horizon penetrating, hyperboloidal foliation of Kerr spacetime and spatial compactification. In particular, we present a framework for waveform generation from point-particle perturbations. Extensive tests of a time domain implementation in the code {\\it Teukode} are presented. The code can efficiently deliver waveforms at future null infinity. As a first application of the method, we compute the gravitational waveforms from inspiraling and coalescing black-hole binaries in the large-mass-ratio limit. The smaller mass black hole is modeled as a point particle whose dynamics is driven by an effective-one-body-resummed analytical radiation reaction force. We compare the analytical angular momentum loss to the gravitational wave angular momentum flux. We find that higher-order post-Newtonian corrections are needed to improve the consistency for rapidly spinning binaries. Close to merger, the subdominant multipolar amplitudes (notably the $m=0$ ones) are enhanced for retrograde orbits with respect to prograde ones. We argue that this effect mirrors nonnegligible deviations from circularity of the dynamics during the late-plunge and merger phase. We compute the gravitational wave energy flux flowing into the black hole during the inspiral using a time-domain formalism proposed by Poisson. Finally, a self-consistent, iterative method to compute the gravitational wave fluxes at leading-order in the mass of the particle is presented. For a specific case study with $\\hat{a}$=0.9, a simulation that uses the consistent flux differs from one that uses the analytical flux by $\\sim35$ gravitational wave cycles over a total of about $250$ cycles. In this case the horizon absorption accounts for about $+5$ gravitational wave cycles.

  13. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  14. Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts detected by the InterPlanetary Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; H. Augustus; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; G. Castaldi; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; R. P. Croce; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; C. Cutler; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; J. Dickson; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; X. Fan; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. Ha; E. D. Hall; W. Hamilton; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; D. Hofman; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; T. Horrom; D. Hoske; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; A. Idrisy; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; G. Islas; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang

    2014-04-17

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational-wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational-wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational-wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational-wave data is available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational-wave emission energy of $10^{-2}M_{\\odot}c^2$ at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors, and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational-wave detectors.

  15. Gravitational waves from phase transitions at the electroweak scale and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article) | SciTechConnectbeyond (Journal Article) |

  16. Gravitational waves from Sco X-1: A comparison of search methods and prospects for detection with advanced detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Messenger; H. J. Bulten; S. G. Crowder; V. Dergachev; D. K. Galloway; E. Goetz; R. J. G. Jonker; P. D. Lasky; G. D. Meadors; A. Melatos; S. Premachandra; K. Riles; L. Sammut; E. H. Thrane; J. T. Whelan; Y. Zhang

    2015-04-22

    The low-mass X-ray binary Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) is potentially the most luminous source of continuous gravitational-wave radiation for interferometers such as LIGO and Virgo. For low-mass X-ray binaries this radiation would be sustained by active accretion of matter from its binary companion. With the Advanced Detector Era fast approaching, work is underway to develop an array of robust tools for maximizing the science and detection potential of Sco X-1. We describe the plans and progress of a project designed to compare the numerous independent search algorithms currently available. We employ a mock-data challenge in which the search pipelines are tested for their relative proficiencies in parameter estimation, computational efficiency, robust- ness, and most importantly, search sensitivity. The mock-data challenge data contains an ensemble of 50 Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) type signals, simulated within a frequency band of 50-1500 Hz. Simulated detector noise was generated assuming the expected best strain sensitivity of Advanced LIGO and Advanced VIRGO ($4 \\times 10^{-24}$ Hz$^{-1/2}$). A distribution of signal amplitudes was then chosen so as to allow a useful comparison of search methodologies. A factor of 2 in strain separates the quietest detected signal, at $6.8 \\times 10^{-26}$ strain, from the torque-balance limit at a spin frequency of 300 Hz, although this limit could range from $1.2 \\times 10^{-25}$ (25 Hz) to $2.2 \\times 10^{-26}$ (750 Hz) depending on the unknown frequency of Sco X-1. With future improvements to the search algorithms and using advanced detector data, our expectations for probing below the theoretical torque-balance strain limit are optimistic.

  17. Searching for stochastic gravitational waves using data from the two co-located LIGO Hanford detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amado; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderó; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constanci., M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Da; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Pozzo, W De; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; Rosa, R D; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Fiore, L D; Lieto, A D; Palma, I D; Virgilio, A D; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, D; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Hari; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M

    2014-01-01

    Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among other things, on the separation between the two detectors: the smaller the separation, the better the sensitivity. Hence, a co-located detector pair is more sensitive to a gravitational-wave background than a non-co-located detector pair. However, co-located detectors are also expected to suffer from correlated noise from instrumental and environmental effects that could contaminate the measurement of the background. Hence, methods to identify and mitigate the effects of correlated noise are necessary to achieve the potential increase in sensitivity of co-located detectors. Here we report on the first SGWB analysis using the two LIGO Hanford detectors and address the complications arising from correlated environmental noise. We apply correlated noise identification and mitigation techniques...

  18. Constraints on cosmic strings from the LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliá; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; S. Deléglise; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endröczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe

    2014-04-07

    Cosmic strings can give rise to a large variety of interesting astrophysical phenomena. Among them, powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by cusps are a promising observational signature. In this Letter we present a search for GWs from cosmic string cusps in data collected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors between 2005 and 2010, with over 625 days of live time. We find no evidence of GW signals from cosmic strings. From this result, we derive new constraints on cosmic string parameters, which complement and improve existing limits from previous searches for a stochastic background of GWs from cosmic microwave background measurements and pulsar timing data. In particular, if the size of loops is given by the gravitational backreaction scale, we place upper limits on the string tension $G\\mu$ below $10^{-8}$ in some regions of the cosmic string parameter space.

  19. Constraining crystalline color superconducting quark matter with gravitational-wave data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lap-Ming Lin

    2007-10-15

    We estimate the maximum equatorial ellipticity sustainable by compact stars composed of crystalline color-superconducting quark matter. For the theoretically allowed range of the gap parameter $\\Delta$, the maximum ellipticity could be as large as $10^{-2}$, which is about 4 orders of magnitude larger than the tightest upper limit obtained by the recent science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational wave detectors based on the data from 78 radio pulsars. We point out that the current gravitational-wave strain upper limit already has some implications for the gap parameter. In particular, the upper limit for the Crab pulsar implies that $\\Delta$ is less than O(20) MeV for a range of quark chemical potential accessible in compact stars, assuming that the pulsar has a mass $1.4 M_{\\odot}$, radius 10 km, breaking strain $10^{-3}$, and that it has the maximum quadrupole deformation it can sustain without fracturing.

  20. Detecting very long-lived gravitational-wave transients lasting hours to weeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thrane, Eric; Christensen, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of very long-lived gravitational-wave transients (and detector artifacts) lasting hours to weeks. Such very long signals are both interesting in their own right and as a potential source of systematic error in searches for persistent signals, e.g., from a stochastic gravitational-wave background. We review possible mechanisms for emission on these time scales and discuss computational challenges associated with their detection: namely, the substantial volume of data involved in a search for very long transients can require vast computer memory and processing time. These computational difficulties can be addressed through a form of data compression known as coarse-graining, in which information about short time spans is discarded in order to reduce the computational requirements of a search. Using data compression, we demonstrate an efficient radiometer (cross-correlation) algorithm for the detection of very long transients. In the process, we identify features of a very long transie...

  1. Detecting gravitational-wave transients at five sigma: a hierarchical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thrane, Eric

    2015-01-01

    As second-generation gravitational-wave detectors prepare to analyze data at unprecedented sensitivity, there is great interest in searches for unmodeled transients, commonly called bursts. Significant effort has yielded a variety of techniques to identify and characterize such transient signals, and many of these methods have been applied to produce astrophysical results using data from first-generation detectors. However, the computational cost of background estimation remains a challenging problem; it is difficult to claim a 5{\\sigma} detection with reasonable computational resources without paying for efficiency with reduced sensitivity. We demonstrate a hierarchical approach to gravitational-wave transient detection, focusing on long-lived signals, which can be used to detect transients with significance in excess of 5{\\sigma} using modest computational resources. In particular, we show how previously developed seedless clustering techniques can be applied to large datasets to identify high-significance ...

  2. Detecting gravitational-wave transients at five sigma: a hierarchical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Thrane; Michael Coughlin

    2015-10-12

    As second-generation gravitational-wave detectors prepare to analyze data at unprecedented sensitivity, there is great interest in searches for unmodeled transients, commonly called bursts. Significant effort has yielded a variety of techniques to identify and characterize such transient signals, and many of these methods have been applied to produce astrophysical results using data from first-generation detectors. However, the computational cost of background estimation remains a challenging problem; it is difficult to claim a 5{\\sigma} detection with reasonable computational resources without paying for efficiency with reduced sensitivity. We demonstrate a hierarchical approach to gravitational-wave transient detection, focusing on long-lived signals, which can be used to detect transients with significance in excess of 5{\\sigma} using modest computational resources. In particular, we show how previously developed seedless clustering techniques can be applied to large datasets to identify high-significance candidates without having to trade sensitivity for speed.

  3. Detecting very-high-frequency relic gravitational waves by electromagnetic wave polarizations in a waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. L. Tong; Y. Zhang

    2007-11-30

    The polarization vector (PV) of an electromagnetic wave (EW) will experience a rotation in a region of spacetime perturbed by gravitational waves (GWs). Based on this idea, Cruise's group has built an annular waveguide to detect GWs. We give detailed calculations of the rotations of the polarization vector of an EW caused by incident GWs from various directions and in various polarization states, and then analyze the accumulative effects on the polarization vector when the EW passes n cycles along the annular waveguide. We reexamine the feasibility and limitation of this method to detect GWs of high frequency around 100 MHz, in particular, the relic gravitational waves (RGWs). By comparing the spectrum of RGWs in the accelerating universe with the detector sensitivity of the current waveguide, it is found that the amplitude of the RGWs is too low to be detected by the waveguide detectors currently running. Possible ways of improvements on detection are discussed also.

  4. Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the generalised Dirac Hamiltonian in a gravitational-wave background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Q. Quach

    2015-09-05

    Goncalves et al. derived a non-relativistic limit of the generalised Dirac Hamiltonian in the presence of a gravitational wave, using the exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. This gave rise to the intriguing notion that spin-precession may occur even in the absence of a magnetic field. We argue that this effect is not physical as it is the result of a gauge-variant term that was an artefact of a flawed application of the exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. In this paper we derive the correct non-relativistic limit of the generalised Dirac Hamiltonian in the presence of a gravitational wave, using both the exact and standard Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. We show that both transformations consistently produce a Hamiltonian where all terms are gauge-invariant. Unfortunately however, we also show that this means the novel spin-precession effect does not exist.

  5. The Feasibility of Using Black Widow Pulsars in Pulsar Timing Arrays for Gravitational Wave Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bochenek, Christopher; Demorest, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the past five years, approximately one third of the 65 pulsars discovered by radio observations of Fermi unassociated sources are black widow pulsars (BWPs). BWPs are binary millisecond pulsars with companion masses ranging from 0.01-0.1 solar masses which often exhibit radio eclipses. The bloated companions in BWP systems exert small torques on the system causing the orbit to change on small but measurable time scales. Because adding parameters to a timing model reduces sensitivity to a gravitational wave (GW) signal, the need to fit many orbital frequency derivatives to the timing data is potentially problematic for using BWPs to detect GWs with pulsar timing arrays. Using simulated data with up to four orbital frequency derivatives, we show that fitting for orbital frequency derivatives absorbs less than 5% of the low frequency spectrum expected from a stochastic gravitational wave background signal. Furthermore, this result does not change with orbital period. Therefore, we suggest that if timing syste...

  6. Generation of Gravitational Waves and Scalar Perturbations in Inflation with Effective $?$-term and T/S Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Lukash; E. V. Mikheeva

    1998-03-06

    We argue that gravitational wave contribution to the cosmic microwave background anisotropy at angular scale $\\sim 10^0$ may exceed 50% for some models of hybrid inflation producing standard cosmology with the density perturbation slope $n \\simeq 1$.

  7. Measuring test mass acceleration noise in space-based gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Congedo

    2014-09-29

    The basic constituent of interferometric gravitational wave detectors -- the test mass to test mass interferometric link -- behaves as a differential dynamometer measuring effective differential forces, comprising an integrated measure of gravity curvature, inertial effects, as well as non-gravitational spurious forces. This last contribution is going to be characterised by the LISA Pathfinder mission, a technology precursor of future space-borne detectors like eLISA. Changing the perspective from displacement to acceleration can benefit the data analysis of LISA Pathfinder and future detectors. The response in differential acceleration to gravitational waves is derived for a space-based detector's interferometric link. The acceleration formalism can also be integrated into time delay interferometry by building up the unequal-arm Michelson differential acceleration combination. The differential acceleration is nominally insensitive to the system free evolution dominating the slow displacement dynamics of low-frequency detectors. Working with acceleration also provides an effective way to subtract measured signals acting as systematics, including the actuation forces. Because of the strong similarity with the equations of motion, the optimal subtraction of systematic signals, known within some amplitude and time shift, with the focus on measuring the noise provides an effective way to solve the problem and marginalise over nuisance parameters. The $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic, in widespread use throughout the gravitation waves community, is included in the method and suitably generalised to marginalise over linear parameters and noise at the same time. The method is applied to LPF simulator data and, thanks to its generality, can also be applied to the data reduction and analysis of future gravitational wave detectors.

  8. Inflation that runs naturally: Gravitational waves and suppression of power at large and small scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn E. Minor; Manoj Kaplinghat

    2015-03-08

    We point out three correlated predictions of the axion monodromy inflation model: large amplitude of gravitational waves, suppression of power on horizon scales and on scales relevant for the formation of dwarf galaxies. While these predictions are likely generic to models with oscillations in the inflaton potential, the axion monodromy model naturally accommodates the required running spectral index through Planck-scale corrections to the inflaton potential. Applying this model to a combined data set of Planck, ACT, SPT, and WMAP low-$\\ell$ polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, we find a best-fit tensor-to-scalar ratio $r_{0.05} = 0.07^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$ due to gravitational waves, which may have been observed by the BICEP2 experiment. Despite the contribution of gravitational waves, the total power on large scales (CMB power spectrum at low multipoles) is lower than the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology with a power-law spectrum of initial perturbations and no gravitational waves, thus mitigating some of the tension on large scales. There is also a reduction in the matter power spectrum of 20-30\\% at scales corresponding to $k = 10~{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, which are relevant for dwarf galaxy formation. This will alleviate some of the unsolved small-scale structure problems in the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. The inferred matter power spectrum is also found to be consistent with recent Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest data, which is in tension with the Planck-favored $\\Lambda$CDM model with power-law primordial power spectrum.

  9. An efficient Matched Filtering Algorithm for the Detection of Continuous Gravitational Wave Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Williams; B. F. Schutz

    1999-12-08

    We describe an efficient method of matched filtering over long (greater than 1 day) time baselines starting from Fourier transforms of short durations (roughly 30 minutes) of the data stream. This method plays a crucial role in the search algorithm developed by Schutz and Papa for the detection of continuous gravitational waves from pulsars. Also, we discuss the computational cost--saving approximations used in this method, and the resultant performance of the search algorithm.

  10. Gravitational Waves from the First Order Phase Transition of the Higgs Field at High Energy Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    In a wide class of new physics models, there exist scalar fields which obtain vacuum expectation values of high energy scales. We study the possibility that the standard model Higgs field has experienced first-order phase transition at the high energy scale due to the couplings with these scalar fields.We estimate the amount of gravitational waves produced by the phase transition, and discuss observational consequences.

  11. Effect of an Accretion Disk on the Gravitational Wave Signal from an Inspiralling Binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    2000-12-29

    Since black holes can only accrete sub-Keplerian matter, a companion black hole orbiting on a circular and instantaneously Keplerian orbit around a central, massive black hole in a galactic Centre will loss angular momentum and energy to the accreting matter. This loss could be a significant fraction of the loss due to gravitational wave (GW) emission. The corresponding GW signal would be modified. We discuss this effects in the light of the modern accretion disk theory.

  12. High Energy Photons, Neutrinos and Gravitational Waves from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Meszaros; S. Kobayashi; S. Razzaque; B. Zhang

    2003-05-06

    Most of the current knowldege about GRB is based on electromagnetic observations at MeV and lower energies. Here we focus on some recent theoretical work on GRB, in particular the higher energy (GeV-TeV) photon emission, and two potentially important non-electromagnetic channels, the TeV and higher energy neutrino signals, and the gravitational wave signals expected from GRB.

  13. Searching for stochastic gravitational waves using data from the two co-located LIGO Hanford detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amado. Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderó. Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constanci. Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Da. Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; E. Deleeuw; S. Deléglise; W. De. Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. T. DeRosa; R. D. Rosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; L. D. Fiore; A. D. Lieto; I. D. Palma; A. D. Virgilio; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; D. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Hari. K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer

    2014-12-03

    Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among other things, on the separation between the two detectors: the smaller the separation, the better the sensitivity. Hence, a co-located detector pair is more sensitive to a gravitational-wave background than a non-co-located detector pair. However, co-located detectors are also expected to suffer from correlated noise from instrumental and environmental effects that could contaminate the measurement of the background. Hence, methods to identify and mitigate the effects of correlated noise are necessary to achieve the potential increase in sensitivity of co-located detectors. Here we report on the first SGWB analysis using the two LIGO Hanford detectors and address the complications arising from correlated environmental noise. We apply correlated noise identification and mitigation techniques to data taken by the two LIGO Hanford detectors, H1 and H2, during LIGO's fifth science run. At low frequencies, 40 - 460 Hz, we are unable to sufficiently mitigate the correlated noise to a level where we may confidently measure or bound the stochastic gravitational-wave signal. However, at high frequencies, 460-1000 Hz, these techniques are sufficient to set a $95%$ confidence level (C.L.) upper limit on the gravitational-wave energy density of \\Omega(f)<7.7 x 10^{-4} (f/ 900 Hz)^3, which improves on the previous upper limit by a factor of $\\sim 180$. In doing so, we demonstrate techniques that will be useful for future searches using advanced detectors, where correlated noise (e.g., from global magnetic fields) may affect even widely separated detectors.

  14. Toward Early-Warning Detection of Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kipp Cannon; Romain Cariou; Adrian Chapman; Mireia Crispin-Ortuzar; Nickolas Fotopoulos; Melissa Frei; Chad Hanna; Erin Kara; Drew Keppel; Laura Liao; Stephen Privitera; Antony Searle; Leo Singer; Alan Weinstein

    2014-05-07

    Rapid detection of compact binary coalescence (CBC) with a network of advanced gravitational-wave detectors will offer a unique opportunity for multi-messenger astronomy. Prompt detection alerts for the astronomical community might make it possible to observe the onset of electromagnetic emission from (CBC). We demonstrate a computationally practical filtering strategy that could produce early-warning triggers before gravitational radiation from the final merger has arrived at the detectors.

  15. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr\\Hoczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO Science Run and the second and third Virgo Science Runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ~2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semi-major axes of the orbit from ~0.6e-3 ls to ~6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3e-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for ci...

  16. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner}, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Langley, A; Lantz, B

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of an all-sky searches for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50, 1190] Hz and with frequency derivative ranges of [-2 \\times 10^-9, 1.1 \\times 10^-10] Hz/s for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The novelty of the search lies in the use of a non-coherent technique based on the Hough-transform to combine the information from coherent searches on timescales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been deployed on the Einstein@Home distributed computing project infrastructure. The search presented here is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search in early S5 LIGO data. The post-processing has left us with eight surviving candidates. We show that deeper follow-up studies rule each of them out. Hence, since no statistically significant gravitational wave signals have been detected, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 15...

  17. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

    2011-10-02

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

  18. Effective Gravitational Wave Stress-energy Tensor in Alternative Theories of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leo C. Stein; Nicolas Yunes

    2011-01-21

    The inspiral of binary systems in vacuum is controlled by the stress-energy of gravitational radiation and any other propagating degrees of freedom. For gravitational waves, the dominant contribution is characterized by an effective stress-energy tensor at future null infinity. We employ perturbation theory and the short-wavelength approximation to compute this stress-energy tensor in a wide class of alternative theories. We find that this tensor is generally a modification of that first computed by Isaacson, where the corrections can dominate over the general relativistic term. In a wide class of theories, however, these corrections identically vanish at asymptotically flat, future, null infinity, reducing the stress-energy tensor to Isaacson's. We exemplify this phenomenon by first considering dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity, which corrects the action via a scalar field and the contraction of the Riemann tensor and its dual. We then consider a wide class of theories with dynamical scalar fields coupled to higher-order curvature invariants, and show that the gravitational wave stress-energy tensor still reduces to Isaacson's. The calculations presented in this paper are crucial to perform systematic tests of such modified gravity theories through the orbital decay of binary pulsars or through gravitational wave observations.

  19. Gravitational waves from a test particle scattered by a neutron star: Axial mode case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Tominaga; Motoyuki Saijo; Kei-ichi Maeda

    1999-09-20

    Using a metric perturbation method, we study gravitational waves from a test particle scattered by a spherically symmetric relativistic star. We calculate the energy spectrum and the waveform of gravitational waves for axial modes. Since metric perturbations in axial modes do not couple to the matter fluid of the star, emitted waves for a normal neutron star show only one peak in the spectrum, which corresponds to the orbital frequency at the turning point, where the gravitational field is strongest. However, for an ultracompact star (the radius $R \\lesssim 3M$), another type of resonant periodic peak appears in the spectrum. This is just because of an excitation by a scattered particle of axial quasinormal modes, which were found by Chandrasekhar and Ferrari. This excitation comes from the existence of the potential minimum inside of a star. We also find for an ultracompact star many small periodic peaks at the frequency region beyond the maximum of the potential, which would be due to a resonance of two waves reflected by two potential barriers (Regge-Wheeler type and one at the center of the star). Such resonant peaks appear neither for a normal neutron star nor for a Schwarzschild black hole. Consequently, even if we analyze the energy spectrum of gravitational waves only for axial modes, it would be possible to distinguish between an ultracompact star and a normal neutron star (or a Schwarzschild black hole).

  20. Broadband extended emission in gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Amir; Pick, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Black holes in core-collapse of massive stars are expected to surge in mass and angular momentum by hyper-accretion immediately following their formation. We here describe a general framework of extended emission in gravitational waves from non-axisymmetric accretion flows from fallback matter of the progenitor envelope. It shows (a) a maximum efficiency in conversion of accretion energy into gravitational waves at hyper-accretion rates exceeding a critical value set by the ratio of the quadrupole mass inhomogeneity and viscosity with (b) a peak characteristic strain amplitude at the frequency $f_b=\\Omega_b/\\pi$, where $\\Omega_b$ is the Keplerian angular velocity at which viscous torques equal angular momentum loss in gravitational radiation, with $h_{char}\\propto f^{1/6}$ at $ff_b$. Upcoming gravitational wave observations may probe this scaling by extracting broadband spectra using time-sliced matched filtering with chirp templates, recently developed for identifying turbulence in noisy time series.

  1. Monopole gravitational waves from relativistic fireballs driving gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kutschera

    2003-09-16

    Einstein's general relativity predicts that pressure, in general stresses, play a similar role to energy density in generating gravity. The source of gravitational field, the active gravitational mass density, sometimes referred to as Whittaker's mass density, is not conserved, hence its changes can propagate as monopole gravitational waves. Such waves can be generated only by astrophysical sources with varying gravitational mass. Here we show that relativistic fireballs, considered in modelling gamma-ray burst phenomena, are likely to radiate monopole gravitational waves from high-pressure plasma with varying Whittaker's mass. Also, ejection of a significant amount of initial mass-energy of the progenitor contributes to the monopole gravitational radiation. We identify monopole waves with h^11+h^22 waves of Eddington's classification which propagate (in the z-direction) together with the energy carried by massless fields. We show that the monopole waves satisfy Einstein's equations, with a common stress-energy tensor for massless fields. The polarization mode of monopole waves is Phi_22, i.e. these are perpendicular waves which induce changes of the radius of a circle of test particles only (breathing mode). The astrophysical importance of monopole gravitational waves is discussed.

  2. Parameter-space metric for all-sky semicoherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Wette

    2015-10-28

    The sensitivity of all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars is primarily limited by the finite availability of computing resources. Semicoherent searches are a widely-used method of maximizing sensitivity to gravitational-wave pulsars at fixed computing cost: the data from a gravitational-wave detector are partitioned into a number of segments, each segment is coherently analyzed, and the analysis results from each segment are summed together. The generation of template banks for the coherent analysis of each segment, and for the summation, requires knowledge of the metrics associated with the coherent and semicoherent parameter spaces respectively. We present a useful approximation to the semicoherent parameter-space metric, analogous to that presented in Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)] for the coherent metric. The new semicoherent metric is compared to previous work in Pletsch [Phys. Rev. D 82, 042002 (2010)], and Brady and Creighton [Phys. Rev. D 61, 082001 (2000)]. We find that semicoherent all-sky searches require orders of magnitude more templates than previously predicted.

  3. Using polarized maser to detect high-frequency relic gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming-lei Tong; Yang Zhang; Fang-Yu Li

    2008-07-06

    A GHz maser beam with Gaussian-type distribution passing through a homogenous static magnetic field can be used to detect gravitational waves (GWs) with the same frequency. The presence of GWs will perturb the electromagnetic (EM) fields, giving rise to perturbed photon fluxes (PPFs). After being reflected by a fractal membrane, the perturbed photons suffer little decay and can be measured by a microwave receiver. This idea has been explored to certain extent as a method for very high frequency gravitational waves. In this paper, we examine and develop this method more extensively, and confront the possible detection with the predicted signal of relic gravitational waves (RGWs). A maser beam with high linear polarization is used to reduce the background photon fluxes (BPFs) in the detecting direction as the main noise. As a key factor of applicability of this method, we give a preliminary estimation of the sensitivity of a sample detector limited by thermal noise using currently common technology. The minimal detectable amplitude of GWs is found to be $h_{\\rm{min}}\\sim10^{-30}$. Comparing with the known spectrum of the RGWs in the accelerating universe for $\\beta=-1.9$, there is still roughly a gap of $4\\sim 5$ orders. However, possible improvements on the detector can further narrow down the gap and make it a feasible method to detect high frequency RGWs.

  4. Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts detected by the InterPlanetary Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bischof, H; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campanelli, M; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, J; Hall, E D; Hamilton, W; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Horrom, T; Hoske, D; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational-wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational-wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational-wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational-wave da...

  5. Temperature compensated two-mode fiber interferometer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doma, Jagdish Ramchandra

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis we propose an innovative approach of designing and implementing a temperature compensated two-mode optical fiber interferometer in a control system of stabilizing the wavelength of a laser. We give the procedure for designing...

  6. Transverse-Traceless Gravitational Waves In A Spatially Flat FLRW Universe: Causal Structure from Dimension Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Zen Chu

    2015-05-05

    This work was mainly driven by the desire to explore, to what extent embedding some given geometry in a higher dimensional flat one is useful for understanding the causal structure of classical fields traveling in the former, in terms of that in the latter. We point out, in the 4D spatially flat FLRW universe, that the causal structure of transverse-traceless (TT) gravitational waves can be elucidated by first reducing the problem to a 2D Minkowski wave equation with a time dependent potential, where the relevant Green's function is pure tail -- waves produced by a physical source propagate strictly within the null cone. By viewing this 2D world as embedded in a 4D one, the 2D Green's function can also be seen to be sourced by a cylindrically symmetric scalar field in 3D. From both the 2D wave equation as well as the 3D scalar perspective, we recover the exact solution of the 4D graviton tail, for the case where the scale factor written in conformal time is a power law. There are no TT gravitational wave tails when the universe is radiation dominated because the background Ricci scalar is zero. In a matter dominated one, we estimate the amplitude of the tail to be suppressed relative to its null counterpart by both the ratio of the duration of the source to the age of the universe $\\eta_0$, and the ratio of the observer-source spatial distance (at the observer's time) to the same $\\eta_0$. In a universe driven primarily by a cosmological constant, the tail contribution to the background FLRW geometry after the source has ceased, is the conformal factor $a^2$ times a spacetime-constant symmetric matrix proportional to the spacetime volume integral of the TT part of the source's stress-energy-momentum tensor. In other words, massless spin-2 gravitational waves exhibit a memory effect in de Sitter spacetime.

  7. Transverse-Traceless Gravitational Waves In A Spatially Flat FLRW Universe: Causal Structure from Dimension Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Zen Chu

    2015-11-02

    This work was mainly driven by the desire to explore, to what extent embedding some given geometry in a higher dimensional flat one is useful for understanding the causal structure of classical fields traveling in the former, in terms of that in the latter. We point out, in the 4D spatially flat FLRW universe, that the causal structure of transverse-traceless (TT) gravitational waves can be elucidated by first reducing the problem to a 2D Minkowski wave equation with a time dependent potential, where the relevant Green's function is pure tail -- waves produced by a physical source propagate strictly within the null cone. By viewing this 2D world as embedded in a 4D one, the 2D Green's function can also be seen to be sourced by a cylindrically symmetric scalar field in 3D. From both the 2D wave equation as well as the 3D scalar perspective, we recover the exact solution of the 4D graviton tail, for the case where the scale factor written in conformal time is a power law. There are no TT gravitational wave tails when the universe is radiation dominated because the background Ricci scalar is zero. In a matter dominated one, we estimate the amplitude of the tail to be suppressed relative to its null counterpart by both the ratio of the duration of the source to the age of the universe $\\eta_0$, and the ratio of the observer-source spatial distance (at the observer's time) to the same $\\eta_0$. In a universe driven primarily by a cosmological constant, the tail contribution to the background FLRW geometry after the source has ceased, is the conformal factor $a^2$ times a spacetime-constant symmetric matrix proportional to the spacetime volume integral of the TT part of the source's stress-energy-momentum tensor. In other words, massless spin-2 gravitational waves exhibit a tail-induced memory effect in 4D de Sitter spacetime.

  8. Low mass binary neutron star mergers : gravitational waves and neutrino emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francois Foucart; Roland Haas; Matthew D. Duez; Evan O'Connor; Christian D. Ott; Luke Roberts; Lawrence E. Kidder; Jonas Lippuner; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Mark A. Scheel

    2015-10-21

    Neutron star mergers are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves for advanced ground-based detectors. These mergers are also expected to power bright electromagnetic signals, in the form of short gamma-ray bursts, infrared/optical transients, and radio emission. Simulations of these mergers with fully general relativistic codes are critical to understand the merger and post-merger gravitational wave signals and their neutrinos and electromagnetic counterparts. In this paper, we employ the SpEC code to simulate the merger of low-mass neutron star binaries (two $1.2M_\\odot$ neutron stars) for a set of three nuclear-theory based, finite temperature equations of state. We show that the frequency peaks of the post-merger gravitational wave signal are in good agreement with predictions obtained from simulations using a simpler treatment of gravity. We find, however, that only the fundamental mode of the remnant is excited for long periods of time: emission at the secondary peaks is damped on a millisecond timescale in the simulated binaries. For such low-mass systems, the remnant is a massive neutron star which, depending on the equation of state, is either permanently stable or long-lived. We observe strong excitations of l=2, m=2 modes, both in the massive neutron star and in the form of hot, shocked tidal arms in the surrounding accretion torus. We estimate the neutrino emission of the remnant using a neutrino leakage scheme and, in one case, compare these results with a gray two-moment neutrino transport scheme. We confirm the complex geometry of the neutrino emission, also observed in previous simulations with neutrino leakage, and show explicitly the presence of important differences in the neutrino luminosity, disk composition, and outflow properties between the neutrino leakage and transport schemes.

  9. Gravitational waves interacting with a spinning charged particle in the presence of a uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Papadopoulos

    2003-12-23

    The equations which determine the response of a spinning charged particle moving in a uniform magnetic field to an incident gravitational wave are derived in the linearized approximation to general relativity. We verify that 1) the components of the 4-momentum, 4-velocity and the components of the spinning tensor, both electric and magnetic moments, exhibit resonances and 2) the co-existence of the uniform magnetic field and the GW are responsible for the resonances appearing in our equations. In the absence of the GW, the magnetic field and the components of the spin tensor decouple and the magnetic resonances disappear.

  10. chi sup 2_ testing of optimal filters for gravitational wave signals: An experimental implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Baggio; M. Cerdonio; A. Ortolan; G. Vedovato; L. Taffarello; J-P. Zendri; M. Bonaldi; P. Falferi; V. Martinucci; R. Mezzena; G. A. Prodi; S. Vitale

    2000-01-10

    We have implemented likelihood testing of the performance of an optimal filter within the online analysis of AURIGA, a sub-Kelvin resonant-bar gravitational wave detector. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique in discriminating between impulsive mechanical excitations of the resonant-bar and other spurious excitations. This technique also ensures the accuracy of the estimated parameters such as the signal-to-noise ratio. The efficiency of the technique to deal with non-stationary noise and its application to data from a network of detectors are also discussed.

  11. Search for gravitational waves associated with the InterPlanetary Network short gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Predoi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration; K. Hurley; for IPN

    2011-12-07

    We outline the scientific motivation behind a search for gravitational waves associated with short gamma ray bursts detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. The IPN localisation of short gamma ray bursts is limited to extended error boxes of different shapes and sizes and a search on these error boxes poses a series of challenges for data analysis. We will discuss these challenges and outline the methods to optimise the search over these error boxes.

  12. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. B. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. V. Amariutei; M. Andersen; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; N. Arnaud; G. Ashton; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; S. E. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; B. K. Berger; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Birney; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; V. Branco; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; P. Brockill; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; C. C. Buchanan; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; E. Capocasa; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; J. Casanueva Diaz; C. Casentini; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; L. Cerboni Baiardi; G. Cerretani; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Cheng; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. G. Collette; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; L. Conti; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. B. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. T. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; T. Dal Canton; M. D. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; N. S. Darman; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. P. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. C. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; M. Di Giovanni; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. E. Dwyer; T. B. Edo; M. C. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. M. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. C. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. M. Evans; R. Everett; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; H. A. G. Gabbard; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. G. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; V. Germain; A. Ghosh; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. R. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; J. Gonzalez; A. Gopakumar; N. A. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. E. Gossan; M. Gosselin; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; A. Gupta; M. K. Gupta; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. J. Hacker; B. R. Hall; E. D. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Haney; M. M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. J. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; J. Hennig; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; J. Hoelscher-Obermaier; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. A. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; S. Huang; E. A. Huerta; D. Huet; B. Hughey

    2015-10-13

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between $-1.0 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s and $+1.5 \\times 10^{-11}$ Hz/s, and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT), of length 8192 seconds, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, both in the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each dataset a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and for the coincidence step greatly reduce the harmful effect of large instrumental artifacts. Selected candidates have been subject to a follow-up by constructing a new set of longer FFTs followed by a further incoherent analysis. No evidence for continuous gravitational wave signals was found, therefore we have set a population-based joint VSR2-VSR4 90$\\%$ confidence level upper limit on the dimensionless gravitational wave strain in the frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz. This is the first all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves conducted at frequencies below 50 Hz. We set upper limits in the range between about $10^{-24}$ and $2\\times 10^{-23}$ at most frequencies. Our upper limits on signal strain show an improvement of up to a factor of $\\sim$2 with respect to the results of previous all-sky searches at frequencies below $80~\\mathrm{Hz}$.

  13. Gravitational Waves Notes, Issue #4 : "A Roadmap to Fundamental Physics from LISA EMRI Observations"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pau Amaro-Seoane; Bernard Schutz; Carlos F. Sopuerta

    2010-09-07

    GW Notes was born from the need for a journal where the distinct communities involved in gravitation wave research might gather. While these three communities - Astrophysics, General Relativity and Data Analysis - have made significant collaborative progress over recent years, we believe that it is indispensable to future advancement that they draw closer, and that they speak a common idiom. For this GW Notes issue we have approached Carlos F. Sopuerta to write the highlight article of this issue on his thoughts on fundamental physics with LISA.

  14. Noncommutative quantum mechanics of simple matter systems interacting with circularly polarized gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunandan Gangopadhyay; Anirban Saha; Swarup Saha

    2014-09-11

    The response of a test particle, both for the free case and under the harmonic oscillator potential, to circularly polarized gravitational waves is investigated in a noncommutative quantum mechanical setting. The system is quantized following the prescription in \\cite{ncgw1}. Standard algebraic techniques are then employed to solve the Hamiltonian of the system. The solutions, in both cases, show signatures of the coordinate noncommutativity. In the harmonic oscillator case, this signature plays a key role in altering the resonance point and the oscillation frequency of the system.

  15. Application of Artificial Neural Network to Search for Gravitational-Wave Signals Associated with Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyungmin Kim; Ian W. Harry; Kari A. Hodge; Young-Min Kim; Chang-Hwan Lee; Hyun Kyu Lee; John J. Oh; Sang Hoon Oh; Edwin J. Son

    2015-03-03

    We apply a machine learning algorithm, the artificial neural network, to the search for gravitational-wave signals associated with short gamma-ray bursts. The multi-dimensional samples consisting of data corresponding to the statistical and physical quantities from the coherent search pipeline are fed into the artificial neural network to distinguish simulated gravitational-wave signals from background noise artifacts. Our result shows that the data classification efficiency at a fixed false alarm probability is improved by the artificial neural network in comparison to the conventional detection statistic. Therefore, this algorithm increases the distance at which a gravitational-wave signal could be observed in coincidence with a gamma-ray burst. In order to demonstrate the performance, we also evaluate a few seconds of gravitational-wave data segment using the trained networks and obtain the false alarm probability. We suggest that the artificial neural network can be a complementary method to the conventional detection statistic for identifying gravitational-wave signals related to the short gamma-ray bursts.

  16. Searches for inspiral gravitational waves associated with short gamma-ray bursts in LIGO's fifth and Virgo's first science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Dietz

    2010-06-17

    Mergers of two compact objects, like two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole, are the probable progenitor of short gamma-ray bursts. These events are also promising sources of gravitational waves, that are currently motivating related searches by an international network of gravitational wave detectors. Here we describe a search for gravitational waves from the in-spiral phase of two coalescing compact objects, in coincidence with short GRBs occurred during during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. The search includes 22 GRBs for which data from more than one of the detectors in the LIGO/Virgo network were available. No statistically significant gravitational-wave candidate has been found, and a parametric test shows no excess of weak gravitational-wave signals in our sample of GRBs. The 90\\%~C.L. median exclusion distance for GRBs in our sample is of 6.7 Mpc, under the hypothesis of a neutron star - black hole progenitor model.

  17. Gravitational-wave spin-down and stalling lower limits on the electrical resistivity of the accreted mountain in a millisecond pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Vigelius; Andrew Melatos

    2010-05-13

    The electrical resistivity of the accreted mountain in a millisecond pulsar is limited by the observed spin-down rate of binary radio millisecond pulsars (BRMSPs) and the spins and X-ray fluxes of accreting millisecond pulsars (AMSPs). We find $\\eta \\ge 10^{-28}\\,\\mathrm{s}\\, (\\tau_\\mathrm{SD}/1\\,\\mathrm{Gyr})^{-0.8}$ (where $\\tau_\\mathrm{SD}$ is the spin-down age) for BRMSPs and $\\eta \\ge 10^{-25}\\,\\mathrm{s}\\,(\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{a}/\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{E})^{0.6}$ (where $\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{a}$ and $\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{E}$ are the actual and Eddington accretion rates) for AMSPs. These limits are inferred assuming that the mountain attains a steady state, where matter diffuses resistively across magnetic flux surfaces but is replenished at an equal rate by infalling material. The mountain then relaxes further resistively after accretion ceases. The BRMSP spin-down limit approaches the theoretical electron-impurity resistivity at temperatures $\\ga 10^5$ K for an impurity concentration of $\\sim 0.1$, while the AMSP stalling limit falls two orders of magnitude below the theoretical electron-phonon resistivity for temperatures above $10^8$ K. Hence BRMSP observations are already challenging theoretical resistivity calculations in a useful way. Next-generation gravitational-wave interferometers will constrain $\\eta$ at a level that will be competitive with electromagnetic observations.

  18. A First Search for coincident Gravitational Waves and High Energy Neutrinos using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES data from 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Samarai, I Al; Albert, A; André, M; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Jesus, A C Assis; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J-J; Baret, B; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigi, A; Bigongiari, C; Bogazzi, C; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouhou, B; Bouwhuis, M C; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Camarena, F; Capone, A; Cârloganu, C; Carr, J; Cecchini, S; Charif, Z; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Decowski, M P; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Enzenhöfer, A; Ernenwein, J-P; Escoffier, S; Fermani, P; Ferri, M; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fritsch, U; Fuda, J-L; Galatŕ, S; Gay, P; Giacomelli, G; Giordano, V; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; Halladjian, G; Hallewell, G; van Haren, H; Hartman, J; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hößl, J; Hsu, C C; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Lefčvre, D; Lim, G; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Meli, A; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Moscoso, L; Motz, H; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; P?v?la?, G E; Payet, K; Payre, P; Petrovic, J; Piattelli, P; Picot-Clemente, N; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Presani, E; Racca, C; Reed, C; Richardt, C; Richter, R; Rivičre, C; Robert, A; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Ruiz-Rivas, J; Rujoiu, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Samtleben, D F E; Sapienza, P; Schöck, F; Schuller, J-P; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Shanidze, R; Simeone, F; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Toscano, S; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vannoni, G; Vecchi, M; Vernin, P; Wagner, S; Wijnker, G; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yepes, H; Zaborov, D; Zornoza, J D; Zúńiga, J; Aasi, J; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the underwater neutrino telescope ANTARES in its 5 line configuration during the period January - September 2007, which coincided with the fifth and first science runs of LIGO and Virgo, respectively. The LIGO-Virgo data were analysed for candidate gravitational-wave signals coincident in time and direction with the neutrino events. No significant coincident events were observed. We place limits on the density of joint high energy neutrino - gravitational wave emission events in the local universe, and compare them with densities of merger and core-collapse events.

  19. Search for High Frequency Gravitational Wave Bursts in the First Calendar Year of LIGO's Fifth Science Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott

    2009-10-16

    We present an all-sky search for gravitational waves in the frequency range 1 to 6 kHz during the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run. This is the first untriggered LIGO burst analysis to be conducted above 3 kHz. We discuss the unique properties of interferometric data in this regime. 161.3 days of triple-coincident data were analyzed. No gravitational events above threshold were observed and a frequentist upper limit of 5.4 events per year on the rate of strong gravitational wave bursts was placed at a 90% confidence level. Implications for specific theoretical models of gravitational wave emission are also discussed.

  20. The characterization of Virgo data and its impact on gravitational-wave searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; T. Ballinger; S. Ballmer; Y. Bao; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; C. Bond; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; B. F. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. A. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gelencser; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; A. Hardt; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Keitel; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. K. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; J. Kline; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov

    2012-06-18

    Between 2007 and 2010 Virgo collected data in coincidence with the LIGO and GEO gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. These data have been searched for GWs emitted by cataclysmic phenomena in the universe, by non-axisymmetric rotating neutron stars or from a stochastic background in the frequency band of the detectors. The sensitivity of GW searches is limited by noise produced by the detector or its environment. It is therefore crucial to characterize the various noise sources in a GW detector. This paper reviews the Virgo detector noise sources, noise propagation, and conversion mechanisms which were identified in the three first Virgo observing runs. In many cases, these investigations allowed us to mitigate noise sources in the detector, or to selectively flag noise events and discard them from the data. We present examples from the joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo GW searches to show how well noise transients and narrow spectral lines have been identified and excluded from the Virgo data. We also discuss how detector characterization can improve the astrophysical reach of gravitational-wave searches.

  1. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

  2. Gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: Energy loss and waveform to second--post-Newtonian order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Blanchet; Thibault Damour; Bala R. Iyer

    1995-01-24

    Gravitational waves generated by inspiralling compact binaries are investigated to the second--post-Newtonian (2PN) approximation of general relativity. Using a recently developed 2PN-accurate wave generation formalism, we compute the gravitational waveform and associated energy loss rate from a binary system of point-masses moving on a quasi-circular orbit. The crucial new input is our computation of the 2PN-accurate ``source'' quadrupole moment of the binary. Tails in both the waveform and energy loss rate at infinity are explicitly computed. Gravitational radiation reaction effects on the orbital frequency and phase of the binary are deduced from the energy loss. In the limiting case of a very small mass ratio between the two bodies we recover the results obtained by black hole perturbation methods. We find that finite mass ratio effects are very significant as they increase the 2PN contribution to the phase by up to 52\\%. The results of this paper should be of use when deciphering the signals observed by the future LIGO/VIRGO network of gravitational-wave detectors.

  3. Architecture, implementation and parallelization of the software to search for periodic gravitational wave signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevorg Poghosyan; Sanchit Matta; Achim Streit; Micha? Bejger; Andrzej Królak

    2014-10-14

    The parallelization, design and scalability of the \\sky code to search for periodic gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars is discussed. The code is based on an efficient implementation of the F-statistic using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. To perform an analysis of data from the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors' network, which will start operating in 2015, hundreds of millions of CPU hours will be required - the code utilizing the potential of massively parallel supercomputers is therefore mandatory. We have parallelized the code using the Message Passing Interface standard, implemented a mechanism for combining the searches at different sky-positions and frequency bands into one extremely scalable program. The parallel I/O interface is used to escape bottlenecks, when writing the generated data into file system. This allowed to develop a highly scalable computation code, which would enable the data analysis at large scales on acceptable time scales. Benchmarking of the code on a Cray XE6 system was performed to show efficiency of our parallelization concept and to demonstrate scaling up to 50 thousand cores in parallel.

  4. Transverse-Traceless Gravitational Waves In A Spatially Flat FLRW Universe: Causal Structure from Dimension Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Yi-Zen

    2015-01-01

    This work was mainly driven by the desire to explore, to what extent embedding some given geometry in a higher dimensional flat one is useful for understanding the causal structure of classical fields traveling in the former, in terms of that in the latter. We point out, in the 4D spatially flat FLRW universe, that the causal structure of transverse-traceless (TT) gravitational waves can be elucidated by first reducing the problem to a 2D Minkowski wave equation with a time dependent potential, where the relevant Green's function is pure tail -- waves produced by a physical source propagate strictly within the null cone. By viewing this 2D world as embedded in a 4D one, the 2D Green's function can also be seen to be sourced by a cylindrically symmetric scalar field in 3D. From both the 2D wave equation as well as the 3D scalar perspective, we recover the exact solution of the 4D graviton tail, for the case where the scale factor written in conformal time is a power law. There are no TT gravitational wave tail...

  5. Gravitational Wave Background from Neutrino-Driven Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Hiramatsu; Kei Kotake; Hideaki Kudoh; Atsushi Taruya

    2005-09-27

    We discuss the gravitational wave background (GWB) from a cosmological population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among various emission mechanisms for the gravitational waves (GWs), we pay a particular attention to the vast anisotropic neutrino emissions from the accretion disk around the black hole formed after the so-called failed supernova explosions. The produced GWs by such mechanism are known as burst with memory, which could dominate over the low-frequency regime below \\sim 10Hz. To estimate their amplitudes, we derive general analytic formulae for gravitational waveform from the axisymmetric jets. Based on the formulae, we first quantify the spectrum of GWs from a single GRB. Then, summing up its cosmological population, we find that the resultant value of the density parameter becomes roughly \\Omega_{GW} \\approx 10^{-20} over the wide-band of the low-frequency region, f\\sim 10^{-4}-10^1Hz. The amplitude of GWB is sufficiently smaller than the primordial GWBs originated from an inflationary epoch and far below the detection limit.

  6. Introduction to the Analysis of Low-Frequency Gravitational Wave Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. F. Schutz

    1997-10-15

    The space-based gravitational wave detector LISA will observe in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band (0.1 mHz up to 1 Hz). LISA will search for a variety of expected signals, and when it detects a signal it will have to determine a number of parameters, such as the location of the source on the sky and the signal's polarisation. This requires pattern-matching, called matched filtering, which uses the best available theoretical predictions about the characteristics of waveforms. All the estimates of the sensitivity of LISA to various sources assume that the data analysis is done in the optimum way. Because these techniques are unfamiliar to many young physicists, I use the first part of this lecture to give a very basic introduction to time-series data analysis, including matched filtering. The second part of the lecture applies these techniques to LISA, showing how estimates of LISA's sensitivity can be made, and briefly commenting on aspects of the signal-analysis problem that are special to LISA.

  7. Post-Minkowskian Limit and Gravitational Waves solutions of Fourth Order Gravity: a complete study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Stabile; S. Capozziello

    2015-04-26

    The post-Minkowskian limit and gravitational wave solutions for general fourth-order gravity theories are discussed. Specifically, we consider a Lagrangian with a generic function of curvature invariants $f(R, R_{\\alpha\\beta}R^{\\alpha\\beta}, R_{\\alpha\\beta\\gamma\\delta}R^{\\alpha\\beta\\gamma\\delta})$. It is well known that when dealing with General Relativity such an approach provides massless spin-two waves as propagating degree of freedom of the gravitational field while this theory implies other additional propagating modes in the gravity spectra. We show that, in general, fourth order gravity, besides the standard massless graviton is characterized by two further massive modes with a finite-distance interaction. We find out the most general gravitational wave solutions in terms of Green functions in vacuum and in presence of matter sources. If an electromagnetic source is chosen, only the modes induced by $R_{\\alpha\\beta}R^{\\alpha\\beta}$ are present, otherwise, for any $f(R)$ gravity model, we have the complete analogy with tensor modes of General Relativity. Polarizations and helicity states are classified in the hypothesis of plane wave.

  8. Post-Minkowskian Limit and Gravitational Waves solutions of Fourth Order Gravity: a complete study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stabile, A

    2015-01-01

    The post-Minkowskian limit and gravitational wave solutions for general fourth-order gravity theories are discussed. Specifically, we consider a Lagrangian with a generic function of curvature invariants $f(R, R_{\\alpha\\beta}R^{\\alpha\\beta}, R_{\\alpha\\beta\\gamma\\delta}R^{\\alpha\\beta\\gamma\\delta})$. It is well known that when dealing with General Relativity such an approach provides massless spin-two waves as propagating degree of freedom of the gravitational field while this theory implies other additional propagating modes in the gravity spectra. We show that, in general, fourth order gravity, besides the standard massless graviton is characterized by two further massive modes with a finite-distance interaction. We find out the most general gravitational wave solutions in terms of Green functions in vacuum and in presence of matter sources. If an electromagnetic source is chosen, only the modes induced by $R_{\\alpha\\beta}R^{\\alpha\\beta}$ are present, otherwise, for any $f(R)$ gravity model, we have the compl...

  9. An improved pipeline to search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usman, Samantha A; Nitz, Alexander H; Harry, Ian W; Brown, Duncan A; Capano, Collin D; Dent, Thomas; Fairhurst, Stephen; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Biwer, Christopher M; Canton, Tito Dal; Keppel, Drew; Saulson, Peter R; West, Matthew; Willis, Joshua L

    2015-01-01

    The second generation of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin taking data in September 2015. Sensitive and computationally-efficient data analysis methods will be required to maximize what we learn from their observations. We describe improvements made to the offline analysis pipeline searching for gravitational waves from stellar-mass compact binary coalescences, and assess how these improvements affect search sensitivity. Starting with the two-stage ihope pipeline used in S5, S6 and VSR1-3 and using two weeks of S6/VSR3 data as test periods, we first demonstrate a pipeline with a simpler workflow. This single-stage pipeline performs matched filtering and coincidence testing only once. This simplification allows us to reach much lower false-alarm rates for loud candidate events. We then describe an optimized chi-squared test which minimizes computational cost. Next, we compare methods of generating template banks, demonstrating that a fixed bank may be used for extended stretches of time. Fix...

  10. An improved pipeline to search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samantha A. Usman; Marcel S. Kehl; Alexander H. Nitz; Ian W. Harry; Duncan A. Brown; Collin D. Capano; Thomas Dent; Stephen Fairhurst; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Christopher M. Biwer; Tito Dal Canton; Drew Keppel; Peter R. Saulson; Matthew West; Joshua L. Willis

    2015-08-10

    The second generation of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin taking data in September 2015. Sensitive and computationally-efficient data analysis methods will be required to maximize what we learn from their observations. We describe improvements made to the offline analysis pipeline searching for gravitational waves from stellar-mass compact binary coalescences, and assess how these improvements affect search sensitivity. Starting with the two-stage ihope pipeline used in S5, S6 and VSR1-3 and using two weeks of S6/VSR3 data as test periods, we first demonstrate a pipeline with a simpler workflow. This single-stage pipeline performs matched filtering and coincidence testing only once. This simplification allows us to reach much lower false-alarm rates for loud candidate events. We then describe an optimized chi-squared test which minimizes computational cost. Next, we compare methods of generating template banks, demonstrating that a fixed bank may be used for extended stretches of time. Fixing the bank reduces the cost and complexity, compared to the previous method of regenerating a template bank every 2048 s of analyzed data. Creating a fixed bank shared by all detectors also allows us to apply a more stringent coincidence test, whose performance we quantify. With these improvements, we find a 10% increase in sensitive volume with a negligible change in computational cost.

  11. The NANOGrav Nine-year Data Set: Limits on the Isotropic Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzoumanian, Zaven; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Chamberlin, Sydney; Chatterjee, Shami; Christy, Brian; Cordes, Jim; Cornish, Neil; Demorest, Paul; Deng, Xihao; Dolch, Tim; Ellis, Justin; Ferdman, Rob; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Garver-Daniels, Nate; Jenet, Fredrick; Jones, Glenn; Kaspi, Vicky; Koop, Michael; Lam, Michael; Lazio, Joseph; Levin, Lina; Lommen, Andrea; Lorimer, Duncan; Luo, Jin; Lynch, Ryan; Madison, Dustin; McLaughlin, Maura; McWilliams, Sean; Mingarelli, Chiara; Nice, David; Palliyaguru, Nipuni; Pennucci, Tim; Ransom, Scott; Sampson, Laura; Sanidas, Sotiris; Sesana, Alberto; Siemens, Xavier; Simon, Joseph; Stairs, Ingrid; Stinebring, Dan; Stovall, Kevin; Swiggum, Joseph; Taylor, Stephen; Vallisneri, Michele; van Haasteren, Rutger; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    We compute upper limits on the nanohertz-frequency isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB) using the 9-year data release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. We set upper limits for a GWB from supermassive black hole binaries under power law, broken power law, and free spectral coefficient GW spectrum models. We place a 95\\% upper limit on the strain amplitude (at a frequency of yr$^{-1}$) in the power law model of $A_{\\rm gw} law model, we place priors on the strain amplitude derived from simulations of Sesana (2013) and McWilliams et al. (2014). We find that the data favor a broken power law to a pure power law with odds ratios of 22 and 2.2 to one for the McWilliams and Sesana prior models, respectively. The McWilliams model is essentially ruled out by the data, and the Sesana model is in tension with the data under the assumption of a pure power law. Using the broken power-law analysis ...

  12. Detecting very long-lived gravitational-wave transients lasting hours to weeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Thrane; Vuk Mandic; Nelson Christensen

    2015-05-12

    We explore the possibility of very long-lived gravitational-wave transients (and detector artifacts) lasting hours to weeks. Such very long signals are both interesting in their own right and as a potential source of systematic error in searches for persistent signals, e.g., from a stochastic gravitational-wave background. We review possible mechanisms for emission on these time scales and discuss computational challenges associated with their detection: namely, the substantial volume of data involved in a search for very long transients can require vast computer memory and processing time. These computational difficulties can be addressed through a form of data compression known as coarse-graining, in which information about short time spans is discarded in order to reduce the computational requirements of a search. Using data compression, we demonstrate an efficient radiometer (cross-correlation) algorithm for the detection of very long transients. In the process, we identify features of a very long transient search (related to the rotation of the Earth) that make it more complicated than a search for shorter transient signals. We implement suitable solutions.

  13. Derivative of the light frequency shift as a measure of spacetime curvature for gravitational wave detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Congedo

    2015-04-24

    The measurement of frequency shifts for light beams exchanged between two test masses nearly in free fall is at the heart of gravitational wave detection. It is envisaged that the derivative of the frequency shift is in fact limited by differential forces acting on those test masses. We calculate the derivative of the frequency shift with a fully covariant, gauge-independent and coordinate-free method. This method is general and does not require a congruence of nearby beams' null geodesics as done in previous work. We show that the derivative of the parallel transport is the only means by which gravitational effects shows up in the frequency shift. This contribution is given as an integral of the Riemann tensor --the only physical observable of curvature-- along the beam's geodesic. The remaining contributions are: the difference of velocities, the difference of non-gravitational forces, and finally fictitious forces, either locally at the test masses or non-locally integrated along the beam's geodesic. As an application relevant to gravitational wave detection, we work out the frequency shift in the local Lorentz frame of nearby geodesics.

  14. Colliding neutron stars Gravitational waves, neutrino emission, and $\\gamma$-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruffert, M; Ruffert, Maximilian

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations are presented for the direct head-on or off-center collision of two neutron stars, employing a basically Newtonian PPM code but including the emission of gravitational waves and their back-reaction on the hydrodynamical flow. A physical nuclear equation of state is used that allows us to follow the thermodynamical evolution of the stellar matter and to compute the emission of neutrinos. Predicted gravitational wave signals, luminosities and waveforms, are presented. The models are evaluated for their implications for gamma-ray burst scenarios. We find an extremely luminous outburst of neutrinos with a peak luminosity of more than 4E54 erg/s for several milliseconds. This leads to an efficiency of about 1% for the annihilation of neutrinos with antineutrinos, corresponding to an average energy deposition rate of more than 1E52 erg/s and a total energy of about 1E50 erg deposited in electron-positron pairs around the collision site within 10ms. Although these numbers...

  15. Colliding neutron stars --- Gravitational waves, neutrino emission, and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maximilian Ruffert; H. -Thomas Janka

    1998-04-14

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations are presented for the direct head-on or off-center collision of two neutron stars, employing a basically Newtonian PPM code but including the emission of gravitational waves and their back-reaction on the hydrodynamical flow. A physical nuclear equation of state is used that allows us to follow the thermodynamical evolution of the stellar matter and to compute the emission of neutrinos. Predicted gravitational wave signals, luminosities and waveforms, are presented. The models are evaluated for their implications for gamma-ray burst scenarios. We find an extremely luminous outburst of neutrinos with a peak luminosity of more than 4E54 erg/s for several milliseconds. This leads to an efficiency of about 1% for the annihilation of neutrinos with antineutrinos, corresponding to an average energy deposition rate of more than 1E52 erg/s and a total energy of about 1E50 erg deposited in electron-positron pairs around the collision site within 10ms. Although these numbers seem very favorable for gamma-ray burst scenarios, the pollution of the $e^\\pm$ pair-plasma cloud with nearly 0.1$M_{\\odot}$ of dynamically ejected baryons is 5 orders of magnitude too large. Therefore the formation of a relativistically expanding fireball that leads to a gamma-ray burst powered by neutrino emission from colliding neutron stars is definitely ruled out.

  16. On the Unreasonable Effectiveness of post-Newtonian Theory in Gravitational-Wave Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Clifford M. Will

    2010-01-08

    The first indirect detection of gravitational waves involved a binary system of neutron stars.  In the future, the first direct detection may also involve binary systems -- inspiralling and merging binary neutron stars or black holes. This means that it is essential to understand in full detail the two-body system in general relativity, a notoriously difficult problem with a long history. Post-Newtonian approximation methods are thought to work only under slow motion and weak field conditions, while numerical solutions of Einstein's equations are thought to be limited to the final merger phase.  Recent results have shown that post-Newtonian approximations seem to remain unreasonably valid well into the relativistic regime, while advances in numerical relativity now permit solutions for numerous orbits before merger.  It is now possible to envision linking post-Newtonian theory and numerical relativity to obtain a complete ``solution'' of the general relativistic two-body problem.  These solutions will play a central role in detecting and understanding gravitational wave signals received by interferometric observatories on Earth and in space.

  17. Energy-Momentum and Angular Momentum Carried by Gravitational Waves in Extended New General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisaku Sakane; Toshiharu Kawai

    2002-09-30

    In an extended, new form of general relativity, which is a teleparallel theory of gravity, we examine the energy-momentum and angular momentum carried by gravitational wave radiated from Newtonian point masses in a weak-field approximation. The resulting wave form is identical to the corresponding wave form in general relativity, which is consistent with previous results in teleparallel theory. The expression for the dynamical energy-momentum density is identical to that for the canonical energy-momentum density in general relativity up to leading order terms on the boundary of a large sphere including the gravitational source, and the loss of dynamical energy-momentum, which is the generator of \\emph{internal} translations, is the same as that of the canonical energy-momentum in general relativity. Under certain asymptotic conditions for a non-dynamical Higgs-type field $\\psi^{k}$, the loss of ``spin'' angular momentum, which is the generator of \\emph{internal} $SL(2,C)$ transformations, is the same as that of angular momentum in general relativity, and the losses of canonical energy-momentum and orbital angular momentum, which constitute the generator of Poincar\\'{e} \\emph{coordinate} transformations, are vanishing. The results indicate that our definitions of the dynamical energy-momentum and angular momentum densities in this extended new general relativity work well for gravitational wave radiations, and the extended new general relativity accounts for the Hulse-Taylor measurement of the pulsar PSR1913+16.

  18. Detection of high energy cosmic rays with the resonant gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS and EXPLORER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Astone; D. Babusci; M. Bassan; P. Bonifazi; G. Cavallari; E. Coccia; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; G. Giordano; C. Ligi; A. Marini; G. Mazzitelli; Y. Minenkov; I. Modena; G. Modestino; A. Moleti; G. V. Pallottino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; A. Rocchi; F. Ronga; R. Terenzi; M. Visco

    2008-06-14

    The cryogenic resonant gravitational wave detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER, made of an aluminum alloy bar, can detect cosmic ray showers. At temperatures above 1 K, when the material is in the normal conducting state, the measured signals are in good agreement with the values expected based on the cosmic rays data and on the thermo-acoustic model. When NAUTILUS was operated at the temperature of 0.14 K, in superconductive state, large signals produced by cosmic ray interactions, more energetic than expected, were recorded. The NAUTILUS data in this case are in agreement with the measurements done by a dedicated experiment on a particle beam. The biggest recorded event was in EXPLORER and excited the first longitudinal mode to a vibrational energy of about 670 K, corresponding to about 360 TeV absorbed in the bar. Cosmic rays can be an important background in future acoustic detectors of improved sensitivity. At present, they represent a useful tool to verify the gravitational wave antenna performance.

  19. Cubic order spin effects in the dynamics and gravitational wave energy flux of compact object binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sylvain Marsat

    2015-01-23

    We investigate cubic-in-spin effects for inspiralling compact objects binaries, both in the dynamics and the energy flux emitted in gravitational waves, at the leading post-Newtonian order. We use a Lagrangian formalism to implement finite-size effects, and extend it at cubic order in the spins, which corresponds to the octupolar order in a multipolar decomposition. This formalism allows us to derive the equation of motion, equations of precession for the spin, and stress-energy tensor of each body in covariant form, and admits a formal generalization to any multipolar order. For spin-induced multipoles, i.e. in the case where the rotation of the compact object is sole responsible for the additional multipole moments, we find a unique structure for the octupolar moment representing cubic-in-spin effects. We apply these results to compute the associated effects in the dynamics of compact binary systems, and deduce the corresponding terms in the energy loss rate due to gravitational waves. These effects enter at the third-and-a-half post-Newtonian order, and can be important for binaries involving rapidly spinning black holes. We provide simplified results for spin-aligned, circular orbits, and discuss the quantitative importance of the new contributions.

  20. Use of gravitational waves to measure alignment of spins in compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Vitale; Ryan Lynch; Philip Graff; Riccardo Sturani

    2015-03-14

    Coalescences of compact objects, neutron star and black holes, in binary systems are very promising sources of gravitational waves for the ground based detectors Advanced LIGO and Virgo. Much about compact binaries is still uncertain, including how often they are formed in the Universe, and some key details about their formation channels. One of the key open questions about compact binary coalescences is whether or not common envelope evolution is highly efficient in aligning spins with the orbital angular momentum. In this paper we show how gravitational waves detected by Advanced LIGO and Virgo can be used to verify if spins are preferentially aligned with the orbital angular momentum in compact binaries made of two black holes or a neutron star and a black hole. We first assume that all sources have either nearly aligned or non-aligned spins and use Bayesian model selection to calculate a cumulative odds ratio to compare the aligned and non-aligned models. We see that the correct model is typically preferred after one year of observation, at the realistic detection rate. We also simulate a situation where only a fraction of detected events have nearly aligned spins, and show how the mixture parameter can be estimated. We find that there exists a bias toward higher degrees of alignment and that this bias is larger for black hole binaries.

  1. Cubic order spin effects in the dynamics and gravitational wave energy flux of compact object binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsat, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    We investigate cubic-in-spin effects for inspiralling compact objects binaries, both in the dynamics and the energy flux emitted in gravitational waves, at the leading post-Newtonian order. We use a Lagrangian formalism to implement finite-size effects, and extend it at cubic order in the spins, which corresponds to the octupolar order in a multipolar decomposition. This formalism allows us to derive the equation of motion, equations of precession for the spin, and stress-energy tensor of each body in covariant form, and admits a formal generalization to any multipolar order. For spin-induced multipoles, i.e. in the case where the rotation of the compact object is sole responsible for the additional multipole moments, we find a unique structure for the octupolar moment representing cubic-in-spin effects. We apply these results to compute the associated effects in the dynamics of compact binary systems, and deduce the corresponding terms in the energy loss rate due to gravitational waves. These effects enter a...

  2. Precise atmospheric parameters for the shortest-period binary white dwarfs: gravitational waves, metals, and pulsations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianninas, A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Dufour, P.; Bergeron, P.; Brown, Warren R.; Hermes, J. J.

    2014-10-10

    We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 61 low-mass white dwarfs and provide precise atmospheric parameters, masses, and updated binary system parameters based on our new model atmosphere grids and the most recent evolutionary model calculations. For the first time, we measure systematic abundances of He, Ca, and Mg for metal-rich, extremely low mass white dwarfs and examine the distribution of these abundances as a function of effective temperature and mass. Based on our preliminary results, we discuss the possibility that shell flashes may be responsible for the presence of the observed He and metals. We compare stellar radii derived from our spectroscopic analysis to model-independent measurements and find good agreement except for white dwarfs with T {sub eff} ? 10,000 K. We also calculate the expected gravitational wave strain for each system and discuss their significance to the eLISA space-borne gravitational wave observatory. Finally, we provide an update on the instability strip of extremely low mass white dwarf pulsators.

  3. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000...

  4. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M . G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; M. Benacquista; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; V. Dolique; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; K. Haris; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley

    2014-05-22

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs, radiating 1% of their mass as gravitational waves in the fundamental, $\\ell=m=2$, oscillation mode, that is nearly three orders of magnitude more stringent than previous results.

  5. All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the second joint LIGO-Virgo run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; A. Hardt; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy

    2012-04-20

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010: data are analyzed when at least two of the three LIGO-Virgo detectors are in coincident operation, with a total observation time of 207 days. The analysis searches for transients of duration < 1 s over the frequency band 64-5000 Hz, without other assumptions on the signal waveform, polarization, direction or occurrence time. All identified events are consistent with the expected accidental background. We set frequentist upper limits on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts by combining this search with the previous LIGO-Virgo search on the data collected between November 2005 and October 2007. The upper limit on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts at the Earth is 1.3 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present upper limits on source rate density per year and Mpc^3 for sample populations of standard-candle sources. As in the previous joint run, typical sensitivities of the search in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for these waveforms lie in the range 5 10^-22 Hz^-1/2 to 1 10^-20 Hz^-1/2. The combination of the two joint runs entails the most sensitive all-sky search for generic gravitational-wave bursts and synthesizes the results achieved by the initial generation of interferometric detectors.

  6. Searches for inspiral gravitational waves associated with short gamma-ray bursts in LIGO's fifth and Virgo's first science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Dietz

    2010-06-16

    This brief report describes the search for gravitational-wave inspiral signals from short gamma-ray bursts. Since these events are probably created by the merger of two compact objects, a targeted search with a lower threshold can be made. The data around 22 short gamma-ray bursts have been analyzed.

  7. Enhancement of sensitivity and bandwidth of gravitational wave detectors using fast-light-based white light cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    of neutron stars in a binary system as they lose energy via gravitational radiation. However, GWs have of gravitational waves (GWs) has been observed indirectly, by monitoring the change in the orbital frequencyLIGO system without changing any other optical elements. We show a choice of parameters for which the signal

  8. Gravitational waves versus X-ray and gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, R., E-mail: fe.fisica@gmail.com, E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it, E-mail: ruffini@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universitŕ di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 090227B, allows us to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X-ray and gamma-ray emission in a short GRB.

  9. A Proposal for Determining the Energy Content of Gravitational Waves by Using Approximate Symmetries of Differential Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibrar Hussain; F. M. Mahomed; Asghar Qadir

    2009-03-11

    Since gravitational wave spacetimes are time-varying vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations, there is no unambiguous means to define their energy content. However, Weber and Wheeler had demonstrated that they do impart energy to test particles. There have been various proposals to define the energy content but they have not met with great success. Here we propose a definition using "slightly broken" Noether symmetries. We check whether this definition is physically acceptable. The procedure adopted is to appeal to "approximate symmetries" as defined in Lie analysis and use them in the limit of the exact symmetry holding. A problem is noted with the use of the proposal for plane-fronted gravitational waves. To attain a better understanding of the implications of this proposal we also use an artificially constructed time-varying non-vacuum metric and evaluate its Weyl and stress-energy tensors so as to obtain the gravitational and matter components separately and compare them with the energy content obtained by our proposal. The procedure is also used for cylindrical gravitational wave solutions. The usefulness of the definition is demonstrated by the fact that it leads to a result on whether gravitational waves suffer self-damping.

  10. Energy release from hadron-quark phase transition in neutron stars and the axial w mode of gravitational waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Weikang; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun; Ko, Che Ming; Wen, De Hua.

    2011-01-01

    the energy release from a neutron star owing to the hadron-quark phase transition. Moreover, the frequency and damping time of the first axial w mode of gravitational waves are studied for both hyperonic and hybrid stars. We find that the energy release...

  11. Testing gravitational-wave searches with numerical relativity waveforms: Results from the first Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Aylott; John G. Baker; William D. Boggs; Michael Boyle; Patrick R. Brady; Duncan A. Brown; Bernd Brügmann; Luisa T. Buchman; Alessandra Buonanno; Laura Cadonati; Jordan Camp; Manuela Campanelli; Joan Centrella; Shourov Chatterji; Nelson Christensen; Tony Chu; Peter Diener; Nils Dorband; Zachariah B. Etienne; Joshua Faber; Stephen Fairhurst; Benjamin Farr; Sebastian Fischetti; Gianluca Guidi; Lisa M. Goggin; Mark Hannam; Frank Herrmann; Ian Hinder; Sascha Husa; Vicky Kalogera; Drew Keppel; Lawrence E. Kidder; Bernard J. Kelly; Badri Krishnan; Pablo Laguna; Carlos O. Lousto; Ilya Mandel; Pedro Marronetti; Richard Matzner; Sean T. McWilliams; Keith D. Matthews; R. Adam Mercer; Satyanarayan R. P. Mohapatra; Abdul H. Mroué; Hiroyuki Nakano; Evan Ochsner; Yi Pan; Larne Pekowsky; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Denis Pollney; Frans Pretorius; Vivien Raymond; Christian Reisswig; Luciano Rezzolla; Oliver Rinne; Craig Robinson; Christian Röver; Lucía Santamaría; Bangalore Sathyaprakash; Mark A. Scheel; Erik Schnetter; Jennifer Seiler; Stuart L. Shapiro; Deirdre Shoemaker; Ulrich Sperhake; Alexander Stroeer; Riccardo Sturani; Wolfgang Tichy; Yuk Tung Liu; Marc van der Sluys; James R. van Meter; Ruslan Vaulin; Alberto Vecchio; John Veitch; Andrea Viceré; John T. Whelan; Yosef Zlochower

    2009-07-09

    The Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project is a collaborative effort between members of the numerical relativity and gravitational-wave data analysis communities. The purpose of NINJA is to study the sensitivity of existing gravitational-wave search algorithms using numerically generated waveforms and to foster closer collaboration between the numerical relativity and data analysis communities. We describe the results of the first NINJA analysis which focused on gravitational waveforms from binary black hole coalescence. Ten numerical relativity groups contributed numerical data which were used to generate a set of gravitational-wave signals. These signals were injected into a simulated data set, designed to mimic the response of the Initial LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. Nine groups analysed this data using search and parameter-estimation pipelines. Matched filter algorithms, un-modelled-burst searches and Bayesian parameter-estimation and model-selection algorithms were applied to the data. We report the efficiency of these search methods in detecting the numerical waveforms and measuring their parameters. We describe preliminary comparisons between the different search methods and suggest improvements for future NINJA analyses.

  12. Parameter estimation for compact binary coalescence signals with the first generation gravitational-wave detector network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endröczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P

    2013-01-01

    Compact binary systems with neutron stars or black holes are one of the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Gravitational radiation encodes rich information about source physics; thus parameter estimation and model selection are crucial analysis steps for any detection candidate events. Detailed models of the anticipated waveforms enable inference on several parameters, such as component masses, spins, sky location and distance that are essential for new astrophysical studies of these sources. However, accurate measurements of these parameters and discrimination of models describing the underlying physics are complicated by artifacts in the data, uncertainties in the waveform models and in the calibration of the detectors. Here we report such measurements on a selection of simulated signals added either in hardware or software to the data collected by the two LIGO instruments and the Virgo detector during their most recent joint science run, including a "blind injection" wher...

  13. Constraints on cosmic (super)strings from the LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliá, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic string cusps produce powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs). These bursts provide the most promising observational signature of cosmic strings. In this letter we report stringent limits on cosmic string models obtained from the analysis of 625 days of observation with the LIGO and Virgo GW detectors. A significant fraction of the cosmic string parameter space is ruled out. This result complements and improves existing limits from searches for a stochastic background of GWs using cosmic microwave background and pulsar timing data. In particular, if the size of loops is given by gravitational back-reaction, we place upper limits on the string tension $G\\mu$ below $10^{-8}$ in some regions of the cosmic string parameter space.

  14. Primordial massive gravitational waves from Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations during de Sitter inflation in the Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity. Primordial massive gravitational waves are composed of one scalar, two vector and four tensor circularly polarized modes. We show that the vector power spectrum decays quickly like a transversely massive vector in the superhorizon limit z ? 0. In this limit, the power spectrum coming from massive tensor modes decays quickly, leading to the conventional tensor power spectrum. Also, we find that in the limit of m{sup 2} ? 0 (keeping the Weyl-squared term only), the vector and tensor power spectra disappear. It implies that their power spectra are not gravitationally produced because they (vector and tensor) are decoupled from the expanding de Sitter background, as a result of conformal invariance.

  15. Wavelet entropy filter and cross-correlation of gravitational wave data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Terenzi; R. Sturani

    2009-05-28

    We present a method for enhancing the cross-correlation of gravitational wave signals eventually present in data streams containing otherwise uncorrelated noise. Such method makes use of the wavelet decomposition to cast the cross-correlation time series in time-frequency space. Then an entropy criterion is applied to identify the best time frequency resolution, i.e. the resolution allowing to concentrate the signal in the smallest number of wavelet coefficients. By keeping only the coefficients above a certain threshold, it is possible to reconstruct a cross-correlation time series where the effect of common signal is stronger. We tested our method against signals injected over two data streams of uncorrelated white noise.

  16. Capturing the electromagnetic counterparts of binary neutron star mergers through low latency gravitational wave triggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Q; Rowlinson, A; Gao, H; Zhang, B; Tingay, S J; Boer, M; Wen, L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the prospects for joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of low-latency search pipelines we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs using realistic distributions of source parameters to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. To determine what EM observations can be achieved, we consider a selection of facilities with GW follow-up agreements in place, from low-frequency radio to high energy $\\gamma$-ray; we assess the performance of each using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo. We ...

  17. Gravity-Gradient Subtraction in 3rd Generation Underground Gravitational-Wave Detectors in Homogeneous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Harms; Riccardo DeSalvo; Steven Dorsher; Vuk Mandic

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we develop a new approach to gravity-gradient noise subtraction for underground gravitational-wave detectors in homogeneous rock. The method is based on spatial harmonic expansions of seismic fields. It is shown that gravity-gradient noise produced by seismic fields from distant sources, stationary or non-stationary, can be calculated from seismic data measured locally at the test mass. Furthermore, the formula is applied to seismic fields from stationary local sources. It is found that gravity gradients from these fields can be subtracted using local seismic measurements. The results are confirmed numerically with a finite-element simulation. A new seismic-array design is proposed that provides the additional information about the seismic field required to ensure applicability of the approach to realistic scenarios even with inhomogeneous rock and non-stationary local sources.

  18. Expected properties of the first gravitational wave signal detected with pulsar timing arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosado, Pablo A; Gair, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to investigate the nature of the first gravitational wave (GW) signal to be detected by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs): will it be an individual, resolved supermassive black hole binary (SBHB), or a stochastic background made by the superposition of GWs produced by an ensemble of SBHBs? To address this issue, we analyse a broad set of simulations of the cosmological population of SBHBs, that cover the entire parameter space allowed by current electromagnetic observations in an unbiased way. For each simulation, we construct the expected GW signal and identify the loudest individual sources. We then employ appropriate detection statistics to evaluate the relative probability of detecting each type of source as a function of time for a variety of PTAs; we consider the current International PTA (IPTA), and speculate into the era of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The main properties of the first detectable individual SBHBs are also investigated. Contrary to previous work, we cast our resu...

  19. Utilization of electromagnetic detector for selection and detection of high-frequency relic gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fangyu Li; Zhenya Chen; Ying Yi

    2005-11-03

    It is shown that coupling system between fractal membranes and a Gaussian beam passing through a static magnetic field has strong selection capability for the stochastic relic gravitational wave background. The relic GW components propagating along the positive direction of the symmetrical axis of the Gaussian beam might generate an optimal electromagnetic perturbation while the perturbation produced by the relic GW components propagating along the negative and perpendicular directions to the symmetrical axis will be much less than the former.The influence of the random fluctuation of the relic GWs to such effect can be neglected and the influence of the random fluctuation of the relic GWs to such effect can be neglected.

  20. Gravitational Wave Emission from the Single-Degenerate Channel of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Falta; Robert T. Fisher; Gaurav Khanna

    2011-05-28

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore--like SNe II--potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We perform the first detailed calculations of the GW emission for a SN Ia of any type within the single-degenerate channel. The gravitationally-confined detonation (GCD) mechanism predicts a strongly-polarized GW burst in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning may be able to detect this predicted signal from SNe Ia at distances up to 1 Mpc. If observable, GWs may offer a direct probe into the first few seconds of the SNe Ia detonation.

  1. Anisotropies of gravitational-wave standard sirens as a new cosmological probe without redshift information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Taruya, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Compact binary stars at cosmological distances are promising sources for gravitational waves (GWs), and these are thought to be powerful cosmological probes, referred to as the GW standard sirens. With future GW detectors such as the Einstein telescope (ET), we will be able to precisely measure their luminosity distances out to a redshift $z\\sim5$. While previously proposed cosmological studies using the GW standard sirens require redshift information for each source, which could be obtained through an extensive electromagnetic follow-up campaign, we here propose an alternative method only with the luminosity distances. Utilizing the anisotropies of the number density and luminosity distances originated from the large-scale structure, we discuss how this anisotropies can be measured and are sensitive to the cosmology, finding that the expected constraints on the primordial non-Gaussianity parameter $f_{\\rm NL}$ could become $\\sigma(f_{\\rm NL})=0.54$ with a network of ET-like detectors.

  2. Probing the noncommutative structure of space with a quantum harmonic oscillator driven by gravitational wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the quantum mechanical transitions, induced by the combined effect of Gravitational wave (GW) and noncommutative (NC) structure of space, among the states of a 2-dimensional harmonic oscillator. The phonon modes excited by the passing GW within the resonant bar-detector are formally identical to forced harmonic oscillator and they represent a length variation of roughly the same order of magnitude as the characteristic length-scale of spatial noncommutativity estimated from the phenomenological upper bound of the NC parameter. This motivates our present work. We employ a number of different GW wave-forms that are typically expected from possible astronomical sources. We find that the transition probablities are quite sensitive to the nature of polarization of the GW. We further elaborate on the particular type of sources of GW radiation which can induce transitions that can be used as effective probe of the spatial noncommutative structure.

  3. Search for periodic gravitational radiation with the ALLEGRO gravitational wave detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Mauceli; M. P. McHugh; W. O. Hamilton; W. W. Johnson; A. Morse

    2000-07-11

    We describe the search for a continuous signal of gravitational radiation from a rotating neutron star in the data taken by the ALLEGRO gravitational wave detector in early 1994. Since ALLEGRO is sensitive at frequencies near 1 kHz, only neutron stars with spin periods near 2 ms are potential sources. There are no known sources of this typ e for ALLEGRO, so we directed the search towards both the galactic center and the globular clus ter 47 Tucanae. The analysis puts a constraint of roughly $8 \\times 10^{-24}$ at frequencies near 1 kHz on the gravitational strain emitted from pulsar spin-down in either 47 Tucanae or the galactic center.

  4. Interaction of a circularly polarised gravitational wave with a charged particle in a static magnetic background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunandan Gangopadhyay; Anirban Saha; Swarup Saha

    2014-12-24

    Interaction of a charged particle in a static magnetic background, i.e., a Landau system with circularly polarised gravitational wave (GW) is studied quantum mechanically in the long wavelength and low velocity limit. We quantize the classical Hamiltonian following \\cite{speli}. The rotating polarization vectors of the circularly polarized GW are employed to form a unique directional triad which served as the coordinate axes. The Schrodinger equations for the system are cast in the form of a set of coupled linear differential equations. This system is solved by iterative technique. We compute the time-evolution of the position and momentum expectation values of the particle. The results show that the resonance behaviour obtained earlier\\cite{emgw_classical} by classical treatements of the system has a quantum analogue not only for the linearly polarized GW \\cite{emgw_1_lin}, but for circularly polarized GW as well.

  5. How Gravitational-wave Observations Can Shape the Gamma-ray Burst Paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imre Bartos; Patrick Brady; Szabolcs Marka

    2012-12-11

    By reaching through shrouding blastwaves, efficiently discovering off-axis events, and probing the central engine at work, gravitational wave (GW) observations will soon revolutionize the study of gamma-ray bursts. Already, analyses of GW data targeting gamma-ray bursts have helped constrain the central engines of selected events. Advanced GW detectors with significantly improved sensitivities are under construction. After outlining the GW emission mechanisms from gamma-ray burst progenitors (binary coalescences, stellar core collapses, magnetars, and others) that may be detectable with advanced detectors, we review how GWs will improve our understanding of gamma-ray burst central engines, their astrophysical formation channels, and the prospects and methods for different search strategies. We place special emphasis on multimessenger searches. To achieve the most scientific benefit, GW, electromagnetic, and neutrino observations should be combined to provide greater discriminating power and science reach.

  6. The advanced system for the electromagnetic response of high-frequency gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin Li; Lu Zhang; Kai Lin; Hao Wen

    2014-11-20

    Based on the electromagnetic (EM) response system of high frequency gravitational waves (HFGWs) in GHz band, we mainly discuss the EM response to the relic HFGWs, which are predicted by quintessential and ordinary inflationary models, and the braneworld HFGWs from braneworld scenarios. Both of them would generate detectable transverse perturbative photon fluxes (PPFs) thought to be the signal. Through resetting the magnetic component of Gaussian Beam to be in the standard gaussian form, the signal strength would be enhanced theoretically. Under the typical conditions, the analysis of background noise (background photon fluxes) and shot noise provides the possible transverse detection width for these HFGWs, meanwhile the standard quantum limit estimation proves our detection is possible. Finally according to the principle of maximum signal to noise ratio, we find some optimal system parameters and the relationship between effective width for energy fluxes accumulation and frequency.

  7. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fangyu Li; Hao Wen; Zhenyun Fang

    2015-10-20

    Interaction of very low-frequency primordial(relic) gravitational waves(GWs) to cosmic microwave background(CMB) can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic(EM) response to high-frequency GWs(HFGWs) would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes, and study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  8. Conversion of relic gravitational waves into photons in cosmological magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgov, Alexander D.; Ejlli, Damian, E-mail: dolgov@fe.infn.it, E-mail: ejlli@fe.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico-Edificio C, Universitŕ degli Studi di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    Conversion of gravitational waves into electromagnetic radiation is discussed. The probability of transformations of gravitons into photons in presence of cosmological background magnetic field is calculated at the recombination epoch and during subsequent cosmological stages. The produced electromagnetic radiation is concentrated in the X-ray part of the spectrum. It is shown that if the early Universe was dominated by primordial black holes (PBHs) prior to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), the relic gravitons emitted by PBHs would transform to an almost isotropic background of electromagnetic radiation due to conversion of gravitons into photons in cosmological magnetic fields. Such extragalactic radiation could be noticeable or even dominant component of Cosmic X-ray Background.

  9. Measurement of the mechanical loss of a cooled reflective coating for gravitational wave detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Shinji Miyoki; Takashi Uchiyama; Hideki Ishitsuka; Masatake Ohashi; Kazuaki Kuroda; Takayuki Tomaru; Nobuaki Sato; Toshikazu Suzuki; Tomiyoshi Haruyama; Akira Yamamoto; Takakazu Shintomi; Kenji Numata; Koichi Waseda; Kazuhiko Ito; Koji Watanabe

    2006-07-22

    We have measured the mechanical loss of a dielectric multilayer reflective coating (ion-beam sputtered SiO$_2$ and Ta$_2$O$_5$) in cooled mirrors. The loss was nearly independent of the temperature (4 K $\\sim$ 300 K), frequency, optical loss, and stress caused by the coating, and the details of the manufacturing processes. The loss angle was $(4 \\sim 6) \\times 10^{-4}$. The temperature independence of this loss implies that the amplitude of the coating thermal noise, which is a severe limit in any precise measurement, is proportional to the square root of the temperature. Sapphire mirrors at 20 K satisfy the requirement concerning the thermal noise of even future interferometric gravitational wave detector projects on the ground, for example, LCGT.

  10. Single and double superimposing interferometer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Interferometers which can imprint a coherent delay on a broadband uncollimated beam are described. The delay value can be independent of incident ray angle, allowing interferometry using uncollimated beams from common extended sources such as lamps and fiber bundles, and facilitating Fourier Transform spectroscopy of wide angle sources. Pairs of such interferometers matched in delay and dispersion can measure velocity and communicate using ordinary lamps, wide diameter optical fibers and arbitrary non-imaging paths, and not requiring a laser.

  11. A novel scheme for rapid parallel parameter estimation of gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Pankow; P. Brady; E. Ochsner; R. O'Shaughnessy

    2015-02-15

    We introduce a highly-parallelizable architecture for estimating parameters of compact binary coalescence using gravitational-wave data and waveform models. Using a spherical harmonic mode decomposition, the waveform is expressed as a sum over modes that depend on the intrinsic parameters (e.g. masses) with coefficients that depend on the observer dependent extrinsic parameters (e.g. distance, sky position). The data is then prefiltered against those modes, at fixed intrinsic parameters, enabling efficiently evaluation of the likelihood for generic source positions and orientations, independent of waveform length or generation time. We efficiently parallelize our intrinsic space calculation by integrating over all extrinsic parameters using a Monte Carlo integration strategy. Since the waveform generation and prefiltering happens only once, the cost of integration dominates the procedure. Also, we operate hierarchically, using information from existing gravitational-wave searches to identify the regions of parameter space to emphasize in our sampling. As proof of concept and verification of the result, we have implemented this algorithm using standard time-domain waveforms, processing each event in less than one hour on recent computing hardware. For most events we evaluate the marginalized likelihood (evidence) with statistical errors of less than about 5%, and even smaller in many cases. With a bounded runtime independent of the waveform model starting frequency, a nearly-unchanged strategy could estimate NS-NS parameters in the 2018 advanced LIGO era. Our algorithm is usable with any noise curve and existing time-domain model at any mass, including some waveforms which are computationally costly to evolve.

  12. Precision ephemerides for gravitational-wave searches. I. Sco X-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galloway, Duncan K.; Premachandra, Sammanani [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Steeghs, Danny; Marsh, Tom [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Astrophysics Group, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Casares, Jorge; Cornelisse, Rémon, E-mail: Duncan.Galloway@monash.edu [Instituto de Astrofísica, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-01-20

    Rapidly rotating neutron stars are the only candidates for persistent high-frequency gravitational wave emission, for which a targeted search can be performed based on the spin period measured from electromagnetic (e.g., radio and X-ray) observations. The principal factor determining the sensitivity of such searches is the measurement precision of the physical parameters of the system. Neutron stars in X-ray binaries present additional computational demands for searches due to the uncertainty in the binary parameters. We present the results of a pilot study with the goal of improving the measurement precision of binary orbital parameters for candidate gravitational wave sources. We observed the optical counterpart of Sco X-1 in 2011 June with the William Herschel Telescope and also made use of Very Large Telescope observations in 2011 to provide an additional epoch of radial-velocity measurements to earlier measurements in 1999. From a circular orbit fit to the combined data set, we obtained an improvement of a factor of 2 in the orbital period precision and a factor of 2.5 in the epoch of inferior conjunction T {sub 0}. While the new orbital period is consistent with the previous value of Gottlieb et al., the new T {sub 0} (and the amplitude of variation of the Bowen line velocities) exhibited a significant shift, which we attribute to variations in the emission geometry with epoch. We propagate the uncertainties on these parameters through to the expected Advanced LIGO-Virgo detector network observation epochs and quantify the improvement obtained with additional optical observations.

  13. Detecting gravitational waves from mountains on neutron stars in the Advanced Detector Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brynmor Haskell; Maxim Priymak; Alessandro Patruno; Manuel Oppenoorth; Andrew Melatos; Paul Lasky

    2015-01-24

    Rapidly rotating Neutron Stars (NSs) in Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) are thought to be interesting sources of Gravitational Waves (GWs) for current and next generation ground based detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and the Einstein Telescope. The main reason is that many of the NS in these systems appear to be spinning well below their Keplerian breakup frequency, and it has been suggested that torques associated with GW emission may be setting the observed spin period. This assumption has been used extensively in the literature to assess the strength of the likely gravitational wave signal. There is now, however, a significant amount of theoretical and observation work that suggests that this may not be the case, and that GW emission is unlikely to be setting the spin equilibrium period in many systems. In this paper we take a different starting point and predict the GW signal strength for two physical mechanisms that are likely to be at work in LMXBs: crustal mountains due to thermal asymmetries and magnetically confined mountains. We find that thermal crustal mountains in transient LMXBs are unlikely to lead to detectable GW emission, while persistent systems are good candidates for detection by Advanced LIGO and by the Einstein Telescope. Detection prospects are pessimistic for the magnetic mountain case, unless the NS has a buried magnetic field of $B\\approx 10^{12}$ G, well above the typically inferred exterior dipole fields of these objects. Nevertheless, if a system were to be detected by a GW observatory, cyclotron resonant scattering features in the X-ray emission could be used to distinguish between the two different scenarios.

  14. Projected Constraints on Scalarization with Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Sampson; Nicolas Yunes; Neil Cornish; Marcelo Ponce; Enrico Barausse; Antoine Klein; Carlos Palenzuela; Luis Lehner

    2014-11-28

    Certain scalar-tensor theories have the property of endowing stars with scalar hair, sourced either by the star's own compactness (spontaneous scalarization) or, for binary systems, by the companion's scalar hair (induced scalarization) or by the orbital binding energy (dynamical scalarization). Scalarized stars in binaries present different conservative dynamics than in General Relativity, and can also excite a scalar mode in the metric perturbation that carries away dipolar radiation. As a result, the binary orbit shrinks faster than predicted in General Relativity, modifying the rate of decay of the orbital period. In spite of this, scalar-tensor theories can pass existing binary pulsar tests, because observed pulsars may not be compact enough or sufficiently orbitally bound to activate scalarization. Gravitational waves emitted during the last stages of compact binary inspirals are thus ideal probes of scalarization effects. For the standard projected sensitivity of advanced LIGO, we here show that, if neutron stars are sufficiently compact to enter the detector's sensitivity band already scalarized, then gravitational waves could place constraints at least comparable to binary pulsars. If the stars dynamically scalarize while inspiraling in band, then constraints are still possible provided the scalarization occurs sufficiently early in the inspiral, roughly below an orbital frequency of 50Hz. In performing these studies, we derive an easy-to-calculate data analysis measure, an integrated phase difference between a General Relativistic and a modified signal, that maps directly to the Bayes factor so as to determine whether a modified gravity effect is detectable. Finally, we find that custom-made templates are equally effective as model-independent, parameterized post-Einsteinian waveforms at detecting such modified gravity effects at realistic signal-to-noise ratios.

  15. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 11 SEPTEMBER 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2083 A gravitational wave observatory operating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Nelson

    with its best ever sensitivity, which proves the usefulness of quantum entanglement and the qualification the sensitivity is, in practice, limited by seismic noise, suspension thermal noise, and in future interferometers

  16. Gravitational Waves around a Naked Singularity -- Odd-Parity Perturbation of Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi Space-Time --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Iguchi; Ken-ichi Nakao; Tomohiro Harada

    1998-04-06

    The motion of a spherical dust cloud is described by the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi solution and is completely specified by initial values of distributions of the rest mass density and specific energy of the dust fluid. From generic initial conditions of this spherically symmetric collapse, there appears a naked singularity at the symmetric center in the course of the gravitational collapse of the dust cloud. So this might be a counter example to the cosmic censorship hypothesis. To investigate the genericity of this example, we examine the stability of the `nakedness' of this singularity against odd-parity modes of non-spherical linear perturbations for the metric, i.e., linear gravitational waves. We find that the perturbations do not diverge but are well-behaved even in the neighborhood of the central naked singularity. This means that the naked singularity formation process is marginally stable against the odd-parity modes of linear gravitational waves.

  17. The constraints on power spectrum of relic gravitational waves from current observations of large-scale structure of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Novosyadlyj; S. Apunevych

    2004-12-02

    We carry out the determination of the amplitude of relic gravitational waves power spectrum. Indirect best-fit technique was applied to compare observational data and theory predictions. As observations we have used data on large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe and anisotropy of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature. The conventional inflationary model with 11 parameters has been investigated, all of them evaluated jointly. This approach gave us a possibility to find parameters of power spectrum of gravitational waves along with statistical errors. The main result consists in following: WMAP data on power spectrum of CMB temperature fluctuations along with LSS data prefer model with small amplitude of tensor mode power spectrum, close to zero. The upper limit for its amplitude at quadupole harmonics T/S=0.6 at 95% C.L.

  18. Low pumping energy mode of the "optical bars''/"optical lever" topologies of gravitational-wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Ya. Khalili

    2003-04-16

    The ``optical bars''/``optical lever'' topologies of gravitational-wave antennae allow to obtain sensitivity better that the Standard Quantum Limit while keeping the optical pumping energy in the antenna relatively low. Element of the crucial importance in these schemes is the local meter which monitors the local test mirror position. Using cross-correlation of this meter back-action noise and its measurement noise it is possible to further decrease the optical pumping energy. In this case the pumping energy minimal value will be limited by the internal losses in the antenna only. Estimates show that for values of parameters available for contemporary and planned gravitational-wave antennae, sensitivity about one order of magnitude better than the Standard Quantum Limit can be obtained using the pumping energy about one order of magnitude smaller energy than is required in the traditional topology in order to obtain the the Standard Quantum Limit level of sensitivity.

  19. Search for Gravitational-wave Inspiral Signals Associated with Short Gamma-ray Bursts During Ligo’s Fifth and Virgo’s First Science Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsotti, Lisa

    Progenitor scenarios for short gamma-ray bursts (short GRBs) include coalescenses of two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole, which would necessarily be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves. ...

  20. Multimessenger search for sources of gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos: Initial results for LIGO-Virgo and IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aartsen, M.?G.

    We report the results of a multimessenger search for coincident signals from the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories and the partially completed IceCube high-energy neutrino detector, including periods of joint ...

  1. Exploring binary-neutron-star-merger scenario of short-gamma-ray bursts by gravitational-wave observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenta Kiuchi; Yuichiro Sekiguchi; Masaru Shibata; Keisuke Taniguchi

    2010-02-13

    We elucidate the feature of gravitational waves (GWs) from binary neutron star merger collapsing to a black hole by general relativistic simulation. We show that GW spectrum imprints the coalescence dynamics, formation process of disk, equation of state for neutron stars, total masses, and mass ratio. A formation mechanism of the central engine of short $\\gamma$-ray bursts, which are likely to be composed of a black hole and surrounding disk, therefore could be constrained by GW observation.

  2. A directed search for gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 with initial LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ashton, G; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barclay, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio,, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dartez, L; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fuentes-Tapia, S; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Hee, S; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Key, J S

    2014-01-01

    We present results of a search for continuously-emitted gravitational radiation, directed at the brightest low-mass X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1. Our semi-coherent analysis covers 10 days of LIGO S5 data ranging from 50-550 Hz, and performs an incoherent sum of coherent $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic power distributed amongst frequency-modulated orbital sidebands. All candidates not removed at the veto stage were found to be consistent with noise at a 1% false alarm rate. We present Bayesian 95% confidence upper limits on gravitational-wave strain amplitude using two different prior distributions: a standard one, with no a priori assumptions about the orientation of Scorpius X-1; and an angle-restricted one, using a prior derived from electromagnetic observations. Median strain upper limits of 1.3e-24 and 8e-25 are reported at 150 Hz for the standard and angle-restricted searches respectively. This proof of principle analysis was limited to a short observation time by unknown effects of accretion on the intrinsic spin...

  3. Search for long-lived gravitational-wave transients coincident with long gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Br; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderon Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; S. Deleglise; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. EndrH; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. Gonzalez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Go; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jimenez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman

    2013-12-09

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been linked to extreme core-collapse supernovae from massive stars. Gravitational waves (GW) offer a probe of the physics behind long GRBs. We investigate models of long-lived (~10-1000s) GW emission associated with the accretion disk of a collapsed star or with its protoneutron star remnant. Using data from LIGO's fifth science run, and GRB triggers from the swift experiment, we perform a search for unmodeled long-lived GW transients. Finding no evidence of GW emission, we place 90% confidence level upper limits on the GW fluence at Earth from long GRBs for three waveforms inspired by a model of GWs from accretion disk instabilities. These limits range from F<3.5 ergs cm^-2 to $F<1200 ergs cm^-2, depending on the GRB and on the model, allowing us to probe optimistic scenarios of GW production out to distances as far as ~33 Mpc. Advanced detectors are expected to achieve strain sensitivities 10x better than initial LIGO, potentially allowing us to probe the engines of the nearest long GRBs.

  4. Implementation and testing of the first prompt search for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhillon, V; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fridriksson, J K; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Homan, J; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Laas-Bourez, M; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N

    2011-01-01

    Aims. A transient astrophysical event observed in both gravitational wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) channels would yield rich scientific rewards. A first program initiating EM follow-ups to possible transient GW events has been developed and exercised by the LIGO and Virgo community in association with several partners. In this paper, we describe and evaluate the methods used to promptly identify and localize GW event candidates and to request images of targeted sky locations. Methods. During two observing periods (Dec 17 2009 to Jan 8 2010 and Sep 2 to Oct 20 2010), a low-latency analysis pipeline was used to identify GW event candidates and to reconstruct maps of possible sky locations. A catalog of nearby galaxies and Milky Way globular clusters was used to select the most promising sky positions to be imaged, and this directional information was delivered to EM observatories with time lags of about thirty minutes. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to evaluate the low-latency GW pipeline's ability...

  5. Swift follow-up observations of candidate gravitational-wave transient events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, P A; Gehrels, N; Homan, J; Osborne, J P; Siegel, M; Beardmore, A; Handbauer, P; Gelbord, J; Kennea, J A; Smith, M; Zhu, Q; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; ac, F Acernese; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; ac, A Allocca; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; ac, F Barone; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; ab, A Basti; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; ab, L Bonelli; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; ab, M Branchesi; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; ab, H J Bulten; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; ab, E Calloni; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; ab, E Coccia; Cohadon, P -F; ab, C N Colacino; ab, A Colla; Colombini, M; ab, A Conte; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; ab, R De Rosa; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; ab, A Di Lieto; Di Palma, I; ac, M Di Paolo Emilio; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; ab, M Drago; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eikenberry, S; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; ab, V Fafone; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; ab, I Ferrante; Ferrini, F; ab, F Fidecaro; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; ab, S Frasca; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; ab, L Gammaitoni; Garcia, J; ab, F Garufi; Gaspar, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; ab, G M Guidi; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; d, P Jaranowski; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L

    2012-01-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory. Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge". With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected...

  6. Newtonian-noise cancellation in full-tensor gravitational-wave detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Harms; Ho Jung Paik

    2015-04-18

    Terrestrial gravity noise, also known as Newtonian noise, produced by ambient seismic and infrasound fields will pose one of the main sensitivity limitations in low-frequency, ground-based, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. It was estimated that this noise foreground needs to be suppressed by about 3 -- 5 orders of magnitude in the frequency band 10\\,mHz to 1\\,Hz, which will be extremely challenging. In this article, we present a new approach that greatly facilitates cancellation of gravity noise in full-tensor GW detectors. The method uses optimal combinations of tensor channels and environmental sensors such as seismometers and microphones to reduce gravity noise. It makes explicit use of the direction of propagation of a GW, and can therefore either be implemented in directional searches for GWs or in observations of known sources. We show that suppression of the Newtonian-noise foreground is greatly facilitated using the extra strain channels in full-tensor GW detectors. Only a modest number of auxiliary, high-sensitivity environmental sensors are required to achieve noise suppression by a few orders of magnitude.

  7. Shift Symmetry and Higgs Inflation in Supergravity with Observable Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lazarides; C. Pallis

    2015-08-26

    We demonstrate how to realize within supergravity a novel chaotic-type inflationary scenario driven by the radial parts of a conjugate pair of Higgs superfields causing the spontaneous breaking of a grand unified gauge symmetry at a scale assuming the value of the supersymmetric grand unification scale. The superpotential is uniquely determined at the renormalizable level by the gauge symmetry and a continuous R symmetry. We select two types of Kahler potentials, which respect these symmetries as well as an approximate shift symmetry. In particular, they include in a logarithm a dominant shift-symmetric term proportional to a parameter c- together with a small term violating this symmetry and characterized by a parameter c+. In both cases, imposing a lower bound on c-, inflation can be attained with subplanckian values of the original inflaton, while the corresponding effective theory respects perturbative unitarity for r+-=c+/c-<1. These inflationary models do not lead to overproduction of cosmic defects, are largely independent of the one-loop radiative corrections and accommodate, for natural values of r+-, observable gravitational waves consistently with all the current observational data. The inflaton mass is mostly confined in the range (3.7-8.1)x10^10 GeV.

  8. Radio Crickets: Chirping Jets from Black Hole Binaries Entering their Gravitational Wave Inspiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Girish

    2015-01-01

    We study a novel electromagnetic signature of supermassive black hole binaries whose inspiral starts being dominated by gravitational wave (GW) emission. Recent simulations suggest that the binary's member BHs can continue to accrete gas from the circumbinary accretion disk in this phase of the binary's evolution, all the way until coalescence. If one of the binary members produces a radio jet as a result of accretion, the jet precesses along a biconical surface due to the binary's orbital motion. When the binary enters the GW phase of its evolution, the opening angle widens, the jet exhibits milliarcsecond scale wiggles, and the conical surface of jet precession is twisted due to apparant superluminal motion. The rapidly increasing orbital velocity of the binary gives the jet an appearance of a "chirp." This helical chirping morphology of the jet can be used to infer the binary parameters. For binaries with mass 10^7--10^10 Msun at redshifts z<0.5, monitoring these features in current and archival data wi...

  9. Coincidence searches of gravitational waves and short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Maselli; Valeria Ferrari

    2014-05-28

    Black-hole neutron-star coalescing binaries have been invoked as one of the most suitable scenario to explain the emission of short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed, if the black-hole which forms after the merger, is surrounded by a massive disk, neutrino annihilation processes may produce high-energy and collimated electromagnetic radiation. In this paper, we devise a new procedure, to be used in the search for gravitational waves from black-hole-neutron-star binaries, to assign a probability that a detected gravitational signal is associated to the formation of an accreting disk, massive enough to power gamma-ray bursts. This method is based on two recently proposed semi-analytic fits, one reproducing the mass of the remnant disk surrounding the black hole as a function of some binary parameters, the second relating the neutron star compactness, with its tidal deformability. Our approach can be used in low-latency data analysis to restrict the parameter space searching for gravitational signals associated with short gamma-ray bursts, and to gain information on the dynamics of the coalescing system and on the neutron star equation of state.

  10. Radio Remnants of Compact Binary Mergers - the Electromagnetic Signal that will follow the Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehud Nakar; Tsvi Piran

    2011-02-04

    The question "what is the observable electromagnetic (EM) signature of a compact binary merger?" is an intriguing one with crucial consequences to the quest for gravitational waves (GW). Compact binary mergers are prime sources of GW, targeted by current and next generation detectors. Numerical simulations have demonstrated that these mergers eject energetic sub-relativistic (or even relativistic) outflows. This is certainly the case if the mergers produce short GRBs, but even if not, significant outflows are expected. The interaction of such outflows with the surround matter inevitably leads to a long lasting radio signal. We calculate the expected signal from these outflows (our calculations are also applicable to short GRB orphan afterglows) and we discuss their detectability. We show that the optimal search for such signal should, conveniently, take place around 1.4 GHz. Realistic estimates of the outflow parameters yield signals of a few hundred $\\mu$Jy, lasting a few weeks, from sources at the detection horizon of advanced GW detectors. Followup radio observations, triggered by GW detection, could reveal the radio remnant even under unfavorable conditions. Upcoming all sky surveys can detect a few dozen, and possibly even thousands, merger remnants at any give time, thereby providing robust merger rate estimates even before the advanced GW detectors become operational. In fact, the radio transient RT 19870422 fits well the overall properties predicted by our model and we suggest that its most probable origin is a compact binary merger radio remnant.

  11. Isotropic Detectable X-ray Counterparts to Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shota Kisaka; Kunihito Ioka; Takashi Nakamura

    2015-07-18

    Neutron star binary mergers are strong sources of gravitational waves (GWs). Promising electromagnetic counterparts are short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) but the emission is highly collimated. We propose that the scattering of the long-lasting plateau emission in short GRBs by the merger ejecta produces nearly isotropic emission for $\\sim 10^4$ s with flux $10^{-13}-10^{-10}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ at 100 Mpc in X-ray. This is detectable by Swift XRT and wide field X-ray detectors such as ISS-Lobster, Einstein Probe, eROSITA and WF-MAXI, which are desired by the infrared and optical follow-ups to localize and measure the distance to the host galaxy. The scattered X-rays obtain linear polarization, which correlates with the jet direction, X-ray luminosity and GW polarizations. The activity of plateau emission is also a natural energy source of a macronova (or kilonova) detected in short GRB 130603B without the $r$-process radioactivity.

  12. The effect of mass-segregation on gravitational wave sources near massive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Hopman; Tal Alexander

    2006-03-13

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from the inspiral of compact remnants (CRs) into massive black holes (MBHs) will be observable to cosmological distances. While a CR spirals in, 2-body scattering by field stars may cause it to fall into the MBH before reaching a short period orbit that would give an observable signal. As a result, only CRs very near (~0.01 pc) the MBH can spiral in successfully. In a multi-mass stellar population, the heaviest objects sink to the center, where they are more likely to slowly spiral into the MBH without being swallowed prematurely. We study how mass-segregation modifies the stellar distribution and the rate of GW events. We find that the inspiral rate per galaxy for white dwarfs is 30 per Gyr, for neutron stars 6 per Gyr, and for stellar black holes (SBHs) 250 per Gyr. The high rate for SBHs is due to their extremely steep density profile, n_{BH}(r)\\propto r^{-2}. The GW detection rate will be dominated by SBHs.

  13. Line-robust statistics for continuous gravitational waves: safety in the case of unequal detector sensitivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Keitel; Reinhard Prix

    2015-01-16

    The multi-detector F-statistic is close to optimal for detecting continuous gravitational waves (CWs) in Gaussian noise. However, it is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artefacts, for example quasi-monochromatic disturbances ('lines'), which resemble a CW signal more than Gaussian noise. In a recent paper [Keitel et al 2014, PRD 89 064023], a Bayesian model selection approach was used to derive line-robust detection statistics for CW signals, generalising both the F-statistic and the F-statistic consistency veto technique and yielding improved performance in line-affected data. Here we investigate a generalisation of the assumptions made in that paper: if a CW analysis uses data from two or more detectors with very different sensitivities, the line-robust statistics could be less effective. We investigate the boundaries within which they are still safe to use, in comparison with the F-statistic. Tests using synthetic draws show that the optimally-tuned version of the original line-robust statistic remains safe in most cases of practical interest. We also explore a simple idea on further improving the detection power and safety of these statistics, which we however find to be of limited practical use.

  14. Spectral properties of the post-merger gravitational-wave signal from binary neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentaro Takami; Luciano Rezzolla; Luca Baiotti

    2015-03-06

    Extending previous work by a number of authors, we have recently presented a new approach in which the detection of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries can be used to determine the equation of state of matter at nuclear density and hence the structure of neutron stars. In particular, after performing a large number of numerical-relativity simulations of binaries with nuclear equations of state, we have found that the post-merger emission is characterized by two distinct and robust spectral features. While the high-frequency peak was already shown to be associated with the oscillations of the hypermassive neutron star produced by the merger and to depend on the equation of state, we have highlighted that the low-frequency peak is related to the merger process and to the total compactness of the stars in the binary. This relation is essentially universal and provides a powerful tool to set tight constraints on the equation of state. We here provide additional information on the extensive analysis performed, illustrating the methods used, the tests considered, as well as the robustness of the results. We also discuss additional relations that can be deduced when exploring the data and how these correlate with various properties of the binary. Finally, we present a simple mechanical toy model that explains the main spectral features of the post-merger signal and can even reproduce analytically the complex waveforms emitted right after the merger.

  15. Isotropic Detectable X-ray Counterparts to Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kisaka, Shota; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Neutron star binary mergers are strong sources of gravitational waves (GWs). Promising electromagnetic counterparts are short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) but the emission is highly collimated. We propose that the scattering of the long-lasting plateau emission in short GRBs by the merger ejecta produces nearly isotropic emission for $\\sim 10^4$ s with flux $10^{-10}-10^{-13}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in X-ray. This is detectable by wide field X-ray detectors such as ISS-Lobster, eROSITA and WF-MAXI, which are desired by the infrared and optical follow-ups to localize and measure the distance to the host galaxy. The scattered X-rays obtain linear polarization, which correlates with the jet direction, X-ray luminosity and GW polarizations. The activity of plateau emission is also a natural energy source of a macronova (or kilonova) detected in short GRB 130603B without the $r$-process radioactivity.

  16. Observing Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae in the Advanced Detector Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gossan, S E; Stuver, A; Zanolin, M; Gill, K; Ott, C D

    2015-01-01

    The next galactic core-collapse supernova (CCSN) has already exploded, and its electromagnetic (EM) waves, neutrinos, and gravitational waves (GWs) may arrive at any moment. We present an extensive study on the potential sensitivity of prospective detection scenarios for GWs from CCSNe within 5Mpc, using realistic noise at the predicted sensitivity of the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors for 2015, 2017, and 2019. We quantify the detectability of GWs from CCSNe within the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud, for which there will be an observed neutrino burst. We also consider extreme GW emission scenarios for more distant CCSNe with an associated EM signature. We find that a three detector network at design sensitivity will be able to detect neutrino-driven CCSN explosions out to ~5.5 kpc, while rapidly rotating core collapse will be detectable out to the Large Magellanic Cloud at 50kpc. Of the phenomenological models for extreme GW emission scenarios considered in this study, such as long-lived bar...

  17. Quantifying and mitigating bias in inference on gravitational wave source populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan R. Gair; Christopher J. Moore

    2015-05-29

    When using incorrect or inaccurate signal models to perform parameter estimation on a gravitational wave signal, biased parameter estimates will in general be obtained. For a single event this bias may be consistent with the posterior, but when considering a population of events this bias becomes evident as a sag below the expected diagonal line of the P-P plot showing the fraction of signals found within a certain significance level versus that significance level. It would be hoped that recently proposed techniques for accounting for model uncertainties in parameter estimation would, to some extent, alleviate this problem. Here we demonstrate that this is indeed the case. We derive an analytic approximation to the P-P plot obtained when using an incorrect signal model to perform parameter estimation. This approximation is valid in the limit of high signal-to-noise ratio and nearly correct waveform models. We show how the P-P plot changes if a Gaussian process likelihood that allows for model errors is used to analyse the data. We demonstrate analytically and using numerical simulations that the bias is always reduced in this way. These results provide a way to quantify bias in inference on populations and demonstrate the importance of utilising methods to mitigate this bias.

  18. Lattice template placement for coherent all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Wette

    2014-12-22

    All-sky, broadband, coherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars are restricted by limited computational resources. Minimizing the number of templates required to cover the search parameter space, of sky position and frequency evolution, is one important way to reduce the computational cost of a search. We demonstrate a practical algorithm which, for the first time, achieves template placement with a minimal number of templates for an all-sky search, using the reduced supersky parameter-space metric of Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)]. The metric prescribes a constant template density in the signal parameters, which permits that templates be placed at the vertices of a lattice. We demonstrate how to ensure complete coverage of the parameter space, including in particular at its boundaries. The number of templates generated by the algorithm is compared to theoretical estimates, and to previous predictions by Brady et al. [Phys. Rev. D 57, 2101 (1998)]. The algorithm may be applied to any search parameter space with a constant template density, which includes semicoherent searches and searches targeting known low-mass X-ray binaries.

  19. Perturbative Photon Fluxes Generated by High-Frequency Gravitational Waves and Their Physical Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fangyu Li; Robert M L Baker Jr.; Zhenyun Fang; Gary V. Stephenson; Zhenya Chen

    2008-06-12

    We consider the electromagnetic (EM) perturbative effects produced by the high-frequency gravitational waves (HFGWs) in the GHz band in a special EM resonance system, which consists of fractal membranes, a Gaussian beam (GB) passing through a static magnetic field. It is predicted, under the synchroresonance condition, coherence modulation of the HFGWs to the preexisting transverse components of the GB produces the transverse perturbative photon flux (PPF),which has three novel and important properties: (1)The PPF has maximum at a longitudinal symmetrical surface of the GB where the transverse background photon flux (BPF) vanishes; (2) the resonant effect will be high sensitive to the propagating directions of the HFGWs; (3) the PPF reflected or transmitted by the fractal membrane exhibits a very small decay compared with very large decay of the much stronger BPF. Such properties might provide a new way to distinguish and display the perturbative effects produced by the HFGWs. We also discuss the high-frequency asymptotic behavior of the relic GWs in the microwave band and the positive definite issues of their energy-momentum pseudo-tensor.

  20. BRIGHT BROADBAND AFTERGLOWS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM MERGERS OF BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao He; Ding Xuan; Wu Xuefeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Dai Zigao, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-07-10

    If double neutron star mergers leave behind a massive magnetar rather than a black hole, then a bright early afterglow can follow the gravitational wave burst (GWB) even if there is no short gamma-ray burst (SGRB)-GWB association or if there is an association but the SGRB does not beam toward Earth. Besides directly dissipating the proto-magnetar wind, as suggested by Zhang, here we suggest that the magnetar wind could push the ejecta launched during the merger process and, under certain conditions, would reach a relativistic speed. Such a magnetar-powered ejecta, when interacting with the ambient medium, would develop a bright broadband afterglow due to synchrotron radiation. We study this physical scenario in detail and present the predicted X-ray, optical, and radio light curves for a range of magnetar and ejecta parameters. We show that the X-ray and optical light curves usually peak around the magnetar spin-down timescale ({approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} s), reaching brightnesses readily detectable by wide-field X-ray and optical telescopes, and remain detectable for an extended period. The radio afterglow peaks later, but is much brighter than the case without a magnetar energy injection. Therefore, such bright broadband afterglows, if detected and combined with GWBs in the future, would be a probe of massive millisecond magnetars and stiff equations of state for nuclear matter.

  1. A directed search for gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 with initial LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; G. Ashton; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; S. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; Th. S. Bauer; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; M. Benacquista; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; S. Buchman; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio, Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; C. Cutler; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; L. Dartez; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; X. Fan; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; S. Fuentes-Tapia; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. Hacker; E. D. Hall; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; S. Hee; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; G. Heinzel; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; A. Idrisy; N. Indik; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; G. Islas; J. C. Isler; T. Isogai; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; S. Jawahar; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; V. Kalogera

    2014-12-01

    We present results of a search for continuously-emitted gravitational radiation, directed at the brightest low-mass X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1. Our semi-coherent analysis covers 10 days of LIGO S5 data ranging from 50-550 Hz, and performs an incoherent sum of coherent $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic power distributed amongst frequency-modulated orbital sidebands. All candidates not removed at the veto stage were found to be consistent with noise at a 1% false alarm rate. We present Bayesian 95% confidence upper limits on gravitational-wave strain amplitude using two different prior distributions: a standard one, with no a priori assumptions about the orientation of Scorpius X-1; and an angle-restricted one, using a prior derived from electromagnetic observations. Median strain upper limits of 1.3e-24 and 8e-25 are reported at 150 Hz for the standard and angle-restricted searches respectively. This proof of principle analysis was limited to a short observation time by unknown effects of accretion on the intrinsic spin frequency of the neutron star, but improves upon previous upper limits by factors of ~1.4 for the standard, and 2.3 for the angle-restricted search at the sensitive region of the detector.

  2. The Emission of Electromagnetic Radiation from Charges Accelerated by Gravitational Waves and its Astrophysical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell Revalski; Will Rhodes; Thulsi Wickramasinghe

    2015-02-03

    We provide calculations and theoretical arguments supporting the emission of electromagnetic radiation from charged particles accelerated by gravitational waves (GWs). These waves have significant indirect evidence to support their existence, yet they interact weakly with ordinary matter. We show that the induced oscillations of charged particles interacting with a GW, which lead to the emission of electromagnetic radiation, will also result in wave attenuation. These ideas are supported by a small body of literature, as well as additional arguments for particle acceleration based on GW memory effects. We derive order of magnitude power calculations for various initial charge distributions accelerated by GWs. The resulting power emission is extremely small for all but very strong GWs interacting with large quantities of charge. If the results here are confirmed and supplemented, significant consequences such as attenuation of early universe GWs could result. Additionally, this effect could extend GW detection techniques into the electromagnetic regime. These explorations are worthy of study to determine the presence of such radiation, as it is extremely important to refine our theoretical framework in an era of active GW astrophysics.

  3. Extended hierarchical search (EHS) algorithm for detection of gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand S. Sengupta; Sanjeev V. Dhurandhar; Albert Lazzarini; Tom Prince

    2001-09-27

    Pattern matching techniques like matched filtering will be used for online extraction of gravitational wave signals buried inside detector noise. This involves cross correlating the detector output with hundreds of thousands of templates spanning a multi-dimensional parameter space, which is very expensive computationally. A faster implementation algorithm was devised by Mohanty and Dhurandhar [1996] using a hierarchy of templates over the mass parameters, which speeded up the procedure by about 25 to 30 times. We show that a further reduction in computational cost is possible if we extend the hierarchy paradigm to an extra parameter, namely, the time of arrival of the signal. In the first stage, the chirp waveform is cut-off at a relatively low frequency allowing the data to be coarsely sampled leading to cost saving in performing the FFTs. This is possible because most of the signal power is at low frequencies, and therefore the advantage due to hierarchy over masses is not compromised. Results are obtained for spin-less templates up to the second post-Newtonian (2PN) order for a single detector with LIGO I noise power spectral density. We estimate that the gain in computational cost over a flat search is about 100.

  4. Parameter estimation on gravitational waves from neutron-star binaries with spinning components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farr, Ben; Farr, Will M; Haster, Carl-Johan; Middleton, Hannah; Cannon, Kipp; Graff, Philip B; Hanna, Chad; Mandel, Ilya; Pankow, Chris; Price, Larry R; Sidery, Trevor; Singer, Leo P; Urban, Alex L; Vecchio, Alberto; Veitch, John; Vitale, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Inspiraling binary neutron stars are expected to be one of the most significant sources of gravitational-wave signals for the new generation of advanced ground-based detectors. Advanced LIGO will begin operation in 2015 and we investigate how well we could hope to measure properties of these binaries should a detection be made in the first observing period. We study an astrophysically motivated population of sources (binary components with masses $1.2~\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$-$1.6~\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ and spins of less than $0.05$) using the full LIGO analysis pipeline. While this simulated population covers the observed range of potential binary neutron-star sources, we do not exclude the possibility of sources with parameters outside these ranges; given the existing uncertainty in distributions of mass and spin, it is critical that analyses account for the full range of possible mass and spin configurations. We find that conservative prior assumptions on neutron-star mass and spin lead to average fractional uncertain...

  5. Effects of gravitational-wave recoil on the dynamics and growth of supermassive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Blecha; Abraham Loeb

    2008-08-01

    Simulations of binary black hole mergers indicate that asymmetrical gravitational wave (GW) emission can cause black holes to recoil at speeds up to thousands of km/s. These GW recoil events can dramatically affect the coevolution of recoiling supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. However, theoretical studies of SMBH-galaxy evolution almost always assume a stationary central black hole. In light of the numerical results on GW recoil velocities, we relax that assumption here and consider the consequences of recoil for SMBH evolution. We follow the trajectories of SMBHs ejected in a smooth background potential that includes both a stellar bulge and a multi-component gaseous disk. In addition, we calculate the accretion rate onto the SMBH as a function of time using a hybrid prescription of viscous (alpha-disk) and Bondi accretion. We find that recoil kicks between 100 km/s and the escape speed cause SMBHs to wander through the galaxy and halo for about 1 Myr - 1 Gyr before settling back to the galactic center. However, the mass accreted during this time is roughly constant at about 10% of the initial mass, independent of the recoil velocity. This indicates that while large recoils may disrupt active galactic nuclei feedback processes, recoil itself is an effective means of regulating SMBH growth. Recoiling SMBHs may be observable as spatially or kinematically offset quasars, but finding such systems could be challenging, because the largest offsets correspond to the shortest quasar lifetimes.

  6. Detection of gravitational-wave bursts with chirplet-like template families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Chassande-Mottin; Miriam Miele; Satya Mohapatra; Laura Cadonati

    2010-05-28

    Gravitational Wave (GW) burst detection algorithms typically rely on the hypothesis that the burst signal is "locally stationary", that is it changes slowly with frequency. Under this assumption, the signal can be decomposed into a small number of wavelets with constant frequency. This justifies the use of a family of sine-Gaussian templates in the Omega pipeline, one of the algorithms used in LIGO-Virgo burst searches. However there are plausible scenarios where the burst frequency evolves rapidly, such as in the merger phase of a binary black hole and/or neutron star coalescence. In those cases, the local stationarity of sine-Gaussians induces performance losses, due to the mismatch between the template and the actual signal. We propose an extension of the Omega pipeline based on chirplet-like templates. Chirplets incorporate an additional parameter, the chirp rate, to control the frequency variation. In this paper, we show that the Omega pipeline can easily be extended to include a chirplet template bank. We illustrate the method on a simulated data set, with a family of phenomenological binary black-hole coalescence waveforms embedded into Gaussian LIGO/Virgo-like noise. Chirplet-like templates result in an enhancement of the measured signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. On the anisotropy of the gravitational wave background from massless preheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethke, Laura; Rajantie, Arttu [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Figueroa, Daniel G., E-mail: laura.bethke06@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: daniel.figueroa@unige.ch, E-mail: a.rajantie@imperial.ac.uk [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics, Université de Genčve, 24 quai Ernest Ansermet, CH–1211 Genčve 4 (Switzerland)

    2014-06-01

    When a light scalar field is present during inflation, its value varies on superhorizon scales, modulating the preheating process at the end of inflation. Consequently, the amplitude of the gravitational wave (GW) background produced during preheating is also modulated. The observed energy density of this background appears therefore anisotropic at different angles in the sky. We provide a master formula for the angular power spectrum C{sub l} of the anisotropies in the GW background from preheating, valid for any scenario where the anisotropies are due to the superhorizon modulation of a light degree of freedom. Using lattice field theory simulations of massless preheating with g{sup 2}/? = 2, we find a flat angular spectrum l(l+1)C{sub l} ? 3 × 10{sup ?4}, which represents a strong anisotropy of ? 1% variations on large angular scales. For our choice of couplings, long wavelengths are amplified most strongly during parametric resonance, which is crucial for the development of the anisotropies. If future direct detection GW observatories are capable of detecting backgrounds of cosmological origin, they (may also) be able to detect this effect. This could eventually become a powerful tool to discriminate among inflationary and preheating scenarios.

  8. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Goggin, L M; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs,...

  9. All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the second joint LIGO-Virgo run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardt, A; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N

    2012-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010: data are analyzed when at least two of the three LIGO-Virgo detectors are in coincident operation, with a total observation time of 207 days. The analysis searches for transients of duration < 1 s over the frequency band 64--5000 Hz, without other assumptions on the signal waveform, polarization, direction or occurrence time. All identified events are consistent with the expected accidental background. We set frequentist upper limits on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts by combining this search with the previous LIGO-Virgo search on the data collected between November 2005 and October 2007. The upper limit on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts at the Earth is 1.3 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present upper limits on source rate density per year and Mpc^3 for sample populations of standard-candle sources. As in the previous...

  10. Narrow-band search of continuous gravitational-wave signals from Crab and Vela pulsars in Virgo VSR4 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ashton, G; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barclay, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio,, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dartez, L; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fuentes-Tapia, S; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Hee, S; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Key, J S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a coherent narrow-band search for continuous gravitational-wave signals from the Crab and Vela pulsars conducted on Virgo VSR4 data. In order to take into account a possible small mismatch between the gravitational wave frequency and two times the star rotation frequency, inferred from measurement of the electromagnetic pulse rate, a range of 0.02 Hz around two times the star rotational frequency has been searched for both the pulsars. No evidence for a signal has been found and 95$\\%$ confidence level upper limits have been computed both assuming polarization parameters are completely unknown and that they are known with some uncertainty, as derived from X-ray observations of the pulsar wind torii. For Vela the upper limits are comparable to the spin-down limit, computed assuming that all the observed spin-down is due to the emission of gravitational waves. For Crab the upper limits are about a factor of two below the spin-down limit, and represent a significant improv...

  11. Testing General Relativity using Bayesian model selection: Applications to observations of gravitational waves from compact binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; John Veitch; Alberto Vecchio

    2011-01-07

    Second generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, are expected to begin operation by 2015. Such instruments plan to reach sensitivities that will offer the unique possibility to test General Relativity in the dynamical, strong field regime and investigate departures from its predictions, in particular using the signal from coalescing binary systems. We introduce a statistical framework based on Bayesian model selection in which the Bayes factor between two competing hypotheses measures which theory is favored by the data. Probability density functions of the model parameters are then used to quantify the inference on individual parameters. We also develop a method to combine the information coming from multiple independent observations of gravitational waves, and show how much stronger inference could be. As an introduction and illustration of this framework - and a practical numerical implementation through the Monte Carlo integration technique of nested sampling - we apply it to gravitational waves from the inspiral phase of coalescing binary systems as predicted by General Relativity and a very simple alternative theory in which the graviton has a non-zero mass. This method can trivially (and should) be extended to more realistic and physically motivated theories.

  12. EARLY X-RAY AND OPTICAL AFTERGLOW OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM MERGERS OF BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Bing [Kavli Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Double neutron star mergers are strong sources of gravitational waves. The upcoming advanced gravitational wave detectors are expected to make the first detection of gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) associated with these sources. Proposed electromagnetic counterparts of a GWB include a short gamma-ray burst, an optical macronova, and a long-lasting radio afterglow. Here we suggest that at least some GWBs could be followed by an early afterglow lasting for thousands of seconds, if the post-merger product is a highly magnetized, rapidly rotating, massive neutron star rather than a black hole. This afterglow is powered by dissipation of a proto-magnetar wind. The X-ray flux is estimated to be as bright as (10{sup -8}-10{sup -7}) erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The optical flux is subject to large uncertainties but could be as bright as 17th magnitude in R band. We provide observational hints of such a scenario, and discuss the challenge and strategy to detect these signals.

  13. Possible High-Energy Neutrino and Photon Signals from Gravitational Wave Bursts due to Double Neutron Star Mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, He; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2013-01-01

    As the technology of gravitational-wave and neutrino detectors becomes increasingly mature, a multi-messenger era of astronomy is ushered in. Advanced gravitational wave detectors are close to making a ground-breaking discovery of gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) associated with mergers of double neutron stars (NS-NS). It is essential to study the possible electromagnetic (EM) and neutrino emission counterparts of these GWBs. Recent observations and numerical simulations suggest that at least a fraction of NS-NS mergers may leave behind a massive millisecond magnetar as the merger product. Here we show that protons accelerated in the forward shock powered by a magnetar wind pushing the ejecta launched during the merger process would interact with photons generated in the dissipating magnetar wind and emit high energy neutrinos and photons. We estimate the typical energy and fluence of the neutrinos from such a scenario. We find that $\\sim$PeV neutrinos could be emitted from the shock front as long as the ejec...

  14. Narrow-band search of continuous gravitational-wave signals from Crab and Vela pulsars in Virgo VSR4 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; G. Ashton; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; S. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; Th. S. Bauer; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; M. Benacquista; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; S. Buchman; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio, Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; C. Cutler; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; L. Dartez; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; X. Fan; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; S. Fuentes-Tapia; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. Hacker; E. D. Hall; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; S. Hee; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; G. Heinzel; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; A. Idrisy; N. Indik; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; G. Islas; J. C. Isler; T. Isogai; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; S. Jawahar; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K

    2014-10-30

    In this paper we present the results of a coherent narrow-band search for continuous gravitational-wave signals from the Crab and Vela pulsars conducted on Virgo VSR4 data. In order to take into account a possible small mismatch between the gravitational wave frequency and two times the star rotation frequency, inferred from measurement of the electromagnetic pulse rate, a range of 0.02 Hz around two times the star rotational frequency has been searched for both the pulsars. No evidence for a signal has been found and 95$\\%$ confidence level upper limits have been computed both assuming polarization parameters are completely unknown and that they are known with some uncertainty, as derived from X-ray observations of the pulsar wind torii. For Vela the upper limits are comparable to the spin-down limit, computed assuming that all the observed spin-down is due to the emission of gravitational waves. For Crab the upper limits are about a factor of two below the spin-down limit, and represent a significant improvement with respect to past analysis. This is the first time the spin-down limit is significantly overcome in a narrow-band search.

  15. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  16. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  17. Ramsey-Bordé interferometer for electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl-Peter Marzlin

    2013-07-15

    A scheme to realize an electron interferometer using low-intensity, bi-chromatic laser pulses as beam splitter is proposed. The splitting process is based on a modification of the Kapitza-Dirac effect, which produces a momentum kick for electrons with a specific initial momentum. A full interferometric setup in Ramsey-Bord\\'e configuration is theoretically analyzed.

  18. Constraining alternative theories of gravity by gravitational waves from precessing eccentric compact binaries with LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi; Takahiro Tanaka

    2010-05-13

    We calculate how strongly one can put constraints on alternative theories of gravity such as Brans-Dicke and massive graviton theories with LISA. We consider inspiral gravitational waves from a compact binary composed of a neutron star (NS) and an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) in Brans-Dicke (BD) theory and that composed of 2 super massive black holes (SMBHs) in massive graviton theories. We use the restricted 2PN waveforms including the effects of spins. We also take both precession and eccentricity of the orbit into account. For simplicity, we set the fiducial value for the spin of one of the binary constituents to zero so that we can apply the approximation called \\textit{simple precession}. We perform the Monte Carlo simulations of $10^4$ binaries, estimating the determination accuracy of binary parameters including the BD parameter $\\omega_{\\mathrm{BD}}$ and the Compton wavelength of graviton $\\lambda_g$ for each binary using the Fisher matrix method. We find that including both the spin-spin coupling $\\sigma$ and the eccentricity $e$ into the binary parameters reduces the determination accuracy by an order of magnitude for the Brans-Dicke case, whilst it has less influence on massive graviton theories. On the other hand, including precession enhances the constraint on $\\omega_{\\mathrm{BD}}$ only 20$%$ but it increases the constraint on $\\lambda_g$ by an order of magnitude. Using a $(1.4+1000)M_{\\odot}$ NS/BH binary of SNR=$\\sqrt{200}$, one can put a constraint $\\omega_{\\mathrm{BD}}>6944$, whilst using a $(10^7+10^6)M_{\\odot}$ BH/BH binary at 3Gpc, one can put $\\lambda_g>3.06\\times10^{21}$cm, on average. The latter is 4 orders of magnitude stronger than the one obtained from the solar system experiment. These results indicate that the effects of precession and eccentricity must be taken carefully in the parameter estimation analysis.

  19. Gravitational wave observations of galactic intermediate-mass black hole binaries with DECIGO Path Finder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi

    2012-03-03

    DECIGO Path Finder (DPF) is a space-borne gravitational wave (GW) detector with sensitivity in the frequency band 0.1--100Hz. As a first step mission to DECIGO, it is aiming for launching in 2016--2017. Although its main objective is to demonstrate technology for GW observation in space, DPF still has a chance of detecting GW signals and performing astrophysical observations. With an observable range up to 50 kpc, its main targets are GW signals from galactic intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) binaries. By using inspiral-merger-ringdown phenomenological waveforms, we perform both pattern-averaged analysis and Monte Carlo simulations including the effect of detector motion to find that the masses and (effective) spins of the IMBHs could be determined with errors of a few percent, should the signals be detected. Since GW signals from IMBH binaries with masses above $10^4 M_\\odot$ cannot be detected by ground-based detectors, these objects can be unique sources for DPF. If the inspiral signal of a $10^3M_\\odot$ IMBH binary is detected with DPF, it can give alert to the ringdown signal for the ground-based detectors $10^2$--$10^3$s before coalescence. We also estimate the possible bound on the graviton Compton wavelength from a possible IMBH binary in $\\omega$ Centauri. We obtain a slightly weaker constraint than the solar system experiment and an about 2 orders of magnitude stronger constraint than the one from binary pulsar tests. Unfortunately, the detection rate of IMBH binaries is rather small.

  20. Capturing the electromagnetic counterparts of binary neutron star mergers through low latency gravitational wave triggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. Chu; E. J. Howell; A. Rowlinson; H. Gao; B. Zhang; S. J. Tingay; M. Boer; L. Wen

    2015-09-26

    We investigate the prospects for joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of low-latency search pipelines we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs using realistic distributions of source parameters to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. To determine what EM observations can be achieved, we consider a selection of facilities with GW follow-up agreements in place, from low-frequency radio to high energy $\\gamma$-ray; we assess the performance of each using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo. We show that while challenging, breakthrough multimessenger science is possible to achieve with a range of follow-up facilities using low latency pipelines. To catch the prompt stage ($<$ 5s) of SGRBs under this scenario, it is challenging even for instruments with a large field-of-view; we suggest this provides motivation to speed up the follow-up pipelines of both the GW observatories and EM facilities. We further show that adding an Australian instrument to an expanded detector network including LIGO-India and Japanese KAGRA, will improve the angular resolution by a factor of 2. Using this network with an almost instantaneous GW triggering latency, we show that if wide field-of-view X-ray instruments such as the proposed ISS-Lobster can employ fast triggering mechanisms, one could obtain almost complete temporal and multiwavelength coverage of the prompt and early activity of SGRBs.

  1. Improved spacecraft radio science using an on-board atomic clock: application to gravitational wave searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Tinto; George J. Dick; John D. Prestage; J. W. Armstrong

    2008-12-13

    Recent advances in space-qualified atomic clocks (low-mass, low power-consumption, frequency stability comparable to that of ground-based clocks) can enable interplanetary spacecraft radio science experiments at unprecedented Doppler sensitivities. The addition of an on-board digital receiver would allow the up- and down-link Doppler frequencies to be measured separately. Such separate, high-quality measurements allow optimal data combinations that suppress the currently-leading noise sources: phase scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere and Doppler noise caused by mechanical vibrations of the ground antenna. Here we provide a general expression for the optimal combination of ground and on-board Doppler data and compute the sensitivity such a system would have to low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Assuming a plasma scintillation noise calibration comparable to that already demonstrated with the multi-link CASSINI radio system, the space-clock/digital-receiver instrumentation enhancements would give GW strain sensitivity of $2.0 \\times 10^{-17}$ for randomly polarized, monochromatic GW signals over a two-decade ($\\sim0.0001-0.01$ Hz) region of the low-frequency band. This is about an order of magnitude better than currently achieved with traditional two-way coherent Doppler experiments. The utility of optimally combining simultaneous up- and down-link observations is not limited to GW searches. The Doppler tracking technique discussed here could be performed at minimal incremental cost to also improve other radio science experiments (i.e. tests of relativistic gravity, planetary and satellite gravity field measurements, atmospheric and ring occultations) on future interplanetary missions.

  2. Expected properties of the first gravitational wave signal detected with pulsar timing arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo A. Rosado; Alberto Sesana; Jonathan Gair

    2015-06-22

    In this paper we attempt to investigate the nature of the first gravitational wave (GW) signal to be detected by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs): will it be an individual, resolved supermassive black hole binary (SBHB), or a stochastic background made by the superposition of GWs produced by an ensemble of SBHBs? To address this issue, we analyse a broad set of simulations of the cosmological population of SBHBs, that cover the entire parameter space allowed by current electromagnetic observations in an unbiased way. For each simulation, we construct the expected GW signal and identify the loudest individual sources. We then employ appropriate detection statistics to evaluate the relative probability of detecting each type of source as a function of time for a variety of PTAs; we consider the current International PTA, and speculate into the era of the Square Kilometre Array. The main properties of the first detectable individual SBHBs are also investigated. Contrary to previous work, we cast our results in terms of the detection probability (DP), since the commonly adopted criterion based on a signal-to-noise ratio threshold is statistic-dependent and may result in misleading conclusions for the statistics adopted here. Our results confirm quantitatively that a stochastic signal is more likely to be detected first (with between 75 to 93 per cent probability, depending on the array), but the DP of single-sources is not negligible. Our framework is very flexible and can be easily extended to more realistic arrays and to signal models including environmental coupling and SBHB eccentricity.

  3. Analytic spectrum of relic gravitational waves modified by neutrino free streaming and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. X. Miao; Y. Zhang

    2007-03-23

    We include the effect of neutrino free streaming into the spectrum of relic gravitational waves (RGWs) in the currently accelerating universe. For the realistic case of a varying fractional neutrino energy density and a non-vanishing derivative of mode function at the neutrino decoupling, the integro-differential equation of RGWs is solved by a perturbation method for the period from the neutrino decoupling to the matter-dominant stage. Incorporating it to the analytic solution of the whole history of expansion of the universe, the analytic solution of GRWs is obtained, evolving from the inflation up to the current acceleration. The resulting spectrum of GRWs covers the whole range of frequency $(10^{-19}\\sim 10^{10})$Hz, and improves the previous results. It is found that the neutrino free-streaming causes a reduction of the spectral amplitude by $\\sim 20%$ in the range $(10^{-16}\\sim 10^{-10})$ Hz, and leaves the other portion of the spectrum almost unchanged. This agrees with the earlier numerical calculations. Examination is made on the difference between the accelerating and non-accelerating models, and our analysis shows that the ratio of the spectral amplitude in accelerating $\\Lambda$CDM model over that in CDM model is $\\sim 0.7$, and within the various accelerating models of $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}> \\Omega_m $ the spectral amplitude is proportional to $ \\Omega_m/\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ for the whole range of frequency. Comparison with LIGO S5 Runs Sensitivity shows that RGWs are not yet detectable by the present LIGO, and in the future LISA may be able to detect RGWs in some inflationary models.

  4. Quantum Noise Limits in White-Light-Cavity-Enhanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minchuan Zhou; Zifan Zhou; Selim M. Shahriar

    2015-09-03

    Previously, we had proposed a gravitational wave detector that incorporates the white light cavity (WLC) effect using a compound cavity for signal recycling (CC-SR). Here, we first use an idealized model for the negative dispersion medium (NDM), and use the Caves model for phase-insensitive linear amplifier to account for the quantum noise (QN) from the NDM, to determine the upper bound of the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product. We calculate the quantum noise limited sensitivity curves for the CC-SR design, and find that the broadening of sensitivity predicted by the classical analysis is also present in these curves, but is somewhat reduced. Furthermore, we find that the curves always stay above the standard quantum limit (SQL). To circumvent this limitation, we modify the dispersion to compensate the non-linear phase variation produced by the opto-mechanical (OM) resonance effects. We find that the upper bound of the factor by which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is increased, compared to the highest sensitivity result predicted by Bunanno and Chen [Phys. Rev. D 64, 042006 (2001)], is ~14. We also present a simpler scheme (WLC-SR) where a dispersion medium is inserted in the SR cavity. For this scheme, we found the upper bound of the enhancement factor to be ~18. We then consider an explicit system for realizing the NDM, which makes use of five energy levels in M-configuration to produce Gain, accompanied by Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (the GEIT system). For this explicit system, we employ the rigorous approach based on Master Equation (ME) to compute the QN contributed by the NDM, thus enabling us to determine the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product definitively rather than the upper bound thereof. Specifically, we identify a set of parameters for which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is enhanced by a factor of 17.66.

  5. Parameter estimation on gravitational waves from neutron-star binaries with spinning components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Farr; Christopher P. L. Berry; Will M. Farr; Carl-Johan Haster; Hannah Middleton; Kipp Cannon; Philip B. Graff; Chad Hanna; Ilya Mandel; Chris Pankow; Larry R. Price; Trevor Sidery; Leo P. Singer; Alex L. Urban; Alberto Vecchio; John Veitch; Salvatore Vitale

    2015-08-24

    Inspiraling binary neutron stars are expected to be one of the most significant sources of gravitational-wave signals for the new generation of advanced ground-based detectors. Advanced LIGO will begin operation in 2015 and we investigate how well we could hope to measure properties of these binaries should a detection be made in the first observing period. We study an astrophysically motivated population of sources (binary components with masses $1.2~\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$-$1.6~\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ and spins of less than $0.05$) using the full LIGO analysis pipeline. While this simulated population covers the observed range of potential binary neutron-star sources, we do not exclude the possibility of sources with parameters outside these ranges; given the existing uncertainty in distributions of mass and spin, it is critical that analyses account for the full range of possible mass and spin configurations. We find that conservative prior assumptions on neutron-star mass and spin lead to average fractional uncertainties in component masses of $\\sim 16\\%$, with little constraint on spins (the median $90\\%$ upper limit on the spin of the more massive component is $\\sim 0.7$). Stronger prior constraints on neutron-star spins can further constrain mass estimates, but only marginally. However, we find that the sky position and luminosity distance for these sources are not influenced by the inclusion of spin; therefore, if LIGO detects a low-spin population of BNS sources, less computationally expensive results calculated neglecting spin will be sufficient for guiding electromagnetic follow-up.

  6. Constraining the neutron star equation of state with gravitational wave signals from coalescing binary neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalis Agathos; Jeroen Meidam; Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Marco Tompitak; John Veitch; Salvatore Vitale; Chris Van Den Broeck

    2015-07-12

    Recently exploratory studies were performed on the possibility of constraining the neutron star equation of state (EOS) using signals from coalescing binary neutron stars, or neutron star-black hole systems, as they will be seen in upcoming advanced gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. In particular, it was estimated to what extent the combined information from multiple detections would enable one to distinguish between different equations of state through hypothesis ranking or parameter estimation. Under the assumption of zero neutron star spins both in signals and in template waveforms and considering tidal effects to 1 post-Newtonian (1PN) order, it was found that O(20) sources would suffice to distinguish between a hard, moderate, and soft equation of state. Here we revisit these results, this time including neutron star tidal effects to the highest order currently known, termination of gravitational waveforms at the contact frequency, neutron star spins, and the resulting quadrupole-monopole interaction. We also take the masses of neutron stars in simulated sources to be distributed according to a relatively strongly peaked Gaussian, as hinted at by observations, but without assuming that the data analyst will necessarily have accurate knowledge of this distribution for use as a mass prior. We find that especially the effect of the latter is dramatic, necessitating many more detections to distinguish between different EOS and causing systematic biases in parameter estimation, on top of biases due to imperfect understanding of the signal model pointed out in earlier work. This would get mitigated if reliable prior information about the mass distribution could be folded into the analyses.

  7. Mis-Modelling in Gravitational Wave Astronomy: The Trouble With Templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Sampson; Neil Cornish; Nicolas Yunes

    2014-03-20

    Waveform templates are a powerful tool for extracting and characterizing gravitational wave signals, acting as highly restrictive priors on the signal morphologies that allow us to extract weak events buried deep in the instrumental noise. The templates map the waveform shapes to physical parameters, thus allowing us to produce posterior probability distributions for these parameters. However, there are attendant dangers in using highly restrictive signal priors. If strong field gravity is not accurately described by General Relativity (GR), then using GR templates may result in fundamental bias in the recovered parameters, or even worse, a complete failure to detect signals. Here we study such dangers, concentrating on three distinct possibilities. First, we show that there exist modified theories compatible with all existing tests that would fail to be detected by the LIGO/Virgo network using searches based on GR templates, but which would be detected using a one parameter post-Einsteinian extension. Second, we study modified theories that produce departures from GR that turn on suddenly at a critical frequency, producing waveforms that do not naively fit into the simplest parameterized post-Einsteinian (ppE) scheme. We show that even the simplest ppE templates are still capable of picking up these strange signals and diagnosing a departure from GR. Third, we study whether using inspiral-only ppE waveforms for signals that include merger and ringdown can lead to problems in misidentifying a GR departure. We present an easy technique that allows us to self-consistently identify the inspiral portion of the signal, and thus remove these potential biases, allowing GR tests to be performed on higher mass signals that merge within the detector band. We close by studying a parameterized waveform model that may allow us to test GR using the full inspiral-merger-ringdown signal.

  8. Photorefractive Interferometers for Ultrasonic Measurements on Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafond, E. F.; Brodeur, P. H.; Gerhardstein, J. P.; Habeger, C. C.; Telschow, Kenneth Louis

    2002-12-01

    Photorefractive interferometers have been employed for the detection of ultrasound in metals and composites since 1991 [1–4]. Instances of laser-generated ultrasound and laser-based detection in paper were reported in 1996 [5]. More recently, bismuth silicon oxide (BSO) photorefractive interferometers were adapted to detect ultrasound in paper [6]. In this article we discuss BSO and GaAs photorefractive detection of ultrasound on different paper grades and present the resulting waveforms. Compared to contact piezoelectric transducer methods, laser interferometry offers signifcant advantages. One of these is that it is a noncontact technique. This is especially important for on-line application to lightweight papers which could be marked or damaged by contact transducers. Broadband ultrasonic laser generation matched with the broadband sensitivity of laser interferometers is another beneft. This is important for obtaining narrow pulses in nondispersive time-of-fight determinations and for measuring the phase velocity of dispersive modes over a wide frequency band. Also, laser ultrasonic techniques provide a measure of bending stiffness through the analysis of low frequency A0 waves.

  9. Sensitivity Achieved by the LIGO and Virgo Gravitational Wave Detectors during LIGO's Sixth and Virgo's Second and Third Science Runs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration

    2012-03-15

    We summarize the sensitivity achieved by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors for low-mass compact binary coalescence (CBC) searches during LIGO's sixth science run and Virgo's second and third science runs. We present strain noise power spectral densities (PSDs) which are representative of the typical performance achieved by the detectors in these science runs. The data presented here and in the accompanying web-accessible data files are intended to be released to the public as a summary of detector performance for low-mass CBC searches during S6 and VSR2-3.

  10. A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Sakakibara; N. Kimura; T. Suzuki; K. Yamamoto; D. Chen; S. Koike; C. Tokoku; T. Uchiyama; M. Ohashi; K. Kuroda

    2013-09-19

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  11. A study of cooling time reduction of interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors using a high-emissivity coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakakibara, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Chen, D.; Tokoku, C.; Uchiyama, T.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.; Kimura, N.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, S.

    2014-01-29

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  12. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM MASSIVE MAGNETARS FORMED IN BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dall'Osso, Simone [Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Tübingen, auf der Morgenstelle 10 D-72076 (Germany); Giacomazzo, Bruno [Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Perna, Rosalba [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Stella, Luigi, E-mail: simone.dallosso@uni-tuebingen.de [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs), as well as candidate progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Depending on the total initial mass of the system and the NS equation of state (EOS), the post-merger phase can be characterized by a prompt collapse to a black hole or by the formation of a supramassive NS, or even a stable NS. In the latter cases of post-merger NS (PMNS) formation, magnetic field amplification during the merger will produce a magnetar and induce a mass quadrupole moment in the newly formed NS. If the timescale for orthogonalization of the magnetic symmetry axis with the spin axis is smaller than the spindown time, the NS will radiate its spin down energy primarily via GWs. Here we study this scenario for the various outcomes of NS formation: we generalize the set of equilibrium states for a twisted torus magnetic configuration to include solutions that, for the same external dipolar field, carry a larger magnetic energy reservoir; we hence compute the magnetic ellipticity for such configurations, and the corresponding strength of the expected GW signal as a function of the relative magnitude of the dipolar and toroidal field components. The relative number of GW detections from PMNSs and from binary NSs is a very strong function of the NS EOS, being higher (?1%) for the stiffest EOSs and negligibly small for the softest ones. For intermediate-stiffness EOSs, such as the n = 4/7 polytrope recently used by Giacomazzo and Perna or the GM1 used by Lasky et al., the relative fraction is ?0.3%; correspondingly, we estimate a GW detection rate from stable PMNSs of ?0.1-1 yr{sup –1} with advanced detectors, and of ?100-1000 yr{sup –1} with detectors of third generation such as the Einstein Telescope. Measurement of such GW signals would provide constraints on the NS EOS and, in connection with an SGRB, on the nature of the binary progenitors giving rise to these events.

  13. SEARCH FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES ASSOCIATED WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DURING LIGO SCIENCE RUN 6 AND VIRGO SCIENCE RUNS 2 AND 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K. [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. D. [California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92831 (United States); Abernathy, M. [SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Adams, C. [LIGO-Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agatsuma, K. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2012-11-20

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole, and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10{sup -2} M {sub Sun} c {sup 2} at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short-hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron-star-black-hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc, respectively. These distance limits, while significantly larger than for a search that is not aided by GRB satellite observations, are not large enough to expect a coincidence with a GRB. However, projecting these exclusions to the sensitivities of Advanced LIGO and Virgo, which should begin operation in 2015, we find that the detection of gravitational waves associated with GRBs will become quite possible.

  14. SPIE March 23, 1998 Palomar Testbed Interferometer Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPIE March 23, 1998 Palomar Testbed Interferometer JKW-1 Palomar Testbed Interferometer Kent 23, 1998 Palomar Testbed Interferometer JKW-2 Acknowledgements A. Boden, G. Brack, M. Colavita, M Belle, J. Yu #12;SPIE March 23, 1998 Palomar Testbed Interferometer JKW-3 Overview · Brief description

  15. Process control system using polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Thomas J. (Maumee, OH); Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

    1994-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  16. Process control system using polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1994-02-15

    A system for nondestructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figures.

  17. Furnace control apparatus using polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Thomas J. (Maumee, OH); Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  18. Furnace control apparatus using polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-03-28

    A system for nondestructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figures.

  19. Low latency search for Gravitational waves from BH-NS binaries in coincidence with Short Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Maselli; Valeria Ferrari

    2014-02-24

    We propose a procedure to be used in the search for gravitational waves from black hole-neutron star coalescing binaries, in coincidence with short gamma-ray bursts. It is based on two recently proposed semi-analytic fits, one reproducing the mass of the remnant disk surrounding the black hole which forms after the merging as a function of some binary parameters, the second relating the neutron star compactness, i.e. the ratio of mass and radius, with its tidal deformability. Using a Fisher matrix analysis and the two fits, we assign a probability that the emitted gravitational signal is associated to the formation of an accreting disk massive enough to supply the energy needed to power a short gamma ray burst. This information can be used in low-latency data analysis to restrict the parameter space searching for gravitational wave signals in coincidence with short gamma-ray bursts, and to gain information on the dynamics of the coalescing system and on the internal structure of the components. In addition, when the binary parameters will be measured with high accuracy, it will be possible to use this information to trigger the search for off-axis gamma-ray bursts afterglows.

  20. A coherent method for the detection and parameter estimation of continuous gravitational wave signals using a pulsar timing array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D.; Jenet, Fredrick A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, 1 West University Boulevard, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The use of a high precision pulsar timing array is a promising approach to detecting gravitational waves in the very low frequency regime (10{sup –6}-10{sup –9} Hz) that is complementary to ground-based efforts (e.g., LIGO, Virgo) at high frequencies (?10-10{sup 3} Hz) and space-based ones (e.g., LISA) at low frequencies (10{sup –4}-10{sup –1} Hz). One of the target sources for pulsar timing arrays is individual supermassive black hole binaries which are expected to form in galactic mergers. In this paper, a likelihood-based method for detection and parameter estimation is presented for a monochromatic continuous gravitational wave signal emitted by such a source. The so-called pulsar terms in the signal that arise due to the breakdown of the long-wavelength approximation are explicitly taken into account in this method. In addition, the method accounts for equality and inequality constraints involved in the semi-analytical maximization of the likelihood over a subset of the parameters. The remaining parameters are maximized over numerically using Particle Swarm Optimization. Thus, the method presented here solves the monochromatic continuous wave detection and parameter estimation problem without invoking some of the approximations that have been used in earlier studies.

  1. Improving the sensitivity of a search for coalescing binary black holes with non-precessing spins in gravitational wave data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Privitera; Satyanarayan R. P. Mohapatra; Parameswaran Ajith; Kipp Cannon; Nickolas Fotopoulos; Melissa A. Frei; Chad Hanna; Alan J. Weinstein; John T. Whelan

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate the implementation of a sensitive search pipeline for gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes whose components have spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum. We study the pipeline recovery of simulated gravitational wave signals from aligned-spin binary black holes added to real detector noise, comparing the pipeline performance with aligned-spin filter templates to the same pipeline with non-spinning filter templates. Our results exploit a three-parameter phenomenological waveform family that models the full inspiral-merger-ringdown coalescence and treats the effect of aligned spins with a single effective spin parameter \\chi. We construct template banks from these waveforms by a stochastic placement method and use these banks as filters in the recently-developed gstlal search pipeline. We measure the observable volume of the analysis pipeline for binary black hole signals with total mass in [15,25] solar masses and \\chi in [0, 0.85]. We find an increase in observable volume of up to 45% for systems with 0.2 <= \\chi <= 0.85 with almost no loss of sensitivity to signals with 0 <= \\chi <= 0.2. We demonstrate this analysis on 25.9 days of data obtained from the Hanford and Livingston detectors in LIGO's fifth observation run.

  2. The Massive Pulsar PSR J1614-2230: Linking Quantum Chromodynamics, Gamma-ray Bursts, and Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feryal Ozel; Dimitrios Psaltis; Scott Ransom; Paul Demorest; Mark Alford

    2010-10-27

    The recent measurement of the Shapiro delay in the radio pulsar PSR J1614-2230 yielded a mass of 1.97 +/- 0.04 M_sun, making it the most massive pulsar known to date. Its mass is high enough that, even without an accompanying measurement of the stellar radius, it has a strong impact on our understanding of nuclear matter, gamma-ray bursts, and the generation of gravitational waves from coalescing neutron stars. This single high mass value indicates that a transition to quark matter in neutron-star cores can occur at densities comparable to the nuclear saturation density only if the quarks are strongly interacting and are color superconducting. We further show that a high maximum neutron-star mass is required if short duration gamma-ray bursts are powered by coalescing neutron stars and, therefore, this mechanism becomes viable in the light of the recent measurement. Finally, we argue that the low-frequency (<= 500 Hz) gravitational waves emitted during the final stages of neutron-star coalescence encode the properties of the equation of state because neutron stars consistent with this measurement cannot be centrally condensed. This will facilitate the measurement of the neutron star equation of state with Advanced LIGO/Virgo.

  3. Inference on gravitational waves from coalescences of stellar-mass compact objects and intermediate-mass black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haster, Carl-Johan; Berry, Christopher P L; Stevenson, Simon; Veitch, John; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescences of neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes into intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of $\\gtrsim 100$ solar masses represent one of the exciting possible sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors. These sources can provide definitive evidence for the existence of IMBHs, probe globular-cluster dynamics, and potentially serve as tests of general relativity. We analyse the accuracy with which we can measure the masses and spins of the IMBH and its companion in intermediate-mass ratio coalescences. We find that we can identify an IMBH with a mass above $100 ~ M_\\odot$ with $95\\%$ confidence provided the massive body exceeds $130 ~ M_\\odot$. For source masses above $\\sim200 ~ M_\\odot$, the best measured parameter is the frequency of the quasi-normal ringdown. Consequently, the total mass is measured better than the chirp mass for massive binaries, but the total mass is still partly degenerate with spin, which cannot be accurately measured. Low-frequency detector sen...

  4. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  5. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  6. Modeling the Impulsive Noise Component and its Effect on the Operation of a Simple Coherent Network Algorithm for Unmodeled Gravitational Wave Bursts Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria Principe; Innocenzo M Pinto

    2008-06-27

    An analytic model a la Middleton of the impulsive noise component in the data of interferometric gravitational wave detectors is proposed, based on an atomic representation of glitches. A fully analytic characterization of the coherent network data analysis algorithm proposed by Rakhmanov and Klimenko is obtained, for the simplest relevant case of triggered detection of unmodeled gravitational wave bursts, using the above noise model. The detector's performance is evaluated under a suitable central-limit hypothesis, and the effects of both the noisiness of the pseudo-templates, and the presence of the impulsive noise component are highlighted.

  7. Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts during LIGO science run 6 and Virgo science runs 2 and 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, M S; Hurley, K C; Jenke, P A; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Zhang, X -L; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endröczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardt, A; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole; and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10^-2 M c^2 at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc respectively. These ...

  8. Multimessenger Search for Sources of Gravitational Waves and High-Energy Neutrinos: Results for Initial LIGO-Virgo and IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Macías, O; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Me