National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for laser interferometer gravitational-wave

  1. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of Violin-Mode resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level Violin-Mode (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent noise-gain peaking arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillationsthis output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 1.20) MV(rms) m{sup ?1}(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 13) picometres/?Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of 0.1 mm.

  2. COLLOQUIUM: The Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Merger | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 5, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium, PPPL (284 cap.) COLLOQUIUM: The Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger Dr. Duncan Brown Syracuse University On September 14, 2015 the the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) simultaneously observed gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger. The gravitational waves observed match the waveform predicted by general relativity

  3. Application of asymptotic expansions for maximum likelihood estimators errors to gravitational waves from binary mergers: The single interferometer case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanolin, M.; Vitale, S.; Makris, N.

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we apply to gravitational waves (GW) from the inspiral phase of binary systems a recently derived frequentist methodology to calculate analytically the error for a maximum likelihood estimate of physical parameters. We use expansions of the covariance and the bias of a maximum likelihood estimate in terms of inverse powers of the signal-to-noise ration (SNR)s where the square root of the first order in the covariance expansion is the Cramer Rao lower bound (CRLB). We evaluate the expansions, for the first time, for GW signals in noises of GW interferometers. The examples are limited to a single, optimally oriented, interferometer. We also compare the error estimates using the first two orders of the expansions with existing numerical Monte Carlo simulations. The first two orders of the covariance allow us to get error predictions closer to what is observed in numerical simulations than the CRLB. The methodology also predicts a necessary SNR to approximate the error with the CRLB and provides new insight on the relationship between waveform properties, SNR, dimension of the parameter space and estimation errors. For example the timing match filtering can achieve the CRLB only if the SNR is larger than the Kurtosis of the gravitational wave spectrum and the necessary SNR is much larger if other physical parameters are also unknown.

  4. Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    predicted | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein predicted By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research February 12, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The collision of two black holes - an event detected for the first time ever by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO - is seen in this still from a computer simulation. (Image by SXS) The collision of two black holes - an

  5. Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    predicted | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein predicted By Catherine andonella, Office of the Dean for Research February 12, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The collision of two black holes - an event detected for the first time ever by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO - is seen in this still from a computer simulation. (Image by SXS) The collision of two black holes - an

  6. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  7. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  8. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES OF HYPERACCRETING COLLAPSAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Harikae, Seiji

    2012-08-20

    By performing two-dimensional special relativistic (SR) magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we study possible signatures of gravitational waves (GWs) in the context of the collapsar model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts. In our SR simulations, the central black hole is treated as an absorbing boundary. By doing so, we focus on the GWs generated by asphericities in neutrino emission and matter motions in the vicinity of the hyperaccreting disks. We compute nine models by adding initial angular momenta and magnetic fields parametrically to a precollapse core of a 35 M{sub Sun} progenitor star. As for the microphysics, a realistic equation of state is employed and the neutrino cooling is taken into account via a multi-flavor neutrino leakage scheme. To accurately estimate GWs produced by anisotropic neutrino emission, we perform a ray-tracing analysis in general relativity by a post-processing procedure. By employing a stress formula that includes contributions from both magnetic fields and SR corrections, we also study the effects of magnetic fields on the gravitational waveforms. We find that the GW amplitudes from anisotropic neutrino emission show a monotonic increase with time, whose amplitudes are much larger than those from matter motions of the accreting material. We show that the increasing trend of the neutrino GWs stems from the excess of neutrino emission in the direction near parallel to the spin axis illuminated from the hyperaccreting disks. We point out that a recently proposed future space-based interferometer like Fabry-Perot-type DECIGO would permit the detection of these GW signals within Almost-Equal-To 100 Mpc.

  9. PROSPECTS FOR JOINT GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE AND ELECTROMAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS OF NEUTRON-STAR-BLACK-HOLE COALESCING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pannarale, Francesco; Ohme, Frank E-mail: frank.ohme@ligo.org

    2014-08-10

    Coalescing neutron-star-black-hole (NS-BH) binaries are a promising source of gravitational-wave (GW) signals detectable with large-scale laser interferometers such as the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo. They are also one of the main short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) progenitor candidates. If the black hole (BH) tidally disrupts its companion, an SGRB may be ignited when a sufficiently massive accretion disk forms around the remnant BH. Detecting an NS-BH coalescence both in the GW and electromagnetic (EM) spectrum offers a wealth of information about the nature of the source. How much can actually be inferred from a joint detection is unclear, however, as a mass/spin degeneracy may reduce the GW measurement accuracy. To shed light on this problem and on the potential of joint EM+GW observations, we here combine recent semi-analytical predictions for the remnant disk mass with estimates of the parameter-space portion that is selected by a GW detection. We identify cases in which an SGRB ignition is supported, others in which it can be excluded, and finally others in which the outcome depends on the chosen model for the currently unknown NS equation of state. We pinpoint a range of systems that would allow us to place lower bounds on the equation of state stiffness if both the GW emission and its EM counterpart are observed. The methods we develop can broaden the scope of existing GW detection and parameter-estimation algorithms and could allow us to disregard about half of the templates in an NS-BH search following an SGRB trigger, increasing its speed and sensitivity.

  10. General properties of the gravitational wave spectrum from phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transitions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect General properties of the gravitational wave spectrum from phase transitions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: General properties of the gravitational wave spectrum from phase transitions In this paper we discuss some general aspects of the gravitational wave background arising from postinflationary short-lasting cosmological events such as phase transitions. We concentrate on the physics which determines the shape and the peak

  11. Standing gravitational waves from domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Myrzakul, Shynaray; Singleton, Douglas

    2009-07-15

    We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of 'stiff' matter, i.e., matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era, the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact nonlinear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

  12. Multicomponent wavefield characterization with a novel scanning laser interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, Thomas E.; Wijk, Kasper van; Pouet, Bruno; Wartelle, Alexis

    2010-07-15

    The in-plane component of the wavefield provides valuable information about media properties from seismology to nondestructive testing. A new compact scanning laser ultrasonic interferometer collects light scattered away from the angle of incidence to provide the absolute ultrasonic displacement for both the out-of-plane and an in-plane components. This new system is tested by measuring the radial and vertical polarization of a Rayleigh wave in an aluminum half-space. The estimated amplitude ratio of the horizontal and vertical displacement agrees well with the theoretical value. The phase difference exhibits a small bias between the two components due to a slightly different frequency response between the two processing channels of the prototype electronic circuitry.

  13. Observable induced gravitational waves from an early matter phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alabidi, Laila; Sasaki, Misao; Kohri, Kazunori; Sendouda, Yuuiti E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp E-mail: sendouda@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-01

    Assuming that inflation is succeeded by a phase of matter domination, which corresponds to a low temperature of reheating T{sub r} < 10{sup 9}GeV, we evaluate the spectra of gravitational waves induced in the post-inflationary universe. We work with models of hilltop-inflation with an enhanced primordial scalar spectrum on small scales, which can potentially lead to the formation of primordial black holes. We find that a lower reheat temperature leads to the production of gravitational waves with energy densities within the ranges of both space and earth based gravitational wave detectors.

  14. Gravitational waves from phase transitions at the electroweak scale and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    beyond (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect waves from phase transitions at the electroweak scale and beyond Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gravitational waves from phase transitions at the electroweak scale and beyond If there was a first-order phase transition in the early universe, there should be an associated stochastic background of gravitational waves. In this paper, we point out that the characteristic frequency of the spectrum due to phase transitions which took place in

  15. New Sources of Gravitational Waves During Inflation (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Technical Report: New Sources of Gravitational Waves During Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New Sources of Gravitational Waves During Inflation We point out that detectable inflationary tensor modes can be generated by particle or string sources produced during inflation, consistently with the requirements for inflation and constraints from scalar fluctuations. We show via examples that this effect can dominate over the contribution from quantum

  16. Gravitational waves from global second order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jr, John T. Giblin; Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier; Vlcek, Brian E-mail: larryp@caltech.edu E-mail: bvlcek@uwm.edu

    2012-11-01

    Global second-order phase transitions are expected to produce scale-invariant gravitational wave spectra. In this manuscript we explore the dynamics of a symmetry-breaking phase transition using lattice simulations. We explicitly calculate the stochastic gravitational wave background produced during the transition and subsequent self-ordering phase. We comment on this signal as it compares to the scale-invariant spectrum produced during inflation.

  17. Anisotropies in the gravitational-wave stochastic background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ölmez, S.; Mandic, V.; Siemens, X. E-mail: mandic@physics.umn.edu

    2012-07-01

    We consider anisotropies in the stochastic background of gravitational-waves (SBGW) arising from random fluctuations in the number of gravitational-wave sources. We first develop the general formalism which can be applied to different cosmological or astrophysical scenarios. We then apply this formalism to calculate the anisotropies of SBGW associated with the fluctuations in the number of cosmic string loops, considering both cosmic string cusps and kinks. We calculate the anisotropies as a function of angle and frequency.

  18. Inflationary gravitational waves and the evolution of the early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori E-mail: moroi@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of various phenomena which may have happened in the early universe on the spectrum of inflationary gravitational waves. The phenomena include phase transitions, entropy productions from non-relativistic matter, the production of dark radiation, and decoupling of dark matter/radiation from thermal bath. These events can create several characteristic signatures in the inflationary gravitational wave spectrum, which may be direct probes of the history of the early universe and the nature of high-energy physics.

  19. Gravitational wave hotspots: Ranking potential locations of single-source gravitational wave emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Joseph; Polin, Abigail; Lommen, Andrea; Christy, B; Stappers, Ben; Finn, Lee Samuel; Jenet, F. A.

    2014-03-20

    The steadily improving sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) systems in the nearby universe will be detectable sometime during the next decade. Currently, PTAs assume an equal probability of detection from every sky position, but as evidence grows for a non-isotropic distribution of sources, is there a most likely sky position for a detectable single source of GWs? In this paper, a collection of Galactic catalogs is used to calculate various metrics related to the detectability of a single GW source resolvable above a GW background, assuming that every galaxy has the same probability of containing an SMBHB. Our analyses of these data reveal small probabilities that one of these sources is currently in the PTA band, but as sensitivity is improved regions of consistent probability density are found in predictable locations, specifically around local galaxy clusters.

  20. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES OF JET PRECESSION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Mouyuan; Liu Tong; Gu Weimin; Lu Jufu

    2012-06-10

    The physical nature of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is believed to involve an ultra-relativistic jet. The observed complex structure of light curves motivates the idea of jet precession. In this work, we study the gravitational waves of jet precession based on neutrino-dominated accretion disks around black holes, which may account for the central engine of GRBs. In our model, the jet and the inner part of the disk may precess along with the black hole, which is driven by the outer part of the disk. Gravitational waves are therefore expected to be significant from this black-hole-inner-disk precession system. By comparing our numerical results with the sensitivity of some detectors, we find that it is possible for DECIGO and BBO to detect such gravitational waves, particularly for GRBs in the Local Group.

  1. Gravitational-wave generation in hybrid quintessential inflationary models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sa, Paulo M.; Henriques, Alfredo B.

    2010-06-15

    We investigate the generation of gravitational waves in the hybrid quintessential inflationary model. The full gravitational-wave energy spectrum is calculated using the method of continuous Bogoliubov coefficients. The postinflationary kination period, characteristic of quintessential inflationary models, leaves a clear signature on the spectrum, namely, a peak at high frequencies. The maximum of the peak is firmly located at the megahertz-gigahertz region of the spectrum and corresponds to {Omega}{sub GW{approx_equal}}10{sup -12}. This peak is substantially smaller than the one appearing in the gravitational-wave energy spectrum of the original quintessential inflationary model, therefore avoiding any conflict with the nucleosynthesis constraint on {Omega}{sub GW}.

  2. Studying inflation with future space-based gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Moroi, Takeo; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: moroi@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent progress in our understanding of the B-mode polarization of cosmic microwave background (CMB), which provides important information about the inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs), we study the possibility to acquire information about the early universe using future space-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors. We perform a detailed statistical analysis to estimate how well we can determine the reheating temperature after inflation as well as the amplitude, the tensor spectral index, and the running of the inflationary gravitational waves. We discuss how the accuracies depend on noise parameters of the detector and the minimum frequency available in the analysis. Implication of such a study on the test of inflation models is also discussed.

  3. First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Abbott et al.

    2004-03-09

    We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h{sub rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h{sub rss} {approx} 10{sup -19} - 10{sup -17} strain/{radical}Hz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

  4. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for θ=x/μ in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman–Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified Ψ{sub 4}, implying three degrees of freedom for θ=x/μ. This compares with two for a canonical embedding of θ=t/μ. Also, if one introduces the Ricci tensor formalism to describe a massive graviton arising from the nCS modified gravity, one finds one massive mode after making second-order wave equations, which is compared to five found from the parity-even Einstein–Weyl gravity.

  5. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES IN BLACK HOLE FORMING CORE COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerd-Durn, Pablo; DeBrye, Nicolas; Aloy, Miguel A.; Font, Jos A.; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2013-12-20

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of collapsing stellar cores. Our initial model consists of a low metallicity rapidly-rotating progenitor which is evolved in axisymmetry with the latest version of our general relativistic code CoCoNuT, which allows for black hole formation and includes the effects of a microphysical equation of state (LS220) and a neutrino leakage scheme to account for radiative losses. The motivation of our study is to analyze in detail the emission of gravitational waves in the collapsar scenario of long gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations show that the phase during which the proto-neutron star (PNS) survives before ultimately collapsing to a black hole is particularly optimal for gravitational wave emission. The high-amplitude waves last for several seconds and show a remarkable quasi-periodicity associated with the violent PNS dynamics, namely during the episodes of convection and the subsequent nonlinear development of the standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). By analyzing the spectrogram of our simulations we are able to identify the frequencies associated with the presence of g-modes and with the SASI motions at the PNS surface. We note that the gravitational waves emitted reach large enough amplitudes to be detected with third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope within a Virgo Cluster volume at rates ? 0.1yr{sup 1}.

  6. Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binary Black Holes: Theoretical and Experimental Challenges

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    A network of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors (LIGO/VIRGO/GEO/...) is currently taking data near its planned sensitivity. Coalescing black hole binaries are among the most promising, and most exciting, gravitational wave sources for these detectors. The talk will review the theoretical and experimental challenges that must be met in order to successfully detect gravitational waves from coalescing black hole binaries, and to be able to reliably measure the physical parameters of the source (masses, spins, ...).

  7. Noise power spectral density of a fibre scattered-light interferometer with a semiconductor laser source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekseev, A E; Potapov, V T

    2013-10-31

    Spectral characteristics of the noise intensity fluctuations at the output of a scattered-light interferometer, caused by phase fluctuations of semiconductor laser radiation are considered. This kind of noise is one of the main factors limiting sensitivity of interferometric sensors. For the first time, to our knowledge, the expression is obtained for the average noise power spectral density at the interferometer output versus the degree of a light source coherence and length of the scattering segment. Also, the approximate expressions are considered which determine the power spectral density in the low-frequency range (up to 200 kHz) and in the limiting case of extended scattering segments. The expression obtained for the noise power spectral density agrees with experimental normalised power spectra with a high accuracy. (interferometry of radiation)

  8. SPINDOWN OF ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS: GRAVITATIONAL WAVES OR MAGNETIC BRAKING?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff, Jan E.; Jaikumar, Prashanth; Chan, Vincent; Ouyed, Rachid

    2012-05-20

    We study the spindown of isolated neutron stars from initially rapid rotation rates, driven by two factors: (1) gravitational wave emission due to r-modes and (2) magnetic braking. In the context of isolated neutron stars, we present the first study including self-consistently the magnetic damping of r-modes in the spin evolution. We track the spin evolution employing the RNS code, which accounts for the rotating structure of neutron stars for various equations of state. We find that, despite the strong damping due to the magnetic field, r-modes alter the braking rate from pure magnetic braking for B {<=} 10{sup 13} G. For realistic values of the saturation amplitude {alpha}{sub sat}, the r-mode can also decrease the time to reach the threshold central density for quark deconfinement. Within a phenomenological model, we assess the gravitational waveform that would result from r-mode-driven spindown of a magnetized neutron star. To contrast with the persistent signal during the spindown phase, we also present a preliminary estimate of the transient gravitational wave signal from an explosive quark-hadron phase transition, which can be a signal for the deconfinement of quarks inside neutron stars.

  9. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2015-07-16

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T>160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  10. Gravitational waves from individual supermassive black hole binaries in circular orbits: limits from the North American nanohertz observatory for gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Dolch, T.; Lam, M. T.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Ellis, J. A.; Demorest, P. B.; Deng, X.; Koop, M.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Garver-Daniels, N.; Lorimer, D. R.; Jenet, F.; Jones, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Lommen, A. N.; Collaboration: NANOGrav Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    We perform a search for continuous gravitational waves from individual supermassive black hole binaries using robust frequentist and Bayesian techniques. We augment standard pulsar timing models with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency variable pulse shape terms. We apply our techniques to the Five Year Data Release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. We find that there is no evidence for the presence of a detectable continuous gravitational wave; however, we can use these data to place the most constraining upper limits to date on the strength of such gravitational waves. Using the full 17 pulsar data set we place a 95% upper limit on the strain amplitude of h {sub 0} ? 3.0 10{sup 14} at a frequency of 10 nHz. Furthermore, we place 95% sky-averaged lower limits on the luminosity distance to such gravitational wave sources, finding that d{sub L} ? 425 Mpc for sources at a frequency of 10 nHz and chirp mass 10{sup 10} M {sub ?}. We find that for gravitational wave sources near our best timed pulsars in the sky, the sensitivity of the pulsar timing array is increased by a factor of ?four over the sky-averaged sensitivity. Finally we place limits on the coalescence rate of the most massive supermassive black hole binaries.

  11. Gravitational waves from gamma-ray pulsar glitches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stopnitzky, Elan; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    We use data from pulsar gamma-ray glitches recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope as input to theoretical models of gravitational wave signals the glitches might generate. We find that the typical peak amplitude of the gravity wave signal from gamma-ray pulsar glitches lies between 10{sup 23} and 10{sup 35} in dimensionless units, with peak frequencies in the range of 1 to 1000 Hz, depending on the model. We estimate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for all gamma-ray glitches, and discuss detectability with current gravity wave detectors. Our results indicate that the strongest predicted signals are potentially within reach of current detectors, and that pulsar gamma-ray glitches are promising targets for gravity wave searches by current and next-generation detectors.

  12. Gravitational waves from phase transitions at the electroweak...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature range 100 GeV-10sup 7 GeV is precisely in the window that will be probed by the second generation of space-based interferometers such as the big bang observer (BBO). ...

  13. Gravitational waves from the collision of tidally disrupted stars with massive black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    East, William E.

    2014-11-10

    We use simulations of hydrodynamics coupled with full general relativity to investigate the gravitational waves produced by a star colliding with a massive black hole when the star's tidal disruption radius lies far outside of the black hole horizon. We consider both main-sequence and white-dwarf compaction stars, and nonspinning black holes, as well as those with near-extremal spin. We study the regime in between where the star can be accurately modeled by a point particle, and where tidal effects completely suppress the gravitational wave signal. We find that nonnegligible gravitational waves can be produced even when the star is strongly affected by tidal forces, as well as when it collides with large angular momentum. We discuss the implications that these results have for the potential observation of gravitational waves from these sources with future detectors.

  14. Gravitational wave generation from bubble collisions in first-order phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transitions: An analytic approach (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect wave generation from bubble collisions in first-order phase transitions: An analytic approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gravitational wave generation from bubble collisions in first-order phase transitions: An analytic approach Gravitational wave production from bubble collisions was calculated in the early 1990s using numerical simulations. In this paper, we present an alternative analytic estimate,

  15. Gravitational waves and the scale of inflation (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Gravitational waves and the scale of inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gravitational waves and the scale of inflation Authors: Mirbabayi, Mehrdad ; Senatore, Leonardo ; Silverstein, Eva ; Zaldarriaga, Matias Publication Date: 2015-03-12 OSTI Identifier: 1180012 Grant/Contract Number: FG02-12ER41854; AC03-76SF00515 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID:

  16. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse physics.

  17. A Bayesian approach to multi-messenger astronomy: identification of gravitational-wave host galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, XiLong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2014-11-01

    We present a general framework for incorporating astrophysical information into Bayesian parameter estimation techniques used by gravitational wave data analysis to facilitate multi-messenger astronomy. Since the progenitors of transient gravitational wave events, such as compact binary coalescences, are likely to be associated with a host galaxy, improvements to the source sky location estimates through the use of host galaxy information are explored. To demonstrate how host galaxy properties can be included, we simulate a population of compact binary coalescences and show that for ?8.5% of simulations within 200 Mpc, the top 10 most likely galaxies account for a ?50% of the total probability of hosting a gravitational wave source. The true gravitational wave source host galaxy is in the top 10 galaxy candidates ?10% of the time. Furthermore, we show that by including host galaxy information, a better estimate of the inclination angle of a compact binary gravitational wave source can be obtained. We also demonstrate the flexibility of our method by incorporating the use of either the B or K band into our analysis.

  18. A real-time laser feedback control method for the three-wave laser source used in the polarimeter-interferometer diagnostic on Joint-TEXT tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, C. Y.; Chen, J. Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.

    2014-12-15

    A three-wave laser polarimeter-interferometer, equipped with three independent far-infrared laser sources, has been developed on Joint-TEXT (J-TEXT) tokamak. The diagnostic system is capable of high-resolution temporal and phase measurement of the Faraday angle and line-integrated density. However, for long-term operation (>10 min), the free-running lasers can lead to large drifts of the intermediate frequencies (∼100–∼500 kHz/10 min) and decay of laser power (∼10%–∼20%/10 min), which act to degrade diagnostic performance. In addition, these effects lead to increased maintenance cost and limit measurement applicability to long pulse/steady state experiments. To solve this problem, a real-time feedback control method of the laser source is proposed. By accurately controlling the length of each laser cavity, both the intermediate frequencies and laser power can be simultaneously controlled: the intermediate frequencies are controlled according to the pre-set values, while the laser powers are maintained at an optimal level. Based on this approach, a real-time feedback control system has been developed and applied on J-TEXT polarimeter-interferometer. Long-term (theoretically no time limit) feedback of intermediate frequencies (maximum change less than ±12 kHz) and laser powers (maximum relative power change less than ±7%) has been successfully achieved.

  19. Gravitational waves from domain walls in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadota, Kenji; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken’ichi

    2015-10-16

    The next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model predicts the formation of domain walls due to the spontaneous breaking of the discrete Z{sub 3}-symmetry at the electroweak phase transition, and they collapse before the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis if there exists a small bias term in the potential which explicitly breaks the discrete symmetry. Signatures of gravitational waves produced from these unstable domain walls are estimated and their parameter dependence is investigated. It is shown that the amplitude of gravitational waves becomes generically large in the decoupling limit, and that their frequency is low enough to be probed in future pulsar timing observations.

  20. Results of the IGEC-2 search for gravitational wave bursts during 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astone, P.; Babusci, D.; Giordano, G.; Marini, A.; Modestino, G.; Quintieri, L.; Ronga, F.; Baggio, L.; Bassan, M.; Fafone, V.; Moleti, A.; Bignotto, M.; Cerdonio, M.; Conti, L.; Drago, M.; Liguori, N.; Bonaldi, M.; Falferi, P.; Vinante, A.; Camarda, M.

    2007-11-15

    The network of resonant bar detectors of gravitational waves resumed coordinated observations within the International Gravitational Event Collaboration (IGEC-2). Four detectors are taking part in this Collaboration: ALLEGRO, AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS. We present here the results of the search for gravitational wave bursts over 6 months during 2005, when IGEC-2 was the only gravitational wave observatory in operation. The implemented network data analysis is based on a time coincidence search among AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS; ALLEGRO data was reserved for follow-up studies. The network amplitude sensitivity to bursts improved by a factor {approx_equal}3 over the 1997-2000 IGEC observations; the wider sensitive band also allowed the analysis to be tuned over a larger class of waveforms. Given the higher single-detector duty factors, the analysis was based on threefold coincidence, to ensure the identification of any single candidate of gravitational waves with high statistical confidence. The false detection rate was as low as 1 per century. No candidates were found.

  1. Dual surface interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pardue, R.M.; Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-12

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarterwave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  2. Dual surface interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pardue, Robert M.; Williams, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarter-wave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  3. ZYGO Mark Ivxp Interferometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZYGO Mark Ivxp Interferometer Back to Equipment

  4. Precise atmospheric parameters for the shortest-period binary white dwarfs: gravitational waves, metals, and pulsations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianninas, A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Dufour, P.; Bergeron, P.; Brown, Warren R.; Hermes, J. J.

    2014-10-10

    We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 61 low-mass white dwarfs and provide precise atmospheric parameters, masses, and updated binary system parameters based on our new model atmosphere grids and the most recent evolutionary model calculations. For the first time, we measure systematic abundances of He, Ca, and Mg for metal-rich, extremely low mass white dwarfs and examine the distribution of these abundances as a function of effective temperature and mass. Based on our preliminary results, we discuss the possibility that shell flashes may be responsible for the presence of the observed He and metals. We compare stellar radii derived from our spectroscopic analysis to model-independent measurements and find good agreement except for white dwarfs with T {sub eff} ≲ 10,000 K. We also calculate the expected gravitational wave strain for each system and discuss their significance to the eLISA space-borne gravitational wave observatory. Finally, we provide an update on the instability strip of extremely low mass white dwarf pulsators.

  5. On the Unreasonable Effectiveness of post-Newtonian Theory in Gravitational-Wave Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Clifford M. Will

    2010-01-08

    The first indirect detection of gravitational waves involved a binary system of neutron stars.  In the future, the first direct detection may also involve binary systems -- inspiralling and merging binary neutron stars or black holes. This means that it is essential to understand in full detail the two-body system in general relativity, a notoriously difficult problem with a long history. Post-Newtonian approximation methods are thought to work only under slow motion and weak field conditions, while numerical solutions of Einstein's equations are thought to be limited to the final merger phase.  Recent results have shown that post-Newtonian approximations seem to remain unreasonably valid well into the relativistic regime, while advances in numerical relativity now permit solutions for numerous orbits before merger.  It is now possible to envision linking post-Newtonian theory and numerical relativity to obtain a complete ``solution'' of the general relativistic two-body problem.  These solutions will play a central role in detecting and understanding gravitational wave signals received by interferometric observatories on Earth and in space.

  6. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  7. Primordial massive gravitational waves from Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations during de Sitter inflation in the Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity. Primordial massive gravitational waves are composed of one scalar, two vector and four tensor circularly polarized modes. We show that the vector power spectrum decays quickly like a transversely massive vector in the superhorizon limit z?0. In this limit, the power spectrum coming from massive tensor modes decays quickly, leading to the conventional tensor power spectrum. Also, we find that in the limit of m{sup 2}?0 (keeping the Weyl-squared term only), the vector and tensor power spectra disappear. It implies that their power spectra are not gravitationally produced because they (vector and tensor) are decoupled from the expanding de Sitter background, as a result of conformal invariance.

  8. Conversion of relic gravitational waves into photons in cosmological magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgov, Alexander D.; Ejlli, Damian E-mail: ejlli@fe.infn.it

    2012-12-01

    Conversion of gravitational waves into electromagnetic radiation is discussed. The probability of transformations of gravitons into photons in presence of cosmological background magnetic field is calculated at the recombination epoch and during subsequent cosmological stages. The produced electromagnetic radiation is concentrated in the X-ray part of the spectrum. It is shown that if the early Universe was dominated by primordial black holes (PBHs) prior to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), the relic gravitons emitted by PBHs would transform to an almost isotropic background of electromagnetic radiation due to conversion of gravitons into photons in cosmological magnetic fields. Such extragalactic radiation could be noticeable or even dominant component of Cosmic X-ray Background.

  9. Gravitational waves versus X-ray and gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, R., E-mail: fe.fisica@gmail.com, E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it, E-mail: ruffini@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universit di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 090227B, allows us to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X-ray and gamma-ray emission in a short GRB.

  10. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Shelley, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  11. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  12. Sliding coherence window technique for hierarchical detection of continuous gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletsch, Holger J.

    2011-06-15

    A novel hierarchical search technique is presented for all-sky surveys for continuous gravitational-wave sources, such as rapidly spinning nonaxisymmetric neutron stars. Analyzing yearlong detector data sets over realistic ranges of parameter space using fully coherent matched-filtering is computationally prohibitive. Thus more efficient, so-called hierarchical techniques are essential. Traditionally, the standard hierarchical approach consists of dividing the data into nonoverlapping segments of which each is coherently analyzed, and subsequently the matched-filter outputs from all segments are combined incoherently. The present work proposes to break the data into subsegments shorter than the desired maximum coherence time span (size of the coherence window). Then matched-filter outputs from the different subsegments are efficiently combined by sliding the coherence window in time: Subsegments whose timestamps are closer than coherence window size are combined coherently, otherwise incoherently. Compared to the standard scheme at the same coherence time baseline, data sets longer by about 50-100% would have to be analyzed to achieve the same search sensitivity as with the sliding coherence window approach. Numerical simulations attest to the analytically estimated improvement.

  13. Reconstruction of source location in a network of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalier, Fabien; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Clapson, Andre-Claude; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Leroy, Nicolas; Varvella, Monica

    2006-10-15

    This paper deals with the reconstruction of the direction of a gravitational wave source using the detection made by a network of interferometric detectors, mainly the LIGO and Virgo detectors. We suppose that an event has been seen in coincidence using a filter applied on the three detector data streams. Using the arrival time (and its associated error) of the gravitational signal in each detector, the direction of the source in the sky is computed using a {chi}{sup 2} minimization technique. For reasonably large signals (SNR>4.5 in all detectors), the mean angular error between the real location and the reconstructed one is about 1 deg. . We also investigate the effect of the network geometry assuming the same angular response for all interferometric detectors. It appears that the reconstruction quality is not uniform over the sky and is degraded when the source approaches the plane defined by the three detectors. Adding at least one other detector to the LIGO-Virgo network reduces the blind regions and in the case of 6 detectors, a precision less than 1 deg. on the source direction can be reached for 99% of the sky.

  14. BRIGHT BROADBAND AFTERGLOWS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM MERGERS OF BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao He; Ding Xuan; Wu Xuefeng; Zhang Bing; Dai Zigao E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2013-07-10

    If double neutron star mergers leave behind a massive magnetar rather than a black hole, then a bright early afterglow can follow the gravitational wave burst (GWB) even if there is no short gamma-ray burst (SGRB)-GWB association or if there is an association but the SGRB does not beam toward Earth. Besides directly dissipating the proto-magnetar wind, as suggested by Zhang, here we suggest that the magnetar wind could push the ejecta launched during the merger process and, under certain conditions, would reach a relativistic speed. Such a magnetar-powered ejecta, when interacting with the ambient medium, would develop a bright broadband afterglow due to synchrotron radiation. We study this physical scenario in detail and present the predicted X-ray, optical, and radio light curves for a range of magnetar and ejecta parameters. We show that the X-ray and optical light curves usually peak around the magnetar spin-down timescale ({approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} s), reaching brightnesses readily detectable by wide-field X-ray and optical telescopes, and remain detectable for an extended period. The radio afterglow peaks later, but is much brighter than the case without a magnetar energy injection. Therefore, such bright broadband afterglows, if detected and combined with GWBs in the future, would be a probe of massive millisecond magnetars and stiff equations of state for nuclear matter.

  15. EARLY X-RAY AND OPTICAL AFTERGLOW OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM MERGERS OF BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Bing [Kavli Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Double neutron star mergers are strong sources of gravitational waves. The upcoming advanced gravitational wave detectors are expected to make the first detection of gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) associated with these sources. Proposed electromagnetic counterparts of a GWB include a short gamma-ray burst, an optical macronova, and a long-lasting radio afterglow. Here we suggest that at least some GWBs could be followed by an early afterglow lasting for thousands of seconds, if the post-merger product is a highly magnetized, rapidly rotating, massive neutron star rather than a black hole. This afterglow is powered by dissipation of a proto-magnetar wind. The X-ray flux is estimated to be as bright as (10{sup -8}-10{sup -7}) erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The optical flux is subject to large uncertainties but could be as bright as 17th magnitude in R band. We provide observational hints of such a scenario, and discuss the challenge and strategy to detect these signals.

  16. Gravitational waves and stalled satellites from massive galaxy mergers at z ? 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Pretorius, Frans; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2014-07-10

    We present a model for merger-driven evolution of the mass function for massive galaxies and their central supermassive black holes at late times. We discuss the current observational evidence in favor of merger-driven massive galaxy evolution during this epoch, and demonstrate that the observed evolution of the mass function can be reproduced by evolving an initial mass function under the assumption of negligible star formation. We calculate the stochastic gravitational wave signal from the resulting black hole binary mergers in the low redshift universe (z ? 1) implied by this model, and find that this population has a signal-to-noise ratio 2 to 5 larger than previous estimates for pulsar timing arrays, with a (2?, 3?) lower limit within this model of h{sub c}(f = 1 yr{sup 1}) = (1.1 10{sup 15}, 6.8 10{sup 16}). The strength of this signal is sufficient to make it detectable with high probability under conservative assumptions within the next several years. A principle reason that this result is larger than previous estimates is our use of a recent recalibration of the black hole-stellar mass correlation for the brightest cluster galaxies, which increases our estimate by a factor of ?2 relative to past results. For cases where a galaxy merger fails to lead to a black hole merger, we estimate the probability for a given number of satellite black holes to remain within a massive host galaxy, and interpret the result in light of ULX observations. We find that in rare cases, wandering supermassive black holes may be bright enough to appear as ULXs.

  17. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM MASSIVE MAGNETARS FORMED IN BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dall'Osso, Simone [Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Tbingen, auf der Morgenstelle 10 D-72076 (Germany); Giacomazzo, Bruno [Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Perna, Rosalba [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Stella, Luigi, E-mail: simone.dallosso@uni-tuebingen.de [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs), as well as candidate progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Depending on the total initial mass of the system and the NS equation of state (EOS), the post-merger phase can be characterized by a prompt collapse to a black hole or by the formation of a supramassive NS, or even a stable NS. In the latter cases of post-merger NS (PMNS) formation, magnetic field amplification during the merger will produce a magnetar and induce a mass quadrupole moment in the newly formed NS. If the timescale for orthogonalization of the magnetic symmetry axis with the spin axis is smaller than the spindown time, the NS will radiate its spin down energy primarily via GWs. Here we study this scenario for the various outcomes of NS formation: we generalize the set of equilibrium states for a twisted torus magnetic configuration to include solutions that, for the same external dipolar field, carry a larger magnetic energy reservoir; we hence compute the magnetic ellipticity for such configurations, and the corresponding strength of the expected GW signal as a function of the relative magnitude of the dipolar and toroidal field components. The relative number of GW detections from PMNSs and from binary NSs is a very strong function of the NS EOS, being higher (?1%) for the stiffest EOSs and negligibly small for the softest ones. For intermediate-stiffness EOSs, such as the n = 4/7 polytrope recently used by Giacomazzo and Perna or the GM1 used by Lasky etal., the relative fraction is ?0.3%; correspondingly, we estimate a GW detection rate from stable PMNSs of ?0.1-1yr{sup 1} with advanced detectors, and of ?100-1000yr{sup 1} with detectors of third generation such as the Einstein Telescope. Measurement of such GW signals would provide constraints on the NS EOS and, in connection with an SGRB, on the nature of the binary progenitors giving rise to these events.

  18. A study of cooling time reduction of interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors using a high-emissivity coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakakibara, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Chen, D.; Tokoku, C.; Uchiyama, T.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.; Kimura, N.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, S.

    2014-01-29

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  19. SEARCH FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES ASSOCIATED WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DURING LIGO SCIENCE RUN 6 AND VIRGO SCIENCE RUNS 2 AND 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Adams, C.; Affeldt, C.; Allen, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G.; Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A.; Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2012-11-20

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole, and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10{sup -2} M {sub Sun} c {sup 2} at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short-hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron-star-black-hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc, respectively. These distance limits, while significantly larger than for a search that is not aided by GRB satellite observations, are not large enough to expect a coincidence with a GRB. However, projecting these exclusions to the sensitivities of Advanced LIGO and Virgo, which should begin operation in 2015, we find that the detection of gravitational waves associated with GRBs will become quite possible.

  20. A coherent method for the detection and parameter estimation of continuous gravitational wave signals using a pulsar timing array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D.; Jenet, Fredrick A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, 1 West University Boulevard, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The use of a high precision pulsar timing array is a promising approach to detecting gravitational waves in the very low frequency regime (10{sup 6}-10{sup 9} Hz) that is complementary to ground-based efforts (e.g., LIGO, Virgo) at high frequencies (?10-10{sup 3} Hz) and space-based ones (e.g., LISA) at low frequencies (10{sup 4}-10{sup 1} Hz). One of the target sources for pulsar timing arrays is individual supermassive black hole binaries which are expected to form in galactic mergers. In this paper, a likelihood-based method for detection and parameter estimation is presented for a monochromatic continuous gravitational wave signal emitted by such a source. The so-called pulsar terms in the signal that arise due to the breakdown of the long-wavelength approximation are explicitly taken into account in this method. In addition, the method accounts for equality and inequality constraints involved in the semi-analytical maximization of the likelihood over a subset of the parameters. The remaining parameters are maximized over numerically using Particle Swarm Optimization. Thus, the method presented here solves the monochromatic continuous wave detection and parameter estimation problem without invoking some of the approximations that have been used in earlier studies.

  1. Single and double superimposing interferometer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Interferometers which can imprint a coherent delay on a broadband uncollimated beam are described. The delay value can be independent of incident ray angle, allowing interferometry using uncollimated beams from common extended sources such as lamps and fiber bundles, and facilitating Fourier Transform spectroscopy of wide angle sources. Pairs of such interferometers matched in delay and dispersion can measure velocity and communicate using ordinary lamps, wide diameter optical fibers and arbitrary non-imaging paths, and not requiring a laser.

  2. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  3. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  4. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takacs, Peter Z.; Qian, Shi-Nan

    1989-01-01

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  5. Fermilab Cultural Events in Chicago's Far West Side

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Einstein, Black Holes and a Cosmic Chirp Dr. Barry Barish LIGOS, Caltech Presented in collaboration with the Fermilab Users Annual Meeting Wednesday, June 15, 2016 @ 8 pm Tickets - $7 Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves 100 years ago. They have been recently observed from a pair of merging Black Holes by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). The physics of gravitational waves, the detection technique, the observation and its implications will all be

  6. Photorefractive Interferometers for Ultrasonic Measurements on Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafond, E. F.; Brodeur, P. H.; Gerhardstein, J. P.; Habeger, C. C.; Telschow, Kenneth Louis

    2002-12-01

    Photorefractive interferometers have been employed for the detection of ultrasound in metals and composites since 1991 [14]. Instances of laser-generated ultrasound and laser-based detection in paper were reported in 1996 [5]. More recently, bismuth silicon oxide (BSO) photorefractive interferometers were adapted to detect ultrasound in paper [6]. In this article we discuss BSO and GaAs photorefractive detection of ultrasound on different paper grades and present the resulting waveforms. Compared to contact piezoelectric transducer methods, laser interferometry offers signifcant advantages. One of these is that it is a noncontact technique. This is especially important for on-line application to lightweight papers which could be marked or damaged by contact transducers. Broadband ultrasonic laser generation matched with the broadband sensitivity of laser interferometers is another beneft. This is important for obtaining narrow pulses in nondispersive time-of-fight determinations and for measuring the phase velocity of dispersive modes over a wide frequency band. Also, laser ultrasonic techniques provide a measure of bending stiffness through the analysis of low frequency A0 waves.

  7. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  8. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  9. Process control system using polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1994-02-15

    A system for nondestructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figures.

  10. Process control system using polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1994-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  11. Furnace control apparatus using polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  12. Furnace control apparatus using polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-03-28

    A system for nondestructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figures.

  13. Heterodyne interferometer with angstrom-level periodic nonlinearity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitz, Tony L. (Gainesville, FL); Beckwith, John F. (Indialantic, FL)

    2005-01-25

    Displacement measuring interferometer systems and methods are disclosed. One or more acousto-optic modulators for receiving a laser light beam from a laser light source can be utilized to split the laser light beam into two or more laser light beams, while spatially separating frequencies thereof. One or more reflective mechanisms can be utilized to reflect one or more of the laser light beams back to the acousto-optic modulator. Interference of two or more of the laser light beams generally at the acousto-optic modulator can provide an interfered laser light beam thereof. A detector for receiving the interfered laser light beam can be utilized to provide interferometer measurement data.

  14. Achromatic self-referencing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feldman, M.

    1994-04-19

    A self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer is described for accurately measuring laser wavefronts over a broad wavelength range (for example, 600 nm to 900 nm). The apparatus directs a reference portion of an input beam to a reference arm and a measurement portion of the input beam to a measurement arm, recombines the output beams from the reference and measurement arms, and registers the resulting interference pattern ([open quotes]first[close quotes] interferogram) at a first detector. Optionally, subportions of the measurement portion are diverted to second and third detectors, which respectively register intensity and interferogram signals which can be processed to reduce the first interferogram's sensitivity to input noise. The reference arm includes a spatial filter producing a high quality spherical beam from the reference portion, a tilted wedge plate compensating for off-axis aberrations in the spatial filter output, and mirror collimating the radiation transmitted through the tilted wedge plate. The apparatus includes a thermally and mechanically stable baseplate which supports all reference arm optics, or at least the spatial filter, tilted wedge plate, and the collimator. The tilted wedge plate is mounted adjustably with respect to the spatial filter and collimator, so that it can be maintained in an orientation in which it does not introduce significant wave front errors into the beam propagating through the reference arm. The apparatus is polarization insensitive and has an equal path length configuration enabling measurement of radiation from broadband as well as closely spaced laser line sources. 3 figures.

  15. Achromatic self-referencing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    A self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer for accurately measuring laser wavefronts over a broad wavelength range (for example, 600 nm to 900 nm). The apparatus directs a reference portion of an input beam to a reference arm and a measurement portion of the input beam to a measurement arm, recombines the output beams from the reference and measurement arms, and registers the resulting interference pattern ("first" interferogram) at a first detector. Optionally, subportions of the measurement portion are diverted to second and third detectors, which respectively register intensity and interferogram signals which can be processed to reduce the first interferogram's sensitivity to input noise. The reference arm includes a spatial filter producing a high quality spherical beam from the reference portion, a tilted wedge plate compensating for off-axis aberrations in the spatial filter output, and mirror collimating the radiation transmitted through the tilted wedge plate. The apparatus includes a thermally and mechanically stable baseplate which supports all reference arm optics, or at least the spatial filter, tilted wedge plate, and the collimator. The tilted wedge plate is mounted adjustably with respect to the spatial filter and collimator, so that it can be maintained in an orientation in which it does not introduce significant wave front errors into the beam propagating through the reference arm. The apparatus is polarization insensitive and has an equal path length configuration enabling measurement of radiation from broadband as well as closely spaced laser line sources.

  16. A continuous cold atomic beam interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Hongbo; Feng, Yanying Yan, Xueshu; Jiang, Zhikun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Xiaojia; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2015-03-07

    We demonstrate an atom interferometer that uses a laser-cooled continuous beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms having velocities of 10–20 m/s. With spatially separated Raman beams to coherently manipulate the atomic wave packets, Mach–Zehnder interference fringes are observed at an interference distance of 2L = 19 mm. The apparatus operates within a small enclosed area of 0.07 mm{sup 2} at a bandwidth of 190 Hz with a deduced sensitivity of 7.8×10{sup −5} rad/s/√(Hz) for rotations. Using a low-velocity continuous atomic source in an atom interferometer enables high sampling rates and bandwidths without sacrificing sensitivity and compactness, which are important for applications in real dynamic environments.

  17. Analysis of a free oscillation atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kafle, Rudra P.; Zozulya, Alex A.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2011-09-15

    We analyze a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)-based free oscillation atom Michelson interferometer in a weakly confining harmonic magnetic trap. A BEC at the center of the trap is split into two harmonics by a laser standing wave. The harmonics move in opposite directions with equal speeds and turn back under the influence of the trapping potential at their classical turning points. The harmonics are allowed to pass through each other and a recombination pulse is applied when they overlap at the end of a cycle after they return for the second time. We derive an expression for the contrast of the interferometric fringes and obtain the fundamental limit of performance of the interferometer in the parameter space.

  18. Multipulsed dynamic moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.

    1991-01-01

    An improved dynamic moire interferometer comprised of a lasing medium providing a plurality of beams of coherent light, a multiple q-switch producing multiple trains of 100,000 or more pulses per second, a combining means collimating multiple trains of pulses into substantially a single train and directing beams to specimen gratings affixed to a test material, and a controller, triggering and sequencing the emission of the pulses with the occurrence and recording of a dynamic loading event.

  19. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1997-06-24

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  20. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  1. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  2. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  3. Polarizing optical interferometer having a dual use optical element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-04-04

    A system for nondestructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figures.

  4. Polarizing optical interferometer having a dual use optical element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  5. Laser system preset unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodwin, William L.

    1977-01-01

    An electronic circuit is provided which may be used to preset a digital display unit of a Zeeman-effect layer interferometer system which derives distance measurements by comparing a reference signal to a Doppler signal generated at the output of the interferometer laser head. The circuit presets dimensional offsets in the interferometer digital display by electronically inducing a variation in either the Doppler signal or the reference signal, depending upon the direction of the offset, to achieve the desired display preset.

  6. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gero, Jonathan; Ermold, Brian; Gaustad, Krista; Koontz, Annette; Hackel, Denny; Garcia, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) is a ground-based instrument that measures the downwelling infrared radiance from the Earth’s atmosphere. The observations have broad spectral content and sufficient spectral resolution to discriminate among gaseous emitters (e.g., carbon dioxide and water vapor) and suspended matter (e.g., aerosols, water droplets, and ice crystals). These upward-looking surface observations can be used to obtain vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and water vapor, as well as measurements of trace gases (e.g., ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane) and downwelling infrared spectral signatures of clouds and aerosols. The AERI is a passive remote sounding instrument, employing a Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the spectral range 3.3–19.2 μm (520–3020 cm-1) at an unapodized resolution of 0.5 cm-1 (max optical path difference of 1 cm). The extended-range AERI (ER-AERI) deployed in dry climates, like in Alaska, have a spectral range of 3.3–25.0 μm (400–3020 cm-1) that allow measurements in the far-infrared region. Typically, the AERI averages views of the sky over a 16-second interval and operates continuously.

  7. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein predicted Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." The collision of two black holes - an event detected for the first time ever by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO - is seen in this still from a computer simulation. (Image by SXS)

  8. A new method for determining the plasma electron density using three-color interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2012-06-15

    A new method for determining the plasma electron density using the fractional fringes on three-color interferometer is proposed. Integrated phase shift on each interferometer is derived without using the temporal history of the fractional fringes. The dependence on the fringe resolution and the electrical noise are simulated on the wavelengths of CO{sub 2} laser. Short-time integrations of the fractional fringes enhance the reliability of this method.

  9. Interferometer for the measurement of plasma density

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Abram R.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer which combines the advantages of a coupled cavity interferometer requiring alignment of only one light beam, and a quadrature interferometer which has the ability to track multi-fringe phase excursions unambiguously. The device utilizes a Bragg cell for generating a signal which is electronically analyzed to unambiguously determine phase modulation which is proportional to the path integral of the plasma density.

  10. Solid optical ring interferometer for high-throughput feedback-free spectral analysis and filtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrak, B.; Peiris, M.; Muller, A.

    2015-02-15

    We describe a simple and inexpensive optical ring interferometer for use in high-resolution spectral analysis and filtering. It consists of a solid cuboid, reflection-coated on two opposite sides, in which constructive interference occurs for waves in a rhombic trajectory. Due to its monolithic design, the interferometers resonance frequencies are insensitive to environmental disturbances over time. Additional advantages are its simplicity of alignment, high-throughput, and feedback-free operation. If desired, it can be stabilized with a secondary laser without disturbance of the primary signal. We illustrate the use of the interferometer for the measurement of the spectral Mollow triplet from a quantum dot and characterize its long-term stability for filtering applications.

  11. Portable Doppler interferometer system for shock diagnostics and high speed motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, K.J.; Crump, O.B. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a system that uses the Doppler effect and is widely used for measuring the velocity of projectiles, detonations, flying plates, shock pressures (particle velocity) and other high speed/high acceleration motion. Other methods of measurement such as accelerometers and pressure gauges have disadvantages in that they are sensitive to radiation, electromagnetic pulses, and their mass can drastically alter the velocity of the projectile. VISAR uses single frequency-single mode laser fight focused onto a target of interest. Reflected fight from the target is collected and sent through a modified, unequal leg Michelson interferometer. In the interferometer the light is split into two components which travel through the legs of the interferometer cavity and are then recombined. When the light recombines, an interference pattern is created which can range from dark (destructive interference) to bright (constructive interference). When the target moves, the reflected laser light experiences a frequency shift (increase) with respect to the frequency from the target in a static condition. Since the Doppler shifted light is split and routed through an unequal leg interferometer cavity, there is a time lag of the light containing the Doppler information at the recombination point in the interferometer. The effect of the time lag is to create a sinusoidally changing interference pattern (commonly called fringes). Since the interferometer time delay, laser wavelength, and the speed of light are known, an accurate measurement of target velocity/acceleration may be measured by analyzing both the number of tinges and the speed of tinge generation (system accuracy is 3--4%).

  12. Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... currently being devel- oped and tested which will employ a three-wave far-infrared laser. ... Laser polarimetry has been used previously to investi- gate magnetic fluctuations ...

  13. Nonlocal polarization interferometer for entanglement detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Brian P; Humble, Travis S; Grice, Warren P

    2014-01-01

    We report a nonlocal interferometer capable of detecting entanglement and identifying Bell states statistically. This is possible due to the interferometer's unique correlation dependence on the antidiagonal elements of the density matrix, which have distinct bounds for separable states and unique values for the four Bell states. The interferometer consists of two spatially separated balanced Mach-Zehnder or Sagnac interferometers that share a polarization-entangled source. Correlations between these interferometers exhibit nonlocal interference, while single-photon interference is suppressed. This interferometer also allows for a unique version of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell test where the local reality is the photon polarization. We present the relevant theory and experimental results.

  14. Nonlocal polarization interferometer for entanglement detection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, Brian P; Humble, Travis S; Grice, Warren P

    2014-01-01

    We report a nonlocal interferometer capable of detecting entanglement and identifying Bell states statistically. This is possible due to the interferometer's unique correlation dependence on the antidiagonal elements of the density matrix, which have distinct bounds for separable states and unique values for the four Bell states. The interferometer consists of two spatially separated balanced Mach-Zehnder or Sagnac interferometers that share a polarization-entangled source. Correlations between these interferometers exhibit nonlocal interference, while single-photon interference is suppressed. This interferometer also allows for a unique version of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell test where the local reality is the photon polarization. We present themore » relevant theory and experimental results.« less

  15. Ordinary SQUID interferometers and superfluid helium matter wave interferometers: The role of quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovashkin, A. I.; Zherikhina, L. N. Tskhovrebov, A. M.; Izmailov, G. N.; Ozolin, V. V.

    2010-08-15

    When comparing the operation of a superfluid helium matter wave quantum interferometer (He SQUID) with that of an ordinary direct-current quantum interferometer (dc SQUID), we estimate their resolution limitation that correspond to quantum fluctuations. An alternative mode of operation of the interferometer as a unified macroquantum system is considered.

  16. Hand held phase-shifting diffraction Moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1994-09-20

    An interferometer is described in which a coherent beam of light is generated within a remote case and transmitted to a hand held unit tethered to said remote case, said hand held unit having optical elements for directing a pair of mutually coherent collimated laser beams at a diffraction grating. Data from the secondary or diffracted beams are then transmitted to a separate video and data acquisition system for recording and analysis for load induced deformation or for identification purposes. Means are also provided for shifting the phase of one incident beam relative to the other incident beam and being controlled from within said remote case. 4 figs.

  17. Hand held phase-shifting diffraction moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    An interferometer in which a coherent beam of light is generated within a remote case and transmitted to a hand held unit tethered to said remote case, said hand held unit having optical elements for directing a pair of mutually coherent collimated laser beams at a diffraction grating. Data from the secondary or diffracted beams are then transmitted to a separate video and data acquisition system for recording and analysis for load induced deformation or for identification purposes. Means are also provided for shifting the phase of one incident beam relative to the other incident beam and being controlled from within said remote case.

  18. A new method for determining the plasma electron density using optical frequency comb interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki Tojo, Hiroshi; Sasao, Hajime; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-15

    A new method of plasma electron density measurement using interferometric phases (fractional fringes) of an optical frequency comb interferometer is proposed. Using the characteristics of the optical frequency comb laser, high density measurement can be achieved without fringe counting errors. Simulations show that the short wavelength and wide wavelength range of the laser source and low noise in interferometric phases measurements are effective to reduce ambiguity of measured density.

  19. laser | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    laser

  20. Impact of anomalous dispersion on the interferometer measurements of plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2004-12-16

    For many decades optical interferometers have been used to measure the electron density of plasmas. During the last ten years X-ray lasers in the wavelength range 14 to 47 nm have enabled researchers to use interferometers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes that the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index of refraction less than one and the electron density proportional to the number of fringe shifts. Recent experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one and made us question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction. Recent calculations showed how the anomalous dispersion from the bound electrons can dominate the index of refraction in many types of plasma and make the index greater than one or enhance the index such that one would greatly overestimate the electron density of the plasma using interferometers. In this work we calculate the index of refraction of C, Al, Ti, and Pd plasmas for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV (12.4 nm) using a new average-atom code. The results show large variations from the free electron approximation under many different plasma conditions. We validate the average-atom code against the more detailed OPAL code for carbon and aluminum plasmas. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  1. Beam shuttering interferometer and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.; Lassahn, Gordon D.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus resulting in the simplification of phase shifting interferometry by eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift between interferograms constant. The present invention provides a simple, inexpensive means to shutter each independent beam of the interferometer in order to facilitate the data acquisition requirements for optical interferometry and phase shifting interferometry. By eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift constant, a simple, economical means and apparatus for performing the technique of phase shifting interferometry is provide which, by thermally expanding a fiber optical cable changes the optical path distance of one incident beam relative to another.

  2. Beam shuttering interferometer and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Lassahn, G.D.

    1993-07-27

    A method and apparatus resulting in the simplification of phase shifting interferometry by eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift between interferograms constant. The present invention provides a simple, inexpensive means to shutter each independent beam of the interferometer in order to facilitate the data acquisition requirements for optical interferometry and phase shifting interferometry. By eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift constant, a simple, economical means and apparatus for performing the technique of phase shifting interferometry is provide which, by thermally expanding a fiber optical cable changes the optical path distance of one incident beam relative to another.

  3. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  4. High data-rate atom interferometers through high recapture efficiency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biedermann, Grant; Rakholia, Akash Vrijal; McGuinness, Hayden

    2015-01-27

    An inertial sensing system includes a magneto-optical trap (MOT) that traps atoms within a specified trapping region. The system also includes a cooling laser that cools the trapped atoms so that the atoms remain within the specified region for a specified amount of time. The system further includes a light-pulse atom interferometer (LPAI) that performs an interferometric interrogation of the atoms to determine phase changes in the atoms. The system includes a controller that controls the timing of MOT and cooling laser operations, and controls the timing of interferometric operations to substantially recapture the atoms in the specified trapping region. The system includes a processor that determines the amount inertial movement of the inertial sensing system based on the determined phase changes in the atoms. Also, a method of inertial sensing using this inertial sensing system includes recapture of atoms within the MOT following interferometric interrogation by the LPAI.

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Absolute Solar Transmittance Interferometer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAbsolute Solar Transmittance Interferometer (ASTI) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at ...

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object using a polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-05-09

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  7. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, Philip L.; Sweatt, William C.; Crump, Jr., O. B.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    1993-09-14

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  8. Laser barometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Kevin R.; Shiels, David; Rash, Tim

    2001-02-06

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  9. Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    The scope of our research in laser and related technologies has grown over the years and has attracted a broad user base for applications within DOE, DOD, and private industry. Within the next few years, we expect to begin constructing the National Ignition Facility, to make substantial progress in deploying AVLIS technology for uranium and gadolinium enrichment, and to develop new radar sensing techniques to detect underwater objects. Further, we expect to translate LLNL patent ideas in microlithography into useful industrial products and to successfully apply high-power, diode-based laser technology to industrial and government applications.

  10. Short gamma-ray burst formation rate from BATSE data using E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation and the minimum gravitational-wave event rate of a coalescing compact binary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonetoku, Daisuke; Sawano, Tatsuya; Toyanago, Asuka [College of Science and Engineering, School of Mathematics and Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takahashi, Keitaro, E-mail: yonetoku@astro.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp, E-mail: takashi@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Using 72 short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) with well determined spectral data observed by BATSE, we determine their redshift and luminosity by applying the E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation for SGRBs found by Tsutsui et al. For 53 SGRBs with an observed flux brighter than 4 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup 2} s{sup 1}, the cumulative redshift distribution up to z = 1 agrees well with that of 22 Swift SGRBs. This suggests that the redshift determination by the E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation for SGRBs works well. The minimum event rate at z = 0 is estimated as R{sub on?axis}{sup min}=6.3{sub ?3.9}{sup +3.1} 10{sup ?10} events Mpc{sup ?3} yr{sup ?1}, so that the minimum beaming angle is 0.6-7.8 assuming a merging rate of 10{sup 7}- 4 10{sup 6} events Mpc{sup 3} yr{sup 1} suggested from the binary pulsar data. Interestingly, this angle is consistent with that for SGRB 130603B of ?4-8. On the other hand, if we assume a beaming angle of ?6 suggested from four SGRBs with the observed beaming angle value, then the minimum event rate including off-axis SGRBs is estimated as R{sub all}{sup min}=1.15{sub ?0.66}{sup +0.56} 10{sup ?7} events Mpc{sup ?3} yr{sup ?1}. If SGRBs are induced by the coalescence of binary neutron stars (NSs) and/or black holes (BHs), then this event rate leads to a minimum gravitational-wave detection rate of 3.8{sub ?2.2}{sup +1.8} (146{sub ?83}{sup +71}) events yr{sup ?1} for an NS-NS (NS-BH) binary, respectively, by a worldwide network with KAGRA, advanced-LIGO, advanced-VIRGO, and GEO.

  11. Single-shot electron bunch length measurements using a spatial electro-optical autocorrelation interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suetterlin, Daniel; Erni, Daniel; Schlott, Volker; Sigg, Hans; Jaeckel, Heinz; Murk, Axel

    2010-10-15

    A spatial, electro-optical autocorrelation (EOA) interferometer using the vertically polarized lobes of coherent transition radiation (CTR) has been developed as a single-shot electron bunch length monitor at an optical beam port downstream the 100 MeV preinjector LINAC of the Swiss Light Source. This EOA monitor combines the advantages of step-scan interferometers (high temporal resolution) [D. Mihalcea et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 9, 082801 (2006) and T. Takahashi and K. Takami, Infrared Phys. Technol. 51, 363 (2008)] and terahertz-gating technologies [U. Schmidhammer et al., Appl. Phys. B: Lasers Opt. 94, 95 (2009) and B. Steffen et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 032802 (2009)] (fast response), providing the possibility to tune the accelerator with an online bunch length diagnostics. While a proof of principle of the spatial interferometer was achieved by step-scan measurements with far-infrared detectors, the single-shot capability of the monitor has been demonstrated by electro-optical correlation of the spatial CTR interference pattern with fairly long (500 ps) neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser pulses in a ZnTe crystal. In single-shot operation, variations of the bunch length between 1.5 and 4 ps due to different phase settings of the LINAC bunching cavities have been measured with subpicosecond time resolution.

  12. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medecki, Hector

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams.

  13. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medecki, H.

    1998-11-10

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams. 8 figs.

  14. Two-path plasmonic interferometer with integrated detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Aizin, Gregory

    2016-03-29

    An electrically tunable terahertz two-path plasmonic interferometer with an integrated detection element can down convert a terahertz field to a rectified DC signal. The integrated detector utilizes a resonant plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism that measures the component of the plasma waves in-phase with an excitation field that functions as the local oscillator in the mixer. The plasmonic interferometer comprises two independently tuned electrical paths. The plasmonic interferometer enables a spectrometer-on-a-chip where the tuning of electrical path length plays an analogous role to that of physical path length in macroscopic Fourier transform interferometers.

  15. Optical layout and mechanical structure of polarimeter-interferometer system for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Z. Y.; Liu, H. Q. Jie, Y. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Shen, J. S.; An, Z. H.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Li, G. S.; Zhu, X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.

    2014-11-15

    A Far-InfaRed (FIR) three-wave POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system for measurement current density profile and electron density profile is under development for the EAST tokamak. The FIR beams are transmitted from the laser room to the optical tower adjacent to EAST via ?20 m overmoded dielectric waveguide and then divided into 5 horizontal chords. The optical arrangement was designed using ZEMAX, which provides information on the beam spot size and energy distribution throughout the optical system. ZEMAX calculations used to optimize the optical layout design are combined with the mechanical design from CATIA, providing a 3D visualization of the entire POINT system.

  16. Dual-domain lateral shearing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2004-03-16

    The phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) was developed to address the problem of at-wavelength metrology of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical systems. Although extremely accurate, the fact that the PS/PDI is limited to use with coherent EUV sources, such as undulator radiation, is a drawback for its widespread use. An alternative to the PS/PDI, with relaxed coherence requirements, is lateral shearing interferometry (LSI). The use of a cross-grating, carrier-frequency configuration to characterize a large-field 4.times.-reduction EUV lithography optic is demonstrated. The results obtained are directly compared with PS/PDI measurements. A defocused implementation of the lateral shearing interferometer in which an image-plane filter allows both phase-shifting and Fourier wavefront recovery. The two wavefront recovery methods can be combined in a dual-domain technique providing suppression of noise added by self-interference of high-frequency components in the test-optic wavefront.

  17. Multichannel microwave interferometer for the levitated dipole experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boxer, Alexander C.; Garnier, Darren T.; Mauel, Michael E.

    2009-04-15

    A four-channel microwave interferometer (center frequency: 60 GHz) has been constructed to measure plasma density profiles in the levitated dipole experiment (LDX). The LDX interferometer has a unique design owing to the unique geometry of LDX. The main design features of the interferometer are: (1) the transmitted beam traverses the plasma entirely in O-mode; (2) the interferometer is a heterodyne system employing two free-running oscillators; (3) four signals of data are received from just on transmitted beam; (4) phase shifts are detected in quadrature. Calibration tests demonstrate that the interferometer measures phase shifts with an uncertainty of approximately 5 deg. Plasma densities in LDX corresponding to phase shifts of up to 5{pi} are routinely and successfully measured.

  18. Understanding the dramatic role of anomalous dispersion on the measurement of electron densities in plasmas using interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2005-07-20

    For decades the electron density of plasmas has been measured using optical interferometers. With the availability of good X-ray laser sources in the last decade interferometers have been extended into the wavelength range 14-47 nm, which has enabled researchers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Recent interferometer experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 nm and brought into question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index. In this paper we show how the anomalous dispersion from bound electrons can dominate the free electron contribution to the index of refraction in many plasmas and make the index greater than one or enhance the contribution to the index such that one would greatly overestimate the density of the plasma using interferometers. Using a new average-atom code we calculate the index of refraction in many plasmas at different temperatures for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV and compare against calculations done with OPAL. We also present examples of other plasmas that may have index of refraction greater than one at X-ray laser energies. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  19. Investigation of microscale shock phenomena using a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trott, Wayne M.; Asay, James R.

    1998-07-10

    An optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) can be operated in a line-imaging configuration that effectively combines subnanosecond temporal resolution with high spatial resolution (length scales<10 {mu}m). This technique easily captures very small temporal variations in the onset of motion across the face of a small-scale (400-{mu}m diameter) laser-driven flyer. In another application, line-imaging ORVIS has been used to obtain spatially resolved particle velocity vs. time information at flyer impact on a lithium fluoride witness plate. Subnanosecond differences in flyer arrival time are clearly resolved and the results also show subtle amplitude variations in the pulse delivered at different locations of the acceptor. Observed velocity field variations in laser acceleration of a patterned flyer target demonstrate the feasibility of using line ORVIS in studies of instability formation and growth. These results indicate that this diagnostic can be applied to a wide variety of shock phenomena.

  20. Fourier-transform and global contrast interferometer alignment methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2001-01-01

    Interferometric methods are presented to facilitate alignment of image-plane components within an interferometer and for the magnified viewing of interferometer masks in situ. Fourier-transforms are performed on intensity patterns that are detected with the interferometer and are used to calculate pseudo-images of the electric field in the image plane of the test optic where the critical alignment of various components is being performed. Fine alignment is aided by the introduction and optimization of a global contrast parameter that is easily calculated from the Fourier-transform.

  1. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Handbook

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gero, Jonathan; Hackel, Denny; Garcia, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) is a ground-based instrument that measures the downwelling infrared radiance from the Earth’s atmosphere. The observations have broad spectral content and sufficient spectral resolution to discriminate among gaseous emitters (e.g., carbon dioxide and water vapor) and suspended matter (e.g., aerosols, water droplets, and ice crystals). These upward-looking surface observations can be used to obtain vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and water vapor, as well as measurements of trace gases (e.g., ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane) and downwelling infrared spectral signatures of clouds and aerosols.The AERI is a passive remote sounding instrument, employing a Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the spectral range 3.3–19.2 μm (520–3020 cm-1) at an unapodized resolution of 0.5 cm-1 (max optical path difference of 1 cm). The extended-range AERI (ER-AERI) deployed in dry climates, like in Alaska, have a spectral range of 3.3–25.0 μm (400–3020 cm-1) that allow measurements in the far-infrared region. Typically, the AERI averages views of the sky over a 16-second interval and operates continuously.

  2. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  3. DIII-D in-vessel port cover and shutter assembly for the phase contrast interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The entire outer wall of the DIII-D vacuum vessel interion is covered with a regular array of graphite tiles. Certain of the diagnostic ports through the outer vessel wall contain equipment which is shielded from the plasma by installing port covers designed to withstand energy deposition. If the diagnostic contained in the port must communicate with the vessel volume, a shutter assembly is usually provided. In the ports at 285 degrees, R+1 and R-1, interferometer mirrors have been installed to provide a means for transmitting a large diameter CO-2 laser beam through the edge of the plasma. To protect the mirrors and other hardware contained in these ports, a special protective plate and shutter arrangement has been designed. This report describes the details of design, fabrication, and installation of these protective covers and shutters.

  4. Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system for current density measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X. Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Wang, Z. X.; Qian, J. P.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.; Li, G. S.

    2014-11-15

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 10{sup 16} m{sup ?2} (?2), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1.

  5. Multiphoton- and simultaneous conjugate Ramsey-Borde atom interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Holger; Chiow, Sheng-wey; Herrmann, Sven [Physics Department, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Chu, Steven [Physics Department, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2008-03-06

    We report on our experiment to measure h/M, the ratio of the Planck constant to the mass of Cs atoms, and thereby the fine-structure constant. The target accuracy is 1 part per billion or better. We focus on two recent milestones: (i) The first realization of atom interferometers based on light-pulse beam splitters that transfer the momentum of up to 12 photon pairs, which increases the useful signal (matter wave phase shift) by a factor of 144 compared to the beam splitters used in the best present atom interferometers. Moreover, they lead to a cancellation of important systematic effects. (ii) The first realization of a simultaneous pair of conjugate Ramsey-Borde interferometers. In these, the relative sign of the inertial term is reversed so that it can be cancelled. Simultaneous operation means that this holds for a time-dependent inertial term (vibrations) too, which promises a substantial improvement in the signal to noise ratio.

  6. Approaching attometer laser vibrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rembe, Christian; Kadner, Lisa; Giesen, Moritz

    2014-05-27

    The heterodyne two-beam interferometer has been proven to be the optimal solution for laser-Doppler vibrometry regarding accuracy and signal robustness. The theoretical resolution limit for a two-beam interferometer of laser class 3R (up to 5 mW visible measurement-light) is in the regime of a few femtometer per square-root Hertz and well suited to study vibrations in microstructures. However, some new applications of RF-MEM resonators, nanostructures, and surface-nano-defect detection require resolutions beyond that limit. The resolution depends only on the noise and the sensor sensitivity to specimen displacements. The noise is already defined in nowadays systems by the quantum nature of light for a properly designed optical sensor and more light would lead to an inacceptable influence like heating of a very tiny structure. Thus, noise can only be improved by squeezed-light techniques which require a negligible loss of measurement light which is impossible for almost all technical measurement tasks. Thus, improving the sensitivity is the only possible path which could make attometer laser vibrometry possible. Decreasing the measurement wavelength would increase the sensitivity but would also increase the photon shot noise. In this paper, we discuss an approach to increase the sensitivity by assembling an additional mirror between interferometer and specimen to form an optical cavity. A detailed theoretical analysis of this setup is presented and we derive the resolution limit, discuss the main contributions to the uncertainty budget, and show a first experiment proving the sensitivity amplification of our approach.

  7. Light pulse analysis with a multi-state atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, I.; Lombardi, P.; Schfer, F.; Petrovic, J.; Cataliotti, F. S.

    2014-12-04

    We present a controllable multi-state cold-atom interferometer that is easy-to-use and fully merged on an atom chip. We demonstrate its applications as a sensor of the fields whose interactions with atoms are state-dependent.

  8. Laser Roadshow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    outreach Laser Roadshow The NIF Laser Roadshow includes a number of interactive laser demonstrations (Laser Light Fountain, Laser DJ, and NIF "3D ride") that have traveled across ...

  9. Investigation of microscale shock phenomena using a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trott, W.M.; Asay, J.R.

    1998-07-01

    An optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) can be operated in a line-imaging configuration that effectively combines subnanosecond temporal resolution with high spatial resolution (length scales{lt}10{mu}m). This technique easily captures very small temporal variations in the onset of motion across the face of a small-scale (400-{mu}m diameter) laser-driven flyer. In another application, line-imaging ORVIS has been used to obtain spatially resolved particle velocity vs. time information at flyer impact on a lithium fluoride witness plate. Subnanosecond differences in flyer arrival time are clearly resolved and the results also show subtle amplitude variations in the pulse delivered at different locations of the acceptor. Observed velocity field variations in laser acceleration of a patterned flyer target demonstrate the feasibility of using line ORVIS in studies of instability formation and growth. These results indicate that this diagnostic can be applied to a wide variety of shock phenomena. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer mask designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2001-01-01

    In a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer, different image-plane mask designs can improve the operation of the interferometer. By keeping the test beam window of the mask small compared to the separation distance between the beams, the problem of energy from the reference beam leaking through the test beam window is reduced. By rotating the grating and mask 45.degree., only a single one-dimensional translation stage is required for phase-shifting. By keeping two reference pinholes in the same orientation about the test beam window, only a single grating orientation, and thus a single one-dimensional translation stage, is required. The use of a two-dimensional grating allows for a multiplicity of pinholes to be used about the pattern of diffracted orders of the grating at the mask. Orientation marks on the mask can be used to orient the device and indicate the position of the reference pinholes.

  11. Phase estimation with nonunitary interferometers: Information as a metric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahder, Thomas B.

    2011-05-15

    Determining the phase in one arm of a quantum interferometer is discussed taking into account the three nonideal aspects in real experiments: nondeterministic state preparation, nonunitary state evolution due to losses during state propagation, and imperfect state detection. A general expression is written for the probability of a measurement outcome taking into account these three nonideal aspects. As an example of applying the formalism, the classical Fisher information and fidelity (Shannon mutual information between phase and measurements) are computed for few-photon Fock and N00N states input into a lossy Mach-Zehnder interferometer. These three nonideal aspects lead to qualitative differences in phase estimation, such as a decrease in fidelity and Fisher information that depends on the true value of the phase.

  12. Noise-Immune Conjugate Large-Area Atom Interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiow Shengwey; Herrmann, Sven [Physics Department, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Chu, Steven; Mueller, Holger [Physics Department, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, 366 Le Conte Hall, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    We present a pair of simultaneous conjugate Ramsey-Borde atom interferometers using large (20(Planck constant/2pi)k)-momentum transfer beam splitters, where (Planck constant/2pi)k is the photon momentum. Simultaneous operation allows for common-mode rejection of vibrational noise. This allows us to surpass the enclosed space-time area of previous interferometers with a splitting of 20(Planck constant/2pi)k by a factor of 2500. Using a splitting of 10(Planck constant/2pi)k, we demonstrate a 3.4 ppb resolution in the measurement of the fine structure constant. Examples for applications in tests of fundamental laws of physics are given.

  13. The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preliminary Assessments of Instrument Deployments in 2006 The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and Preliminary Assessments of Instrument Deployments in 2006 Dedecker, Ralph University of Wisconsin Demirgian, Jack Argonne National Laboratory Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Revercomb, Henry University of Wisconsin-Madison Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Instruments One of the key

  14. Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Data Analysis Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Data Analysis Methods R. O. Knuteson, W. L. Smith, S. A. Ackerman, H. E. Revercomb, H. Woolf, and H. Howell Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Inter- ferometer (AERI) have been analyzed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Fourier Transform Data Analysis Tools science team project under the

  15. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer grating designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan; Tejnil, Edita

    2001-01-01

    In a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer, by sending the zeroth-order diffraction to the reference pinhole of the mask and the first-order diffraction to the test beam window of the mask, the test and reference beam intensities can be balanced and the fringe contrast improved. Additionally, using a duty cycle of the diffraction grating other than 50%, the fringe contrast can also be improved.

  16. Statistical anisotropies in gravitational waves in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Wang, Yi E-mail: emami@ipm.ir E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-09-01

    Solid inflation can support a long period of anisotropic inflation. We calculate the statistical anisotropies in the scalar and tensor power spectra and their cross-correlation in anisotropic solid inflation. The tensor-scalar cross-correlation can either be positive or negative, which impacts the statistical anisotropies of the TT and TB spectra in CMB map more significantly compared with the tensor self-correlation. The tensor power spectrum contains potentially comparable contributions from quadrupole and octopole angular patterns, which is different from the power spectra of scalar, the cross-correlation or the scalar bispectrum, where the quadrupole type statistical anisotropy dominates over octopole.

  17. General properties of the gravitational wave spectrum from phase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10.1103PhysRevD.79.083519; (c) 2009 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Country of Publication: United States Language: ...

  18. New Sources of Gravitational Waves During Inflation (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    constitute a determination of the inflationary Hubble scale. Authors: Senatore, Leonardo ; Silverstein, Eva ; Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC ; Zaldarriaga, Matias ;...

  19. Gravitational wave generation from bubble collisions in first...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In our approach, we provide a model for the bubble velocity power spectrum, suitable for ... SPECTRA; STRESSES; TURBULENCE; VELOCITY Word Cloud More Like This Full Text ...

  20. Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Physics. "It opens a whole new way to look at the universe and more. It is brilliance in all dimensions." The collision of two black holes - an event detected for the ...

  1. Gravitational waves found, black-hole models led the way

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Gravitational Redshift of Galaxies in Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Title: Gravitational Redshift of Galaxies in Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Authors: Sadeh, Iftach ; Feng, Low Lerh ; Lahav, Ofer Publication Date: 2015-02-20 OSTI Identifier: 1181622 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

  2. Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    scalable sensitivity (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor with scalable sensitivity Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on February 5, 2017 Title: Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor with scalable sensitivity Our design, fabrication, and characterization of a label-free Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) optical biosensor that incorporates a highly dispersive

  3. Wollaston prism phase-stepping point diffraction interferometer and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C.

    2004-10-12

    A Wollaston prism phase-stepping point diffraction interferometer for testing a test optic. The Wollaston prism shears light into reference and signal beams, and provides phase stepping at increased accuracy by translating the Wollaston prism in a lateral direction with respect to the optical path. The reference beam produced by the Wollaston prism is directed through a pinhole of a diaphragm to produce a perfect spherical reference wave. The spherical reference wave is recombined with the signal beam to produce an interference fringe pattern of greater accuracy.

  4. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer phase grating designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick (Oakland, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Diffraction phase gratings are employed in phase-shifting point diffraction interferometers to improve the interferometric fringe contrast. The diffraction phase grating diffracts a zeroth-order diffraction of light at a first power level to the test-beam window of a mask that is positioned at the image plane and a first-order diffraction at a second power to the reference-beam pinhole. The diffraction phase grating is preferably selected to yield a desired ratio of the first power level to second power level.

  5. On-fiber plasmonic interferometer for multi-parameter sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhijian [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Chen, Yongyao [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Liu, Haijun [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Bae, Hyungdae [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Olson, Douglas A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Gupta, Ashwani K. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Yu, Miao [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel miniature multi-parameter sensing device based on a plasmonic interferometer fabricated on a fiber facet in the optical communication wavelength range. This device enables the coupling between surface plasmon resonance and plasmonic interference in the structure, which are the two essential mechanisms for multi-parameter sensing. We experimentally show that these two mechanisms have distinctive responses to temperature and refractive index, rendering the device the capability of simultaneous temperature and refractive index measurement on an ultra-miniature form factor. A high refractive index sensitivity of 220 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) and a high temperature sensitivity of 60 pm/ C is achieved with our device.

  6. Measurements of Martin-Puplett Interferometer Limitations using Blackbody Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Klopf, John M.

    2013-06-01

    Frequency domain measurements with Martin-Puplett interferometer is one of a few techniques capable of bunch length measurements at the level of ~ 100 fs. As the bunch length becomes shorter, it is important to know and be able to measure the limitations of the instrument in terms of shortest measurable bunch length. In this paper we describe an experiment using a blackbody source with the modified Martin-Puplett interferometer that is routine- ly used for bunch length measurements at the JLab FEL, as a way to estimate the shortest, measurable bunch length. The limitation comes from high frequency cut-off of the wire-grid polarizer currently used and is estimated to be 50 fs RMS. The measurements are made with the same Golay cell detector that is used for beam measure- ments. We demonstrate that, even though the blackbody source is many orders of magnitude less bright than the coherent transition or synchrotron radiation, it can be used for the measurements and gives a very good signal to noise ratio in combination with lock-in detection. We also compare the measurements made in air and in vacuum to characterize the very strong effect of the atmospheric absorption.

  7. Statistical measures of Planck scale signal correlations in interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Craig J.; Kwon, Ohkyung

    2015-06-22

    A model-independent statistical framework is presented to interpret data from systems where the mean time derivative of positional cross correlation between world lines, a measure of spreading in a quantum geometrical wave function, is measured with a precision smaller than the Planck time. The framework provides a general way to constrain possible departures from perfect independence of classical world lines, associated with Planck scale bounds on positional information. A parametrized candidate set of possible correlation functions is shown to be consistent with the known causal structure of the classical geometry measured by an apparatus, and the holographic scaling of information suggested by gravity. Frequency-domain power spectra are derived that can be compared with interferometer data. As a result, simple projections of sensitivity for specific experimental set-ups suggests that measurements will directly yield constraints on a universal time derivative of the correlation function, and thereby confirm or rule out a class of Planck scale departures from classical geometry.

  8. On-fiber plasmonic interferometer for multi-parameter sensing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhijian; Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Bae, Hyungdae; Olson, Douglas A.; Gupta, Ashwani K.; Yu, Miao

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel miniature multi-parameter sensing device based on a plasmonic interferometer fabricated on a fiber facet in the optical communication wavelength range. This device enables the coupling between surface plasmon resonance and plasmonic interference in the structure, which are the two essential mechanisms for multi-parameter sensing. We experimentally show that these two mechanisms have distinctive responses to temperature and refractive index, rendering the device the capability of simultaneous temperature and refractive index measurement on an ultra-miniature form factor. A high refractive index sensitivity of 220 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) and a high temperature sensitivity of 60morepm/ C is achieved with our device.less

  9. Precision Laser Annealing of Focal Plane Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Daniel A.; DeRose, Christopher; Starbuck, Andrew Lea; Verley, Jason C.; Jenkins, Mark W.

    2015-09-01

    We present results from laser annealing experiments in Si using a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG microlaser. Exposure with laser at fluence values above the damage threshold of commercially available photodiodes results in electrical damage (as measured by an increase in photodiode dark current). We show that increasing the laser fluence to values in excess of the damage threshold can result in annealing of a damage site and a reduction in detector dark current by as much as 100x in some cases. A still further increase in fluence results in irreparable damage. Thus we demonstrate the presence of a laser annealing window over which performance of damaged detectors can be at least partially reconstituted. Moreover dark current reduction is observed over the entire operating range of the diode indicating that device performance has been improved for all values of reverse bias voltage. Additionally, we will present results of laser annealing in Si waveguides. By exposing a small (<10 um) length of a Si waveguide to an annealing laser pulse, the longitudinal phase of light acquired in propagating through the waveguide can be modified with high precision, <15 milliradian per laser pulse. Phase tuning by 180 degrees is exhibited with multiple exposures to one arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer at fluence values below the morphological damage threshold of an etched Si waveguide. No reduction in optical transmission at 1550 nm was found after 220 annealing laser shots. Modeling results for laser annealing in Si are also presented.

  10. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  11. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of gravity acceleration and gravity gradient with an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorrentino, F.; Lien, Y.-H.; Rosi, G.; Tino, G. M.; Bertoldi, A.; Bodart, Q.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Angelis, M. de; Prevedelli, M.

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate a method to measure the gravitational acceleration with a dual cloud atom interferometer; the use of simultaneous atom interferometers reduces the effect of seismic noise on the gravity measurement. At the same time, the apparatus is capable of accurate measurements of the vertical gravity gradient. The ability to determine the gravity acceleration and gravity gradient simultaneously and with the same instrument opens interesting perspectives in geophysical applications.

  13. Non-contact measurements of ultrasonic waves on paper webs using a photorefractive interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brodeur, Pierre H.; Lafond, Emmanuel F.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for non-contact measurement of ultrasonic waves on moving paper webs employs a photorefractive interferometer. The photorefractive interferometer employs an optical head in which the incident beam and reflected beam are coaxial, thus enabling detection of both in-plane and out-of-plane waves with a single apparatus. The incident beam and reference beams are focused into a line enabling greater power to be used without damaging the paper.

  14. Three Dimensional Speckle Imaging Employing a Frequency-Locked Tunable Diode Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Bret D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schiffern, John T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2015-09-01

    We describe a high accuracy frequency stepping method for a tunable diode laser to improve a three dimensional (3D) imaging approach based upon interferometric speckle imaging. The approach, modeled after Takeda, exploits tuning an illumination laser in frequency as speckle interferograms of the object (specklegrams) are acquired at each frequency in a Michelson interferometer. The resulting 3D hypercube of specklegrams encode spatial information in the x-y plane of each image with laser tuning arrayed along its z-axis. We present laboratory data of before and after results showing enhanced 3D imaging resulting from precise laser frequency control.

  15. Hybrid shearing and phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Kenneth Alan; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2003-06-03

    A new interferometry configuration combines the strengths of two existing interferometry methods, improving the quality and extending the dynamic range of both. On the same patterned mask, placed near the image-plane of an optical system under test, patterns for phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry and lateral shearing interferometry coexist. The former giving verifiable high accuracy for the measurement of nearly diffraction-limited optical systems. The latter enabling the measurement of optical systems with more than one wave of aberration in the system wavefront. The interferometry configuration is a hybrid shearing and point diffraction interferometer system for testing an optical element that is positioned along an optical path including: a source of electromagnetic energy in the optical path; a first beam splitter that is secured to a device that includes means for maneuvering the first beam splitter in a first position wherein the first beam splitter is in the optical path dividing light from the source into a reference beam and a test beam and in a second position wherein the first beam splitter is outside the optical path: a hybrid mask which includes a first section that defines a test window and at least one reference pinhole and a second section that defines a second beam splitter wherein the hybrid mask is secured to a device that includes means for maneuvering either the first section or the second section into the optical path positioned in an image plane that is created by the optical element, with the proviso that the first section of the hybrid mask is positioned in the optical path when first beam splitter is positioned in the optical path; and a detector positioned after the hybrid mask along the optical path.

  16. Design of a fully-fiber multi-chord interferometer and a new phase-shift demodulation method for field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Dongfan Sun, Qizhi; Zhao, Xiaoming; Jia, Yuesong

    2014-05-15

    A 633 nm laser interferometer has been designed based on a novel concept, which, without the acousto-optic modulator or the demodulator circuit, adopts the fibers to connect all elements except photodetectors and oscilloscope in this system to make it more compact, portable, and efficient. The noteworthy feature is to mathematically compare the two divided interference signals, which have the same phase-shift caused by the electron density but possess the different initial phase and low angular frequencies. It is possible to read the plasma density directly on the oscilloscope by our original mathematic demodulation method without a camera. Based on the Abel inversion algorithm, the radial electron density profiles versus time can be obtained by using the multi-chord system. The designed measurable phase shift ranges from 0 to 2π rad corresponding to the maximum line integral of electron density less than 3.5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}, and the phase accuracy is about 0.017 rad corresponding to the line integral of electron density accuracy of 1 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}. After the construction of eight-chord interferometer, it will provide the detailed time resolved information of the spatial distribution of the electron density in the field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma target produced by the “Yingguang-1” programmed-discharge device, which is being constructed in the Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, China Academy of Engineering Physics.

  17. Temperature and melting of laser-shocked iron releasing into an LiF window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Henry, E.; Vinci, T.; Faral, B.; Tomasini, M.; Telaro, B.; Batani, D.

    2005-06-15

    Absolute reflectivity and self-emission diagnostics are used to determine the gray-body equivalent temperature of laser-shocked iron partially releasing into a lithium fluoride window. Pressure and reflectivity are measured simultaneously by means of velocity interferometer system for any reflector interferometers. In the temperature-pressure plane, a temperature plateau in the release is observed which is attributed to iron's melting line. Extrapolation of data leads to a melting temperature at Earth's inner-outer core boundary of 7800{+-}1200 K, in good agreement with previous works based on dynamic compression. Shock temperatures were calculated and found to be in the liquid phase.

  18. Satellite-based laser windsounder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, J.F.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Quick, C.R.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project`s primary objective is to determine the technical feasibility of using satellite-based laser wind sensing systems for detailed study of winds, aerosols, and particulates around and downstream of suspected proliferation facilities. Extensive interactions with the relevant operational organization resulted in enthusiastic support and useful guidance with respect to measurement requirements and priorities. Four candidate wind sensing techniques were evaluated, and the incoherent Doppler technique was selected. A small satellite concept design study was completed to identify the technical issues inherent in a proof-of-concept small satellite mission. Use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer instead of a Fabry-Perot would significantly simplify the optical train and could reduce weight, and possibly power, requirements with no loss of performance. A breadboard Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based system has been built to verify these predictions. Detailed plans were made for resolving other issues through construction and testing of a ground-based lidar system in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, and through numerical lidar wind data assimilation studies.

  19. Dual-axis high-data-rate atom interferometer via cold ensemble exchange

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rakholia, Akash V.; McGuinness, Hayden J.; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2014-11-24

    We demonstrate a dual-axis accelerometer and gyroscope atom interferometer, which can form the building blocks of a six-axis inertial measurement unit. By recapturing the atoms after the interferometer sequence, we maintain a large atom number at high data rates of 50 to 100 measurements per second. Two cold ensembles are formed in trap zones located a few centimeters apart and are launched toward one another. During their ballistic trajectory, they are interrogated with a stimulated Raman sequence, detected, and recaptured in the opposing trap zone. As a result, we achieve sensitivities at μg/ √Hz and μrad/s/ √Hz levels, making thismore » a compelling prospect for expanding the use of atom interferometer inertial sensors beyond benign laboratory environments.« less

  20. Dual-axis high-data-rate atom interferometer via cold ensemble exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakholia, Akash V.; McGuinness, Hayden J.; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2014-11-24

    We demonstrate a dual-axis accelerometer and gyroscope atom interferometer, which can form the building blocks of a six-axis inertial measurement unit. By recapturing the atoms after the interferometer sequence, we maintain a large atom number at high data rates of 50 to 100 measurements per second. Two cold ensembles are formed in trap zones located a few centimeters apart and are launched toward one another. During their ballistic trajectory, they are interrogated with a stimulated Raman sequence, detected, and recaptured in the opposing trap zone. As a result, we achieve sensitivities at ?g/ ?Hz and ?rad/s/ ?Hz levels, making this a compelling prospect for expanding the use of atom interferometer inertial sensors beyond benign laboratory environments.

  1. Laser Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Facilities Current Schedule of Experiments Operation Schedule Janus Titan Europa COMET Facility Floorplan

  2. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogi, Y., E-mail: kogi@fit.ac.jp; Higashi, T.; Matsukawa, S. [Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Mase, A. [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-0811 (Japan); Kohagura, J.; Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5202 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  3. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-15

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  4. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. The beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being recombined with the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones.

  5. Laser Faraday

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    published 1 October 2004) Far-infrared laser polarimetry with time response up to 1 ... Recently, a new high-speed laser polarimeter system 1 has been developed on the Madison ...

  6. Laser microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  7. Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salmon, Jr., Joseph T.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam.

  8. Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salmon, J.T. Jr.

    1991-08-27

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam. 11 figures.

  9. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  10. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  11. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  12. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  13. Edge-channel interferometer at the graphene quantum Hall pn junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morikawa, Sei; Moriya, Rai; Masubuchi, Satoru Machida, Tomoki; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2015-05-04

    We demonstrate a quantum Hall edge-channel interferometer in a high-quality graphene pn junction under a high magnetic field. The co-propagating p and n quantum Hall edge channels traveling along the pn interface functions as a built-in Aharonov-Bohm-type interferometer, the interferences in which are sensitive to both the external magnetic field and the carrier concentration. The trajectories of peak and dip in the observed resistance oscillation are well reproduced by our numerical calculation that assumes magnetic flux quantization in the area enclosed by the co-propagating edge channels. Coherent nature of the co-propagating edge channels is confirmed by the checkerboard-like pattern in the dc-bias and magnetic-field dependences of the resistance oscillations.

  14. Holographic Noise in Michelson Interferometers: A Direct Experimental Probe of Unification at the Planck Scale

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hogan, Craig

    2010-01-08

    Classical spacetime and quantum mass-energy form the basis of all of physics. They become inconsistent at the Planck scale, 5.4 times 10^{-44} seconds, which may signify a need for reconciliation in a unified theory. Although proposals for unified theories exist, a direct experimental probe of this scale, 16 orders of magnitude above Tevatron energy, has seemed hopelessly out of reach. However in a particular interpretation of holographic unified theories, derived from black hole evaporation physics, a world assembled out of Planck-scale waves displays effects of unification with a new kind of uncertainty in position at the Planck diffraction scale, the geometric mean of the Planck length and the apparatus size. In this case a new phenomenon may measurable, an indeterminacy of spacetime position that appears as noise in interferometers. The colloquium will discuss the theory of the effect, and our plans to build a holographic interferometer at Fermilab to measure it.

  15. Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results H. E. Revercomb, R. O. Knuteson, W. L. Smith, F. A. Best, and R. G. Dedecker University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin H. B. Howell National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Systems Design and Applications Branch Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Accurate and spectrally detailed observations of the thermal emission from radiatively important atmospheric gases, aerosols, and clouds are now being

  16. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In the embodiment of the invention claimed herein, the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being combined with either the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser.

  17. Fiber Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiber Lasers NIF & Photon Science physicists are exploring the fundamental limits of traditional round fiber structure and developing alternate solutions to allow scaling to higher powers and pulse energies. Comprehensive models of ribbon fiber structures, or waveguides, are also being developed. The goal is to develop ribbon fiber lasers that can amplify light beams to powers well beyond fundamental limits. Joint research efforts with the Lasers and Optics Research Center at the U.S. Air

  18. Laser apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Owen; Stogran, Edmund M.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus is described wherein an active laser element, such as the disc of a face-pumped laser, is mounted in a housing such that the weight of the element is supported by glass spheres which fill a chamber defined in the housing between the walls of the housing and the edges of the laser element. The uniform support provided by the spheres enable the chamber and the pump side of the laser element to be sealed without affecting the alignment or other optical properties of the laser element. Cooling fluid may be circulated through the sealed region by way of the interstices between the spheres. The spheres, and if desired also the cooling fluid may contain material which absorbs radiation at the wavelength of parasitic emissions from the laser element. These parasitic emissions enter the spheres through the interface along the edge surface of the laser element and it is desirable that the index of refraction of the spheres and cooling fluid be near the index of refraction of the laser element. Thus support, cooling, and parasitic suppression functions are all accomplished through the use of the arrangement.

  19. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  20. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  1. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  2. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  3. Explosive laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Davis, W.C.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO$sub 2$ and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO$sub 2$ lasing. (auth)

  4. Laser goniometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fairer, George M.; Boernge, James M.; Harris, David W.; Campbell, DeWayne A.; Tuttle, Gene E.; McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  5. Null test fourier domain alignment technique for phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    Alignment technique for calibrating a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer involves three independent steps where the first two steps independently align the image points and pinholes in rotation and separation to a fixed reference coordinate system, e.g, CCD. Once the two sub-elements have been properly aligned to the reference in two parameters (separation and orientation), the third step is to align the two sub-element coordinate systems to each other in the two remaining parameters (x,y) using standard methods of locating the pinholes relative to some easy to find reference point.

  6. Liquid crystal devices especially for use in liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Kenneth L.

    2009-02-17

    Liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) systems that can provide real-time, phase-shifting interferograms that are useful in the characterization of static optical properties (wavefront aberrations, lensing, or wedge) in optical elements or dynamic, time-resolved events (temperature fluctuations and gradients, motion) in physical systems use improved LCPDI cells that employ a "structured" substrate or substrates in which the structural features are produced by thin film deposition or photo resist processing to provide a diffractive element that is an integral part of the cell substrate(s). The LC material used in the device may be doped with a "contrast-compensated" mixture of positive and negative dichroic dyes.

  7. Laser applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelson, M.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The breadth of current applications of laser technology is described. It is used as the basis for extrapolating to future application in such activities as AVLIS, SIS, ICP-MS, and RIMs.

  8. Short-Pulse Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Short-Pulse Lasers NIF Petawatt Laser Is on Track to Completion The National Ignition Facility's Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC), a petawatt-class laser with peak power ...

  9. Apparatus for controlling the scan width of a scanning laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, G.W.

    1996-10-22

    Swept-wavelength lasers are often used in absorption spectroscopy applications. In experiments where high accuracy is required, it is desirable to continuously monitor and control the range of wavelengths scanned (the scan width). A system has been demonstrated whereby the scan width of a swept ring-dye laser, or semiconductor diode laser, can be measured and controlled in real-time with a resolution better than 0.1%. Scan linearity, or conformity to a nonlinear scan waveform, can be measured and controlled. The system of the invention consists of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, three CAMAC interface modules, and a microcomputer running a simple analysis and proportional-integral control algorithm. With additional modules, multiple lasers can be simultaneously controlled. The invention also includes an embodiment implemented on an ordinary PC with a multifunction plug-in board. 8 figs.

  10. Apparatus for controlling the scan width of a scanning laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    Swept-wavelength lasers are often used in absorption spectroscopy applications. In experiments where high accuracy is required, it is desirable to continuously monitor and control the range of wavelengths scanned (the scan width). A system has been demonstrated whereby the scan width of a swept ring-dye laser, or semiconductor diode laser, can be measured and controlled in real-time with a resolution better than 0.1%. Scan linearity, or conformity to a nonlinear scan waveform, can be measured and controlled. The system of the invention consists of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, three CAMAC interface modules, and a microcomputer running a simple analysis and proportional-integral control algorithm. With additional modules, multiple lasers can be simultaneously controlled. The invention also includes an embodiment implemented on an ordinary PC with a multifunction plug-in board.

  11. Design and construction of a Fourier transform soft x-ray interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spring, John A.

    2000-05-10

    Helium, with its two electrons and one nucleus, is a three-body system. One of the models for investigating correlated electron motion in this system is autoionization, produced via double excitation of the electrons. Predictions about the autoionization spectrum of helium have differed from each other and from preliminary experimental data. However, previous experiments have not been able to distinguish among the theoretical predictions because their energy resolution is not high enough to resolve the narrow linewidths of quasi-forbidden peaks and the resonances that appear in the highest excited states. Consequently, a team of researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have embarked on a project for building a high-resolution Fourier-Transform Soft X-ray (or VUV) interferometer (FTSX) to provide definitive data to answer remaining questions about the autoionization spectrum of helium. The design and construction of this interferometer is described in detail below, including the use of a flexure stage to provide the large path length difference necessary for high resolution measurements, the manufacture of x-ray beamsplitters, a description of the software, and the solution to the problems of stick-slip, vibration, and alignment. Current progress of its development is also described, as well as future goals.

  12. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, Bradley S. (Knoxville, TN); Wetherington, Jr., Grady R. (Harriman, TN)

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  13. Gravitational wave signals from short-lived topological defects in the MSSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamada, Ayuki; Yamada, Masaki

    2015-10-09

    Supersymmetric theories, including the minimal supersymmetric standard model, usually contain many scalar fields whose potentials are absent in the exact supersymmetric limit and within the renormalizable level. Since their potentials are vulnerable to the finite energy density of the Universe through supergravity effects, these flat directions have nontrivial dynamics in the early Universe. Recently, we have pointed out that a flat direction may have a positive Hubble induced mass term during inflation whereas a negative one after inflation. In this case, the flat direction stays at the origin of the potential during inflation and then obtain a large vacuum expectation value after inflation. After that, when the Hubble parameter decreases down to the mass of the flat direction, it starts to oscillate around the origin of the potential. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of the flat direction with and without higher dimensional superpotentials and show that topological defects, such as cosmic strings and domain walls, form at the end of inflation and disappear at the beginning of oscillation of the flat direction. We numerically calculate their gravitational signals and find that the observation of gravitational signals would give us information of supersymmetric scale, the reheating temperature of the Universe, and higher dimensional operators.

  14. Thermal gradient-induced forces on geodesic reference masses for LISA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbone, L.; Ciani, G.; Dolesi, R.; Hueller, M.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Weber, W. J.; Cavalleri, A.

    2007-11-15

    The low frequency sensitivity of space-borne gravitational wave observatories will depend critically on the geodesic purity of the trajectories of orbiting test masses. Fluctuations in the temperature difference across the enclosure surrounding the free-falling test mass can produce noisy forces through several processes, including the radiometric effect, radiation pressure, and outgassing. We present here a detailed experimental investigation of thermal gradient-induced forces for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave mission and the LISA Pathfinder, employing high resolution torsion pendulum measurements of the torque on a LISA-like test mass suspended inside a prototype of the LISA gravitational reference sensor that will surround the test mass in orbit. The measurement campaign, accompanied by numerical simulations of the radiometric and radiation pressure effects, allows a more accurate and representative characterization of thermal-gradient forces in the specific geometry and environment relevant to LISA free-fall. The pressure dependence of the measured torques allows clear identification of the radiometric effect, in quantitative agreement with the model developed. In the limit of zero gas pressure, the measurements are most likely dominated by outgassing, but at a low level that does not threaten the current LISA noise estimate, which assumes a maximum net force per degree of temperature difference of 100(pN/K) for the overall thermal gradient-induced effects.

  15. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OToole, A. E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com; Pea Arellano, F. E.; Rodionov, A. V.; Kim, C.; Shaner, M.; Asadoor, M.; Sobacchi, E.; Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R. E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com; Bhawal, A.; Gong, P.; Lottarini, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Murphy, C.

    2014-07-15

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.

  16. Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor with scalable sensitivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qin, Kun; Hu, Shuren; Retterer, Scott T.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2016-02-05

    Our design, fabrication, and characterization of a label-free Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI) optical biosensor that incorporates a highly dispersive one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal in one arm are presented. The sensitivity of this slow light MZI-based sensor scales with the length of the slow light photonic crystal region. The numerically simulated sensitivity of a MZI sensor with a 16 μm long slow light region is 115,000 rad/RIU-cm, which is sevenfold higher than traditional MZI biosensors with millimeter-length sensing regions. Moreover, the experimental bulk refractive index detection sensitivity of 84,000 rad/RIU-cm is realized and nucleic acid detection is also demonstrated.

  17. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer focus-aid enhanced mask

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    A phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer system (PS/PDI) employing a PS/PDI mask that includes a PDI focus aid is provided. The PDI focus aid mask includes a large or secondary reference pinhole that is slightly displaced from the true or primary reference pinhole. The secondary pinhole provides a larger capture tolerance for interferometrically performing fine focus. With the focus-aid enhanced mask, conventional methods such as the knife-edge test can be used to perform an initial (or rough) focus and the secondary (large) pinhole is used to perform interferometric fine focus. Once the system is well focused, high accuracy interferometry can be performed using the primary (small) pinhole.

  18. Flexture plate motion-transfer mechanism, beam-splitter assembly, and interferometer incorporating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Dettori, M.D.; Grigely, L.J.; Murray, T.C.; Solomon, P.R.; Dine, C.P. Van; Wright, D.D.

    1996-01-23

    A multiplicity of one-piece flexure plates are assembled in pairs to provide a support system on which a retroreflector may be mounted for reciprocal motion. Combined with balance bodies, the flexure plates provide a support system having portions that are dynamically and statically balanced with one another, irrespective of orientation, so as to thereby immunize the unit against extraneous forces. The motion transfer assembly is especially adapted for use to support a moving retroreflector in a two-arm interferometer that may further include a beamsplitter assembly constructed from a one-piece, integrally formed body, the body having convergent, optically flat planar surfaces of specular reflectance, and means for adjustably mounting a beamsplitter therein. The spectrometer is of modular construction, and employs an integrated clocking sub-assembly as well as a light-weight voice-coil motor. 15 figs.

  19. Flexture plate motion-transfer mechanism, beam-splitter assembly, and interferometer incorporating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M.; Dettori, Mark D.; Grigely, Lawrence J.; Murray, Terence C.; Solomon, Peter R.; Van Dine, C. Peter; Wright, David D.

    1996-01-01

    A multiplicity of one-piece flexure plates are assembled in pairs to provide a support system on which a retroreflector may be mounted for reciprocal motion. Combined with balance bodies, the flexure plates provide a support system having portions that are dynamically and statically balanced with one another, irrespective of orientation, so as to thereby immunize the unit against extraneous forces. The motion transfer assembly is especially adapted for use to support a moving retroreflector in a two-arm interferometer that may further include a beamsplitter assembly constructed from a one-piece, integrally formed body, the body having convergent, optically flat planar surfaces of specular reflectance, and means for adjustably mounting a beamsplitter therein. The spectrometer is of modular construction, and employs an integrated clocking sub-assembly as well as a light-weight voice-coil motor.

  20. In-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer composed of microtaper and long-period grating in all-solid photonic bandgap fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Zhifang; Liu Yange; Wang Zhi; Han Tingting; Li Shuo; Jiang Meng; Ping Shum, Perry

    2012-10-01

    We report a compact in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer combining a microtaper with a long-period grating (LPG) in a section of all-solid photonic bandgap fiber. Theoretical and experimental investigations reveal that the interferometer works from the interference between the fundamental core mode and the LP{sub 01} cladding supermodes. The mechanism underlying the mode coupling caused by the microtaper can be attributed to a bandgap-shifting as the fiber diameter is abruptly scaled down. In addition, the interferometer designed to strengthen the coupling ratio of the long-period grating has a promising practical application in the simultaneous measurement of curvature and temperature.

  1. Heterodyne laser diagnostic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Globig, Michael A.; Johnson, Michael A.; Wyeth, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The heterodyne laser diagnostic system includes, in one embodiment, an average power pulsed laser optical spectrum analyzer for determining the average power of the pulsed laser. In another embodiment, the system includes a pulsed laser instantaneous optical frequency measurement for determining the instantaneous optical frequency of the pulsed laser.

  2. Robust random number generation using steady-state emission of gain-switched laser diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Z. L. Lucamarini, M.; Dynes, J. F.; Frhlich, B.; Plews, A.; Shields, A. J.

    2014-06-30

    We demonstrate robust, high-speed random number generation using interference of the steady-state emission of guaranteed random phases, obtained through gain-switching a semiconductor laser diode. Steady-state emission tolerates large temporal pulse misalignments and therefore significantly improves the interference quality. Using an 8-bit digitizer followed by a finite-impulse-response unbiasing algorithm, we achieve random number generation rates of 8 and 20?Gb/s, for laser repetition rates of 1 and 2.5?GHz, respectively, with a 20% tolerance in the interferometer differential delay. We also report a generation rate of 80?Gb/s using partially phase-correlated short pulses. In relation to the field of quantum key distribution, our results confirm the gain-switched laser diode as a suitable light source, capable of providing phase-randomized coherent pulses at a clock rate of up to 2.5?GHz.

  3. How Lasers Work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Lasers Work "Laser" is an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. A laser is created when the electrons in atoms in special glasses, crystals, or ...

  4. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jupiter Laser Facility The commissioning of the Titan Petawatt-Class laser to LLNL's Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) has provided a unique platform for the use of petawatt (PW)-class ...

  5. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as replacing, but as complimentary to conventional CT, to be used in specific applications.

  6. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supporting the broad community of high-energy-density researchers The Jupiter Laser ... flexibility and high laser shot rates, and to allow direct user operation of experiments. ...

  7. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  8. Omega Laser Facility - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE ...

  9. OMEGA Laser Drivers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drivers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE ...

  10. OMEGA Laser - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE ...

  11. PLANETARY TRANSITS WITH THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY RADIO INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selhorst, C. L.; Barbosa, C. L.; Vlio, Adriana

    2013-11-10

    Planetary transits are commonly observed at visible wavelengths. Here we investigate the shape of a planetary transit observed at radio wavelengths. Solar maps at 17 GHz are used as a proxy for the stellar eclipse by several sizes of planets from super-Earths to hot Jupiters. The relative depth at mid-transit is the same as observed at visible wavelengths, but the limb brightening of the stellar disk at 17 GHz is clearly seen in the shape of the transit light curve. Moreover, when the planet occults an active region the depth of the transit decreases even further, depending on the brightness of the active region relative to the surrounding disk. For intense active region, with 50 times the brightness temperature of the surrounding disk, the decrease can supercede the unperturbed transit depth depending on the size of the eclipsing planet. For a super-Earth (R{sub p} = 0.02 R{sub s} ) crossing, the decrease in intensity is 0.04%, increasing to 0.86% in the case when a strong active region is present. On the other hand, for a hot Jupiter with R{sub p} = 0.17R{sub s} , the unperturbed transit depth is 3% increasing to 4.7% when covering this strong active region. This kind of behavior can be verified with observation of planetary transits with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array radio interferometer.

  12. Velocity Interferometer blanking due to preheating in a double pulse planar experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laffite, S.; Combis, P.; Clerouin, J.; Recoules, V.; Rousseaux, C.; Videau, L.; Baton, S. D.; Koenig, M.

    2014-08-15

    Optical diagnostics, such as VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) or SOP (Streaked Optical Pyrometry), have become essential in shock timing experiments. Their high precision allows for accurate measurements of shock velocities, chronometry, and brightness temperature. However, in some instances, these measurements can be compromised. In planar shock coalescence experiments recently performed at the LULI facility [Baton et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 195002 (2012)], VISAR signal loss was observed. In these experiments, a strong shock launched by a high-intensity spike catches up with a previously shock launched by an earlier, low-intensity beam. The disappearance of the VISAR signal is attributed to a preheating of the coronal plasma by x-rays generated by the high intensity spike. The signal does not disappear if the high-intensity spike starts after VISAR probe beam begins to reflect off of the first shock. The VISAR diagnostic, modeled using an assessment of the optical index in quartz, compares favorably to experimental results. This provides evidence that x-ray preheating can cause blanking of the VISAR signal in quartz.

  13. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  14. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  15. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  16. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam.

  17. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  18. Laser accelerometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vescial, F.; Aronowitz, F.; Niguel, L.

    1990-04-24

    This patent describes a laser accelerometer. It comprises: an optical cavity characterizing a frame having an input axis (x), a cross axis (y) orthogonal to and co-planar with the input axis and a (z) axis passing through the intersection of the (x) and (y) axes, the (z) axis being orthogonal to the plane of the (x) and (y) axes; and (x) axis proof mass having a predetermined blanking surface; a flexible beam having a first end coupled to the (x) axis proof mass and a second end coupled to the frame, deflection of the flexible beams permitting a predetermined range of movement of the (x) proof mass on the input axis in a direction opposite to sensed acceleration of the frame; a laser light source having a mirror means within the cavity for providing a light ray coaxially aligned with the (z) axis; detector means having at least a first detector on a sensitive plane, the plane being normal to the (z) axis; bias and amplifier means coupled to the detector means for providing a bias current to the first detector and for amplifying the intensity signal; the (x) axis proof mass blanking surface being centrally positioned within and normal to the light ray null intensity region to provide increased blanking of the light ray in response to transverse movement of the mass on the input axis; control means responsive to the intensity signal for applying an (x) axis restoring force to restore the (x) axis proof mass to the central position and for providing an (x) axis output signal proportional to the restoring force.

  19. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Plasma Interactions Laser Plasma Interactions Understanding and controlling laser produced plasmas for fusion and basic science Contact David Montgomery (505) 665-7994 Email John Kline (505) 667-7062 Email Thomson scattering is widely used to measure plasma temperature, density, and flow velocity in laser-produced plasmas at Trident, and is also used to detect plasma waves driven by unstable and nonlinear processes. A typical configuration uses a low intensity laser beam (2nd, 3rd, or 4th

  20. Laser-Based Nondestructive Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Projects Laser-Based Nondestructive Testing High speed, non-contact NDT for ... scanning, non-destructive pulsed laser excitation and a laser-Doppler vibrometer (LDV). ...

  1. Learn More about Fusion & Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learn More about Fusion & Lasers How Lasers Work Learn how lasers were developed and how they work. Outreach NIF & Photon Science researchers take learning opportunities on the...

  2. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  3. Infrared laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  4. Infrared laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  5. Laser Manufacturing | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Manufacturing at GE Global Research Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new ... Laser Manufacturing at GE Global Research Learn how laser sintering, an additive laser ...

  6. Laser amplifier and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  7. Laser amplifier and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  8. Phased laser array for generating a powerful laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2004-02-17

    A first injection laser signal and a first part of a reference laser beam are injected into a first laser element. At least one additional injection laser signal and at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are injected into at least one additional laser element. The first part of a reference laser beam and the at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are amplified and phase conjugated producing a first amplified output laser beam emanating from the first laser element and an additional amplified output laser beam emanating from the at least one additional laser element. The first amplified output laser beam and the additional amplified output laser beam are combined into a powerful laser beam.

  9. Laser particle sorter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, John C.; Buican, Tudor N.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

  10. Injection Laser System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Injection Laser System For each of NIF's 192 beams: The pulse shape as a function of time ... NIF's injection laser system (ILS) plays a key role in meeting these three requirements. ...

  11. Slender tip laser scalpel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-01-06

    A laser scalpel includes a ribbon optical waveguide extending therethrough and terminating at a slender optical cutting tip. A laser beam is emitted along the height of the cutting tip for cutting tissue therealong.

  12. Laser programs highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

  13. Laser particle sorter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  14. Laser preheat enhanced ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.W.

    1999-03-02

    A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided. 11 figs.

  15. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miley, George H.; Wells, William E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  16. Waveguide gas laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zedong, C.

    1982-05-01

    Waveguide gas lasers are described. Transmission loss of hollow tube light waveguides, coupling loss, the calculation of output power, and the width of the oscillation belt are discussed. The structure of a waveguide CO/sub 2/ laser is described.

  17. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  18. Laser cutting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  19. Laser material processing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  20. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  1. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  2. LaserFest Celebration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  3. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  4. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Archived Data at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The AERI instrument is an advanced version of the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) designed and fabricated at the University of Wisconsin (Revercomb et al. 1988) to measure upwelling infrared radiances from an aircraft. The AERI is a fully automated ground-based passive infrared interferometer that measures downwelling atmospheric radiance from 3.3 - 18.2 mm (550 - 3000 cm-1) at less than 10-minute temporal resolution with a spectral resolution of one wavenumber. It has been used in DOEs Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Much of the data available here at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), an institute within the University of Wisconsins Space Science and Engineering Center, may also be available in the ARM Archive. On this website, data and images from six different field experiments are available, along with AERIPLUS realtime data for the Madison, Wisconsin location. Realtime data includes temperature and water vapor time-height cross sections, SKEWT diagrams, convective stability indices, and displays from a rooftop Lidar instrument. The field experiments took place in Oaklahoma and Wisconsin with the AERI prototype.

  5. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Archived Data at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The AERI instrument is an advanced version of the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) designed and fabricated at the University of Wisconsin (Revercomb et al. 1988) to measure upwelling infrared radiances from an aircraft. The AERI is a fully automated ground-based passive infrared interferometer that measures downwelling atmospheric radiance from 3.3 - 18.2 mm (550 - 3000 cm-1) at less than 10-minute temporal resolution with a spectral resolution of one wavenumber. It has been used in DOEÆs Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Much of the data available here at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), an institute within the University of Wisconsin’s Space Science and Engineering Center, may also be available in the ARM Archive. On this website, data and images from six different field experiments are available, along with AERIPLUS realtime data for the Madison, Wisconsin location. Realtime data includes temperature and water vapor time-height cross sections, SKEWT diagrams, convective stability indices, and displays from a rooftop Lidar instrument. The field experiments took place in Oaklahoma and Wisconsin with the AERI prototype.

  6. Testing a Model of Planck-Scale Quantum Geometry With Broadband Correlation of Colocated 40m Interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCuller, Lee Patrick

    2015-12-01

    The Holometer is designed to test for a Planck diffractive-scaling uncertainty in long-baseline position measurements due to an underlying noncommutative geometry normalized to relate Black hole entropy bounds of the Holographic principle to the now-finite number of position states. The experiment overlaps two independent 40 meter optical Michelson interferometers to detect the proposed uncertainty as a common broadband length fluctuation. 150 hours of instrument cross-correlation data are analyzed to test the prediction of a correlated noise magnitude of $7\\times10^{−21}$~m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$ with an effective bandwidth of 750kHz. The interferometers each have a quantum-limited sensitivity of $2.5\\times 10^{−18}$~m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$, but their correlation with a time-bandwidth product of $4\\times 10^{11}$ digs between the noise floors in search for the covarying geometric jitter. The data presents an exclusion of 5 standard deviations for the tested model. This exclus ion is defended through analysis of the calibration methods for the instrument as well as further sub shot noise characterization of the optical systems to limit spurious background-correlations from undermining the signal.

  7. Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trident Laser Facility Trident Laser Facility Enabling world-class science in high-energy density physics and fundamental laser-matter interactions April 12, 2012 Invisible infrared light from the 200-trillion watt Trident Laser enters from the bottom to interact with a one-micrometer thick foil target in the center of the photo. The laser pulse produces a plasma - an ionized gas - many times hotter than the center of the sun, which lasts for a trillionth of a second. During this time some

  8. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  9. Sensitivity enhancement of grating interferometer based two-dimensional sensor arrays using two-wavelength readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferhanoglu, Onur; Urey, Hakan

    2011-07-01

    Diffraction gratings integrated with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors offer displacement measurements with subnanometer sensitivity. However, the sensitivity of the interferometric readout may drop significantly based on the gap between the grating and the reference surface. A two-wavelength (2-{lambda}) readout method was previously tested using a single MEMS sensor for illustrating increased displacement measurement capability. This work demonstrates sensitivity enhancement on a sensor array with large scale parallelization ({approx}20,000 sensors). The statistical representation, which is developed to model sensitivity enhancement within a grating based sensor array, is supported by experimental results using a thermal sensor array. In the experiments, two lasers at different wavelengths (633 and 650 nm) illuminate the thermal sensor array from the backside, time-sequentially. The diffracted first order light from the array is imaged onto a single CCD camera. The target scene is reconstructed by observing the change in the first diffracted order diffraction intensity for both wavelengths. Merging of the data from two measurements with two lasers was performed by taking the larger of the two CCD measurements with respect to the reference image for each sensor. {approx}30% increase in the average sensitivity was demonstrated for a 160x120 pixel IR sensor array. Proposed architecture is also applicable to a variety of sensing applications, such as parallel biosensing and atomic force microscopy, for improved displacement measurements and enhanced sensitivity.

  10. Plasma Interactions in Laser Irradiated Semi-Cylindrical Cavities Studied with Soft X-Ray Interferometry Using a Capillary Discharge Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purvis, M A; Grava, J; Filevich, J; Marconi, M; Rocca, J J; Moon, S J; Dunn, J; Nilsen, J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Jankowska, E

    2007-09-19

    Soft x-ray interferometry was used to measure the evolution of dense converging plasmas created by laser irradiation of 500 {micro}m diameter semi-cylindrical carbon targets. Optical laser pulses with an intensity of {approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} and 120 ps duration were used to heat the surface of the cavities. The dense plasma formed expands from the walls converging slightly off the semi-cylinder's axis, giving rise to a bright localized high density plasma region. A sequence of electron density maps were measured using a 46.9 nm wavelength tabletop capillary discharge soft x-ray laser probe and a amplitude division interferometer based on diffraction gratings. The measured density profiles are compared with simulations conducted using the multi-dimensional hydrodynamic code HYDRA. The benchmarked model was then used to simulate particle trajectories which reveal that the increase in electron density near the axis is mainly the result of the convergence of plasma that originated at the bottom of the groove during laser irradiation.

  11. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  12. Laser metrology for coherent multi-telescope arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shao, Michael; Massie, Norbert A.

    1993-01-01

    In multi-telescope arrays that comprise multiple telescopes, a beam-combining module, and flat mirrors for directing light beams from the multiple telescopes to the beam combining module, a laser metrology system is used for monitoring various pathlengths along a beam path where deviations are likely. Some pathlengths are defined simply by a pair of retroreflectors or reflectors at both ends. Lengths between pairs of retroreflectors are measured and monitored by laser interferometers. One critical pathlength deviation is related to the displacement of the flat mirror. A reference frame is set up relative to the beam-combining module to form and define the coordinate system within which the positions of the flat mirrors are measured and monitored. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of retroreflectors along the optical axis of the beam-combining module defines a reference frame. A triangle is formed by the reference frame as the base and another retroreflector at the flat mirror as the vertex. The triangle is used to monitor the position of the flat mirror. A beam's pathlength is dynamically corrected in response to the monitored deviations.

  13. Laser metrology for coherent multi-telescope arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shao, M.; Massie, N.A.

    1993-05-04

    In multi-telescope arrays that comprise multiple telescopes, a beam-combining module, and flat mirrors for directing light beams from the multiple telescopes to the beam combining module, a laser metrology system is used for monitoring various pathlengths along a beam path where deviations are likely. Some pathlengths are defined simply by a pair of retroreflectors or reflectors at both ends. Lengths between pairs of retroreflectors are measured and monitored by laser interferometers. One critical pathlength deviation is related to the displacement of the flat mirror. A reference frame is set up relative to the beam-combining module to form and define the coordinate system within which the positions of the flat mirrors are measured and monitored. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of retroreflectors along the optical axis of the beam-combining module defines a reference frame. A triangle is formed by the reference frame as the base and another retroreflector at the flat mirror as the vertex. The triangle is used to monitor the position of the flat mirror. A beam's pathlength is dynamically corrected in response to the monitored deviations.

  14. Improving the efficiency of hierarchical equations of motion approach and application to coherent dynamics in Aharonov–Bohm interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Dong; Xu, RuiXue; Zheng, Xiao; Wang, Shikuan; Wang, Rulin; Ye, LvZhou; Yan, YiJing

    2015-03-14

    Several recent advancements for the hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) approach are reported. First, we propose an a priori estimate for the optimal number of basis functions for the reservoir memory decomposition. Second, we make use of the sparsity of auxiliary density operators (ADOs) and propose two ansatzs to screen out all the intrinsic zero ADO elements. Third, we propose a new truncation scheme by utilizing the time derivatives of higher-tier ADOs. These novel techniques greatly reduce the memory cost of the HEOM approach, and thus enhance its efficiency and applicability. The improved HEOM approach is applied to simulate the coherent dynamics of Aharonov–Bohm double quantum dot interferometers. Quantitatively accurate dynamics is obtained for both noninteracting and interacting quantum dots. The crucial role of the quantum phase for the magnitude of quantum coherence and quantum entanglement is revealed.

  15. Rapid and noncontact photoacoustic tomography imaging system using an interferometer with high-speed phase modulation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun; Tang, Zhilie; Wu, Yongbo; Wang, Yi

    2015-04-15

    We designed, fabricated, and tested a rapid and noncontact photoacoustic tomography (PAT) imaging system using a low-coherence interferometer with high-speed phase modulation technique. Such a rapid and noncontact probing system can greatly decrease the time of imaging. The proposed PAT imaging system is experimentally verified by capturing images of a simulated tissue sample and the blood vessels within the ear flap of a mouse (pinna) in vivo. The axial and lateral resolutions of the system are evaluated at 45 and ∼15 μm, respectively. The imaging depth of the system is 1 mm in a special phantom. Our results show that the proposed system opens a promising way to realize noncontact, real-time PAT.

  16. Synthetic laser medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  17. Synthetic laser medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  18. Micro-laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.

    2003-07-22

    A micro-laser is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide and at least one amplifying medium in the waveguide. PBG features are positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings and allow introduction of amplifying mediums into the highly resonant guided micro-laser microcavity. The micro-laser may be positioned on a die of a bulk substrate material with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a micro-laser is disclosed. A method for tuning the micro-laser is also disclosed. The micro-laser may be used as an optical regenerator, or a light source for data transfer or for optical computing.

  19. Precision laser aiming system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Brandon R.; Todd, Steven N.

    2009-04-28

    A precision laser aiming system comprises a disrupter tool, a reflector, and a laser fixture. The disrupter tool, the reflector and the laser fixture are configurable for iterative alignment and aiming toward an explosive device threat. The invention enables a disrupter to be quickly and accurately set up, aligned, and aimed in order to render safe or to disrupt a target from a standoff position.

  20. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  1. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  2. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  3. Lasers in materials processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.I.; Rockower, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    A status report on the uranium Laser Isotope Separation (LIS) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented. Prior to this status report, process economic analysis is presented so as to understand how the unique properties of laser photons can be best utilized in the production of materials and components despite the high cost of laser energy. The characteristics of potential applications that are necessary for success are identified, and those factors that have up to now frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser induced chemical and physical process for the production of new or existing materials are pointed out.

  4. Fluorinated laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R.; Feeman, James F.

    1992-01-01

    A novel class of dye is disclosed which is particularly efficient and stable for dye laser applications, lasing between 540 and 570 nm.

  5. Optical amplifiers and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klimov, Victor I.; Mikhailovski, Alexandre; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Leatherdale, Catherine A.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2004-11-16

    An optical amplifier and laser having both broad band and wide range specific band capability can be based on semiconductor nanocrystal solids.

  6. Novel fluorinated laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R.; Feeman, James F.

    1991-01-01

    A novel class of dye is disclosed which is particularly efficient and stable for dye laser applications, lasing between 540 and 570 nm.

  7. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deri, R. J.

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  8. OMEGA EP Laser Dedication Movie - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dedication Movie - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to ...

  9. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W.

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  10. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - Laser Drivers Index S.O. 4: Laser Drivers Shot Operation Procedure Index (S-OM-M-015) LDO Shot Preparation Checklists S.O. 4-1: Laser Drivers Operator's Shot Preparation ...

  11. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamlines Daily Securing Checklist (S-AB-P-482) EP Bay and OAA Securing Walkthrough (S-AB-P-582) Laser StartupShutdown LOTF Laser Startup (S-AB-P-038) LOTF Laser Shutdown ...

  12. Two-chord interferometry using 3.39 {mu}m He-Ne laser on a flux-coil-generated FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gota, H.; Deng, B. H.; Gupta, D.; Kiyashko, V.; Knapp, K.; Mendoza, R.; Morehouse, M.; Bolte, N.; Roche, T.; Wessel, F.

    2010-10-15

    A two-chord {lambda}{sub IR}{approx}3.39 {mu}m He-Ne laser interferometer system was developed for a flux-coil-generated field-reversed configuration to estimate the electron density and the total temperature of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. This two-chord heterodyne interferometer system consists of a single {approx}2 mW infrared He-Ne laser, a visible ({lambda}{sub vis}{approx}632.8 nm) He-Ne laser for the alignment, a 40 MHz acousto-optic modulator, photodetectors, and quadrature phase detectors. Initial measurement was performed and the measured average electron densities were 2-10x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at two different radial positions in the midplane. A time shift in density was observed as the FRC expands radially. The time evolution of the line-averaged density agrees with the density estimated from the in situ internal magnetic probes, based on a rigid-rotor profile model.

  13. Laser peening with fiber optic delivery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Ault, Earl R.; Scheibner, Karl F.

    2004-11-16

    A system for processing a workpiece using a laser. The laser produces at least one laser pulse. A laser processing unit is used to process the workpiece using the at least one laser pulse. A fiber optic cable is used for transmitting the at least one laser pulse from the laser to the laser processing unit.

  14. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chapter 1 - Laser Sources Operations Procedures Start UpShut Down Procedures Support Procedures Maintenance Procedures Maintenance Procedures -Laser System Maintenance ...

  15. Laser-induced incandescence (LII)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Laser-induced incandescence (LII) HomeClimate & Earth SystemsClimate Measurement & ModelingLaser-induced incandescence (LII) ...

  16. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the OMEGA Associate Laser Facility Manager. For additional information contact: Director's Administrator University of Rochester - Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River ...

  17. Laser Catalyst - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Laser Catalyst Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL's Laser Catalyst is a method for ...

  18. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... to the OMEGA Associate Laser Facility Manager. For additional information contact: Director's Administrator University of Rochester - Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River ...

  19. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Bay Structure Cleaning Procedures Clean Rod Amplifier Structures (S-SM-P-336) Clean ... Address document comments, questions and corrections to the OMEGA Associate Laser Facility ...

  20. Laser Manufacturing | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home > Impact > Advanced Laser Manufacturing Tools Deliver Higher Performance Click to ... Advanced Laser Manufacturing Tools Deliver Higher Performance In a research lab looking ...

  1. Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Enabling the next generation of intense particle accelerators Contact Juan Fernandez (505) 667-6575 ...

  2. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OMEGAEP Laser Facility Roof Access Checklist (S-AB-P-591) ... For additional information contact: Director's Administrator University of Rochester - Laboratory for Laser ...

  3. Key Laser Technologies for X-Ray FELs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaertner, Franz

    2013-08-31

    In the final project period, we demonstrated sub femtosecond timing distribution over a 1.2 km polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber-optic link using balanced optical cross-correlators (BOCs) for link stabilization. By eliminating polarization mode dispersion, link operation for 16 days maintained 0.6 fs RMS timing drift and during a 3-day interval only 0.13 fs drift, which corresponds to a stability level of 10-21. To improve the overall system efficiency and robustness, we developed fiber-coupled, hybrid-integrated BOCs using waveguides in periodically-poled KTiOPO4 (PPKTP). The measured second-harmonic conversion efficiency in the waveguides is a factor of 50 higher than that of bulk-optic crystals. Characterization of 1st-generation devices shows performance comparable to free-space BOCs, with the potential for significant improvement in future devices. For optical-to-RF conversion, we developed two balanced optical-microwave phase detectors (BOM-PD) based on the Sagnac and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. RF extraction using BOM-PDs in phase-locked loops yielded sub-10-fs residual timing jitter for locking bandwidths on the order of several hundred kHz. Finally, we characterized the timing jitter of ultralow-noise Ti:Sapphire oscillators, demonstrating an unprecedented 13 as of jitter integrated over the entire Nyquist band. Our measurements agreed well with theory, confirming our models for quantum-limited laser noise. Measurements of commercially available solid-state lasers at 1550 nm showed that there are laser sources already available with sufficiently low noise to achieve sub-femtosecond performance as master oscillators within a timing distribution system.

  4. Dye laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye laser amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant. 3 figs.

  5. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Miller, J.L.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-08-23

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window. 2 figs.

  6. Laser Programs Highlight 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, R.R.

    1997-01-31

    Our contributions to laser science and technology and corresponding applications range from concept to design of the National Ignition Facility, transfer of Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation technology to the private sector, and from new initiatives in industry and defense to micro-optics for improving human vision.

  7. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  8. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  9. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  10. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E.; Miller, John L.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window.

  11. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  12. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  13. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  14. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  15. Laser controlled flame stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Thomas, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus is provided for initiating and stabilizing fuel combustion in applications such as gas turbine electrical power generating engines and jet turbine engines where it is desired to burn lean fuel/air mixtures which produce lower amounts of NO.sub.x. A laser induced spark is propagated at a distance from the fuel nozzle with the laser ignitor being remotely located from the high temperature environment of the combustion chamber. A laser initiating spark generated by focusing high peak power laser light to a sufficiently tight laser spot within the fuel to cause the ionization of air and fuel into a plasma is unobtrusive to the flow dynamics of the combustion chamber of a fuel injector, thereby facilitating whatever advantage can be taken of flow dynamics in the design of the fuel injector.

  16. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  17. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-12-12

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac is described. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator, or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  18. Laser dividing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, Jr., R. Edward (Tracy, CA); Johnson, Steve A. (Tracy, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A laser beam dividing apparatus (10) having a first beam splitter (14) with an aperture (16) therein positioned in the path of a laser beam (12) such that a portion of the laser beam (12) passes through the aperture (16) onto a second beam splitter (20) and a portion of the laser beam (12) impinges upon the first beam splitter (14). Both the first beam splitter (14) and the second beam splitter (20) are, optionally, made from a dichroic material such that a green component (24) of the laser beam (12) is reflected therefrom and a yellow component (26) is refracted therethrough. The first beam splitter (14) and the second beam splitter (20) further each have a plurality of facets (22) such that the components (24, 26) are reflected and refracted in a number equaling the number of facets (22).

  19. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, Donald; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  20. 1982 laser program annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R.

    1983-08-01

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications. (MOW)

  1. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1986-08-15

    The atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process for the enrichment of uranium is evaluated. (AIP)

  2. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VII System Description Chapter 1: System Overview Chapter 2: Laser Sources (final draft material) Chapter 3: Laser Amplifiers Chapter 4: Power Conditioning Chapter 5: Optomechanical System Chapter 6: Laser Diagnostics Chapter 7: Experimental System Chapter 8: Control System Chapter 9: Facility and Safety Interlocks Comments Address document comments, questions and corrections to the OMEGA EP Associate Laser Facility Manager

  3. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X Subsystem and Component Maintenance OMEGA Facility Subsystem and Component Maintenance Instructions (S-AA-M-014) Laser Sources Laser Amplifiers Power Conditioning Control System Beamlines Optical Manufacturing Experimental Contamination Control Comments Address document comments, questions and corrections to the OMEGA EP Associate Laser Facility Manager. For additional information contact: Director's Administrator University of Rochester - Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River Rd,

  4. Piezoelectric measurement of laser power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.; Johnson, John A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    A method for measuring the energy of individual laser pulses or a series of laser pulses by reading the output of a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer which has received a known fraction of the total laser pulse beam. An apparatus is disclosed that reduces the incident energy on the PZ transducer by means of a beam splitter placed in the beam of the laser pulses.

  5. Ultra-fast laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V

    2014-01-21

    A laser system is provided which selectively excites Raman active vibrations in molecules. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and remote sensing.

  6. Laser and infrared (selected articles)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-09

    This article reports the author's impressions from a visit to the U.S. in May, 1989. The report describes the rapid deployment in recent years of solid state laser technology in area of application such as high average power, semiconductor laser device pumps, tunability, narrow line width, and other similar solid state laser device, as well as laser materials processing, and so on.

  7. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  8. Laser Spark Plug Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, D.L.; Richardson, S.W.; Woodruff, S.D.; McMillian, M.H.; Guutam, M.

    2007-04-01

    To meet the ignition system needs of large bore high pressure lean burn natural gas engines a laser diode side pumped passively Q-switched laser igniter was designed and tested. The laser was designed to produce the optical intensities needed to initiate ignition in a lean burn high brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) engine. The experimentation explored a variety of optical and electrical input parameters that when combined produced a robust spark in air. The results show peak power levels exceeding 2 MW and peak focal intensities above 400 GW/cm2. Future research avenues and current progress with the initial prototype are presented and discussed.

  9. Measurement of Electron Density near Plasma Grid of Large-scaled Negative Ion Source by Means of Millimeter-Wave Interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagaoka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Ito, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Shibuya, M.; Sato, M.; Komada, S.; Kondo, T.; Hayashi, H.; Asano, E.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2011-09-26

    A millimeter-wave interferometer with the frequency of 39 GHz ({lambda} 7.7 mm) was newly installed to a large-scaled negative ion source. The measurable line-integrated electron density (n{sub e}l) is from 2x10{sup 16} to 7x10{sup 18} m{sup -2}, where n{sub e} and l represent an electron density and the plasma length along the millimeter-wave path, respectively. Our interest in this study is behavior of negative ions and reduction of electron density in the beam extraction region near the plasma grid. The first results show the possibility of the electron density measurement by the millimeter-wave interferometer in this region. The line-averaged electron density increases proportional to the arc power under the condition without cesium seeding. The significant decrease of the electron density and significant increase of the negative ion density were observed just after the cesium seeding. The electron density measured with the interferometer agrees well with that observed with a Langmuir probe. The very high negative ion ratio of n{sub H-}/(n{sub e}+n{sub H-}) = 0.85 was achieved within 400 min. after the cesium seeding.

  10. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  11. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  12. Laser cutting nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramos, Terry J.

    1984-01-01

    A laser cutting nozzle for use with a laser cutting apparatus directing a focused beam to a spot on a work piece. The nozzle has a cylindrical body with a conical tip which together have a conically shaped hollow interior with the apex at a small aperture through the tip. The conical hollow interior is shaped to match the profile of the laser beam, at full beamwidth, which passes through the nozzle to the work piece. A plurality of gas inlet holes extend through the body to the hollow interior and are oriented to produce a swirling flow of gas coaxially through the nozzle and out the aperture, aligned with the laser beam, to the work piece. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

  13. Laser cutting nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramos, T.J.

    1982-09-30

    A laser cutting nozzle for use with a laser cutting apparatus directing a focused beam to a spot on a work piece. The nozzle has a cylindrical body with a conical tip which together have a conically shaped hollow interior with the apex at a small aperture through the tip. The conical hollow interior is shaped to match the profile of the laser beam, at full beamwidth, which passes through the nozzle to the work piece. A plurality of gas inlet holes extend through the body to the hollow interior and are oriented to produce a swirling flow of gas coaxially through the nozzle and out the aperture, aligned with the laser beam, to the work piece.

  14. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A typical configuration uses a low intensity laser beam (2nd, 3rd, or 4th harmonic of 1054-nm) to probe a plasma volume. The Thomson scattered light is collected by a lens and is ...

  15. Insulator for laser housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, D.B.

    1992-12-29

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

  16. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  17. Pulsed gas laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Louis W.; Fitzsimmons, William A.

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

  18. Cylindrical laser resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casperson, Lee W.

    1976-02-24

    The properties of an improved class of lasers is presented. In one configuration of these lasers the radiation propagates radially within the amplifying medium, resulting in high fields and symmetric illumination at the resonator axis. Thus there is a strong focusing of energy at the axis of the resonator. In a second configuration the radiation propagates back and forth in a tubular region of space.

  19. Variable laser attenuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, S.R.

    1987-05-29

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprising one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength. 9 figs.

  20. Variable laser attenuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprng one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength.

  1. Free-Electron Laser | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser is the world's highest-power tunable infrared laser and was developed using the lab's expertise in superconducting ...

  2. Laser, Supercomputer Measure Speedy Electrons in Silicon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser, Supercomputer Measure Speedy Electrons in Silicon Laser, Supercomputer Measure Speedy Electrons in Silicon Simulations at NERSC Help Illuminate Attosecond Laser Experiment ...

  3. High-Powered Lasers for Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    laser technology to produce energetic laser pulses at repetition rates of 10 shots per second with the electrical efficiency required for commercial laser fusion power. ...

  4. EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

  5. Tunable dye laser amplifier chain for laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor' S; D'yachkov, Aleksei B; Labozin, Valerii P; Mironov, Sergei M; Nikulin, Sergei A; Firsov, Valerii A

    2004-05-31

    A tunable dye laser amplifier chain developed for experiments on atomic vapour laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is described. The system, pumped by copper vapour lasers, consists of a master oscillator and an amplifier stage including a preamplifier and three main amplifiers working in the saturation mode. The master oscillator of the stage is a dye laser with a grazing incidence diffraction grating. Longitudinal pumping of the amplifiers is used. The efficiency of the main amplifiers is 50 % - 55 %. The average power of laser radiation at the output of the last amplifier is 100 W. (lasers. amplifiers)

  6. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Gas lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    This book describes the fundamentals of gas lasers. It provides information and data on neutral gas lasers, ionized gas lasers, and molecular gas lasers. Concluding this volume is an extensive table of all gas laser wavelengths.

  7. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  8. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  9. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.

    1990-08-14

    A blue-green laser (450--550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm[sup 3+]. The Tm[sup 3+] is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP. 3 figs.

  10. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Faulkner, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A blue-green laser (450-550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm.sup.3+. The Tm.sup.+ is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP.

  11. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  12. Lasers '90: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Lasers and Applications, San Diego, CA, Dec. 10-14, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.G.; Herbelin, J. Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA )

    1991-01-01

    The general topics considered are: x-ray lasers; FELs; solid state lasers; techniques and phenomena of ultrafast lasers; optical filters and free space laser communications; discharge lasers; tunable lasers; applications of lasers in medicine and surgery; lasers in materials processing; high power lasers; dynamics gratings, wave mixing, and holography; up-conversion lasers; lidar and laser radar; laser resonators; excimer lasers; laser propagation; nonlinear and quantum optics; blue-green technology; imaging; laser spectroscopy; chemical lasers; dye lasers; and lasers in chemistry.

  13. Hugoniot and spall data from the laser-driven miniflyer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warnes, R.H.; Paisley, D.L.; Tonks, D.L.

    1996-05-01

    The laser-driven miniflyer has been developed as a small-sized complement to the propellant- or gas-driven gun with which to make material property measurements. Flyer velocities typically range from 0.5 to 1.5 km/s, depending on the energy of the launching laser and the flyer dimensions. The 10{endash}50 {mu}m-thick flyers, 1{endash}3 mm in diameter, and comparably small targets require very little material and are easy to recover for post-experiment analysis. To measure and improve the precision of our measurements, we are conducting an extensive series of experiments impacting well-characterized Cu, Al, and Au on several transparent, calibrated, windows (PMMA, LiF, and sapphire). Measurement of the impact and interface velocities with a high-time-resolution velocity interferometer (VISAR) gives us a point on the Hugoniot of the flyer material. These are then compared to published Hugoniot data taken with conventional techniques. In the spall experiments, a flyer strikes a somewhat thicker target of the same material and creates a spall in the target. Measuring the free-surface velocity of the target gives information on the compressive elastic-plastic response of the target to the impact, the tensile spall strength, and the strain rate at which the spall occurred. Volumetric strain rates at spall in these experiments are frequently in the 10{sup 6}{endash}10{sup 8}s{sup {minus}1} range, considerably higher than the 10{sup 3}{endash}10{sup 4}s{sup {minus}1} range obtainable from gas gun experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Hugoniot and spall data from the laser-driven miniflyer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warnes, R.H.; Paisley, D.L.; Tonks, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    The laser-driven miniflyer has been developed as a small-sized complement to the propellant or gas-driven gun with which to make material property measurements. Flyer velocities typically range from 0.5 to 1.5 km/s, depending on the energy of the launching laser and the flyer dimensions. The 10--50 {micro}m-thick flyers, 1--3 mm in diameter, and comparably small targets require very little material and are easy to recover for post-experiment analysis. To measure and improve the precision of the measurements, the authors are conducting an extensive series of experiments impacting well-characterized Cu, Al, and Au on several transparent, calibrated, windows (PMMA, LiF, and sapphire). Measurement of the impact and interface velocities with a high-time-resolution velocity interferometer (VISAR) gives them a point on the Hugoniot of the flyer material. These are then compared to published Hugoniot data taken with conventional techniques. In the spall experiments, a flyer strikes a somewhat thicker target of the same material and creates a spall in the target. Measuring the free-surface velocity of the target gives information on the compressive elastic-plastic response of the target to the impact, the tensile spall strength, and the strain rate at which the spall occurred. Volumetric strain rates at spall in these experiments are frequently in the 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} s{sup {minus}1} range, considerably higher than the 10{sup 3}--10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1} range obtainable from gas gun experiments.

  15. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milner, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall mperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser.

  16. OMEGA EP Laser Sources - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE ...

  17. Omega Laser Facility Schedule - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schedule - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE ...

  18. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, P.A.; Anderson, A.T.; Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-20

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dielectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections is disclosed. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections. 4 figs.

  19. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Phillip A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dialectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections.

  20. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - Laser Drivers Front Matter - Maintenance Index & Schedules (S-OM-P-026) Laser Driver Subsystem Procedures Check for Ground Loops (S-SM-P-002) ACSL IFES Synchronization ...

  1. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume IX Subsystem Startup and Shutdown Procedures Chapter 2 - Laser Sources Operations ... & Shutdown S-AB-P-322 Sacher Littman Laser Startup & Shutdown S-AB-P-431 Crystalaser ...

  2. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Changing the Filter in the IRAT Laser Chiller (S-AB-P-168) IRAT Chiller Coolant Filing Maintenance Procedure (S-AB-P-324) IRAT Power Output Check (S-AB-P-255) IRAT Laser Chiller ...

  3. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Optic Cleaning Procedures Optic Cleaning Procedure (S-SM-P-197) Laser Bay Optics Inspect and Document Laser Rod Condition (S-SM-P-198) Inspect and Clean Beam Splitter ...

  4. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - Laser Drivers Front Matter Miscellaneous MIFEDS Post-Shot Recovery (S-OM-P-124) HTS ... Address document comments, questions and corrections to the OMEGA Associate Laser Facility ...

  5. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Omega Laser Facility Documentation 3000 LFORM 6950 Incident Review and Reporting 6610 LLE ... OMEGA Laser System Volume I - System Description (S-AA-M-12) Volume II - System Operation ...

  6. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume VIII System Shot Operations Manual Chapter 2 - Laser Sources Operations Procedures ... LST Securing Checklist S-AB-P-101 Laser Sources Bay Sweep Checklist S-AB-P-517 ...

  7. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Replace PLC Backup Batteries (S-SM-P-225) Reprogram Neuron Module (S-SM-P-226) Check and Balance Video Inputs (S-SM-P-227) Laser Bay Structure Grounding (S-SM-P-228) Laser Bay ...

  8. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Laser Amplifiers Front Matter - Maintenance Index & Schedules (S-OM-P-027) Rod ... SSA Pump Module Windows (S-SM-P-180) SSA Laser Disk Inspection (S-SM-P-181) Inspect ...

  9. Antenna coupled photonic wire lasers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reno, John L.; Kao, Tsung-Kao; Cai, Xiaowei; Lee, Alan W. M.; Hu, Qing

    2015-06-22

    Slope efficiency (SE) is an important performance metric for lasers. In conventional semiconductor lasers, SE can be optimized by careful designs of the facet (or the modulation for DFB lasers) dimension and surface. However, photonic wire lasers intrinsically suffer low SE due to their deep sub-wavelength emitting facets. Inspired by microwave engineering techniques, we show a novel method to extract power from wire lasers using monolithically integrated antennas. These integrated antennas significantly increase the effective radiation area, and consequently enhance the power extraction efficiency. When applied to wire lasers at THz frequency, we achieved the highest single-side slope efficiency (~450moremW/A) in pulsed mode for DFB lasers at 4 THz and a ~4x increase in output power at 3 THz compared with a similar structure without antennas. This work demonstrates the versatility of incorporating microwave engineering techniques into laser designs, enabling significant performance enhancements.less

  10. Laser beam alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kasner, William H.; Racki, Daniel J.; Swenson, Clark E.

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector.

  11. SOLAR PUMPED LASER MICROTHRUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenchik, A M; Beach, R; Dawson, J; Siders, C W

    2010-02-05

    The development of microsatellites requires the development of engines to modify their orbit. It is natural to use solar energy to drive such engines. For an unlimited energy source the optimal thruster must use a minimal amount of expendable material to minimize launch costs. This requires the ejected material to have the maximal velocity and, hence, the ejected atoms must be as light as possible and be ejected by as high an energy density source as possible. Such a propulsion can be induced by pulses from an ultra-short laser. The ultra-short laser provides the high-energy concentration and high-ejected velocity. We suggest a microthruster system comprised of an inflatable solar concentrator, a solar panel, and a diode-pumped fiber laser. We will describe the system design and give weight estimates.

  12. Solar Pumped Laser Microthruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Beach, R.; Dawson, J.; Siders, C. W.

    2010-10-08

    The development of microsatellites requires the development of engines to modify their orbit. It is natural to use solar energy to drive such engines. For an unlimited energy source the optimal thruster must use a minimal amount of expendable material to minimize launch costs. This requires the ejected material to have the maximal velocity and, hence, the ejected atoms must be as light as possible and be ejected by as high an energy density source as possible. Such a propulsion can be induced by pulses from an ultra-short laser. The ultra-short laser provides the high-energy concentration and high-ejected velocity. We suggest a microthruster system comprised of an inflatable solar concentrator, a solar panel, and a diode-pumped fiber laser. We will describe the system design and give weight estimates.

  13. Laser pulse detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, D.N.; Akerman, M.A.

    1979-08-13

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  14. Laser pulse detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Akerman, M. Alfred

    1981-01-01

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  15. Laser isotope separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

    1975-11-26

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  16. Laser isotope separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Boyer, Keith; Greiner, Norman R.

    1988-01-01

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  17. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the matrix, as do strontium and calcium.

  18. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I System Description OMEGA System Operations Manual - Volume I-System Description System Overview Laser Drivers (draft material) Laser Amplifiers Power Conditioning Optomechanical System Laser Diagnostics (draft material available on request) Experimental System Targets and Target Fabrication Target Diagnostics (Refer to Chapter 5 of the Omega Laser Facility Users' Guide) Facility and Safety Interlocks OMEGA Control System (draft material available on request) Target Chamber Tritium Removal

  19. Deposition head for laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  20. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  1. Laser amplifier chain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain.

  2. Laser amplifier chain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-10-20

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain. 6 figs.

  3. Vacuum ultraviolet laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, J.; Ruscic, B.M.; Greene, J.P.

    1984-07-06

    Transitions from the 2p/sup 4/(/sup 1/S/sub 0/)3s /sup 2/S/sub 1/2/ state of atomic fluorine to all allowed loser states produces laser emission at six new wavelengths: 680.7A, 682.6A, 3592.7A, 3574.1A, 6089.2A, and 6046.8A. Coherent radiation at these new wavelengths can be generated in an atomic fluorine laser operated as an amplifier or as an oscillator.

  4. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.

  5. Rare earth gas laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  6. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  7. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 1. Lasers and masers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    This book describes various types of lasers and masers. The following topics are discussed in detail: types and comparisons of laser sources, crystal and glass lasers, semiconductor lasers, organic dye and other liquid lasers, free-electron and x-ray lasers, masers and laser safety.

  8. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  9. A Principal Component Analysis Noise Filter Value-Added Procedure to Remove Uncorrelated Noise from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Lo D. D. Turner R. O. Knuteson

    2006-01-31

    This technical report provide a short description of the application of the principle component analysis techniques to remove uncorrelated random noise from ground-based high spectral resolution infrared radiance observations collected by the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometers (AERIs) deployed by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. A general overview of the technique, the input, and output datastreams of the newly generated value-added product, and the data quality checks used are provided. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2006).

  10. Dye laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye lr amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant.

  11. Miniature Laser Tracker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S.

    2003-09-09

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  12. Oxazine laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R.; Field, George F.

    1992-01-01

    New oxazine compounds useful as dye laser media in solution, are superiior to prior art materials. The oxazine dyes useful when pumped by the 578.2 nm copper line to operate in the 700-800 nm range are described by formula I ##STR1##

  13. Ring laser scatterometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  14. Apodizer aperture for lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorna, Siebe; Siebert, Larry D.; Brueckner, Keith A.

    1976-11-09

    An aperture attenuator for use with high power lasers which includes glass windows shaped and assembled to form an annulus chamber which is filled with a dye solution. The annulus chamber is shaped such that the section in alignment with the axis of the incident beam follows a curve which is represented by the equation y = (r - r.sub.o).sup.n.

  15. Laser Program annual report 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1985-06-01

    The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs.

  16. Ultranarrow linewidth waveguide excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, C.P. ); Feldman, B.J.; Huston, A.

    1989-09-01

    We have constructed a single longitudinal mode XeCl laser using microwave discharge waveguide laser technology. The pulse duration, repetition rate, and simplicity of construction associated with waveguide excimer lasers lend this system unique capabilities and a broad utility for interfacing with other excimer devices. The coherence length of the laser emission has been found to be {similar to}6 m with a corresponding bandwidth of {l brace}22 MHz that is near the transform limit. The laser has been used to demonstrate pulsed UV Doppler velocity measurement in a simple homodyne configuration.

  17. 2 micron femtosecond fiber laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jian; Wan, Peng; Yang, Lihmei

    2014-07-29

    Methods and systems for generating femtosecond fiber laser pulses are disclose, including generating a signal laser pulse from a seed laser oscillator; using a first amplifier stage comprising an input and an output, wherein the signal laser pulse is coupled into the input of the first stage amplifier and the output of the first amplifier stage emits an amplified and stretched signal laser pulse; using an amplifier chain comprising an input and an output, wherein the amplified and stretched signal laser pulse from the output of the first amplifier stage is coupled into the input of the amplifier chain and the output of the amplifier chain emits a further amplified, stretched signal laser pulse. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  18. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  19. Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser: A New Combination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser-Compton Light Source Technology Short-Pulse Lasers High-Powered Lasers Journal Articles home science photon science directed energy Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser: A ...

  20. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau interferometer as refraction diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas at energies below 10 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2014-07-15

    The highly localized density gradients expected in High Energy Density (HED) plasma experiments can be characterized by x-ray phase-contrast imaging in addition to conventional attenuation radiography. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau grating interferometer setup is an attractive HED diagnostic due to its high sensitivity to refraction induced phase shifts. We report on the adaptation of such a system for operation in the sub-10 keV range by using a combination of free standing and ultrathin Talbot gratings. This new x-ray energy explored matches well the current x-ray backlighters used for HED experiments, while also enhancing phase effects at lower electron densities. We studied the performance of the high magnification, low energy Talbot-Lau interferometer, for single image phase retrieval using Moiré fringe deflectometry. Our laboratory and simulation studies indicate that such a device is able to retrieve object electron densities from phase shift measurements. Using laboratory x-ray sources from 7 to 15 μm size we obtained accurate simultaneous measurements of refraction and attenuation for both sharp and mild electron density gradients.

  1. Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

  2. Laser beam temporal and spatial tailoring for laser shock processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd; Dane, C. Brent

    2001-01-01

    Techniques are provided for formatting laser pulse spatial shape and for effectively and efficiently delivering the laser energy to a work surface in the laser shock process. An appropriately formatted pulse helps to eliminate breakdown and generate uniform shocks. The invention uses a high power laser technology capable of meeting the laser requirements for a high throughput process, that is, a laser which can treat many square centimeters of surface area per second. The shock process has a broad range of applications, especially in the aerospace industry, where treating parts to reduce or eliminate corrosion failure is very important. The invention may be used for treating metal components to improve strength and corrosion resistance. The invention has a broad range of applications for parts that are currently shot peened and/or require peening by means other than shot peening. Major applications for the invention are in the automotive and aerospace industries for components such as turbine blades, compressor components, gears, etc.

  3. Laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbert, Gaylen V.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity. It is known in the prior art to utilize a PZT (piezoelectric transducer) element in combination with a mirror to change the cavity length of a laser cavity (which changes the laser frequency). Using a PZT element to drive the mirror directly is adequate at frequencies below 10 kHz. However, in high frequency applications (100 kHz and higher) PZT elements alone do not provide a sufficient change in the cavity length. The present invention utilizes an ultrasonic concentrator with a PZT element and mirror to provide modulation of the laser cavity. With an ultrasonic concentrator, the mirror element at the end of a laser cavity can move at larger amplitudes and higher frequencies.

  4. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

  6. Azacoumarin dye lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R.; Atkins, Ronald L.; Henry, Ronald A.; Fletcher, Aaron N.

    1978-01-01

    A dye laser comprising a laser dye solution of a compound having the general structure: ##STR1## wherein at least one of the 5, 6 and 8 ring positions is occupied by a nitrogen atom in lieu of the corresponding CR group and X is OH, alkoxy, or amino including amino substituted by at least one of the following: alkyl, aryl, acyl, aracyl, a group which taken together with the nitrogen atom of the amino group forms a heterocyclic ring, or part of one or two 5 or 6 membered aliphatic heterocyclic rings attached to ring A at positions 6 or 8 or both depending on where the N in ring A is located. R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, R.sub.6 and R.sub.8 are hydrogen or other groups as defined below. The compounds lase in the blue-green to near ultraviolet region.

  7. Azaquinolone dye lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R.; Atkins, Ronald L.; Henry, Ronald A.; Fletcher, Aaron N.

    1978-01-01

    A dye laser comprising a laser dye solution of a compound having the general structure: ##STR1## wherein at least one of the 5, 6 and 8 ring positions is occupied by a nitrogen atom in lieu of the corresponding CR group and X is OH, alkoxy, or amino including amino substituted by at least one of the following: alkyl, aryl, acyl, aracyl, a group which taken together with the nitrogen atom of the amino group forms a heterocyclic ring, or part of one or two 5 or 6 membered aliphatic heterocyclic rings attached to ring A at positions 6 or 8 or both depending on where the N in ring A is located. R.sub.1, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, R.sub.6 and R.sub.8 are hydrogen or other groups as defined below. The compounds lase in the blue to near ultraviolet region.

  8. Laser pulse sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.

    1998-03-24

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera. 5 figs.

  9. Laser pulse sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera.

  10. Laser beam guard clamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickson, Richard K.

    2010-09-07

    A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

  11. Laser multiplexing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Steve A. (Tracy, CA); English, Jr., Ronald Edward (Tracy, CA); White, Ronald K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A plurality of copper lasers, as radiant power sources, emits a beam of power carrying radiation. A plurality of fiber injection assemblies receives power from the plurality of copper lasers and injects such power into a plurality of fibers for individually transmitting the received power to a plurality of power-receiving devices. The power-transmitting fibers of the system are so arranged that power is delivered therethrough to each of the power-receiving devices such that, even if a few of the radiant power sources and/or fibers fail, the power supply to any of the power receiving devices will not completely drop to zero but will drop by the same proportionate amount.

  12. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  13. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  14. Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Spectroscopy - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  15. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2015-07-07

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for advancing a borehole. High power laser drilling system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam through the electrical motor.

  16. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.

    1997-09-02

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules. 7 figs.

  17. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    1997-01-01

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P.sub.2 O.sub.5, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules.

  18. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  19. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2014-06-03

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  20. The Open Science Grid status and architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pordes, Ruth; Petravick, Don; Kramer, Bill; Olsen, James D.; Livny, Miron; Roy, Gordon A.; Avery, Paul Ralph; Blackburn, Kent; Wenaus, Torre J.; Wuerthwein, Frank K.; Foster, Ian; /Chicago U. /Indiana U.

    2007-09-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. The OSG project[1] is funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program. The OSG project provides specific activities for the operation and evolution of the common infrastructure. The US ATLAS and US CMS collaborations contribute to and depend on OSG as the US infrastructure contributing to the World Wide LHC Computing Grid on which the LHC experiments distribute and analyze their data. Other stakeholders include the STAR RHIC experiment, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and several Fermilab Tevatron experiments- CDF, D0, MiniBoone etc. The OSG implementation architecture brings a pragmatic approach to enabling vertically integrated community specific distributed systems over a common horizontal set of shared resources and services. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  1. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,; Coghlan, Susan; Yelick, Katherine

    2011-12-21

    The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was to investigate the potential role of cloud computing in addressing the computing needs for the DOE Office of Science (SC), particularly related to serving the needs of mid- range computing and future data-intensive computing workloads. A set of research questions was formed to probe various aspects of cloud computing from performance, usability, and cost. To address these questions, a distributed testbed infrastructure was deployed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The testbed was designed to be flexible and capable enough to explore a variety of computing models and hardware design points in order to understand the impact for various scientific applications. During the project, the testbed also served as a valuable resource to application scientists. Applications from a diverse set of projects such as MG-RAST (a metagenomics analysis server), the Joint Genome Institute, the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), were used by the Magellan project for benchmarking within the cloud, but the project teams were also able to accomplish important production science utilizing the Magellan cloud resources.

  2. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VIII System Shot Operations Manual Volume VIII Index (S-AB-P-157) Shot Director Operating Checklists Laser Sources Power Conditioning Beamlines Experimental Systems Experimental Diagnostics Comments Address document comments, questions and corrections to the OMEGA EP Associate Laser Facility Manager. For additional information contact: Director's Administrator University of Rochester - Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River Rd, Rochester, NY 14623-1299 Last updated: November 14

  3. Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Enabling the next generation of intense particle accelerators Contact Juan Fernandez (505) 667-6575 Email Short-pulse ion acceleration The Trident facility is a world-class performer in the area of ion acceleration from laser-solid target interactions. Trident has demonstrated over 100 MeV protons at intensities of 8x1020 W/cm2 with efficiencies approaching 5%. These intense relativistic interactions can be diagnosed

  4. Hybrid fiber-rod laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Messerly, Michael J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2012-12-18

    Single, or near single transverse mode waveguide definition is produced using a single homogeneous medium to transport both the pump excitation light and generated laser light. By properly configuring the pump deposition and resulting thermal power generation in the waveguide device, a thermal focusing power is established that supports perturbation-stable guided wave propagation of an appropriately configured single or near single transverse mode laser beam and/or laser pulse.

  5. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Dan (Brentwood, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 Kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 Kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  6. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.; Cook, E.G.

    1993-01-05

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  7. Uranium molecular laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, R.J.; Sullivan, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Molecular Laser Isotope Separation program is moving into the engineering phase, and it is possible to determine in some detail the plant cost terms involved in the process economics. A brief description of the MLIS process physics is given as a motivation to the engineering and economics discussion. Much of the plant cost arises from lasers and the overall optical system. In the paper, the authors discuss lasers as operating units and systems, along with temporal multiplexing and Raman shifting. Estimates of plant laser costs are given.

  8. Single-exciton nanocrystal laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klimov, Victor I.; Ivanov, Sergei A.

    2012-01-17

    A laser system employing amplification via a single exciton regime and to optical gain media having single exciton amplification is provided.

  9. Laser system using regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmett, John L. [Pleasanton, CA

    1980-03-04

    High energy laser system using a regenerative amplifier, which relaxes all constraints on laser components other than the intrinsic damage level of matter, so as to enable use of available laser system components. This can be accomplished by use of segmented components, spatial filters, at least one amplifier using solid state or gaseous media, and separated reflector members providing a long round trip time through the regenerative cavity, thereby allowing slower switching and adequate time to clear the spatial filters, etc. The laser system simplifies component requirements and reduces component cost while providing high energy output.

  10. Laser system using regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmett, J.L.

    1980-03-04

    High energy laser system is disclosed using a regenerative amplifier, which relaxes all constraints on laser components other than the intrinsic damage level of matter, so as to enable use of available laser system components. This can be accomplished by use of segmented components, spatial filters, at least one amplifier using solid state or gaseous media, and separated reflector members providing a long round trip time through the regenerative cavity, thereby allowing slower switching and adequate time to clear the spatial filters, etc. The laser system simplifies component requirements and reduces component cost while providing high energy output. 10 figs.

  11. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, Mark A.

    1985-01-01

    A laser pulse is injected into an unstable ring resonator-amplifier structure. Inside this resonator the laser pulse is amplified, spatially filtered and magnified. The laser pulse is recirculated in the resonator, being amplified, filtered and magnified on each pass. The magnification is chosen so that the beam passes through the amplifier in concentric non-overlapping regions similar to a single pass MOPA. After a number of passes around the ring resonator the laser pulse is spatially large enough to exit the ring resonator system by passing around an output mirror.

  12. Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars mission laser tool Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL Curiosity will carry the newly delivered laser instrument to reveal which elements are present in Mars' rocks and ...

  13. Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps ChemCam zaps rocks with a high-powered laser to determine their composition and carries a camera that can ...

  14. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  15. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruhn, Charles R.; Hammond, Robert B.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  16. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruhn, C.R.; Hammond, R.B.

    The disclosure related to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  17. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  18. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  19. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.; Ault, E.R.; Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment. 2 figs.

  20. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W.; Ault, Earl R.; Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

  1. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffers, K.I.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.; Keszler, D.A.

    1997-10-14

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM{prime}(BO{sub 3})F, where M, M{prime} are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO{sub 3}F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator. 6 figs.

  2. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffers, Kathleen I.; DeLoach, Laura D.; Payne, Stephen A.; Keszler, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM'(BO.sub.3)F, where M, M' are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO.sub.3 F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator.

  3. Ultrafast laser diagnostics to investigate initiation fundamentals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast laser diagnostics to investigate initiation fundamentals in energetic materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast laser diagnostics to investigate ...

  4. OMEGA Amplifiers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amplifiers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  5. OMEGA Experimental Systems - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Systems - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map ...

  6. Laser Crystallization of Phase Change Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geoffrey Campbell is the Principal Investigator for Laser Crystallization of Phase Change Material LLNL BES Programs Highlight Laser Crystallization of Phase Change Material False ...

  7. Laser diagnostics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser diagnostics Subscribe to RSS - Laser diagnostics The Multi-Point Thomson Scattering (MPTS) diagnostic system has been providing time dependent Te and ne profile measurements ...

  8. OMEGA Power Conditioning - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Conditioning - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map ...

  9. Laser Induced Spectroscopy - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Induced Spectroscopy Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL's Laser Induced Spectroscopy technology detects and measures ...

  10. Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer treatment Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment Scientists have observed for the first time how a laser penetrates dense, electron-rich plasma to generate ions. ...

  11. Parabola Alignment Diagnostic - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parabola Alignment Diagnostic - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the ...

  12. OMEGA EP Amplifiers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amplifiers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  13. OMEGA EP Construction - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  14. Joint Operations - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  15. Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Advanced diagnostics of experiments covering many orders of magnitude in strain ...

  16. Improved Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Elemental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Improved Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) ... NETL has developed a CO2 injection basin leakage detection system using miniaturized laser ...

  17. Safety and Security at Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety and Security Safety and Security at Trident Laser Facility Enabling world-class science in high-energy density physics and fundamental laser-matter interactions Contact ...

  18. Laser activated diffuse discharge switch (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laser activated diffuse discharge switch Title: Laser activated diffuse discharge switch The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch which is capable of changing ...

  19. Laser Light Engines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laser Light Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name: Laser Light Engines Place: Salem, New Hampshire Zip: NH 03079 Sector: Efficiency Product: Salem-based, designs, develops and...

  20. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  1. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  2. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction.

  3. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Xu, Huiwen; Luk, Ting Shan; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  4. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 8. 2B. Interferometer gauge pressure-time measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, J.E.; Seacord, D.F.; Newman, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    This project was charged with the responsibility of conducting tests on static aircraft panels mounted on the ground at various ranges from the blast. Pressure-versus-time data were obtained using interferometer gauges. The gauge proved to be reliable and easy to operate. Its high-frequency response enabled it to record data to the pressure rise at the front of the blast wave which had not been noted previously. These results show, from measurements taken by pressure instruments mounted flush with the ground, that the rise times at the front of the blast waves were on gamma-radiation intensity by the smple expedient of stacking a few layers of lead breic around the gauge mounts.

  5. Energy level effects during multiphoton dissociation and the laser separation of closely spaced isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreou, D.

    1996-09-01

    A novel approach for enhancing the selectivity of the desired isotope in the molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS) process is presented. The scheme consists of simultaneously applying two laser beams with frequencies corresponding to those between the ground and the first energy excitation level and the ground and the second energy excitation level, respectively. Practical relations on the properties of the spherical-top molecules are derived and a semiclassical analysis of the electromagnetic interaction within the limits of the experimental conditions applied in actual MLIS experiments shows that the selectivity, defined as the ratio of the absorption cross sections of the two isotopes, increases by a factor of 10{endash}20 times in the case of the uranium isotopes. In addition, it is demonstrated that during the multiphoton absorption process energy-level splittings due to induced magnetic dipoles and induced electric quadrupoles are by no means negligible. They become significant during multiphoton processes where two or more photons are lost during the interaction process. At high pumping powers they become dominant and inhibit selectivity. They cancel out during interaction processes where there is no change in the total number of photons, such as scattering. These effects can be avoided by applying the laser beams to the molecular gas in arrangements which in principle are equivalent to a Mach{endash}Zehnder interferometer with the molecules substituted for the reuniting beam splitter. Moreover, the induced electric quadrupoles (E2) are fully exploited. The application of the results and the concepts described herein can render the MLIS process the most economic and practical method for the commercial separation of the uranium isotopes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - Laser Drivers Only (S-OM-P-165) S.O. 1-2.2: Type 2 - Non-Propagating (S-OM-P-166) S.O. 1-2.3: Type 3 - A Splitter (S-OM-P-167) S.O. 1-2.4: Type 4 - Terminating in Laser Bay ...

  7. Multiple pass laser amplifier system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brueckner, Keith A.; Jorna, Siebe; Moncur, N. Kent

    1977-01-01

    A laser amplification method for increasing the energy extraction efficiency from laser amplifiers while reducing the energy flux that passes through a flux limited system which includes apparatus for decomposing a linearly polarized light beam into multiple components, passing the components through an amplifier in delayed time sequence and recombining the amplified components into an in phase linearly polarized beam.

  8. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Claire Gmachl

    2010-09-01

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  9. Phasing surface emitting diode laser outputs into a coherent laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F.

    2006-10-10

    A system for generating a powerful laser beam includes a first laser element and at least one additional laser element having a rear laser mirror, an output mirror that is 100% reflective at normal incidence and <5% reflective at an input beam angle, and laser material between the rear laser mirror and the output mirror. The system includes an injector, a reference laser beam source, an amplifier and phase conjugater, and a combiner.

  10. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  11. Laser program annual report 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1984-06-01

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications.

  12. Advanced laser remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, J.; Czuchlewski, S.; Karl, R.

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Remote measurement of wind velocities is critical to a wide variety of applications such as environmental studies, weather prediction, aircraft safety, the accuracy of projectiles, bombs, parachute drops, prediction of the dispersal of chemical and biological warfare agents, and the debris from nuclear explosions. Major programs to develop remote sensors for these applications currently exist in the DoD and NASA. At present, however, there are no real-time, three-dimensional wind measurement techniques that are practical for many of these applications and we report on two new promising techniques. The first new technique uses an elastic backscatter lidar to track aerosol patterns in the atmosphere and to calculate three dimensional wind velocities from changes in the positions of the aerosol patterns. This was first done by Professor Ed Eloranta of the University of Wisconsin using post processing techniques and we are adapting Professor Eloranta`s algorithms to a real-time data processor and installing it in an existing elastic backscatter lidar system at Los Alamos (the XM94 helicopter lidar), which has a compatible data processing and control system. The second novel wind sensing technique is based on radio-frequency (RF) modulation and spatial filtering of elastic backscatter lidars. Because of their compactness and reliability, solid state lasers are the lasers of choice for many remote sensing applications, including wind sensing.

  13. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  14. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milner, J.R.

    1994-10-25

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall temperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser. 8 figs.

  15. Total internal reflection laser tools and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Kolachalam, Sharath K.; Grubb, Daryl L.

    2016-02-02

    There is provided high power laser tools and laser heads that utilize total internal reflection ("TIR") structures to direct the laser beam along a laser beam path within the TIR structure. The TIR structures may be a TIR prism having its hypotenuse as a TIR surface.

  16. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  17. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  18. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  19. Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Globig, Michael A. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of the frequency during the pulse.

  20. Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Globig, Michael A. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of th frequency during the pulse.

  1. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, P.R.; Feeman, J.F.; Field, G.F.

    1998-08-11

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula 1 are provided by the formula described in the paper wherein R{sup 1} and R{sup 4} are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R{sup 1}--R{sup 2} or R{sup 2}--R{sup 4} form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R{sup 2} is hydrogen or joined with R{sup 1} or R{sup 4} as described above; R{sup 3} is --(CH{sub 2}){sub m}--SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or formula 2 given in paper where Y is 2 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  2. Range imaging laser radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Marion W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  3. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R.; Feeman, James F.; Field, George F.

    1998-01-01

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula I are provided ##STR1## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.4 are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R.sup.1 -R.sup.2 or R.sup.2 -R.sup.4 form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R.sup.2 is hydrogen or joined with R.sup.1 or R.sup.4 as described above; R.sup.3 is --(CH.sub.2).sub.m --SO.sub.3.sup.-, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or ##STR2## where Y is 2 --SO.sub.3.sup.- ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO.sub.3.sup.-. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  4. Laser weld jig

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Blarigan, Peter (Livermore, CA); Haupt, David L. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  5. Laser interlock system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodruff, Steven D; Mcintyre, Dustin L

    2015-01-13

    A method and device for providing a laser interlock having a first optical source, a first beam splitter, a second optical source, a detector, an interlock control system, and a means for producing dangerous optical energy. The first beam splitter is optically connected to the first optical source, the first detector and the second optical source. The detector is connected to the interlock control system. The interlock control system is connected to the means for producing dangerous optical energy and configured to terminate its optical energy production upon the detection of optical energy at the detector from the second optical source below a predetermined detector threshold. The second optical source produces an optical energy in response to optical energy from the first optical source. The optical energy from the second optical source has a different wavelength, polarization, modulation or combination thereof from the optical energy of the first optical source.

  6. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1993-03-30

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  7. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  8. Note: Accuracy of velocity correction for impact of a laser-accelerated miniature flyer with lithium fluoride shock-compressed along the [100] axis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakabayashi, Kunihiko; Matsumura, Tomoharu; Nakayama, Yoshio; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2011-02-15

    We performed miniature flyer impact experiments to investigate the relationship between the apparent (u{sub a}) and actual (u{sub A}) particle velocities measured by a velocity interferometer in single-crystal lithium fluoride (LiF) that was shock-compressed along the [100] axis. The miniature flyer was accelerated to velocities in the range 652.5-1937.6 m/s by a tabletop pulsed laser. An empirical relationship of u{sub a}= (1.2749 {+-} 0.0102)u{sub A} was obtained. The obtained relationship agreed well with the results of a previous study within the experimental errors and its uncertainty was less than {+-}1%. This result indicates that the present experimental technique is effective for measuring the relationship between u{sub a} and u{sub A} of shocked transparent materials with a comparable accuracy to conventional methods.

  9. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  10. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  11. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brannon, P.J.; Cowgill, D.F.

    1990-12-18

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable. 10 figs.

  12. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  13. Circular free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A.; Kurnit, Norman A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  14. Guidance system for laser targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Porter, Gary D.; Bogdanoff, Anatoly

    1978-01-01

    A system for guiding charged laser targets to a predetermined focal spot of a laser along generally arbitrary, and especially horizontal, directions which comprises a series of electrostatic sensors which provide inputs to a computer for real time calculation of position, velocity, and direction of the target along an initial injection trajectory, and a set of electrostatic deflection means, energized according to a calculated output of said computer, to change the target trajectory to intercept the focal spot of the laser which is triggered so as to illuminate the target of the focal spot.

  15. Wick for metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

  16. Protective laser beam viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

    2012-12-18

    A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

  17. Recombination laser by laser-produced xenon plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanying, L.; Zaitong, L.; Dounan, Z.; Zemin, W.

    1982-09-01

    A recombination laser of Xe plasma produced in a gaseous mixture of He and Xe with a CO/sub 2/ laser pulse of 10.6 micron wave is reported. The particle number is the result of electron-ion recombination. The wavelength of the Xe recombination laser obtained in the experiment is 2.03 microns with an output power of more than 80 watts and a pulse width of 2 microsec. The input CO/sub 2/ laser energy is supplied by a CO/sub 2/ laser with cold cathode electron beam controlled discharge. Each pulse has an energy of over 30 joules (pulse width 1 to 2 microsec). After being reflected by a cylindrical reflector of 6 cm focal length in the target chamber, the CO/sub 2/ laser beam is focussed on a metal target 8 cm long 3 mm wide. At the two ends of the chamber are Brewster angle windows at 2.03 microns made by quartz plates.

  18. High-resolution line-shape spectroscopy during a laser pulse based on Dual-Broad-Band-CARS interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I; Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M E-mail: Al_Vereshchagin@mail.r E-mail: stelmakh@kapella.gpi.r

    2006-07-31

    A high-resolution spectroscopic method is developed for recording Raman spectra of molecular transitions in transient objects during a laser pulse with a resolution of {approx}0.1 cm{sup -1}. The method is based on CARS spectroscopy using a Fabry-Perot interferometer for spectral analysis of the CARS signal and detecting a circular interferometric pattern on a two-dimensional multichannel photodetector. It is shown that the use of the Dual-Broad-Band-CARS configuration to obtain the CARS process provides the efficient averaging of the spectral-amplitude noise of the CARS signal generated by a laser pulse and, in combination with the angular integration of the two-dimensional interference pattern, considerably improves the quality of interferograms. The method was tested upon diagnostics of the transient oxygen-hydrogen flame where information on the shapes of spectral lines of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules required for measuring temperature was simultaneously obtained and used. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m. prokhorov)

  19. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a Transverse Gradient Undulator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser ...

  20. LONGITUDINAL LASER WIRE AT SNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Liu, Yun; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a longitudinal H- beam profile scanner that utilizes laser light to detach convoy electrons and an MCP to collect and measure these electrons. The scanner is located in MEBT with H- energy of 2.5MeV and an RF frequency 402.5MHz. The picosecond pulsed laser runs at 80.5MHz in sync with the accelerator RF. The laser beam is delivered to the beam line through a 30m optical fiber. The pulse width after the fiber transmission measures about 10ps. Scanning the laser phase effectively allows measurements to move along ion bunch longitudinal position. We are able to reliably measure production beam bunch length with this method. The biggest problem we have encountered is background signal from electrons being stripped by vacuum. Several techniques of signal detection are discussed.

  1. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Check Warning Sirens and Strobes (S-AB-P-391) AFC Annual Maintenance (S-AB-P-393) Battery ... HTS Filter replacement (S-AB-P-394) Laser Bay Non-Amplifier Structure Grounding ...

  2. Enhanced vbasis laser diode package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deri, Robert J.; Chen, Diana; Bayramian, Andy; Freitas, Barry; Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-08-19

    A substrate having an upper surface and a lower surface is provided. The substrate includes a plurality of v-grooves formed in the upper surface. Each v-groove includes a first side and a second side perpendicular to the first side. A laser diode bar assembly is disposed within each of the v-grooves and attached to the first side. The laser diode bar assembly includes a first adhesion layer disposed on the first side of the v-groove, a metal plate attached to the first adhesion layer, a second adhesion layer disposed over the metal plate, and a laser diode bar attached to the second adhesion layer. The laser diode bar has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) substantially similar to that of the metal plate.

  3. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  4. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1987-01-01

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  5. Laser fusion monthly -- August 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-08-01

    This report documents the monthly progress for the laser fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First it gives facilities report for both the Shiva and Argus projects. Topics discussed include; laser system for the Nova Project; the fusion experiments analysis facility; optical/x-ray streak camera; Shiva Dante System temporal response; 2{omega}{sub 0} experiment; and planning for an ICF engineering test facility.

  6. Laser program annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Volume 1 provides a Program Overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the Program, a summary of activities carried out under the Glass Laser Experiments Lead Laboratory Program, as well as discussions of Program resources and facilities. Section 2, also in the first volume, covers the work on solid state Nd:glass lasers, including systems operations, Nova and Novette system development, and supporting research and development activities.

  7. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III Subsystem and Component Maintenance OMEGA Facility Subsystem and Component Maintenance Instructions (S-AA-M-014) Part 2 - Maintenance Plans Section 1: Laser Drivers Section 2: Laser Amplifiers Section 3: Power Conditioning Section 4: OMEGA Control System Section 5: Optomechanical Section 6: Optical Manufacturing Section 7: Experimental Operations Section 8: OMEGA Cleanliness Control Section 9: Facilities Comments Address document comments, questions and corrections to the OMEGA Associate

  8. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IX Subsystem Startup and Shutdown Procedures Shot Director Operating Procedures (S-AB-P-010) Laser Sources Operating Procedures (S-AB-P-011) Power Conditioning Operating Procedures (S-AB-P-012) Beamlines Operating Procedures (S-AB-P-013) Experimental System Operating Procedures (S-AB-P-014) Comments Address document comments, questions and corrections to the OMEGA EP Associate Laser Facility Manager. For additional information contact: Director's Administrator University of Rochester -

  9. Laser program annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Volume 3 is comprised of three sections, beginning with Section 8 on Advanced Lasers. Both theoretical and experimental research and development activities on advanced laser systems are presented here. Section 9 contains the results of studies in areas of energy and military applications, including those relating to electrical energy production by inertial confinement fusion systems. Finally, Section 10 presents results from selected activities in the Advanced Isotope Separation Program.

  10. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  11. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  12. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  13. Laser selection based on maximum permissible exposure limits...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laser selection based on maximum permissible exposure limits for visible and middle-near infrared repetitively pulsed lasers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laser ...

  14. Improvements to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improvements to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry for Quantitative Analysis using Short Pulse UV Laser FWPProject Description: Laser ablation inductively ...

  15. National Laser User Facilities Program | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laser User Facilities Program National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program Overview The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester (UR) was ...

  16. Mercury: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Optical Technologies Fiber Lasers Laser-Compton Light Source Technology ... Mercury: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser Concurrent with the development of the National ...

  17. Los Alamos laser instrument arrives on Red Planet's surface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser instrument arrives on Red Planet's surface Los Alamos laser instrument arrives on Red Planet's surface The ChemCam laser characterization instrument was developed at LANL and ...

  18. Han s Laser Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    s Laser Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Han's Laser Technology Co., Ltd Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip: 518057 Product: China-based laser cutter...

  19. Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power plant Title: Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power plant A laser inertial-confinement ...

  20. X-ray laser system, x-ray laser and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    London, Richard A.; Rosen, Mordecai D.; Strauss, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is an x-ray laser system comprising a laser containing generating means for emitting short wave length radiation, and means external to said laser for energizing said generating means, wherein when the laser is in an operative mode emitting radiation, the radiation has a transverse coherence length to width ratio of from about 0.05 to 1. Also disclosed is a method of adjusting the parameters of the laser to achieve the desired coherence length to laser width ratio.