Sample records for laser accelerator bella

  1. EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

  2. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leemans, W.P.; Duarte, R.; Esarey, E.; Fournier, S.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Lockhart, D.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, S.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is presented of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA) that will be driven by a PW-class laser system and of the BELLA Project, which has as its primary goal to build and install the required Ti:sapphire laser system for the acceleration experiments. The basic design of the 10 GeV stage aims at operation in the quasi-linear regime, where the laser excited wakes are largely sinusoidal and offer the possibility of accelerating both electrons and positrons. Simulations show that a 10 GeV electron beam can be generated in a meter scale plasma channel guided LPA operating at a density of about 1017 cm-3 and powered by laser pulses containing 30-40 J of energy in a 50- 200 fs duration pulse, focused to a spotsize of 50-100 micron. The lay-out of the facility and laser system will be presented as well as the progress on building the facility.

  3. BELLA: The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust Nazim Ali Bharmal, Comparisons4-3BEGINBELLA:

  4. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemans, W.P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the plasma target will be the vacuum focus location ofFinal Focus Diagnostic (High Power),' a meter-scale plasma

  5. Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of experiments on new lasers such as BELLA. Principal Investigator: Cameron Geddes, LBNL More Information: See J.-L. Vay, C. G. R. Geddes, E. Cormier-Michel, and D. P. Grote,...

  6. Computational accelerator science needs towards laser-plasma accelerators for future colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, C G R; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser plasma accelerators have the potential to reduce the size of future linacs for high energy physics by more than an order of magnitude, due to their high gradient. Research is in progress at current facilities, including the BELLA PetaWatt laser at LBNL, towards high quality 10 GeV beams and staging of multiple modules, as well as control of injection and beam quality. The path towards high-energy physics applications will likely involve hundreds of such stages, with beam transport, conditioning and focusing. Current research focuses on addressing physics and R&D challenges required for a detailed conceptual design of a future collider. Here, the tools used to model these accelerators and their resource requirements are summarized, both for current work and to support R&D addressing issues related to collider concepts.

  7. Geek-Up[3.18.2011]: Catalytically Active Material and BELLA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PNL scientists are making catyltically active material that may help advance fuel cell and solar energy storage applications and Berkeley is "boosting" their BELLA accelerator.

  8. Progress on laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several laser plasma accelerator schemes are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA). Theory indicates that a very high acceleration gradient, of order 1 GeV/m, can exist in the plasma wave driven by the beating lasers. Experimental results obtained on the PBWA experiment at UCLA confirms this. Parameters related to the PBWA as an accelerator system are derived, among them issues concerning the efficiency and the laser power and energy requirements are discussed.

  9. Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER 5 MAY 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedand millimeter wave radiation from laser acceleratedNo. 5, May 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated

  10. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  11. BELLA World Record Sets Stage for Laser Experiments in Novel Acceleration

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals »Awake Animal Imaging at BNL Nuclear

  12. Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    history of laser-plasma accelerators is reviewed. The excitation of plasma waves by ultra-short laser Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator 692220024 #12; Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator i #12; Tomography of a laser

  13. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadwick, B.A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear laser energydepletion in laser-plasma accelerators ? B. A. Shadwick,of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma

  14. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

  15. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control G. R. Plateau, , C. G. R acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy

  16. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS facility”, in: Proc.electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator ?National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose

  17. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, C.G.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider,"E.Esarey, and W.P.Leemans, "Free-electron laser driven bythe LBNL laser-plasma accelerator," in Proc. Adv. Acc. Con.

  18. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. Theseleft) showing the laser (red), plasma wake density (purple-

  19. STELLA-II Experiment Update on Monoenergetic Laser Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    during Staged Electron Laser Acceleration (STELLA) Experiment* - Used inverse free electron laser (IFEL) as laser acceleration mechanism - IFEL buncher (IFEL1) creates...

  20. Accelerating into the Future Zero to 1GeV in a Few Centimeters

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LBNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  1. Improvement of classical accelerators by lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hora, Heinrich

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of the unconventional accelerator techniques those including lasers are reported. After explaining the advances by lasers for classical accelerator techniques, as FELs and other methods for 100 GHz generation of GW pulses, a survey is given of far field and near field laser acceleration. Problems of the beat-wave accelerator are discussed and schemes for particle interaction in vacuum without plasma are elaborated. One scheme is the Boreham experiment and another is the acceleration of "standing" wave fields where charged particles are trapped in the intensity minima. Another scheme uses the relativistic acceleration by half waves where the now available petawatt-picosecond laser pulses should produce GeV electron pulses of high luminosity. Increase of these electron enrgies would need very large lasers in the future.

  2. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  3. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma accelerated beamsbetween the short- pulse laser generating the electron beamscale laser-plasma accelerator that produces ultra-short (

  4. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    XPLOTGIN, Technical Report LBNL-49625, Lawrence BerkeleyLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR AT THE LBNL LOASIS FACILITY,” inelectron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

  5. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder , E. Esarey, Cs. T´oth, C. G. R. Geddes-generation linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator gamma-gamma () collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator collider

  6. Photonic laser-driven accelerator for GALAXIE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naranjo, B.; Ho, M.; Hoang, P.; Putterman, S.; Valloni, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B. [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design and development of an all-dielectric laser-driven accelerator to be used in the GALAXIE (GV-per-meter Acce Lerator And X-ray-source Integrated Experiment) project's compact free-electron laser. The approach of our working design is to construct eigenmodes, borrowing from the field of photonics, which yield the appropriate, highly demanding dynamics in a high-field, short wavelength accelerator. Topics discussed include transverse focusing, power coupling, bunching, and fabrication.

  7. Ion Acceleration by Short Chirped Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jian-Xing; Keitel, Christoph H; Harman, Zoltán

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct laser acceleration of ions by short frequency-chirped laser pulses is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that intense beams of ions with a kinetic energy broadening of about 1 % can be generated. The chirping of the laser pulse allows the particles to gain kinetic energies of hundreds of MeVs, which is required for hadron cancer therapy, from pulses of energies of the order of 100 J. It is shown that few-cycle chirped pulses can accelerate ions more efficiently than long ones, i.e. higher ion kinetic energies are reached with the same amount of total electromagnetic pulse energy.

  8. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy D. Panasenko, A. J. Shu, C. B., Berkeley, California 94720, USA Abstract. Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies

  9. Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefield Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefield Particle Acceleration in Plasma Channels C for the first time in a high gradient laser wakefield accelerator by guiding the drive laser pulse. Channels formed by hydrodynamic shock were used to guide acceleration relevant laser intensities of at least 1E18

  10. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)] [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Büscher, Markus, E-mail: m.buescher@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany) [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald [Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)] [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  11. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We demonstrate guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode. We also discuss particle beam dynamics in the structure, presenting a novel method for focusing the beam. In addition we describe some potential coupling methods for the structure.

  12. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; Campisi, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We first describe the basic physical properties of an inverse free-electron laser and make an estimate of the order of magnitude of the accelerating field obtainable with such a system; then apply the general ideas to the design of an actual device and through this example we give a more accurate evaluation of the fundamental as well as the technical limitations that this acceleration scheme imposes.

  13. Current Filamentation Instability in Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, C. M.; Drake, R. P. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48103 (United States); Thomas, A. G. R.; McGuffey, C.; Matsuoka, T.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kneip, S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Katsouleas, T. [Platt School of Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708 (United States)

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments using an electron beam produced by laser-wakefield acceleration have shown that varying the overall beam-plasma interaction length results in current filamentation at lengths that exceed the laser depletion length in the plasma. Three-dimensional simulations show this to be a combination of hosing, beam erosion, and filamentation of the decelerated beam. This work suggests the ability to perform scaled experiments of astrophysical instabilities. Additionally, understanding the processes involved with electron beam propagation is essential to the development of wakefield accelerator applications.

  14. PRECISE CHARGE MEASUREMENT FOR LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Donahue, Rich; Rodgers, David; Smith, Alan; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-calibrations of charge diagnostics are conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). Employed diagnostics are a scintillating screen, activation based measurement, and integrating current transformer. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8 %, showing that they can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided they are used properly.

  15. Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra- intense laser pulses S;Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses S. Fourmaux,1,a metallic foils irradiated by ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulses.8­10 Laser-driven ion beams take

  16. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  17. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation ([lambda] = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1[sub w1] = 1.43cm) and then absorbed ([approximately] 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1[sub w2] = 1.8 [minus] 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup ([approximately] 9%) of electrons to [approximately] 1MeV.

  18. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation ({lambda} = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1{sub w1} = 1.43cm) and then absorbed ({approximately} 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1{sub w2} = 1.8 {minus} 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup ({approximately} 9%) of electrons to {approximately} 1MeV.

  19. Direct laser acceleration of electrons in free-space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbajo, Sergio; Wong, Liang Jie; Miller, R J Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact laser-driven accelerators are versatile and powerful tools of unarguable relevance on societal grounds for the diverse purposes of science, health, security, and technology because they bring enormous practicality to state-of-the-art achievements of conventional radio-frequency accelerators. Current benchmarking laser-based technologies rely on a medium to assist the light-matter interaction, which impose material limitations or strongly inhomogeneous fields. The advent of few cycle ultra-intense radially polarized lasers has materialized an extensively studied novel accelerator that adopts the simplest form of laser acceleration and is unique in requiring no medium to achieve strong longitudinal energy transfer directly from laser to particle. Here we present the first observation of direct longitudinal laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons that undergo highly-directional multi-GeV/m accelerating gradients. This demonstration opens a new frontier for direct laser-driven particle accelerati...

  20. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kA are generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma acceleratedscale laser-plasma accelerator that produces ultra-short (

  1. Laser wakefield simulations towards development of compact particle accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Laser wakefield simulations towards development of compact particle accelerators C.G.R. Geddes1, D understanding of accelerator physics to advance beam performance and stability, and particle simulations model, France; 9 Oxford University, UK E-mail: cgrgeddes@lbl.gov Abstract. Laser driven wakefield accelerators

  2. Laser induced electron acceleration in vacuum K. P. Singha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Kunwar Pal

    Laser induced electron acceleration in vacuum K. P. Singha) Department of Physics, Indian Institute acceleration by a plane polarized laser wave has been studied in vacuum. Relativistic equations of motion have been solved exactly for electron trajectory and energy as a function of laser intensity, phase

  3. LASER ACCELERATION IN VACUUM J.L. Hsu, T. Katsouleas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    LASER ACCELERATION IN VACUUM J.L. Hsu, T. Katsouleas University of Southern California, Los Angeles electric fields of high-brightness lasers (e.g., up to order TV/cm) to accelerate particles. Unfortunately, as is well known, it is difficult to couple the vacuum field of the laser to particles so as to achieve a net

  4. Powerful, pulsed, THz radiation from laser accelerated relativistic electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    by strongly focused ( 6 µm), high peak power (up to 10 TW), ultra-short ( 50 fs) laser pulses of a 10 Hz at the exit of the plasma accelerator. Keywords: ultrahigh-fields, ultra-short, laser-plasma, wakefieldPowerful, pulsed, THz radiation from laser accelerated relativistic electron bunches Cs. T´otha, J

  5. Proof-of-principle experiments of laser Wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H. [National Lab. for Higher Energy Physics, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a great interest in laser-plasma accelerators as possible next-generation particle accelerators because of their potential for ultra high accelerating gradients and compact size compared with conventional accelerators. It is known that the laser pulse is capable of exciting a plasma wave propagating at a phase velocity close to the velocity of light by means of beating two-frequency lasers or an ultra short laser pulse. These schemes came to be known as the Beat Wave Accelerator (BWA) for beating lasers or as the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) for a short pulse laser. In this paper, the principle of laser wakefield particle acceleration has been tested by the Nd:glass laser system providing a short pulse with a power of 10 TW and a duration of 1 ps. Electrons accelerated up to 18 MeV/c have been observed by injecting 1 MeV/c electrons emitted from a solid target by an intense laser impact. The accelerating field gradient of 30 GeV/m is inferred.

  6. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V. (Dublin, CA); Baldis, Hector A. (Pleasanton, CA); Landahl, Eric C. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  7. Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data Oliver Rübel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high-energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  8. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data Oliver R¨ubel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  9. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/ps/mm{sup 2}, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within {+-}10%.

  10. PARAMETER OPTIMIZATIONS FOR VACUUM LASER ACCELERATION AT ATF...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 times the laser Rayleigh length. Its acceleration length can be defined with simple optics. In order to get the higher energy gain at ATFBNL, the laser parameters and related...

  11. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be an important focus of laser-plasma acceleration researchfocus. In both cases, light regions of the image ionized and heated the plasma,

  12. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kA are generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma acceleratedfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-For the ultra-high currents of the laser plasma accelerated

  13. Sailing Before the Light: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    at focus Andrea Macchi CNR/INO Sailing Before the Light: Laser-Plasma AccelerationDriven by RadiationSailing Before the Light: Laser-Plasma Acceleration Driven by Radiation Pressure Andrea Macchi 1 "Enrico Fermi", University of Pisa, Italy Plasma Physics Colloquium, Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied

  14. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    structure providing a linear mechanism with potential to harness low-energy laser systems [11 orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them and diagnostics. This includes laser wakefield acceleration [1], where acceleration by a plasma wave excited

  15. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL K. Nakamura , A. J (LBNL) [5, 6]. In this scheme, intense laser pulses were guided over a distance 10 times the Rayleigh facility at LBNL. The laser was focused onto the entrance of a capillary discharge waveguide by an f/25 off

  16. Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

  17. Sub-femtosecond electron bunches created by direct laser acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator with ionization injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemos, N; Marsh, K A; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we will show through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that direct laser acceleration in laser a wakefield accelerator can generate sub-femtosecond electron bunches. Two simulations were done with two laser pulse durations, such that the shortest laser pulse occupies only a fraction of the first bubble, whereas the longer pulse fills the entire first bubble. In the latter case, as the trapped electrons moved forward and interacted with the high intensity region of the laser pulse, micro-bunching occurred naturally, producing 0.5 fs electron bunches. This is not observed in the short pulse simulation.

  18. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kei; Advanced Light Source

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator Experiments at LBNL K. Nakamura ?,† , A. J.National Labo- ratory (LBNL) [5, 6]. In this scheme, intenseof the LOASIS facility at LBNL. The laser beam was focused

  19. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  20. Stable laser–plasma accelerators at low densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Ge, Xulei; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report stable laser wakefield acceleration using 17–50 TW laser pulses interacting with 4?mm-long helium gas jet. The initial laser spot size was relatively large (28??m) and the plasma densities were 0.48–2.0?×?10{sup 19?}cm{sup ?3}. High-quality 100–MeV electron beams were generated at the plasma density of 7.5?×?10{sup 18?}cm{sup ?3}, at which the beam parameters (pointing angle, energy spectrum, charge, and divergence angle) were measured and stabilized. At higher densities, filamentation instability of the laser-plasma interaction was observed and it has led to multiple wakefield accelerated electron beams. The experimental results are supported by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The achievement presented here is an important step toward the use of laser-driven accelerators in real applications.

  1. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the 11th International Free-Electron Laser Conference, Nuc!.A Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator30418 Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

  2. A NEW VERSION OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER TWO BEAM ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation in Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",Power 35 GHz Testing of a Free-Electron Laser and Two-BeamA New Version of a Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

  3. Ultra-high-contrast laser acceleration of relativistic electrons in solid targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higginson, Drew Pitney

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. Higginson, et al. , Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Rise-TimeTHE DISSERTATION Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration ofCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration

  4. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadwick, B.A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    k p k 0 and assume a short laser pulse, k p L ? 2. WithE 0 = mc? p /q. For a short laser pulse, ? ? ? short-pulse lasers via excitation of

  5. Stern-Gerlach surfing in laser wakefield accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flood, Stephen P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of a Stern-Gerlach-type addition to the Lorentz force on electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator. The Stern-Gerlach-type terms are found to generate a family of trajectories describing electrons that surf along the plasma density wave driven by a laser pulse. Such trajectories could lead to an increase in the size of an electron bunch, which may have implications for attempts to exploit such bunches in future free electron lasers.

  6. Effect of the laser wavefront in a laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaurepaire, B; Bocoum, M; Böhle, F; Jullien, A; Rousseau, J-P; Lefrou, T; Douillet, D; Iaquaniello, G; Lopez-Martens, R; Lifschitz, A; Faure, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high repetition rate electron source was generated by tightly focusing kHz, few-mJ laser pulses into an underdense plasma. This high intensity laser-plasma interaction led to stable electron beams over several hours but with strikingly complex transverse distributions even for good quality laser focal spots. Analysis of the experimental data, along with results of PIC simulations demonstrate the role of the laser wavefront on the acceleration of electrons. Distortions of the laser wavefront cause spatial inhomogeneities in the out-of-focus laser distribution and consequently, the laser pulse drives an inhomogenous transverse wakefield whose focusing/defocusing properties affect the electron distribution. These findings explain the experimental results and suggest the possibility of controlling the electron spatial distribution in laser-plasma accelerators by tailoring the laser wavefront.

  7. New Lasers Pave Way for Tabletop Accelerators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (NERSC). Traditional accelerators, like the Large Hadron Collider where the Higgs boson was recently discovered, rely on high-power radio-frequency waves to energize...

  8. GeV electrons due to a transition from laser wakefield acceleration to plasma wakefield acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. E. Masson-Laborde; M. Z. Mo; A. Ali; S. Fourmaux; P. Lassonde; J. C. Kieffer; W. Rozmus; D. Teychenne; R. Fedosejevs

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show through experiments that a transition from laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) regime to a plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) regime can drive electrons up to energies close to the GeV level. Initially, the acceleration mechanism is dominated by the bubble created by the laser in the nonlinear regime of LWFA, leading to an injection of a large number of electrons. After propagation beyond the depletion length, leading to a depletion of the laser pulse, whose transverse ponderomotive force is not able to sustain the bubble anymore, the high energy dense bunch of electrons propagating inside bubble will drive its own wakefield by a PWFA regime. This wakefield will be able to trap and accelerate a population of electrons up to the GeV level during this second stage. Three dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations support this analysis, and confirm the scenario.

  9. First Demonstration of Staged Laser Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * STELLA-LW can utilize similar laser beam transport design used by ATF Channeling and Compton Scattering experiments - Transport designs are proven and effective - Should be...

  10. Desired Improvements in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface polaritons in thin SiC films to sub-wavelength lithography and compact particle acceleration Gennady Shvets, University of Texas at Austin Alan Feinerman (UIC) Chris Zorman...

  11. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  12. Vacuum electron acceleration by using two variable frequency laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saberi, H.; Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is proposed for producing a relativistic electron bunch in vacuum via direct acceleration by using two frequency-chirped laser pulses. We consider the linearly polarized frequency-chiped Hermit-Gaussian 0, 0 mode lasers with linear chirp in which the local frequency varies linearly in time and space. Electron motion is investigated through a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional particle trajectory code in which the relativistic Newton's equations of motion with corresponding Lorentz force are solved. Two oblique laser pulses with proper chirp parameters and propagation angles are used for the electron acceleration along the z-axis. In this way, an electron initially at rest located at the origin could achieve high energy, ?=319 with the scattering angle of 1.02{sup ?} with respect to the z-axis. Moreover, the acceleration of an electron in different initial positions on each coordinate axis is investigated. It was found that this mechanism has the capability of producing high energy electron microbunches with low scattering angles. The energy gain of an electron initially located at some regions on each axis could be greatly enhanced compared to the single pulse acceleration. Furthermore, the scattering angle will be lowered compared to the acceleration by using laser pulses propagating along the z-axis.

  13. Energy limitation of laser-plasma electron accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardenas, D E; Xu, J; Hofmann, L; Buck, A; Schmid, K; Sears, C M S; Rivas, D E; Shen, B; Veisz, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on systematic and high-precision measurements of dephasing, an effect that fundamentally limits the performance of laser wakefield accelerators. Utilizing shock-front injection, a technique providing stable, tunable and high-quality electron bunches, acceleration and deceleration of few-MeV quasi-monoenergetic beams were measured with sub-5-fs and 8-fs laser pulses. Typical density dependent electron energy evolution with 65-300 micrometers dephasing length and 6-20 MeV peak energy was observed and is well described with a simple model.

  14. C. R. Physique 10 (2009) 188196 Laser acceleration of particles in plasmas / Acclration laser de particules dans les plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the properties of beams of protons accelerated in ultra-intense laser irradiation of planar foil targets accélérés par l'interaction d'une impulsion laser ultra intense avec une cible solide est discuté. PlusC. R. Physique 10 (2009) 188­196 Laser acceleration of particles in plasmas / Accélération laser de

  15. Production and acceleration of ion beams by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velardi, L.; Siciliano, M. V.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V. [Department of Physics and I.N.F.N., LEAS Laboratory, University of Salento, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a new pulsed laser ablation technique to obtain energetic ion beams. The accelerator we made is a compact device able to extract and accelerate the ionic components of plasma up to 160 keV per charge state. It is composed by a generating chamber containing an expansion chamber used like first electrode. Next, a second electrode connected to ground and a third electrode connected to negative voltage are used. The third electrode is used also as Faraday cup. By the analysis of the ion signals we studied the plume parameters such as TOF accelerated signals, charge state, and divergence.

  16. A cascaded laser acceleration scheme for the generation of spectrally controlled proton beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian Michael

    We present a novel, cascaded acceleration scheme for the generation of spectrally controlled ion beams using a laser-based accelerator in a 'double-stage' setup. An MeV proton beam produced during a relativistic laser–plasma ...

  17. Teatro de las Bellas Artes de la Ciudad de México

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendoza Ló pez, Margarita

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opera. . . . Estos cuadros mexicanos no limitarán su acción en la ciudad de México; nuestros propósitos son presentarlos en los Estados para que todo el país aproveche y disfrute de la subvención nacional con que debe contar el Palacio de Bellas Artes... Palacio de las Bellas Artes no obtiene la deseada subvención y no puede extender su radio de acción a la provincia. La Compañía Dramática solamente lleva al cabo la temporada inaugural de 1934. Seis años después, en 1940, se constituye el Comité Pro...

  18. Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fourmaux, S.; Gnedyuk, S.; Lassonde, P.; Payeur, S.; Pepin, H.; Kieffer, J. C. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Buffechoux, S.; Albertazzi, B. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Capelli, D.; Antici, P. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Sapienza, Universita di Roma, Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Levy, A.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lecherbourg, L.; Marjoribanks, R. S. [Department of Physics and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report optimization of laser-driven proton acceleration, for a range of experimental parameters available from a single ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser system. We have characterized laser-generated protons produced at the rear and front target surfaces of thin solid targets (15 nm to 90 {mu}m thicknesses) irradiated with an ultra-intense laser pulse (up to 10{sup 20} W Dot-Operator cm{sup -2}, pulse duration 30 to 500 fs, and pulse energy 0.1 to 1.8 J). We find an almost symmetric behaviour for protons accelerated from rear and front sides, and a linear scaling of proton energy cut-off with increasing pulse energy. At constant laser intensity, we observe that the proton cut-off energy increases with increasing laser pulse duration, then roughly constant for pulses longer than 300 fs. Finally, we demonstrate that there is an optimum target thickness and pulse duration.

  19. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams C. B. Schroeder, E of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator-charge force of a charged particle beam. Laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) were first proposed in 1979

  20. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duris, J. P.; Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  1. GeV electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synchronized to the short-pulse laser driver, making such aa laser-plasma accelerator have naturally short durations onsapphire laser system (? = 810 nm) delivering as short as 38

  2. Macroparticle Theory of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takayama, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motz, Undulators and Free-Electron Laser (Clarendon Press,of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Acceleratorof a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

  3. Laser Wakefield Particle Accelerators Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowlandRevolutionizingLaser

  4. Theoretical Examination of Transfer Cavities in a Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govil, R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",A.M. Sessler, "The Free-Electron Laser as a Power Source for

  5. Space-charge effects in ultra-high current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinner, F. J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regime of laser-plasma-accelerated ultra-compact electronin ultra-high current electron bunches generated by laser-by laser-plasma accelerators due to their ultra-high peak

  6. Laser-based proton acceleration on ultra-thin foil with a 100 TW class high intensity laser system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    of electromagnetic fields in plasma, isotopes production or hadron therapy. The 100 TW class laser systemLaser-based proton acceleration on ultra-thin foil with a 100 TW class high intensity laser system. To characterize the plasma expansion, we monitor it with an imaging technique using a femtosecond laser probe

  7. Benchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    with ultra-short Ti-Sapphire laser pulses propagating in hydrogen gas. Both first-order and secondBenchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration Simulations K Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal Abstract. Three-dimensional laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulations have

  8. Two-color-laser-driven direct electron acceleration in infinite vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Liang Jie

    We propose a direct electron acceleration scheme that uses a two-color pulsed radially polarized laser beam. The two-color scheme achieves electron acceleration exceeding 90% of the theoretical energy gain limit, over twice ...

  9. Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of coherent transition radiation generated at a plasma-and G. Fubiani, “Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedW. P. Leemans, “Synchrotron radiation from electron beams in

  10. Recent Progress at LBNL on Characterization of Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electron Bunches using Coherent Transition Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RECENT PROGRESS AT LBNL ON CHARACTERIZATION OF LASERBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA 94720,USA Abstract At LBNL, laser wake?eld accelerators (LWFA) can

  11. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, and W. P. Leemans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, and W. P Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self

  12. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    laser system to focus ultra-short (?30 fs) laser pulses ofLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR The LOASIS Laboratory at LBNL presently produces ultra-short (short-pulse laser driver, making such a source ideal for ultra-

  13. Design for a GeV per meter, laser--driven electron accelerator Y.c. Huang, and R.L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    optics, high power laser, laser-driven accelerator, ultra-fast laser, crossed-laser-beam acceleratorDesign for a GeV per meter, laser--driven electron accelerator Y.c. Huang, and R.L. Byer Stanford-based. multistaged, laser-driven electron linear accelerator microstructure operating in a vacuum that is capable

  14. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW`s) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  15. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  16. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  17. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration, time- varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We ex- tend histogramBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to acceler- ate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram

  18. RECENT PROGRESS AT LBNL ON CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATED ELECTRON BUNCHES USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    RECENT PROGRESS AT LBNL ON CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATED ELECTRON BUNCHES USING. Schroeder, J. van Tilborg, Cs. T´oth Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract At LBNL, laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can now produce ultra-short electron bunches

  19. Plasmonic Meta-Surface for Efficient Ultra-Short Pulse Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar-Lev, Doron

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser-driven particle accelerator based on plasmonic nano-antennas is proposed and analyzed. The concept utilizes the enhancement and localization of the electric field by nano-antennas to maximize the acceleration gradient and to overcome potential metallic losses. The structure is optimized for accelerating relativistic particles using a femto-second laser source operating at 800nm, and is shown to support the bandwidth of ultra-short laser pulses (up to 16fsec) while providing a high acceleration gradient potentially reaching 11.6GV/m.

  20. Blast Wave Formation by Laser-Sustained Nonequilibrium Plasma in the Laser-Driven In-Tube Accelerator Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sawada, Keisuke [Department of Aeronautics and Space Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sasoh, Akihiro [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the dynamics of laser-produced plasma is essentially important for increasing available thrust force in a gas-driven laser propulsion system such as laser-driven in-tube accelerator. A computer code is developed to explore the formation of expanding nonequilibrium plasma produced by laser irradiation. Various properties of the blast wave driven by the nonequilibrium plasma are examined. It is found that the blast wave propagation is substantially affected by radiative cooling effect for lower density case.

  1. Accurate Modeling of Laser-Plasma Accelerators with Particle-In-Cell Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Accurate Modeling of Laser-Plasma Accelerators with Particle-In-Cell Codes Estelle Michel , B. A-plasma accelerators. Here we investigate the numerical heating and macro-particle trajectory errors in 2D PIC wake and be accelerated to high energies [4]. In a particle-grid approach such as PIC, finite

  2. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity.

  3. Unphysical kinetic effects in particle-in-cell modeling of laser wakefield accelerators Estelle Cormier-Michel,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Unphysical kinetic effects in particle-in-cell modeling of laser wakefield accelerators Estelle of laser wakefield accelerators using particle-in-cell codes are investigated. A dark current free laser wakefield accelerator stage, in which no trapping of background plasma electrons into the plasma wave should

  4. Proposed few-optical cycle laser-driven particle accelerator structure T. Plettner, P. P. Lu, and R. L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Proposed few-optical cycle laser-driven particle accelerator structure T. Plettner, P. P. Lu, and R importance for future laser-driven particle accelerators. Application of such short pulses for laser-driven particle accelerators appears especially appealing from a gradient and an efficiency point of view

  5. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  6. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations 367 Automated detection and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations 367 0 Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations Daniela M (particle) accelerators [Geddes et al. (2009); Tajima & Dawson (1979)] model the acceleration of electrons

  7. Spot size dependence of laser accelerated protons in thin multi-ion foils Tung-Chang Liu,1,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    polarized laser beam irradiates an ultra-thin foil and accelerates nearly the whole foil by the radiationSpot size dependence of laser accelerated protons in thin multi-ion foils Tung-Chang Liu,1,a) Xi of the effect of the laser spot size of a circularly polarized laser beam on the energy of quasi

  8. Common Analysis of the Relativistic Klystron and the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the standing-wave free-electron laser on the same footingSessler, A.M. , "The Free Electron Laser as a Power SourceNew Version of a Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",

  9. Two-Dimensional Simulation Analysis of the Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator,"of a standing-wave free-electron laser," Lawrence Berkeleyof a standing-wave free-electron laser," Lawrence Berkeley

  10. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenner, C. M. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Lancaster, K. L.; Musgrave, I. O.; Spindloe, C.; Winstone, T.; Wyatt, D.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Deppert, O. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Batani, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Universita di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milan (Italy); Davies, J. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hassan, S. M.; Tatarakis, M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Centre for Plasma Physics and Lasers, 73133 Chania, 74100 Rethymno, Crete (Greece); and others

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5–30?MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5??m-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ?1 ps.

  11. A LASER STRAIN GAUGE FOR ACCELERATOR TARGETS A. Hassanein, J. Norem, ANL, Argonne, IL 60439

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    A LASER STRAIN GAUGE FOR ACCELERATOR TARGETS A. Hassanein, J. Norem, ANL, Argonne, IL 60439 tests using the Brookhaven AGS and the Argonne CHM linac. 1 INTRODUCTION The next generation of particle

  12. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  13. All-optical measurement of the hot electron sheath driving laser ion acceleration from thin foils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackel, O.

    We present experimental results from an all-optical diagnostic method to directly measure the evolution of the hot-electron distribution driving the acceleration of ions from thin foils using high-intensity lasers. Central ...

  14. Multi-MeV electron acceleration by sub-terawatt laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goers, A J; Feder, L; Miao, B; Salehi, F; Milchberg, H M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate laser-plasma acceleration of high charge electron beams to the ~10 MeV scale using ultrashort laser pulses with as little energy as 10 mJ. This result is made possible by an extremely dense and thin hydrogen gas jet. Total charge up to ~0.5 nC is measured for energies >1 MeV. Acceleration is correlated to the presence of a relativistically self-focused laser filament accompanied by an intense coherent broadband light flash, associated with wavebreaking, which can radiate more than ~3% of the laser energy in a sub-femtosecond bandwidth consistent with half-cycle optical emission. Our results enable truly portable applications of laser-driven acceleration, such as low dose radiography, ultrafast probing of matter, and isotope production.

  15. Test particle simulation of direct laser acceleration in a density-modulated plasma waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.-W.; Jovanovic, I. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electrons by the use of the intense axial electric field of an ultrafast radially polarized laser pulse is a promising technique for future compact accelerators. Density-modulated plasma waveguides can be implemented for guiding the propagation of the laser pulse to extend the acceleration distance and for the quasi-phase-matching between the accelerated electrons and the laser pulse. A test particle model is developed to study the optimal axial density modulation structure of plasma waveguides for laser pulses to efficiently accelerate co-propagating electrons. A simple analytical approach is also presented, which can be used to estimate the energy gain in DLA. The analytical model is validated by the test particle simulation. The effect of injection phase and acceleration of electrons injected at various radial positions are studied. The results indicate that a positively chirped density modulation of the waveguide structure is required to accelerate electron with low initial energies, and can be effectively optimized. A wider tolerance on the injection phase and radial distance from the waveguide axis exists for electrons injected with a higher initial energy.

  16. Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rittershofer, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P/P c ultra-intense laser pulses, such that a 2 ?laser-plasma accel- erators are actively being investigated as ultra-

  17. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasmaA design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generatingare considered. Keywords: Free-electron laser, laser-plasma

  18. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  19. Design of a subnanometer resolution beam position monitor for dielectric laser accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    of the first laser-powered particle accel- erators "on a chip" [1,2]. These devices are specifically designed present a new concept for a beam position monitor with the unique ability to map particle beam position, this device is ideal for future x-ray sources and laser-driven particle accelerators "on a chip." © 2012

  20. Injection and acceleration of electron bunch in a plasma wakefield produced by a chirped laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afhami, Saeedeh; Eslami, Esmaeil, E-mail: eeslami@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrashort laser pulse propagating in plasma can excite a nonlinear plasma wakefield which can trap and accelerate charged particles up to GeV. One-dimensional analysis of electron injection, trapping, and acceleration by different chirped pulses propagating in plasma is investigated numerically. In this paper, we inject electron bunches in front of the chirped pulses. It is indicated that periodical chirped laser pulse can trap electrons earlier than other pulses. It is shown that periodical chirped laser pulses lead to decrease the minimum momentum necessary to trap the electrons. This is due to the fact that periodical chirped laser pulses are globally much efficient than nonchirped pulses in the wakefield generation. It is found that chirped laser pulses could lead to much larger electron energy than that of nonchirped pulses. Relative energy spread has a lower value in the case of periodical chirped laser pulses.

  1. Increased efficiency of ion acceleration by using femtosecond laser pulses at higher harmonic frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Psikal, J., E-mail: jan.psikal@fjfi.cvut.cz [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Klimo, O. [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Weber, S.; Margarone, D. [ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of laser frequency on laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When ultrashort intense laser pulse at higher harmonic frequency irradiates a thin solid foil, the target may become re lativistically transparent for significantly lower laser pulse intensity compared with irradiation at fundamental laser frequency. The relativistically induced transparency results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum energies of accelerated ions and their numbers. Our simulation results have shown the increase in maximum proton energy and increase in the number of high-energy protons by a factor of 2 after the interaction of an ultrashort laser pulse of maximum intensity 7?×?10{sup 21?}W/cm{sup 2} with a fully ionized plastic foil of realistic density and of optimal thickness between 100?nm and 200?nm when switching from the fundamental frequency to the third harmonics.

  2. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  3. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short, high-peak- current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (

  4. Numerical modeling of multi-GeV laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a dielectric capillary tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paradkar, B. S.; Cros, B.; Maynard, G. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, University Paris Sud 11-CNRS, Orsay (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, University Paris Sud 11-CNRS, Orsay (France); Mora, P. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical modeling of laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a gas filled dielectric capillary tube is presented. Guiding of a short pulse laser inside a dielectric capillary tube over a long distance (?1 m) and acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch to ultra-relativistic energies (?5-10 GeV) are demonstrated in the quasi-linear regime of laser wakefield acceleration. Two dimensional axisymmetric simulations were performed with the code WAKE-EP (Extended Performances), which allows computationally efficient simulations of such long scale plasma. The code is an upgrade of the quasi-static particle code, WAKE [P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)], to simulate the acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch (including beam loading effect) and propagation of the laser beam inside a dielectric capillary. The influence of the transverse electric field of the plasma wake on the radial loss of the accelerated electrons to the dielectric wall is investigated. The stable acceleration of electrons to multi-GeV energy with a non-resonant laser pulse with a large spot-size is demonstrated.

  5. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNLlaser-plasma-accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Montgomery, A.L.; Robinson, K.E.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the design and current status of a compactfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, VUVpulses driven by a high-current, GeV electron beam from the existingLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator,whose active acceleration length is only a few cm. The proposedultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to thedrive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science withpulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing to the high current (&10 kA) ofthe laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes arepotentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on SASEand high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length andfluctuations, are considered.

  6. First Experiments on Laser Acceleration of Protons in Overdense Gas Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, Charlotte A. J.; Dover, Nicholas; Najmudin, Zulfikar [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus; Polyanskiy, Michael; Yakimenko, Vitaly [Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY 11973 (United States); Dudnikova, Galina [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ispiriyan, Mikael; Shkolnikov, Peter [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Schreiber, Jeorg [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Fakultat fur Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first, to our knowledge, experimental investigation of proton acceleration by a laser in an overdense gas jet, in particular first direct experimental observations of quasi-monoenergetic spectra of ions accelerated by radiation pressure of relativistically intense circularly polarized laser radiation. CO{sub 2} laser radiation with the wavelength {lambda}{approx_equal}10 {mu}m, focused to the intensities of up to 10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2} into a hydrogen gas jet with densities of 3-5x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, generates proton beams with energy in a narrow range around 1.2 MeV, in a reasonable agreement with Radiation Pressure Acceleration theory. We also observed slow-moving, quasi-stable bubble-like structures in laser plasma, which we interpret as post-solitons.

  7. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the visible free- electron laser oscillator experiment”,based VUV and X-ray free electron lasers”, Appl. Phys. BDesign of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-

  8. High Gradient Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gradient High energy gain Inverse Free Electron Laser P. Musumeci UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy On Behalf of the RUBICON collaboration ATF user meeting, BNL, October 6...

  9. Fission-Fusion: A new reaction mechanism for nuclear astrophysics based on laser-ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thirolf, P. G.; Gross, M.; Allinger, K.; Bin, J.; Henig, A.; Kiefer, D. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Habs, D. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ma, W.; Schreiber, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to produce neutron-rich nuclei in the range of the astrophysical r-process around the waiting point N = 126 by fissioning a dense laser-accelerated thorium ion bunch in a thorium target (covered by a CH{sub 2} layer), where the light fission fragments of the beam fuse with the light fission fragments of the target. Via the 'hole-boring' mode of laser Radiation Pressure Acceleration using a high-intensity, short pulse laser, very efficiently bunches of {sup 232}Th with solid-state density can be generated from a Th target and a deuterated CD{sub 2} foil, both forming the production target assembly. Laser-accelerated Th ions with about 7 MeV/u will pass through a thin CH{sub 2} layer placed in front of a thicker second Th foil (both forming the reaction target) closely behind the production target and disintegrate into light and heavy fission fragments. In addition, light ions (d,C) from the CD{sub 2} layer of the production target will be accelerated as well, inducing the fission process of {sup 232}Th also in the second Th layer. The laser-accelerated ion bunches with solid-state density, which are about 10{sup 14} times more dense than classically accelerated ion bunches, allow for a high probability that generated fission products can fuse again. The high ion beam density may lead to a strong collective modification of the stopping power, leading to significant range and thus yield enhancement. Using a high-intensity laser as envisaged for the ELI-Nuclear Physics project in Bucharest (ELI-NP), order-of-magnitude estimates promise a fusion yield of about 10{sup 3} ions per laser pulse in the mass range of A = 180-190, thus enabling to approach the r-process waiting point at N = 126.

  10. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ti:Sapphire laser system to focus ultra-short (?30 fs) laserLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR The LOASIS Laboratory at LBNL presently produces ultra-short (laser-plasma inter- action lengths. These LWFA-produced electron beams are high current (?10 kA) and ultra-short (

  11. Laser acceleration of protons using multi-ion plasma gaseous targets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Hill, W T; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of a novel acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO2 laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 ?m—much greater than that of a Ti: Sapphire laser—the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the target compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. By impinging such amore »laser beam on a carbon–hydrogen target, the gaseous target is first compressed and accelerated by radiation pressure until the electron layer disrupts, after which the protons are further accelerated by the electron-shielded carbon ion layer. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with a peak power of 70 TW and a pulse duration of 150 wave periods.« less

  12. The analytic model of a laser-accelerated plasma target and its stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khudik, V., E-mail: vkhudik@physics.utexas.edu; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, One University Station C1500, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, One University Station C1500, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-consistent kinetic theory of a laser-accelerated plasma target with distributed electron/ion densities is developed. The simplified model assumes that after an initial transition period the bulk of cold ions are uniformly accelerated by the self-consistent electric field generated by hot electrons trapped in combined ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. Several distinct target regions (non-neutral ion tail, non-neutral electron sheath, and neutral plasma bulk) are identified and analytically described. It is shown analytically that such laser-accelerated finite-thickness target is susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. Particle-in-cell simulations of the seeded perturbations of the plasma target reveal that, for ultra-relativistic laser intensities, the growth rate of the RT instability is depressed from the analytic estimates.

  13. CO2 LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Actually, in this case, we talk about evanescent EM fields vanishing within a l -thick layer above the surface. In the third group of methods, particles are accelerated not by EM...

  14. Laser polishing of niobium for superconducting radio-frequency accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Liang [William and Mary College; Klopf, John M. [William and Mary College; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [JLAB

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interior surfaces of niobium cavities used in superconducting radio frequency accelerators are now obtained by buffered chemical polish and/or electropolish. Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from noxious chemistry and availability of in-process inspection. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damage. Computational modeling was used to estimate the surface temperature and gain insight into the mechanism of laser polishing. Power spectral density analysis of surface topography measurements shows that laser polishing can produce smooth topography similar to that obtained by electropolish. This is a necessary first step toward introducing laser polishing as an alternative to the currently practiced chemical polishing.

  15. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fastto the laser driver, making such a source ideal for ultra-

  16. Towards radiation pressure acceleration of protons using linearly polarized ultrashort petawatt laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, I Jong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yu, Tae Jun; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Nam, Kee Hwan; Nickles, Peter V; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle acceleration using ultraintense, ultrashort laser pulses is one of the most attractive topics in relativistic laser-plasma research. We report proton/ion acceleration in the intensity range of 5x1019 W/cm2 to 3.3x1020 W/cm2 by irradiating linearly polarized, 30-fs, 1-PW laser pulses on 10- to 100-nm-thick polymer targets. The proton energy scaling with respect to the intensity and target thickness was examined. The experiments demonstrated, for the first time with linearly polarized light, a transition from the target normal sheath acceleration to radiation pressure acceleration and showed a maximum proton energy of 45 MeV when a 10-nm-thick target was irradiated by a laser intensity of 3.3x1020 W/cm2. The experimental results were further supported by two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Based on the deduced proton energy scaling, proton beams having an energy of ~ 200 MeV should be feasible at a laser intensity of 1.5x1021 W/cm2.

  17. Space Charge Compensation in Laser Particle Accelerators L.C...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shown in Fig. 1, is composed of an energy modulator (e.g. an inverse free-electron laser) followed by a drift section. A macrobunch with little energy spread enters the...

  18. Electron acceleration in cavitated laser produced ion channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naseri, N. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada) [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Pesme, D. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada) [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Rozmus, W. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada)] [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the channeling of a relativistic laser pulse in an underdense plasma and with the subsequent generation of fast electrons in the cavitated ion channel. The laser pulse has a duration of several hundreds of femtoseconds and its power P{sub L} exceeds the critical power for laser channeling P{sub ch}, with P{sub ch}?1.1P{sub c}, P{sub c} denoting the critical power for relativistic self-focusing. The laser pulse is focused in a plasma of electron density n{sub 0} such that the ratio n{sub 0}/n{sub c} lies in the interval [10{sup ?3},10{sup ?1}], n{sub c} denoting the critical density. The laser-plasma interaction under such conditions is investigated by means of three dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations. It is observed that the steep laser front gives rise to the excitation of a surface wave which propagates along the sharp radial boundaries of the electron free channel created by the laser pulse. The mechanism responsible for the generation of relativistic electrons observed in the PIC simulations is also analyzed by means of a test particles code. The fast electrons are found to be generated by the combination of a surface wave and of the betatron resonance. The maximum electron energy observed in the simulations is scaled as a function of P{sub L}/P{sub c}; it reaches 350–600 MeV for P{sub L}/P{sub c} = 70–140.

  19. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downer, Michael C.

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle accelerators enable scientists to study the fundamental structure of the universe, but have become the largest and most expensive of scientific instruments. In this project, we advanced the science and technology of laser-plasma accelerators, which are thousands of times smaller and less expensive than their conventional counterparts. In a laser-plasma accelerator, a powerful laser pulse exerts light pressure on an ionized gas, or plasma, thereby driving an electron density wave, which resembles the wake behind a boat. Electrostatic fields within this plasma wake reach tens of billions of volts per meter, fields far stronger than ordinary non-plasma matter (such as the matter that a conventional accelerator is made of) can withstand. Under the right conditions, stray electrons from the surrounding plasma become trapped within these “wake-fields”, surf them, and acquire energy much faster than is possible in a conventional accelerator. Laser-plasma accelerators thus might herald a new generation of compact, low-cost accelerators for future particle physics, x-ray and medical research. In this project, we made two major advances in the science of laser-plasma accelerators. The first of these was to accelerate electrons beyond 1 gigaelectronvolt (1 GeV) for the first time. In experimental results reported in Nature Communications in 2013, about 1 billion electrons were captured from a tenuous plasma (about 1/100 of atmosphere density) and accelerated to 2 GeV within about one inch, while maintaining less than 5% energy spread, and spreading out less than ½ milliradian (i.e. ½ millimeter per meter of travel). Low energy spread and high beam collimation are important for applications of accelerators as coherent x-ray sources or particle colliders. This advance was made possible by exploiting unique properties of the Texas Petawatt Laser, a powerful laser at the University of Texas at Austin that produces pulses of 150 femtoseconds (1 femtosecond is 10-15 seconds) in duration and 150 Joules in energy (equivalent to the muzzle energy of a small pistol bullet). This duration was well matched to the natural electron density oscillation period of plasma of 1/100 atmospheric density, enabling efficient excitation of a plasma wake, while this energy was sufficient to drive a high-amplitude wake of the right shape to produce an energetic, collimated electron beam. Continuing research is aimed at increasing electron energy even further, increasing the number of electrons captured and accelerated, and developing applications of the compact, multi-GeV accelerator as a coherent, hard x-ray source for materials science, biomedical imaging and homeland security applications. The second major advance under this project was to develop new methods of visualizing the laser-driven plasma wake structures that underlie laser-plasma accelerators. Visualizing these structures is essential to understanding, optimizing and scaling laser-plasma accelerators. Yet prior to work under this project, computer simulations based on estimated initial conditions were the sole source of detailed knowledge of the complex, evolving internal structure of laser-driven plasma wakes. In this project we developed and demonstrated a suite of optical visualization methods based on well-known methods such as holography, streak cameras, and coherence tomography, but adapted to the ultrafast, light-speed, microscopic world of laser-driven plasma wakes. Our methods output images of laser-driven plasma structures in a single laser shot. We first reported snapshots of low-amplitude laser wakes in Nature Physics in 2006. We subsequently reported images of high-amplitude laser-driven plasma “bubbles”, which are important for producing electron beams with low energy spread, in Physical Review Letters in 2010. More recently, we have figured out how to image laser-driven structures that change shape while propagating in a single laser shot. The latter techniques, which use the methods of computerized tomography, were demonstrated on test objects – e.g. laser-d

  20. ULTRAINTENSE AND ULTRASHORT LASER PULSES FROM RAMAN AMPLIFICATION IN PLASMA FOR LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    to be a promising alternative for obtaining ultra-powerful peta-watt laser pulses. Issues in the system are the kiULTRAINTENSE AND ULTRASHORT LASER PULSES FROM RAMAN AMPLIFICATION IN PLASMA FOR LASER trapping effect in the Raman pulse amplification in plasma. An ultraintense and ultrashort laser pulse

  1. Generation of electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in pure neon gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Tao, Mengze; Chen, Liming [Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the generation of quasimonoenergetic electron beams by the laser wakefield acceleration of 17–50 TW, 30 fs laser pulses in pure neon gas jet. The generated beams have energies in the range 40–120?MeV and up to ?430 pC of charge. At a relatively high density, we observed multiple electron beamlets which has been interpreted by simulations to be the result of breakup of the laser pulse into multiple filaments in the plasma. Each filament drives its own wakefield and generates its own electron beamlet.

  2. Charged-particle acceleration and energy loss in laser-produced plasmas D. G. Hicks,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charged-particle acceleration and energy loss in laser-produced plasmas D. G. Hicks,a) C. K. Li, F, particle energy shifts were dominated by acceleration effects. Using a simple model for the accelerating T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 1997 . Comparing the energy shifts of four particle types

  3. Visual Exploration of Turbulent Combustion and Laser-Wakefield Accelerator Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydrogen flames under different levels of turbulence ­ Lean combustion reduces emissions Important hydrogen flames] #12;Visual Exploration of Turbulent Combustion and Laser-Wakefield Accelerator Simulations 12 Tracking Graph Extraction Pipeline 1. Concatenate to obtain 4D mesh 2. Extract isotherm in 4D 3

  4. Microbunching Instability Effect Studies and Laser Heater Optimization for the SPARX FEL Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaccarezza, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Giannessi, L.; Quattromini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Venturini, C.; Migliorati, M.; Dattoli, G.

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of microbunching instability for the SPARX accelerator have been analyzed by means of numerical simulations. The laser heater counteracting action has been addressed in order to optimize the parameters of the compression system, either hybrid RF plus magnetic chicane or only magnetic, and possibly enhance the FEL performance.

  5. Electron acceleration by an intense short pulse laser in a static magnetic field in vacuum K. P. Singh*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    Electron acceleration by an intense short pulse laser in a static magnetic field in vacuum K. P by a laser pulse having Gaussian radial and temporal profiles of intensity has been studied in a static to be the same as that of the magnetic field of the laser pulse. The electron gains considerable energy

  6. Driving laser pulse evolution in a hollow channel laser wakefield accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    of different methods for laser accel- eration and summaries of experimental and theoretical progress can particle in the LWFA to about one Rayleigh range. Laser guiding in plasma channels has been proposed

  7. Laser pulse propagation in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma channels and wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, B. S., E-mail: bs-phy@yahoo.com; Jain, Archana [Government College Kota, Kota 324001 (India)] [Government College Kota, Kota 324001 (India); Jaiman, N. K. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324010 (India)] [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324010 (India); Gupta, D. N. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)] [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Jang, D. G.; Suk, H. [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kulagin, V. V. [Sternberg Astronomical Institute of Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)] [Sternberg Astronomical Institute of Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wakefield excitation in a preformed inhomogeneous parabolic plasma channel by an intense relativistic (?10{sup 19}?W/cm{sup 2}) circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse is investigated analytically and numerically in the presence of an external longitudinal magnetic field. A three dimensional envelope equation for the evolution of the laser pulse is derived, which includes the effect of the nonparaxial and applied external magnetic field. A relation for the channel radius with the laser spot size is derived and examines numerically to see the external magnetic field effect. It is observed that the channel radius depends on the applied external magnetic field. An analytical expression for the wakefield is derived and validated with the help of a two dimensional particle in cell (2D PIC) simulation code. It is shown that the electromagnetic nature of the wakes in an inhomogeneous plasma channel makes their excitation nonlocal, which results in change of fields with time and external magnetic field due to phase mixing of the plasma oscillations with spatially varying frequencies. The magnetic field effect on perturbation of the plasma density and decreasing length is also analyzed numerically. In addition, it has been shown that the electron energy gain in the inhomogeneous parabolic magnetoplasma channel can be increased significantly compared with the homogeneous plasma channel.

  8. Two Dimensional Simulation Analysis of the First Sections of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator,"of a standing-wave free electron laser," Nucl. Instr. anda standing-wave free-electron laser," Proc. SPIE Conference

  9. Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A.Model Verification andModeling Laser

  10. Strong Field Physics: Probing Critical Acceleration and Inertia with Laser Pulses and Quark-Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lance Labun; Jan Rafelski

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding physics in domains of critical (quantum unstable) fields requires investigating the classical and quantum particle dynamics at the critical acceleration, $\\dot u \\to 1$ [natural units]. This regime of physics remains today experimentally practically untested. Particle and light collision experiments reaching critical acceleration are becoming feasible, in particular applying available high intensity laser technology. Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions breach the critical domain but are complicated by the presence of much other physics. The infamous problem of radiation reaction and the challenging environment of quantum vacuum instability arising in the high field domain signal the need for a thorough redress of the present theoretical framework.

  11. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Litzenberg, D. W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup ?15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1?m) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  12. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  13. Tuning the electron energy by controlling the density perturbation position in laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brijesh, P.; Thaury, C.; Phuoc, K. T.; Corde, S.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS UMR7639, Ecole Polytechnique, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M.; Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A density perturbation in an underdense plasma was used to improve the quality of electron bunches produced in the laser-plasma wakefield acceleration scheme. Quasi-monoenergetic electrons were generated by controlled injection in the longitudinal density gradients of the density perturbation. By tuning the position of the density perturbation along the laser propagation axis, a fine control of the electron energy from a mean value of 60 MeV to 120 MeV has been demonstrated with a relative energy-spread of 15 {+-} 3.6%, divergence of 4 {+-} 0.8 mrad, and charge of 6 {+-} 1.8 pC.

  14. Practical method and device for enhancing pulse contrast ratio for lasers and electron accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui; Wilson, Guy

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for enhancing pulse contrast ratios for drive lasers and electron accelerators. The invention comprises a mechanical dual-shutter system wherein the shutters are placed sequentially in series in a laser beam path. Each shutter of the dual shutter system has an individually operated trigger for opening and closing the shutter. As the triggers are operated individually, the delay between opening and closing first shutter and opening and closing the second shutter is variable providing for variable differential time windows and enhancement of pulse contrast ratio.

  15. Approach towards quasi-monoenergetic laser ion acceleration with doped target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morita, Toshimasa

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion acceleration by using a laser pulse irradiating a disk target which includes hydrogen and carbon is examined using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that over $200$ MeV protons can be generated by using a $620$TW, $5\\times10^{21}$ W/cm$^2$ laser pulse. In a polyethylene (CH$_2$) target, protons and carbon ions separate and form two layers by radiation pressure acceleration. A strong Coulomb explosion in this situation and Coulomb repulsion between each layer generates high energy protons. A doped target, low density hydrogen within a carbon disk, becomes a double layer target which is comprised of a thin and low density hydrogen disk on the surface of a high-$Z$ atom layer. This then generates a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam.

  16. Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators: Wakefield excitation, channel guiding, and laser triggered particle injection*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    particle injection* W. P. Leemans,,a) P. Volfbeyn, K. Z. Guo, and S. Chattopadhyay Ernest Orlando Lawrence-based injection of particles into a plasma wake, are presented. Details of the experimental program at Lawrence for the accel- erating fields as well as guiding for the laser, and a suitable laser driver. The most

  17. Effects of radiation reaction in relativistic laser acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadad, Y.; Labun, L.; Rafelski, J.; Elkina, N.; Klier, C.; Ruhl, H. [Departments of Physics and Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, 85721 (United States); Department fuer Physik der Ludwig-Maximillians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37A, 80333 Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this paper is twofold: to explore the response of classical charges to electromagnetic force at the level of unity in natural units and to establish a criterion that determines physical parameters for which the related radiation-reaction effects are detectable. In pursuit of this goal, the Landau-Lifshitz equation is solved analytically for an arbitrary (transverse) electromagnetic pulse. A comparative study of the radiation emission of an electron in a linearly polarized pulse for the Landau-Lifshitz equation and for the Lorentz force equation reveals the radiation-reaction-dominated regime, in which radiation-reaction effects overcome the influence of the external fields. The case of a relativistic electron that is slowed down by a counterpropagating electromagnetic wave is studied in detail. We further show that when the electron experiences acceleration of order unity, the dynamics of the Lorentz force equation, the Landau-Lifshitz equation and the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation all result in different radiation emission that could be distinguished in experiment. Finally, our analytic and numerical results are compared with those appearing in the literature.

  18. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A445 (2000) 59. [13] W. M. Fawley, LBNL Technical Report No.LBNL-49625 (2002); see also paper MOPPH073, theseLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR AT THE LBNL LOASIS FACILITY ? C. B.

  19. Attosecond Thomson-scattering x-ray source driven by laser-based electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China) [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Ma, Y. Y. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China) [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Song, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. C. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of producing attosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering of laser light off laser-driven relativistic electron beams is investigated. For a ?200-as, tens-MeV electron bunch produced with laser ponderomotive-force acceleration in a plasma wire, exceeding 10{sup 6} photons/s in the form of ?160 as pulses in the range of 3–300 keV are predicted, with a peak brightness of ?5 × 10{sup 20} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1% bandwidth). Our study suggests that the physical scheme discussed in this work can be used for an ultrafast (attosecond) x-ray source, which is the most beneficial for time-resolved atomic physics, dubbed “attosecond physics.”.

  20. Detailed dynamics of electron beams self-trapped and accelerated in a self-modulated laser wakefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    . These features are explained by analysis and test particle simulations of electron dynamics during acceleration wave,1 such as the plasma wakefield accel- erator, the plasma beat-wave accelerator, the Laser Wake the linear dephasing limit, and explained it, using Particle-In-Cell PIC simulations, as a result

  1. Ion acceleration with ultra-thin foils using elliptically polarized laser pulses This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ion acceleration with ultra-thin foils using elliptically polarized laser pulses This article has of Physics Ion acceleration with ultra-thin foils using elliptically polarized laser pulses S G Rykovanov1 of ions with ultra-high intensity laser pulses has attracted broad interest over the last decade. The high

  2. Passive tailoring of laser-accelerated ion beam cut-off energy by using double foil assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. N., E-mail: sophia.chen@polytechnique.edu; Brambrink, E.; Mancic, A.; Romagnani, L.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J., E-mail: julien.fuchs@polytechnique.fr [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-École Polytechnique-Université Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Robinson, A. P. L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Antici, P. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-École Polytechnique-Université Paris VI, Palaiseau (France) [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-École Polytechnique-Université Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma « La Sapienza », Via Scarpa 14-16, 00165 Roma (Italy); INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, 1650 bd. L. Boulet, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada); D'Humières, E. [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States) [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); University of Bordeaux—CNRS—CEA, CELIA, UMR5107, 33405 Talence (France); Gaillard, S. [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Grismayer, T.; Mora, P. [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pépin, H. [INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, 1650 bd. L. Boulet, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada)] [INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, 1650 bd. L. Boulet, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A double foil assembly is shown to be effective in tailoring the maximum energy produced by a laser-accelerated proton beam. The measurements compare favorably with adiabatic expansion simulations, and particle-in-cell simulations. The arrangement proposed here offers for some applications a simple and passive way to utilize simultaneously highest irradiance lasers that have best laser-to-ion conversion efficiency while avoiding the production of undesired high-energy ions.

  3. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for scientific data mining is increasingly considered. In plasma simulations, Bagherjeiran et al. presented a comprehensive report on applying graph-based techniques for orbit classification. They used the KAM classifier to label points and components in single and multiple orbits. Love et al. conducted an image space analysis of coherent structures in plasma simulations. They used a number of segmentation and region-growing techniques to isolate regions of interest in orbit plots. Both approaches analyzed particle accelerator data, targeting the system dynamics in terms of particle orbits. However, they did not address particle dynamics as a function of time or inspected the behavior of bunches of particles. Ruebel et al. addressed the visual analysis of massive laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulation data using interactive procedures to query the data. Sophisticated visualization tools were provided to inspect the data manually. Ruebel et al. have integrated these tools to the visualization and analysis system VisIt, in addition to utilizing efficient data management based on HDF5, H5Part, and the index/query tool FastBit. In Ruebel et al. proposed automatic beam path analysis using a suite of methods to classify particles in simulation data and to analyze their temporal evolution. To enable researchers to accurately define particle beams, the method computes a set of measures based on the path of particles relative to the distance of the particles to a beam. To achieve good performance, this framework uses an analysis pipeline designed to quickly reduce the amount of data that needs to be considered in the actual path distance computation. As part of this process, region-growing methods are utilized to detect particle bunches at single time steps. Efficient data reduction is essential to enable automated analysis of large data sets as described in the next section, where data reduction methods are steered to the particular requirements of our clustering analysis. Previously, we have described the application of a set of algorithms to automate the data analys

  4. Quasimonoenergetic collimated electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in low density pure nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Mengze [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Liming [Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiment is performed using 30 TW, 30 fs, and 800?nm laser pulses, focused onto pure nitrogen plasma having relatively low densities in the range of 0.8×10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3} to 2.7×10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. Electron beams having a low divergence of ?3??mrad (full-width at half-maximum) and quasi-monoenergetic peak energies of ?105??MeV are achieved over 4-mm interaction length. The total electron beam charge reached to 2 nC, however, only 1%–2% of this (tens of pC) had energies >35?MeV. We tried different conditions to optimize the electron beam acceleration; our experiment verifies that lower nitrogen plasma densities are generating electron beams with high quality in terms of divergence, charge, pointing stability, and maximum energy. In addition, if LWFA is to be widely used as a basis for compact particle accelerators in the future, therefore, from the economic and safety points of view we propose the use of nitrogen gas rather than helium or hydrogen.

  5. Accelerating Protons to Therapeutic Energies with Ultra-Intense Ultra-Clean and Ultra-Short Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulanov, Stepan S; Bychenkov, Valery Yu; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultra-thin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10-11 achieved on Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W/cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the Directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultra-thin double-layer (heavy ions / light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 microns (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the ma...

  6. Backward-Propagating MeV Electrons in Ultra-Intense Laser Interactions: Standing Wave Acceleration and Coupling to the Reflected Laser Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orban, Chris; Chowdhury, Enam D; Nees, John A; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, W Melvyn

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-accelerated electron beams have been created at a kHz repetition rate from the reflection of intense ($\\sim10^{18}$ W/cm$^2$), 30 fs laser pulses focused on a continuous water-jet in an experiment at the Air Force Research Laboratory. This paper investigates Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of the laser-target interaction to identify the physical mechanisms of electron acceleration in this experiment. We find that the standing-wave pattern created by the overlap of the incident and reflected laser is particularly important because this standing wave "injects" electrons into the reflected laser pulse where the electrons are further accelerated. We identify two regimes of standing wave acceleration: a highly relativistic case ($a_0~\\geq~1$), and a moderately relativistic case ($a_0~\\sim~0.5$) which operates over a larger fraction of the laser period. Previous work by other groups investigated the highly relativistic case for its usefulness in launching electrons in the forward direction. We extend this ...

  7. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Wu, Kesheng; Childs, Hank; Meredith, Jeremy; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Our work combines and extends techniques from high-performance scientific data management and visualization to enable scientific researchers to gain insight from extremely large, complex, time-varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We extend histogram-based parallel coordinates for use in visual information display as well as an interface for guiding and performing data mining operations, which are based upon multi-dimensional and temporal thresholding and data subsetting operations. To achieve very high performance on parallel computing platforms, we leverage FastBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to accelerate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram computation. We show how these techniques are used in practice by scientific researchers to identify, visualize and analyze a particle beam in a large, time-varying dataset.

  8. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Whittum, D.H.; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Sharp, W.M.; Makowski, M.A.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free-electron laser (FEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) is proposed, in which the FEL interaction takes place in a series of drive cavities, rather than in a waveguide. Each drive cavity is 'beat-coupled' to a section of the accelerating structure. This standing-wave TBA is investigated theoretically and numerically, with analyses included of microwave extraction, growth of the FEL signal through saturation, equilibrium longitudinal beam dynamics following saturation, and sensitivity of the microwave amplitude and phase to errors in current and energy. It is found that phase errors due to current jitter are substantially reduced from previous versions of the TBA. Analytic scalings and numerical simulations are used to obtain an illustrative TBA parameter set.

  9. An ultrashort pulse ultra-violet radiation undulator source driven by a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anania, M. P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Grant, D. W.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Cipiccia, S.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A., E-mail: d.a.jaroszynski@strath.ac.uk [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Geer, S. B. van der; Loos, M. J. de [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poole, M. W.; Shepherd, B. J. A.; Clarke, J. A. [ASTeC, STFC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W. A. [SUPA, School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A. M. [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee DD1 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Narrow band undulator radiation tuneable over the wavelength range of 150–260?nm has been produced by short electron bunches from a 2?mm long laser plasma wakefield accelerator based on a 20?TW femtosecond laser system. The number of photons measured is up to 9?×?10{sup 6} per shot for a 100 period undulator, with a mean peak brilliance of 1?×?10{sup 18} photons/s/mrad{sup 2}/mm{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Simulations estimate that the driving electron bunch r.m.s. duration is as short as 3 fs when the electron beam has energy of 120–130?MeV with the radiation pulse duration in the range of 50–100 fs.

  10. The slingshot effect: a possible new laser-driven high energy acceleration mechanism for electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaetano Fiore; Renato Fedele; Umberto de Angelis

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that under appropriate conditions the impact of a very short and intense laser pulse onto a plasma causes the expulsion of surface electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to the one of propagation of the pulse. This is due to the combined effects of the ponderomotive force and the huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation ("slingshot effect"). The effect should also be present with other states of matter, provided the pulse is sufficiently intense to locally cause complete ionization. An experimental test seems to be feasible and, if confirmed, would provide a new extraction and acceleration mechanism for electrons, alternative to traditional radio-frequency-based or Laser-Wake-Field ones.

  11. Measurements of the critical power for self-injection of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Doppner, T; Fonseca, R A; Marsh, K A; Barty, C J; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Martins, S F; Michel, P; Mori, W; Palastro, J P; Pollock, B B; Pak, A; Ralph, J E; Ross, J S; Siders, C; Silva, L O; Wang, T

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser wakefield acceleration study has been performed in the matched, self-guided, blow-out regime where a 10 J, 60 fs laser produced 720 {+-} 50 MeV quasi-monoenergetic electrons with a divergence of {Delta}{theta} = 2.85 {+-} 0.15 mRad. While maintaining a nearly constant plasma density (3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}), a linear electron energy gain was measured from 100 MeV to 700 MeV when the plasma length was scaled from 3 mm to 8 mm. Absolute charge measurements indicate that self-injection occurs when P/P{sub cr} > 4 and saturates around 100 pC for P/P{sub cr} > 12. The results are compared with both analytical scalings and full 3D particle-in-cell simulations.

  12. Simulation of direct plasma injection for laser ion beam acceleration with a radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Q. Y.; Li, Zh. M.; Liu, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H. Y., E-mail: zhaohy@impcas.ac.cn; Zhang, J. J.; Sha, Sh.; Zhang, Zh. L.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) has been being studied at Institute of Modern Physics since several years ago. A C{sup 6+} beam with peak current of 13 mA, energy of 593 keV/u has been successfully achieved after acceleration with DPIS method. To understand the process of DPIS, some simulations have been done as follows. First, with the total current intensity and the relative yields of different charge states for carbon ions measured at the different distance from the target, the absolute current intensities and time-dependences for different charge states are scaled to the exit of the laser ion source in the DPIS. Then with these derived values as the input parameters, the extraction of carbon beam from the laser ion source to the radio frequency quadrupole with DPIS is simulated, which is well agreed with the experiment results.

  13. Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Kei

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation documents the development of a broadband electron spectrometer (ESM) for GeV class Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA), the production of high quality GeV electron beams (e-beams) for the first time in a LWFA by using a capillary discharge guide (CDG), and a statistical analysis of CDG-LWFAs. An ESM specialized for CDG-LWFAs with an unprecedented wide momentum acceptance, from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, has been developed. Simultaneous measurement of e-beam spectra and output laser properties as well as a large angular acceptance (> {+-} 10 mrad) were realized by employing a slitless scheme. A scintillating screen (LANEX Fast back, LANEX-FB)--camera system allowed faster than 1 Hz operation and evaluation of the spatial properties of e-beams. The design provided sufficient resolution for the whole range of the ESM (below 5% for beams with 2 mrad divergence). The calibration between light yield from LANEX-FB and total charge, and a study on the electron energy dependence (0.071 to 1.23 GeV) of LANEX-FB were performed at the Advanced light source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Using this calibration data, the developed ESM provided a charge measurement as well. The production of high quality electron beams up to 1 GeV from a centimeter-scale accelerator was demonstrated. The experiment used a 310 {micro}m diameter gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide that channeled relativistically-intense laser pulses (42 TW, 4.5 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) over 3.3 centimeters of sufficiently low density ({approx_equal} 4.3 x 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma. Also demonstrated was stable self-injection and acceleration at a beam energy of {approx_equal} 0.5 GeV by using a 225 {micro}m diameter capillary. Relativistically-intense laser pulses (12 TW, 1.3 x 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}) were guided over 3.3 centimeters of low density ({approx_equal} 3.5 x 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma in this experiment. A statistical analysis of the CDG-LWFAs performance was carried out. By taking advantage of the high repetition rate experimental system, several thousands of shots were taken in a broad range of the laser and plasma parameters. An analysis program was developed to sort and select the data by specified parameters, and then to evaluate performance statistically. The analysis suggested that the generation of GeV-level beams comes from a highly unstable and regime. By having the plasma density slightly above the threshold density for self injection, (1) the longest dephasing length possible was provided, which led to the generation of high energy e-beams, and (2) the number of electrons injected into the wakefield was kept small, which led to the generation of high quality (low energy spread) e-beams by minimizing the beam loading effect on the wake. The analysis of the stable half-GeV beam regime showed the requirements for stable self injection and acceleration. A small change of discharge delay t{sub dsc}, and input energy E{sub in}, significantly affected performance. The statistical analysis provided information for future optimization, and suggested possible schemes for improvement of the stability and higher quality beam generation. A CDG-LWFA is envisioned as a construction block for the next generation accelerator, enabling significant cost and size reductions.

  14. Monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil by circularly polarized laser pulse in RPA regime without thermal heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, One University Station C1500, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A kinetic model of the monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil irradiated by the circularly polarized laser pulse is developed. The target moves without thermal heating with constant acceleration which is provided by chirping the frequency of the laser pulse and correspondingly increasing its intensity. In the accelerated reference frame, bulk plasma in the target is neutral and its parameters are stationary: cold ions are immobile while nonrelativistic electrons bounce back and forth inside the potential well formed by ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. It is shown that a positive charge left behind of the moving target in the ion tail and a negative charge in front of the target in the electron sheath form a capacitor whose constant electric field accelerates the ions of the target. The charge separation is maintained by the radiation pressure pushing electrons forward. The scalings of the target thickness and electromagnetic radiation with the electron temperature are found.

  15. Single-Shot Femtosecond Electron Diffraction with Laser-Accelerated Electrons: Experimental Demonstration of Electron Pulse Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokita, Shigeki; Hashida, Masaki; Inoue, Shunsuke; Nishoji, Toshihiko; Otani, Kazuto; Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-7501 (Japan)

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first experimental demonstration of longitudinal compression of laser-accelerated electron pulses. Accelerated by a femtosecond laser pulse with an intensity of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, an electron pulse with an energy of around 350 keV and a relative momentum spread of about 10{sup -2} was compressed to a 500-fs pulse at a distance of about 50 cm from the electron source by using a magnetic pulse compressor. This pulse was used to generate a clear diffraction pattern of a gold crystal in a single shot. This method solves the space-charge problem in ultrafast electron diffraction.

  16. Ultra-high-contrast laser acceleration of relativistic electrons in solid targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higginson, Drew Pitney

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensities with Short-Pulse Lasers 1.2 Inertial Confinementhigh-power, short laser pulse, D. . . . . . . . . . Figurea high-intensity short-pulse laser to produce relativistic

  17. Recirculating accelerator driver for a high-power free-electron laser: A design overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, C.L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab is building a free-electron laser (FEL) to produce continuous-wave (cw), kW-level light at 3-6 {mu}m wavelength. A superconducting linac will drive the laser, generating a 5 mA average current, 42 MeV energy electron beam. A transport lattice will recirculate the beam back to the linac for deceleration and conversion of about 75% of its power into rf power. Bunch charge will range up to 135 pC, and bunch lengths will range down to 1 ps in parts of the transport lattice. Accordingly, space charge in the injector and coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bends come into play. The machine will thus enable studying these phenomena as a precursor to designing compact accelerators of high-brightness beams. The FEL is scheduled to be installed in its own facility by 1 October 1997. Given the short schedule, the machine design is conservative, based on modifications of the CEBAF cryomodule and MIT-Bates transport lattice. This paper surveys the machine design.

  18. Terahertz radiation as a bunch diagnostic for laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Filip, Catalin; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Fubiani, Gwenael; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are reported from two measurement techniques (semiconductor switching and electro-optic sampling) that allow temporal characterization of electron bunches produced by a laser-driven plasma-based accelerator. As femtosecond electron bunches exit the plasma-vacuum interface, coherent transition radiation (at THz frequencies) is emitted. Measuring the properties of this radiation allows characterization of the electron bunches. Theoretical work on the emission mechanism is presented, including a model that calculates the THz wave form from a given bunch profile. It is found that the spectrum of the THz pulse is coherent up to the 200 {micro}m thick crystal (ZnTe) detection limit of 4 THz, which corresponds to the production of sub-50 fs (rms) electron bunch structure. The measurements demonstrate both the shot-to-shot stability of bunch parameters that are critical to THz emission (such as total charge and bunch length), as well as femtosecond synchronization among bunch, THz pulse, and laser beam.

  19. STABLE, MONOENERGETIC 50-400 MeV ELECTRON BEAMS WITH A MATCHED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    progress in laser-based particle accelera- tors [1]. Early breakthroughs in laser-based electron accel

  20. Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kei

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrashort laser pulses and ultra- short electron bunchesinteraction of an intense ultra-short laser pulse with a gas

  1. Motion of the plasma critical layer during relativistic-electron laser interaction with immobile and comoving ion plasma for ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahai, Aakash A., E-mail: aakash.sahai@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime (a{sub 0}>1). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-? traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators. In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme, the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme, the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. In RPA, the acceleration structure velocity critically depends upon plasma-ion mass in addition to the laser intensity and plasma density. In RITA, mass of the heavy immobile plasma-ions does not affect the speed of the critical layer. Inertia of the bared immobile ions in RITA excites the charge separation potential, whereas RPA is not possible when ions are stationary.

  2. Characterization and Application of Hard X-Ray Betatron Radiation Generated by Relativistic Electrons from a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnell, Michael; Uschmann, Ingo; Jansen, Oliver; Kaluza, Malte Christoph; Spielmann, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity for compact table-top x-ray sources with higher brightness, shorter wavelength and shorter pulse duration has led to the development of complementary sources based on laser-plasma accelerators, in contrast to conventional accelerators. Relativistic interaction of short-pulse lasers with underdense plasmas results in acceleration of electrons and in consequence in the emission of spatially coherent radiation, which is known in the literature as betatron radiation. In this article we report on our recent results in the rapidly developing field of secondary x-ray radiation generated by high-energy electron pulses. The betatron radiation is characterized with a novel setup allowing to measure the energy, the spatial energy distribution in the far-field of the beam and the source size in a single laser shot. Furthermore, the polarization state is measured for each laser shot. In this way the emitted betatron x-rays can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool to retrieve very subtle information of t...

  3. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-2099 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-2099 (United States); Beaurepaire, B.; Malka, V.; Faure, J. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  4. Efficient Modeling of Laser-Plasma Accelerators with INF&RNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedetti, C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the interaction of a short laser pulse with an underdensethe fact that the (short) laser pulse is not monochromatic.LPA) [1,2], where a short and intense laser pulse interacts

  5. Shock Wave Acceleration of Monoenergetic Protons using a Multi-Terawatt CO2 Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberberger, Dan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by an ultra intense and short- pulsed laser in under-denseatoms in strong short-pulse laser ?elds,” Nature, vol. 461,techniques for high-power short-pulse laser- produced heavy-

  6. Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kei

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    self-modulated intense short laser pulse. Phys. Rev. Lett. ,eld generated by a short laser pulse in an underdenseof an intense ultra-short laser pulse with a gas jet.

  7. THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FOR A HIGH-GRADIENT ACCELERATING STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18-23, 1982 THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FOR AAC03-76SF00098 THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FORVariable Parameter Free Electron Laser", to be pub 1 i shed

  8. Shock Wave Acceleration of Monoenergetic Protons using a Multi-Terawatt CO2 Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberberger, Dan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fusion implosions at ultra-high laser energies,” Science,of ultrashort, ultra-intense laser light by solids andby an ultra intense and short- pulsed laser in under-dense

  9. Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kei

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phenomena generated by ultra-intense lasers. Science, 300:interaction of an intense ultra-short laser pulse with a gasbe needed for such ultra-intense laser pulses to propagate a

  10. GeV electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beams [5]–[7] using an ultra-intense laser pulse focused on5]–[7], an ultra-intense ?10 19 W/cm 2 laser pulse focusedpulse laser driver, making such a source ideal for ultra-

  11. Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kei

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interaction of an intense ultra-short laser pulse with a gasUltrashort laser pulses and ultra- short electron bunches

  12. THz radiation as a bunch diagnostic for laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the vacuum chamber by an ultra-intense laser pulse. A secondEO) crystal. An ultra-short NIR laser beam was used to probe

  13. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Wang, Hong-Yu [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China) [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Shanghai Bright-Tech Information Technology Co. Ltd., Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  14. Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    he wakefield generated in a plasma by incoherently combining a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e.,without constraining the pulse phases) is studied analytically and by means of fully-self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the wakefield has been characterized and its amplitude compared with the amplitude of the wake generated by a single (coherent) laser pulse. We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of the wakefield within the volume occupied by the laser pulses, behind this region the structure of the wakefield can be regular with an amplitude comparable or equal to that obtained from a single pulse with the same energy. Wake generation requires that the incoherent structure in the laser energy density produced by the combined pulses exists on a time scale short compared to the plasma period. Incoherent combination of multiple laser pulses may enable a technologically simpler path to high-repetition rate, high-average power laser-plasma accelerators and associated applications.

  15. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Sefkow, A. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  16. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R., E-mail: agrt@umich.edu [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  17. Quasi-monoenergetic ion generation by hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration in inhomogeneous plasmas using tailored laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, S. M., E-mail: weng-sm@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Murakami, M.; Azechi, H.; Wang, J. W.; Tasoko, N. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Chen, M. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240, China and Department of Mathematics, Institute of Natural Sciences, and MOE-LSC, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 20040 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240, China and Department of Mathematics, Institute of Natural Sciences, and MOE-LSC, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 20040 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240, China and SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)] [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240, China and SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Mulser, P. [Theoretical Quantum Electronics (TQE), Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)] [Theoretical Quantum Electronics (TQE), Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Yu, W.; Shen, B. F. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed that laser hole-boring at a steady speed in inhomogeneous overdense plasma can be realized by the use of temporally tailored intense laser pulses, producing high-fluence quasi-monoenergetic ion beams. A general temporal profile of such laser pulses is formulated for arbitrary plasma density distribution. As an example, for a precompressed deuterium-tritium fusion target with an exponentially increasing density profile, its matched laser profile for steady hole-boring is given theoretically and verified numerically by particle-in-cell simulations. Furthermore, we propose to achieve fast ignition by the in-situ hole-boring accelerated ions using a tailored laser pulse. Simulations show that the effective energy fluence, conversion efficiency, energy spread, and collimation of the resulting ion beam can be significantly improved as compared to those found with un-tailored laser profiles. For the fusion fuel with an areal density of 1.5?g cm{sup –2}, simulation indicates that it is promising to realize fast ion ignition by using a tailored driver pulse with energy about 65?kJ.

  18. Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b , E.G. Jobbágy b Cabañas S/N, Hurlingham (1686), Buenos Aires, Argentina b Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina c Grupo de Estudios Ambientales e IMASL, Universidad Nacional de San

  19. A threshold for laser-driven linear particle acceleration in unbounded vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Liang Jie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We hypothesize that a charged particle in unbounded vacuum can be substantially accelerated by a force linear in the electric field of a propagating electromagnetic wave only if the accelerating field is capable of bringing ...

  20. accelerator driven radioactive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T. Sasa; K. Tsujimoto; H. Takano 3 Developments in laser-driven plasma accelerators CERN Preprints Summary: Laser-driven plasma accelerators provide acceleration gradients...

  1. Microbunching Instability Effect Studies and Laser Heater Optimization for the SPARX FEL Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SPARX FEL ACCELERATOR * C. Vaccarezza,and possibly enhance the FEL performance. delivered to theinstability effect for the SPARX FEL. Table 1: Electron beam

  2. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plateau, Guillaume

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After imaging the plasma to a primary focus shortly afterfocus was 1 mm above the nozzle. The laser pulse excited a plasma

  3. Proton and Ion Acceleration by BNL Terewatt Picosecond CO2 Laser: New Horizons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnikov, Peter

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The report covers pioneering research on proton and ion generation in gas jets by the world's first picosecond TW CO2 laser developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  4. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short, high- peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact X U V free electron laser (

  5. Low-Charge, Hard X-Ray Free Electron Laser Driven with an X-Band Injector and Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    After the successful operation of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), soft and hard x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are being built, designed, or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency rf cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic rf system is employed to linearize the beam's longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency rf acceleration process. In this paper, a hard x-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photocathode rf gun to linac end) is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic rf linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient, and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (rms), low-charge (10 pC) electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macroparticle 3D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, and incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low-charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters), which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  6. Development of high gradient laser wakefield accelerators towards nuclear detection applications at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron GR

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detection applications at LBNL Cameron G.R. Geddes 1 , DavidLeemans 1,4 LOASIS Program, LBNL, 1 Cyclotron Rd MS 71-259,accelerator experiments at LBNL demonstrated narrow energy

  7. Electron energy boosting in laser-wake-field acceleration with external magnetic field Bapprox1 T and laser prepulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosokai, Tomonao [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Zhidkov, Alexei [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Yamazaki, Atsushi [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Mizuta, Yoshio [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Uesaka, Mitsuru [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 22-2 Shirane-shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kodama, Ryosuke [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundred-mega-electron-volt electron beams with quasi-monoenergetic distribution, and a transverse geometrical emittance as small as approx0.02 pi mm mrad are generated by low power (7 TW, 45 fs) laser pulses tightly focused in helium gas jets in an external static magnetic field, Bapprox1 T. Generation of monoenergetic beams strongly correlates with appearance of a straight, at least 2 mm length plasma channel in a short time before the main laser pulse and with the energy of copropagating picosecond pedestal pulses (PPP). For a moderate energy PPP, the multiple or staged electron self-injection in the channel gives several narrow peaks in the electron energy distribution.

  8. Review of multi-dimensional large-scale kinetic simulation and physics validation of ion acceleration in relativistic laser-matter interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hui-Chun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hegelich, B.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fernandez, J.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shah, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Palaniyappan, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jung, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, B.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bowers, K. [Guest Scientist of XCP-6; Huang, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwan, T.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new experimental technologies enabled realization of Break-out afterburner (BOA) - High quality Trident laser and free-standing C nm-targets. VPIC is an powerful tool for fundamental research of relativistic laser-matter interaction. Predictions from VPIC are validated - Novel BOA and Solitary ion acceleration mechanisms. VPIC is a fully explicit Particle In Cell (PIC) code: models plasma as billions of macro-particles moving on a computational mesh. VPIC particle advance (which typically dominates computation) has been optimized extensively for many different supercomputers. Laser-driven ions lead to realization promising applications - Ion-based fast ignition; active interrogation, hadron therapy.

  9. Accelerator Design Study for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kur, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Experiment”, Free Electron Laser Conference, FEL06,from Shot-Noise, Free Electron Laser Conference FEL08for FERMI@elettra, Free Electron Laser Conference FEL07

  10. Accelerated alpha-decay of 232U isotope achieved by exposure of its aqueous solution with gold nanoparticles to laser radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Simakin; G. A. Shafeev

    2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are presented on laser-induced accelerated alpha-decay of Uranium-232 nuclei under laser exposure of Au nanoparticles in aqueous solutions of its salt. It is demonstrated that the decrease of alpha-activity strongly depends on the peak intensity of the laser radiation in the liquid and is highest at several terawatt per square centimeter. The decrease of alpha-activity of the exposed solutions is accompanied by the deviation of gamma-activities of daughter nuclides of Uranium-232 from their equilibrium values. Possible mechanisms of the laser influence on the alpha-activity are discussed on the basis of the amplification of the electric field of laser wave on metallic nanoparticles.

  11. Electron acceleration by a circularly polarized laser pulse in a plasma K. P. Singha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi-110016, India Received 12 January 2004; accepted 4 May fields, and the electrons gain much higher energies. The resonance is stronger at higher values and plasma density, and initial electron energy. At higher plasma density, the group velocity of the laser

  12. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    laser system to focus ultra-short (?30 fs) laser pulses ofdrive laser pulse, enabling pump- probe studies in ultra-used an ultra- intense ?10 19 W/cm 2 laser pulse focused on

  13. Recent Work on Short Pulse Laser-Plasma Accelerators* T. Katsoul~&), W. B. Mor-ic2),C. Decker(2), T. C. Chiou(l), J. S. Wtu-tele(3j, G. Shve&)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Recent Work on Short Pulse Laser-Plasma Accelerators* T. Katsoul~&), W. B. Mor-ic2),C. Decker(2), TSlKZCf Theory and simulation of short-pulse laser plasma accclcrators is presented. The plasma beat wave advancement of laser technology point to a promising future for short pulse lusor-plasma accclcr

  14. Signatures of the Unruh effect from electrons accelerated by ultra-strong laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralf Schützhold; Gernot Schaller; Dietrich Habs

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the radiation resulting from the Unruh effect for strongly accelerated electrons and show that the photons are created in pairs whose polarizations are maximally entangled. Apart from the photon statistics, this quantum radiation can further be discriminated from the classical (Larmor) radiation via the different spectral and angular distributions. The signatures of the Unruh effect become significant if the external electromagnetic field accelerating the electrons is not too far below the Schwinger limit and might be observable with future facilities. Finally, the corrections due to the birefringent nature of the QED vacuum at such ultra-high fields are discussed. PACS: 04.62.+v, 12.20.Fv, 41.60.-m, 42.25.Lc.

  15. The affect of erbium hydride on the conversion efficience to accelerated protons from ultra-shsort pulse laser irradiated foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offermann, D

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis work explores, experimentally, the potential gains in the conversion efficiency from ultra-intense laser light to proton beams using erbium hydride coatings. For years, it has been known that contaminants at the rear surface of an ultra-intense laser irradiated thin foil will be accelerated to multi-MeV. Inertial Confinement Fusion fast ignition using proton beams as the igniter source requires of about 10{sup 16} protons with an average energy of about 3MeV. This is far more than the 10{sup 12} protons available in the contaminant layer. Target designs must include some form of a hydrogen rich coating that can be made thick enough to support the beam requirements of fast ignition. Work with computer simulations of thin foils suggest the atomic mass of the non-hydrogen atoms in the surface layer has a strong affect on the conversion efficiency to protons. For example, the 167amu erbium atoms will take less energy away from the proton beam than a coating using carbon with a mass of 12amu. A pure hydrogen coating would be ideal, but technologically is not feasible at this time. In the experiments performed for my thesis, ErH{sub 3} coatings on 5 {micro}m gold foils are compared with typical contaminants which are approximately equivalent to CH{sub 1.7}. It will be shown that there was a factor of 1.25 {+-} 0.19 improvement in the conversion efficiency for protons above 3MeV using erbium hydride using the Callisto laser. Callisto is a 10J per pulse, 800nm wavelength laser with a pulse duration of 200fs and can be focused to a peak intensity of about 5 x 10{sup 19}W/cm{sup 2}. The total number of protons from either target type was on the order of 10{sup 10}. Furthermore, the same experiment was performed on the Titan laser, which has a 500fs pulse duration, 150J of energy and can be focused to about 3 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. In this experiment 10{sup 12} protons were seen from both erbium hydride and contaminants on 14 {micro} m gold foils. Significant improvements were also observed but possibly because of the depletion of hydrogen in the contaminant layer case.

  16. Ultra-fast quantum randomness generation by accelerated phase diffusion in a pulsed laser diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Abellan; W. Amaya; M. Jofre; M. Curty; A. Acin; J. Capmany; V. Pruneri; M. W. Mitchell

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a high bit-rate quantum random number generator by interferometric detection of phase diffusion in a gain-switched DFB laser diode. Gain switching at few-GHz frequencies produces a train of bright pulses with nearly equal amplitudes and random phases. An unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to interfere subsequent pulses and thereby generate strong random-amplitude pulses, which are detected and digitized to produce a high-rate random bit string. Using established models of semiconductor laser field dynamics, we predict a regime of high visibility interference and nearly complete vacuum-fluctuation-induced phase diffusion between pulses. These are confirmed by measurement of pulse power statistics at the output of the interferometer. Using a 5.825 GHz excitation rate and 14-bit digitization, we observe 43 Gbps quantum randomness generation.

  17. Ultra-low emittance beam generation using two-color ionization injection in a CO2 laser-driven plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C B; Bulanov, S S; Chen, M; Esarey, E; Geddes, C G R; Vay, J -L; Yu, L -L; Leemans, W P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-low emittance (tens of nm) beams can be generated in a plasma accelerator using ionization injection of electrons into a wakefield. An all-optical method of beam generation uses two laser pulses of different colors. A long-wavelength drive laser pulse (with a large ponderomotive force and small peak electric field) is used to excite a large wakefield without fully ionizing a gas, and a short-wavelength injection laser pulse (with a small ponderomotive force and large peak electric field), co-propagating and delayed with respect to the pump laser, to ionize a fraction of the remaining bound electrons at a trapped wake phase, generating an electron beam that is accelerated in the wake. The trapping condition, the ionized electron distribution, and the trapped bunch dynamics are discussed. Expressions for the beam transverse emittance, parallel and orthogonal to the ionization laser polarization, are presented. An example is shown using a 10-micron CO2 laser to drive the wake and a frequency-doubled Ti:Al2...

  18. Multistage ion acceleration in finite overdense target with a relativistic laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Ujjwal [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    “Multistage ion acceleration” has been analytically and computationally studied in the relativistic regime. For non-relativistic piston velocities, this phenomenon has been described before. But, as we go to relativistic piston velocities, the non-relativistic results hold no more. We have presented a fully relativistic calculation for second stage ion velocities and energies. To verify our calculations, we performed a fully relativistic 1D3V particle in cell simulations using the code LPIC++. It has been found that the relativistic calculations matched very well with the simulation results. Also, it has been seen that at relativistic piston velocities, the non-relativistic results differed by a significant margin. The feasibility of this process has been further established by three dimensional particle in cell simulations.

  19. Dominant deuteron acceleration with a high-intensity laser for isotope production and neutron generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maksimchuk, A.; Raymond, A.; Yu, F.; Dollar, F.; Willingale, L.; Zulick, C.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on the interaction of an ultra-short pulse laser with heavy-water, ice-covered copper targets, at an intensity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, were performed demonstrating the generation of a 'pure' deuteron beam with a divergence of 20 Degree-Sign , maximum energy of 8 MeV, and a total of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} deuterons with energy above 1 MeV-equivalent to a conversion efficiency of 1.5%{+-} 0.2%. Subsequent experiments on irradiation of a {sup 10}B sample with deuterons and neutron generation from d-d reactions in a pitcher-catcher geometry, resulted in the production of {approx}10{sup 6} atoms of the positron emitter {sup 11}C and a neutron flux of (4{+-}1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} neutrons/sterad, respectively.

  20. A new method of measuring the poloidal magnetic and radial electric fields in a tokamak using a laser-accelerated ion-beam trace probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X. Y.; Chen, Y. H.; Lin, C.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Labaratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the poloidal magnetic field (B{sub p}) and radial electric field (E{sub r}) are significant in magnetic confinement devices. In this paper, a new method was proposed to diagnose both B{sub p} and E{sub r} at the same time, which was named Laser-accelerated Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP). This method based on the laser-accelerated ion beam, which has three properties: large energy spread, short pulse lengths, and multiple charge states. LITP can provide the 1D profiles, or 2D images of both B{sub p} and E{sub r}. In this paper, we present the basic principle and some preliminary theoretical results.

  1. Berkeley Lab Compact Accelerator Sets World Record

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab Particle Accelerator Sets World Record Berkeley Lab Particle Accelerator Sets World Record Simulations at NERSC Help Validate Experimental Laser-Plasma Design December...

  2. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  3. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  4. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

  5. Design of a superconducting linear accelerator for an Infrared Free Electron Laser of the proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory at LBL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Byrns, R.; Donahue, R.; Edighoffer, J.; Gough, R.; Hoyer, E.; Kim, K.J.; Leemans, W.; Staples, J.; Taylor, B.; Xie, M.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerator complex has recently been designed at LBL as part of an Infrared Free Electron Laser facility in support of a proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. We will outline the choice of parameters and design philosophy, which are strongly driven by the demand of reliable and spectrally stable operation of the FEL for very special scientific experiments. The design is based on a 500 MHz recirculating superconducting electron linac with highest energy reach of about 60 MeV. The accelerator is injected with beams prepared by a specially designed gun-buncher system and incorporates a near-isochronous and achromatic recirculation line tunable over a wide range of beam energies. The stability issues considered to arrive at the specific design will be outlined.

  6. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  7. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, Robert B. (Shoreham, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  8. Nuclear Physics: Archived Talks - Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns Meetings Recent Talks Archived Talks Accelerator Hall A Hall B Hall C 12 GeV Upgrade Experimental Techniques...

  9. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-Wiggler Free-Electron-Laser Oscillat.ion. Phys. :_.The Los Alamos Free Electron Laser: Accelerator Perfoemance.First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser. Phys . __ Rev~.

  10. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    England, Joel

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  11. BNL | Accelerator Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and new approaches to particle acceleration and x-ray generation. A next-generation ultra-fast CO2 laser based on chirped pulse amplification in isotopic gas mixtures is...

  12. Accelerator Design Study for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kur, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Phase Diagnostics, SLAC Report LCLS-TN-00-12. Emma P.al. 2009, First Results of the LCLS Laser-Heater System, PACLinac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conceptual Design Report,

  13. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 2 shows the expected FEL performance employing a 31-nmDESIGN OF AN XUV FEL DRIVEN BY THE LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATORa design for a compact FEL source of ultra- fast, high-

  14. Phase Stable Net Acceleration of Electrons From a Two-Stage Optical Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Christopher M.S.; /SLAC /Munich, Max Planck Inst. Quantenopt.; Colby, Eric; England, R.J.; Ischebeck, Rasmus; McGuinness, Christopher; Nelson, Janice; Noble, Robert; Siemann, Robert H.; Spencer, James; Walz, Dieter; /SLAC; Plettner, Tomas; Byer, Robert L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we demonstrate the net acceleration of relativistic electrons using a direct, in-vacuum interaction with a laser. In the experiment, an electron beam from a conventional accelerator is first energy modulated at optical frequencies in an inverse-free-electron-laser and bunched in a chicane. This is followed by a second stage optical accelerator to obtain net acceleration. The optical phase between accelerator stages is monitored and controlled in order to scan the accelerating phase and observe net acceleration and deceleration. Phase jitter measurements indicate control of the phase to {approx}13{sup o} allowing for stable net acceleration of electrons with lasers.

  15. Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of the Solid-State Laser System for the Accelerator Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User's Meeting April 3, 2009 Outline Motivation for...

  16. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM); Young, Lloyd M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  17. Beam-Dynamics Studies and Advanced Accelerator Research at CTF-3 Compact Final Focus, Laser Compton Scattering, Plasmas, etc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R W; Burkhardt, H; Corsini, R; Faus-Golfe, A; Gronberg, J; Redaelli, S; Schulte, Daniel; Velasco, M; Zimmermann, Frank

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary investigations are summarized on the possible use of the CTF3 facility for extended beam-dynamics studies and advanced accelerator R&D, which would exploit its unique properties and beam availability. The key element of these considerations is the possible addition of a test beam-delivery system comprising a compact final focus and advanced collimation concepts, scaled from 3 TeV down to low energy and having a short total length. Operational experience, verification of critical questions (octupole tail folding, beam halo transport, etc.), diagnostics (e.g., rf BPMs) and stabilization could all be explored in such a facility, which would benefit not only the CLIC study, but all linear collider projects. Another interesting application would be the study of plasma-beam interaction, which may include plasma focusing, plasma acceleration, ion-channel radiation, and plasma wigglers.

  18. Project: BELLA Bldg. #: 71

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TO CONSTRUCTION AS OF 10/4/2011 Current/Approved Projects Project: Solar Energy Research Center Bldg. #:TBD. #: TBD Affected Area: R1 Road & V Road (58) Dates: 8/2011 - 9/2013 6 Small Projects: A. B50 Electrical/1/2014 N3 (58) 42 11/1/2011 2/1/2014 M-1 (35) 12 10/1/2010 11/1/2011 B81 (21) 18 10/1/2010 11/1/2011 V Road

  19. Electrons in a relativistic-intensity laser field: generation of zeptosecond electromagnetic pulses and energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, A A; Galkin, A L; Kalashnikov, M P; Korobkin, V V; Romanovsky, Mikhail Yu; Shiryaev, O B [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the motion of an electron and emission of electromagnetic waves by an electron in the field of a relativistically intense laser pulse. The dynamics of the electron is described by the Newton equation with the Lorentz force in the right-hand side. It is shown that the electrons may be ejected from the interaction region with high energy. The energy spectrum of these electrons and the technique of using the spectrum to assess the maximal intensity in the focus are analysed. It is found that electromagnetic radiation of an electron moving in an intense laser field occurs within a small angle around the direction of the electron trajectory tangent. The tangent quickly changes its direction in space; therefore, electromagnetic radiation of the electron in the far-field zone in a certain direction in the vicinity of the tangent is a short pulse with a duration as short as zeptoseconds. The calculation of the temporary and spectral distribution of the radiation field is carried out. (superintense laser fields)

  20. Introducing the Fission-Fusion Reaction Process: Using a Laser-Accelerated Th Beam to produce Neutron-Rich Nuclei towards the N=126 Waiting Point of the r Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Habs; P. G. Thirolf; M. Gross; K. Allinger; J. Bin; A. Henig; D. Kiefer; W. Ma; J. Schreiber

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to produce neutron-rich nuclei in the range of the astrophysical r-process around the waiting point N=126 by fissioning a dense laser-accelerated thorium ion bunch in a thorium target (covered by a CH2 layer), where the light fission fragments of the beam fuse with the light fission fragments of the target. Via the 'hole-boring' mode of laser Radiation Pressure Acceleration using a high-intensity, short pulse laser, very efficiently bunches of 232Th with solid-state density can be generated from a Th layer, placed beneath a deuterated polyethylene foil, both forming the production target. Th ions laser-accelerated to about 7 MeV/u will pass through a thin CH2 layer placed in front of a thicker second Th foil closely behind the production target and disintegrate into light and heavy fission fragments. In addition, light ions (d,C) from the CD2 production target will be accelerated as well to about 7 MeV/u, inducing the fission process of 232Th also in the second Th layer. The laser-accelerated ion bunches with solid-state density, which are about 10^14 times more dense than classically accelerated ion bunches, allow for a high probability that generated fission products can fuse again. In contrast to classical radioactive beam facilities, where intense but low-density radioactive beams are merged with stable targets, the novel fission-fusion process draws on the fusion between neutron-rich, short-lived, light fission fragments both from beam and target. The high ion beam density may lead to a strong collective modification of the stopping power in the target, leading to significant range enhancement. Using a high-intensity laser as envisaged for the ELI-Nuclear Physics project in Bucharest (ELI-NP), estimates promise a fusion yield of about 10^3 ions per laser pulse in the mass range of A=180-190, thus enabling to approach the r-process waiting point at N=126.

  1. BNL | Nd:YAG Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nd:YAG Laser The Nd:YAG laser is located in a class 1000 clean room (the YAG Room) near the electron gun end of the ATF accelerator. The clean area also includes a separate laser...

  2. Accelerator on a Chip: How It Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice.

  3. D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George H.

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast Ignition (FI) uses Petawatt laser generated particle beam pulse to ignite a small volume called a pre-compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target, and is the favored method to achieve the high energy gain per target burn needed for an attractive ICF power plant. Ion beams such as protons, deuterons or heavier carbon ions are especially appealing for FI as they have relative straight trajectory, and easier to focus on the fuel capsule. But current experiments have encountered problems with the 'converter-foil' which is irradiated by the Petawatt laser to produce the ion beams. The problems include depletion of the available ions in the convertor foils, and poor energy efficiency (ion beam energy/ input laser energy). We proposed to develop a volumetrically-loaded ultra-high-density deuteron deuterium cluster material as the basis for converter-foil for deuteron beam generation. The deuterons will fuse with the ICF DT while they slow down, providing an extra 'bonus' energy gain in addition to heating the hot spot. Also, due to the volumetric loading, the foil will provide sufficient energetic deuteron beam flux for 'hot spot' ignition, while avoiding the depletion problem encountered by current proton-driven FI foils. After extensive comparative studies, in Phase I, high purity PdO/Pd/PdO foils were selected for the high packing fraction D-Cluster converter foils. An optimized loading process has been developed to increase the cluster packing fraction in this type of foil. As a result, the packing fraction has been increased from 0.1% to 10% - meeting the original Phase I goal and representing a significant progress towards the beam intensities needed for both FI and pulsed neutron applications. Fast Ignition provides a promising approach to achieve high energy gain target performance needed for commercial Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This is now a realistic goal for near term in view of the anticipated ICF target burn at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in CA within a year. This will usher in the technology development Phase of ICF after years of research aimed at achieving breakeven experiment. Methods to achieve the high energy gain needed for a competitive power plant will then be a key developmental issue, and our D-cluster target for Fast Ignition (FI) is expected to meet that need.

  4. Accelerator Research Department B Dept. of Applied Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    1 Accelerator Research Department B Dept. of Applied Physics E163: Laser Acceleration at the NLCTA March 11, 2002 * Spokesman. #12;2 Accelerator Research Department B Dept. of Applied PhysicsTechnical Roadmap LEAPLEAP 1. Demonstrate the physics of laser acceleration in dielectric structures 2. Develop

  5. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  6. Design of a Superconducting Linear Accelerator for an Infrared Free Electron Laser of the Proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory at LBL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    see "An Infrared Free-Electron Laser for CDRL," LBL Pub-FOR AN INFRARED FREE ELECTRON LASER OF 1HE PROPOSED CHEMICALFOR AN INFRARED FREE ELECTRON LASER OF THE PROPOSED CHEMICAL

  7. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; Defense Free-Electron Lasers; AXY Programs; A Next Generation High-Power Neutron-Scattering Facility; JAERI OMEGA Project and Intense Neutron Sources for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Supercollider; The High-Power Microwave (HPM) Program; Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Power Systems Highlights; Industrial Partnering; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Theory and Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  8. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malamud, Ernest

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a PhD in accelerator physics was by E.O. Lawrence.of Beams) organizes accelerator physics sessions at APSstudents specializing in accelerator physics are not being “

  9. Exact and variational solutions of 3D Eigenmodes in high gain Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motz, Undulators and Free-Electron Lasers, (Clarendon Press,in High . Gain Free Electron Lasers MingXie Accelerator andin High Gain Free Electron Lasers Ming Xie Accelerator and

  10. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Mark

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

  11. Design of a Superconducting Linear Accelerator for an Infrared Free Electron Laser of the Proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory at LBL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    500 MHz buncher is a 4-cell SCRF cavity in which the beam issection consists of two SCRF accelerating modules in whichoperating temperature for the SCRF cavities. A standard, 600

  12. Free-Electron Laser Generation of VUV and X-Ray Radiation using a Conditioned Beam and Ion-Channel Focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, L.-H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a) Accelerator Conditioner Free-Electron Laser L ---~>~ . Free Electron Laser Conference, Santain the Proceedings Free-Electron Laser Generation of VUV and

  13. Bella Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes Jump to:formely Sun Electric Systems

  14. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: A Next-Generation Spallation-Neutron Source; Accelerator Performance Demonstration Facility; APEX Free-Electron Laser Project; The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) Program; Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Linac Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operation.

  15. Scattering parameters of the 3.9 GHz accelerating module in a free-electron laser linac: A rigorous comparison between simulations and measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flisgen, T; Zhang, P; Shinton, I R R; Baboi, N; Jones, R M; van Rienen, U

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a comparison between measured and simulated scattering parameters in a wide frequency interval for the third harmonic accelerating module ACC39 in the linear accelerator FLASH, located at DESY in Hamburg/Germany. ACC39 is a cryomodule housing four superconducting 3.9? GHz accelerating cavities. Due to the special shape of the cavities (in particular its end cells and the beam pipes) in ACC39, the electromagnetic field in the module is, in many frequency ranges, coupled from one cavity to the next. Therefore, the scattering parameters are determined by the entire string and not solely by the individual cavities. This makes the determination of the scattering properties demanding. As far as the authors can determine, this paper shows for the first time a direct comparison between state-of-the-art simulations and measurements of rf properties of long, complex, and asymmetric structures over a wide frequency band. Taking into account the complexity of the system and various geometrical unk...

  16. New Laser's "First Light" Shatters Record | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have delivered first light from their Free Electron Laser (FEL). Only 2 years after ground was broken for the FEL, infrared light of more...

  17. Accelerate Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerate Energy Productivity 2030 Over the next year, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Council on Competitiveness and the Alliance to Save Energy will join forces to undertake...

  18. Nonponderomotive electron acceleration in ultrashort surface-plasmon fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racz, Peter; Dombi, Peter [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Konkoly-Thege M. ut 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nonponderomotive nature of ultrafast plasmonic electron acceleration in strongly decaying electromagnetic fields generated by few-cycle and single-cycle femtosecond laser pulses. We clearly identify the conditions contributing to nonponderomotive acceleration and establish fundamental scaling laws and carrier-envelope phase effects. These all-optically accelerated compact, femtosecond electron sources can be utilized in contemporary ultrafast methods.

  19. Circular free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM); Cooper, Richard K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  20. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  1. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  2. Acceleration Fund

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In theACME - AcceleratedAccelerating

  3. Plasma accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  4. A HIGH REPETITION PLASMA MIRROR FOR STAGED ELECTRON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Osterhoff, Jens; Evans, Eugene; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to build a compact, staged laser plasma accelerator the in-coupling of the laser beam to the different stages represents one of the key issues. To limit the spatial foot print and thus to realize a high overall acceleration gradient, a concept has to be found which realizes this in-coupling within a few centimeters. We present experiments on a tape-drive based plasma mirror which could be used to reflect the focused laser beam into the acceleration stage.

  5. MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERG,S.J.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major motivations driving recent interest in FFAGs is their use for the cost-effective acceleration of muons. This paper summarizes the progress in this area that was achieved leading up to and at the FFAG workshop at KEK from July 7-12, 2003. Much of the relevant background and references are also given here, to give a context to the progress we have made.

  6. Laser wakefield simulation using a speed-of-light frame envelope model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser wake?eld simulation using a speed-of-light frameAbstract. Simulation of laser wake?eld accelerator (LWFA)extend hundreds of laser wave- lengths transversely and many

  7. Phase stability of a standing-wave free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser", proceeding of theCoupled-Cavity Free- Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser W. M. Sharp Lawrence

  8. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Dunxiong (Newport News, VA); Krafft, Geoffrey Arthur (Newport News, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control.

  9. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Krafft, G.A.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser is disclosed. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control. 1 fig.

  10. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 6 figs.

  11. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  12. Peculiar acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Amendola; Claudia Quercellini; Amedeo Balbi

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed recently to observe the change in cosmological redshift of distant galaxies or quasars with the next generation of large telescope and ultra-stable spectrographs (the so-called Sandage-Loeb test). Here we investigate the possibility of observing the change in peculiar velocity in nearby clusters and galaxies. This ``peculiar acceleration'' could help reconstructing the gravitational potential without assuming virialization. We show that the expected effect is of the same order of magnitude of the cosmological velocity shift. Finally, we discuss how to convert the theoretical predictions into quantities directly related to observations.

  13. ACCELERATE ENERGY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy ThisThistheSummaryACCELERATE ENERGY

  14. Linear Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinear Accelerator

  15. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  16. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  17. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  18. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprangle, Phillip [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Hafizi, Bahman [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  19. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond pulses with high repetition rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, Anne

    Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond average power Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Free Electron Laser. The combination of the free electron laser leads to very different plasma emission and produces films with high quality

  1. Surface plasmon assisted electron acceleration in photoemission from gold nanopillars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    Surface plasmon assisted electron acceleration in photoemission from gold nanopillars Phillip M emission Plasmon field enhancement Electron acceleration Few-cycle pulses a b s t r a c t Electron 25 and 39 times greater than the experimentally used laser fields. Implications for plasmon

  2. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.; Bottke, I.; Fernow, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package.

  3. for sequence accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Vladimir

    Wynn's -algorithm for sequence accelerators using high precision arithmetic Rachel Baumann University of Arizona Wynn's -algorithm for sequence accelerators using high precision arithmetic Rachel Baumann University of Arizona April 17, 2012 #12;Wynn's -algorithm for sequence accelerators using high

  4. Multiorbit induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvontsov, A.A.; Kas'yanov, V.A.; Chakhlov, V.L.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large numbers of particles accelerated per cycle are made possible by accelerating simultaneously in several equilibrium orbits in a single betatron structure. (AIP)

  5. ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Effective: 04012004 Page 1 of 2 Subject: Accelerator Test Facility - Linear Accelerator General Systems Guide Prepared by: Michael Zarcone...

  6. Desired Improvements in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for single- interface SWABSiC Si Prism + SiC Film Fabrication *Step 1: cutting Si discs (D5cm, t5mm) into 22x12x5 mm "bricks" *Step 2: growth of 1.7 m SiC in Lyon, France...

  7. New Lasers Pave Way for Tabletop Accelerators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNephelineNeuralNewIdeas Spring from|New

  8. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  9. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Accelerator Physics Faculty Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Accelerator Physics Faculty Search The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory invites applications for a faculty appointment in Accelerator Physics (LCLS), LCLS-II, SPEAR-3, NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA), Cathode Test Facility (CTF), the proposed

  10. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Accelerator Cavities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Reece, Charlie

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Charlie Reece, an accelerator technology scientist, explains how superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities work.

  11. Production, Characterization, and Acceleration of Optical Microbunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Christopher M.S.; /Stanford U. /SLAC

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical microbunches with a spacing of 800 nm have been produced for laser acceleration research. The microbunches are produced using a inverse Free-Electron-Laser (IFEL) followed by a dispersive chicane. The microbunched electron beam is characterized by coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) with good agreement to the analytic theory for bunch formation. In a second experiment the bunches are accelerated in a second stage to achieve for the first time direct net acceleration of electrons traveling in a vacuum with visible light. This dissertation presents the theory of microbunch formation and characterization of the microbunches. It also presents the design of the experimental hardware from magnetostatic and particle tracking simulations, to fabrication and measurement of the undulator and chicane magnets. Finally, the dissertation discusses three experiments aimed at demonstrating the IFEL interaction, microbunch production, and the net acceleration of the microbunched beam. At the close of the dissertation, a separate but related research effort on the tight focusing of electrons for coupling into optical scale, Photonic Bandgap, structures is presented. This includes the design and fabrication of a strong focusing permanent magnet quadrupole triplet and an outline of an initial experiment using the triplet to observe wakefields generated by an electron beam passing through an optical scale accelerator.

  12. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We will continue our development of advanced simulation tools by modifying the QuickPIC algorithm to allow for the simulation of plasma particle pick-up by the wake fields. We have also performed extensive simulations of plasma slow wave structures for efficient THz generation by guided laser beams or accelerated electron beams. We will pursue experimental studies of direct laser acceleration, and THz generation by two methods, ponderomotive-induced THz polarization, and THz radiation by laser accelerated electron beams. We also plan to study both conventional and corrugated plasma channels using our new 30 TW in our new lab facilities. We will investigate production of very long hydrogen plasma waveguides (5 cm). We will study guiding at increasing power levels through the onset of laser-induced cavitation (bubble regime) to assess the role played by the preformed channel. Experiments in direct acceleration will be performed, using laser plasma wakefields as the electron injector. Finally, we will use 2-colour ionization of gases as a high frequency THz source (<60 THz) in order for femtosecond measurements of low plasma densities in waveguides and beams.

  13. The grating as an accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernow, R.C.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report considers the use of a diffraction grating as an accelerating structure for charged particle beams. We examine the functional dependence of the electromagnetic fields above the surface of a grating. Calculations are made of the strength of the accelerating modes for structures with {pi} and 2{pi} phase advance per period and for incident waves polarized with either the E or H vector along the grooves of the grating. We consider examples of using gratings in a laser linac and in a grating lens. We also briefly examine previous results published about this subject. 36 refs.

  14. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  15. Hollow screw like drill in plasma using an intense Laguerre Gaussian laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Lingang; Shi, Yin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development of ultra intense laser technology, MeV ions from the laser foil interaction have been obtained by different mechanisms, such as target normal sheath acceleration, radiation pressure acceleration, collisionless shock acceleration, breakout afterburner, and a combination of different mechanisms. These energetic ion beams can be applied in fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion, medical therapy, and proton imaging. However, these ions are mainly accelerated in the laser propagation direction, and the ion acceleration in an azimuthal orientation is scarcely mentioned. Here, a doughnut Laguerre Gaussian LG laser is used for the first time to study the laser plasma interaction in the relativistic intensity regime in three dimensional particle in cell simulations. Studies have shown that a novel rotation of the plasma is produced from the hollow screw like drill of a LG mode laser. The angular momentum of the protons in the longitudinal direction produced by the LG laser is remarkably enh...

  16. Free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  17. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  18. Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics A.M. Sessler OctoberSOME FRONTIERS OF ACCELERATOR PHYSICS* Andrew M. Sessleris Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics and it is most

  19. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  20. Fundamental physics on natures of the macroscopic vacuum under high intense electromagnetic fields with accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kensuke Homma

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    High intense electromagnetic fields can be unique probes to study natures of macroscopic vacua by themselves. Combining accelerators with the intense field can provide more fruitful probes which can neither be achieved by only intense fields nor only high energy accelerators. We will overview the natures of vacua which can be accessible via intense laser-laser and intense laser-electron interactions. In the case of the laser-laser interaction, we propose how to observe nonlinear QED effects and effects of new fields like light scalar and pseudo scalar fields which may contribute to a macroscopic nature of our universe such as dark energy. In the case of the laser-electron interaction, in addition to nonlinear QED effects, we can further discuss the nature of accelerating field in the vacuum where we can access physics related with event horizons such as Hawking-Unruh radiations. We will introduce a recent experimental trial to search for this kind of odd radiations.

  1. A proposed high-power UV industrial demonstration laser at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, S.V.; Bisognano, J.J.; Bohn, C.L. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Processing Consortium, a collaboration of industries, universities, and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia, has proposed building a demonstration industrial processing laser for surface treatment and micro-machining. The laser is a free-electron laser (FEL) with average power output exceeding 1 kW in the ultraviolet (UV). The design calls for a novel driver accelerator that recovers most of the energy of the exhaust electron beam to produce laser light with good wall-plug efficiency. The laser and accelerator design use technologies that are scalable to much higher power. The authors describe the critical design issues in the laser such as the stability, power handling, and losses of the optical resonator, and the quality, power, and reliability of the electron beam. They also describe the calculated laser performance. Finally progress to date on accelerator development and resonator modeling will be reported.

  2. Entanglement of Accelerating Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. L. Ku; M. -C. Chu

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how the entanglement of a maximally entangled pair of particles is affected when one or both of the pair are uniformly accelerated, while the detector remains in an inertial frame. We find that the entanglement is unchanged if all degrees of freedom are considered. However, particle pairs are produced, and the entanglements of different bipartite systems may change with the acceleration. In particular, the entanglement between accelerating fermions is transferred preferentially to the produced antiparticles when the acceleration is large, and the entanglement transfer is complete when the acceleration approaches infinity. However, for scalar particles, no entanglement transfer to the antiparticles is observed.

  3. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided bymore »a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.« less

  4. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanesue, Takeshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  5. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanesue, Takeshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  6. 46696 Achievement Award BELLA - 5 x 6

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2UraniumEnergyDepartment ofEnergyDryers;31,000Daya Bay Reactor

  7. Feasibility study of channeling acceleration experiment at the Fermilab ASTA facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Young-Min; Still, Dean A; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystal channeling technology has offered various opportunities in accelerator community with a viability of ultrahigh gradient (TV/m) acceleration for future HEP collider in Energy Frontier. The major challenge of the channeling acceleration is that ultimate acceleration gradients might require high power driver at hard x-ray regime (~ 40 keV), exceeding those conceivable for x-rays as of today, though x-ray lasers can efficiently excite solid plasma and accelerate particles inside a crystal channel. Moreover, only disposable crystal accelerators are possible at such high externally excited fields which would exceed the ionization thresholds destroying the atomic structure, so acceleration will take place only in a short time before full dissociation of the lattice. Carbon- based nanostructures have great potential with a wide range of flexibility and superior physical strength, which can be applied to channeling acceleration. This paper present beam-driven channeling acceleration concept with CNTs and discu...

  8. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C.B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a self- modulated intense short laser pulse”. Phys. Rev.High Intensity Short Pulse Laser Plasma Experiments”. [39]Instabilities of Short-Pulse Laser Propagation through

  9. Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Plasma-Based Accelerators in Two and Three Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemker, Roy G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, a fully object-oriented, fully relativistic, multi-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code was developed and applied to answer key questions in plasma-based accelerator research. The simulations increase the understanding of the processes in laser plasma and beam-plasma interaction, allow for comparison with experiments, and motivate the development of theoretical models. The simulations support the idea that the injection of electrons in a plasma wave by using a transversely propagating laser pulse is possible. The beam parameters of the injected electrons found in the simulations compare reasonably with beams produced by conventional methods and therefore laser injection is an interesting concept for future plasma-based accelerators. Simulations of the optical guiding of a laser wakefield driver in a parabolic plasma channel support the idea that electrons can be accelerated over distances much longer than the Rayleigh length in a channel. Simulations of plasma wakefield acceleration in the ...

  10. accelerator-based facility design: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    future use in the MITR-II. The information obtained includes reactivity effects, core flux ... Meagher, Paul Christopher 1976-01-01 26 LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C....

  11. Leaky Fermi accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Kushal; Rom-Kedar, Vered; Turaev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Fermi accelerator is a billiard with oscillating walls. A leaky accelerator interacts with an environment of an ideal gas at equilibrium by exchange of particles through a small hole on its boundary. Such interaction may heat the gas: we estimate the net energy flow through the hole under the assumption that the particles inside the billiard do not collide with each other and remain in the accelerator for sufficiently long time. The heat production is found to depend strongly on the type of the Fermi accelerator. An ergodic accelerator, i.e. one which has a single ergodic component, produces a weaker energy flow than a multi-component accelerator. Specifically, in the ergodic case the energy gain is independent of the hole size, whereas in the multi-component case the energy flow may be significantly increased by shrinking the hole size.

  12. THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S E

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  13. Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on high energy ion generation Levi Schachter Active Media Accelerators Benjamin Bowes Ultrafast 2-D radiative transport in a micron-scale aluminum plasma excited at...

  14. Accelerator Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Facility Vitaly Yakimenko October 6-7, 2010 ATF User meeting DOE HE, S. Vigdor, ALD - (Contact) T. Ludlam Chair, Physics Department V. Yakimenko Director ATF, Accelerator...

  15. Accelerator Concepts Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colliders to Synchrotron Radiation Sources. The wide scope of the workshop includes new methods of particle acceleration to high energies, techniques for production of...

  16. Accelerator R&D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting RF Module with a PBG Coupler Cell, 2013 North American Particle Accelerator Conference, Pasadena, CA, September 29 - October 4th, 2013. Evgenya I. Simakov,...

  17. Market Acceleration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fact sheet summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market acceleration subprogram.

  18. Design of an electromagnetic accelerator for turbulent hydrodynamic mix studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Morrison, J.J.; Dimonte, G.; Remington, B.A.

    1993-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic accelerator in the form of a linear electric motor (LEM) has been designed to achieve controlled acceleration profiles of a carriage containing hydrodynamically unstable fluids for the investigation of the development of turbulent mix. The Rayleigh- Taylor instability is investigated by accelerating two dissimilar density fluids using the LEM to achieve a wide variety of acceleration and deceleration profiles. The acceleration profiles are achieved by independent control of rail and augmentation currents. A variety of acceleration-time profiles are possible including: (1) constant, (2) impulsive and (3) shaped. The LEM and support structure are a robust design in order to withstand high loads with deflections and to mitigate operational vibration. Vibration of the carriage during acceleration could create artifacts in the data which would interfere with the intended study of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The design allows clear access for diagnostic techniques such as laser induced fluorescence radiography, shadowgraphs and particle imaging velocimetry. Electromagnetic modeling codes were used to optimize the rail and augmentation coil positions within the support structure framework. Results of contemporary studies for non-arcing sliding contact of solid armatures are used for the design of the driving armature and the dynamic electromagnetic braking system. A 0. 6MJ electrolytic capacitor bank is used for energy storage to drive the LEM. This report will discuss a LEM design which will accelerate masses of up to 3kg to a maximum of about 3000g{sub o}, where g{sub o} is accelerated due to gravity.

  19. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Shan Zhang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Hong Xueren [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Hongyu [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Shanghai Bright-Tech Information Technology Co. Ltd, Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  20. Community petascale project for accelerator science and simulation: Advancing computational science for future accelerators and accelerator technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    program for computational accelerator physics development isof computational accelerator physics applications, withof computational accelerator physics. Under ComPASS, the

  1. Neutrino physics at accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Fernandez

    2006-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Present and future neutrino experiments at accelerators are mainly concerned with understanding the neutrino oscillation phenomenon and its implications. Here a brief account of neutrino oscillations is given together with a description of the supporting data. Some current and planned accelerator neutrino experiments are also explained.

  2. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polosky, Marc A. (Albuquerque, NM); Plummer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  3. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  4. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  5. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish accelerator-specific safety requirements which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, will serve to prevent injuries and illnesses associated with Department of Energy (DOE) or National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) accelerator operations. Cancels DOE O 420.2A. Certified 5-13-08. Canceled by DOE O 420.2C.

  6. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  7. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The order defines accelerators and establishes accelerator specific safety requirements and approval authorities which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, promote safe operations to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Cancels DOE O 420.2B.

  8. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish accelerator-specific safety requirements which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, will serve to prevent injuries and illnesses associated with Department of Energy (DOE) or National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) accelerator operations. Cancels DOE O 420.2. Canceled by DOE O 420.2B.

  9. Multimode Analysis of the Hollow Plasma Channel Wakefield Accelerator C. B. Schroeder,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    by resonant excitation [1]. In conventional accelerators, the size of these accel- erating fields is limited particle beam. For the laser wakefield accelerator one of the most se- vere limitations is the weakening- neous plasma. These properties make it well suited as a structure for both particle beam wakefield

  10. GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to synchrotron radiation facilities and free-electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50 MV m-1 ), requiring tens to hundreds of metres to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources

  11. GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    V) electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free-electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-based accelerators are limited to relatively low needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometres to generate particle energies of interest to high

  12. Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator Carl B. Schroeder1 structure is the transverse instability of the particle beam. INTRODUCTION Plasma-based accelerators have. The electromagnetic wake field response of a hollow plasma channel to a driver (laser or charged particle beam

  13. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Offermann, Dustin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cobble, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gautier, Donald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kline, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Workman, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Fred [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hurry, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Randall [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reid, Sha-Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shimada, Tsutomu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [UNIV OF NEVADA; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [UNIV OF NEVADA; Bussman, Michael [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Kluge, Thomas [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Cowan, Thomas E [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Rassuchine, Jenny M [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Lowenstern, Mario E [UNIV OF MICHIGAN; Mucino, J Eduardo [UNIV OF MICHIGAN; Gall, Brady [UNIV OF MISSOURI; Korgan, Grant [NANOLABZ, RENO; Malekos, Steven [NANOLABZ, RENO; Adams, Jesse [NANOLABZ, RENO; Bartal, Teresa [UCSD; Chawla, Surgreev [UCSD; Higginson, Drew [UCSD; Beg, Farhat [UCSD; Nilson, Phil [LLE, ROCHESTER; MacPhee, Andrew [LLNL; Le Pape, Sebastien [LLNL; Hey, Daniel [LLNL; MacKinnon, Andy [LLNL; Geissel, Mattias [SNL; Schollmeier, Marius [SNL; Stephens, Rich [GENERAL ATOMICS, SAN DIEGO

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  14. accelerator optimization injector: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerator optimization injector First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Study of Laser...

  15. Accelerated Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Morgan H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we establish a formalism for the computation of observables due to acceleration-induced particle physics processes. General expressions for the transition rate, multiplicity, power, spectra, and displacement law of particles undergoing time-dependent acceleration and transitioning into a final state of arbitrary particle number are obtained. The transition rate, power, and spectra are characterised by unique polynomials of multiplicity and thermal distributions of both bosonic and fermionic statistics. The acceleration dependent multiplicity is computed in terms of the branching fractions of the associated inertial processes. The displacement law of the spectra predicts the energy of the emitted particles are directly proportional to the accelerated temperature. These results extend our understanding of particle physics into the high acceleration sector.

  16. Page 1Laser Safety Training Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Laser Institute of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Page 1Laser Safety Training © Laser Institute of America 1 Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety: Hazards, Bioeffects, and Control Measures Laser Institute of America Gus Anibarro Education Manager 2Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Overview Laser Safety Accidents

  17. Proposed dielectric-based microstructure laser-driven undulator T. Plettner and R. L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    by the possibility of future dielectric-based laser-driven particle accelerators that are expected to produce GeV=m accel- eration gradients accompanied by a low-emittance, low- energy spread, and high-repetition rate electron sources [8,9] as well as for dielectric-structure laser-driven particle accelerators are underway

  18. Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

  19. October 1, 2003 / Vol. 28, No. 19 / OPTICS LETTERS 1823 Tuning of laser pulse shapes in grating-based compressors for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    October 1, 2003 / Vol. 28, No. 19 / OPTICS LETTERS 1823 Tuning of laser pulse shapes in grating, C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, and W. P. Leemans Lasers Optics and Accelerator Systems Integrated to optimize a laser-plasma electron accelerator. © 2003 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 320.5520, 320

  20. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); Esarey, Eric (Chevy Chase, MD); Kim, Joon K. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention.

  1. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, D.; Esarey, E.; Kim, J.K.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention. 21 figs.

  2. Laser microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  3. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  4. Jar mechanism accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, E.A.; Webb, D.D.

    1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an accelerator for use with a jar mechanism in a well pipe string to enhance the jarring impact delivered to a stuck object wherein the jar mechanism includes inner and outer members for connection, respectively, between the well pipe string the stuck object. The jar mechanism members are constructed to (1) restrict relative longitudinal movement therebetween to build up energy in the well pipe string and accelerator and then (2) to release the jar mechanism members for unrestrained, free relative longitudinal movement therebetween to engage jarring surfaces on the jar mechanism members for delivering a jarring impact to the stuck object. The accelerator includes: inner and outer telescopically connected members relatively movable longitudinally to accumulate energy in the accelerator; the inner and outer accelerator members each having means for connecting the accelerator in the well pipe string; means associated with the inner and outer members for initially accomodating a predetermined minimum length of unrestrained, free relative longitudinal movement between the inner and outer accelerator members.

  5. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  6. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Tajima; K. Homma

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last Century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers.

  7. COLLIDING PULSE INJECTION EXPERIMENTS IN NON-COLLINEAR GEOMETRY FOR CONTROLLED LASER PLASMA WAKEFIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    emittance) is important for future plasma based accelerators and for applications. In any particle accelerator, particle injection into the accelerating structure is a key technology. In all cur- rent laser with acceler- Work supported by DOE grant DE-AC02-05CH11231, DARPA, and INCITE computational grant. CToth

  8. CEBAF accelerator achievements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y.C. Chao, M. Drury, C. Hovater, A. Hutton, G.A. Krafft, M. Poelker, C. Reece, M. Tiefenback

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  9. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  10. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  11. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  12. APT accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed accelerator production of tritium (APT) project requires an accelerator providing a cw proton beam of 100 mA at 1300 MeV. Since most of the technical risk of a high-current cw (continuous-wave, 100% DF) accelerator resides in the low-energy section, Los Alamos is building a 20 MeV duplicate of the accelerator front end to confirm design codes, beam performance, and demonstrate operaional reliability. We report on design details of this low-energy demonstration accelerator (LEDA) and discuss the integrated design of the full accelerator for the APT plant. LEDA`s proton injector is under test and has produced more than 130 mA at 75 keV. Fabrication is proceeding on a 6.7-KeV, 8-m long RFQ, and detailed design is underway on coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) structures. Detailed design and technology experiments are underway on medium-beta superconducting cavities to assess feasibility of replacing the conventional (room-temperature copper) high-energy linac with a linac made of niobium superconducting RF cavities.

  13. Free-Electron Laser FLASH Injector Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg FLASH Injector Laser Laser 1 Laser 2 Next steps Siegfried | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg Laser 1 System Overview fround trip A 541 (2005) 467­477 #12;Siegfried Schreiber | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser

  14. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Essay: Robert H. Siemann As Leader of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, Eric R.; Hogan, Mark J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Robert H. Siemann originally conceived of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department (AARD) as an academic, experimental group dedicated to probing the technical limitations of accelerators while providing excellent educational opportunities for young scientists. The early years of the Accelerator Research Department B, as it was then known, were dedicated to a wealth of mostly student-led experiments to examine the promise of advanced accelerator techniques. High-gradient techniques including millimeter-wave rf acceleration, beam-driven plasma acceleration, and direct laser acceleration were pursued, including tests of materials under rf pulsed heating and short-pulse laser radiation, to establish the ultimate limitations on gradient. As the department and program grew, so did the motivation to found an accelerator research center that brought experimentalists together in a test facility environment to conduct a broad range of experiments. The Final Focus Test Beam and later the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator provided unique experimental facilities for AARD staff and collaborators to carry out advanced accelerator experiments. Throughout the evolution of this dynamic program, Bob maintained a department atmosphere and culture more reminiscent of a university research group than a national laboratory department. His exceptional ability to balance multiple roles as scientist, professor, and administrator enabled the creation and preservation of an environment that fostered technical innovation and scholarship.

  16. Physically Based Rendering Intersection Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Physically Based Rendering (600.657) Intersection Acceleration #12;Intersection Testing Accelerated partitions: Group objects into clusters Cluster volumes may overlap #12;Uniform (Voxel) Grid Acceleration Acceleration · Trace rays through grid cells ­ Fast ­ Incremental A B C D E F Only check primitives

  17. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C.B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significant in such ultra-short laser-plasma interactions.of ultra-short electron bunches by using colliding laser

  18. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch accelerator (LWFA) a short in- tense laser pulse, with a duration on the order of a plasma wave period July 2004; published 6 December 2004) Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser

  19. Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

  20. Free Electron Laser Nitriding of Metals: From basis physics to industrial applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapin, Gerd

    Accelerator Facility, Free Electron Laser Group, Newport News, VA 23606, USA Abstract Titanium was laser-liquid interface energy and the strain. Further in- vestigations showed that the dendritic growth is beginning treatment, laser nitriding, titanium PACS: 81.65.Lp, 52.50.Jm, 61.80.Ba, 76.80.+y 1 Introduction Titanium

  1. THz generation by ultra-short laser pulses propagating in nonuniform plasma channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    THz generation by ultra-short laser pulses propagating in nonuniform plasma channels T. Antonsen Jr Conventional sources using short pulse lasers rely on pulse generation in a solid and are generally limited in excess of 100 µJ/pulse have been generated as transition radiation by a laser generated and accelerated

  2. Laser/matter interactions by laser-launched plates and direct laser shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Swift, D. C. (Damian C.); Kopp, R. A. (Roger A.); Montgomery, D. S. (David S.); Johnson, R. P. (Randall P.); Munson, C. P. (Carter P.); Letzring, S. A. (Samuel A.); Niemczura, J. G. (Johnathan G.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosives, gas guns, laser-launched flyer plates, and direct laser-irradiation can be used to generate shocks and high-stress in materials. Each method has a unique diameter and thickness of shock that can be generated. In past years, small laboratory lasers have been used to launch flyer plates 2 - 200-pm thick to terminal velocities 0.1 to 5 k d s . Over the past few years we have been using our TRIDENT laser facility (1kJ in 0.2 to 2ps) to accelerate larger diameter (8 mm) and thicker (0.1 - 1.5 mm) flyer plates. These larger diameters and thicker one-dimensional plates more closely compliment traditional experimental methods such as gas guns. The 8-mm diameter and 1-mm thick flyer plates can impart shocks in metals for constitutive dynamic property measurements. The versatility of laser-driven plates permits spatial and temporal profiles of the flyer plate impact on sample targets. LASNEX models and parameters of the laser drive can be used to optimize optical coupling efficiency. The flyer plate launch, acceleration, terminal velocity, and, depending on the experiment, flyer plate impact on to target materials are recorded using point-interferometry (VISAR), and line-imaging interferometry. These high speed optical and laser experimental methods will be described along with ancillary methods, and material data. Constitutive properties of bulk materials, rate effects, and grain size and/or orientation have been studied for several metals including copper, beryllium, gold, and some alloys.

  3. Fermilab | Science | Particle Accelerators | Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A ThisFermilab's Accelerator Complex photo

  4. Fermilab | Science | Particle Accelerators | Leading Accelerator Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A ThisFermilab's Accelerator ComplexLeading

  5. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Robb M. (Albuquerque, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Polosky, Marc A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hoke, Darren A. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, George E. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  6. Biocavity Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  7. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  8. Effects of pulse duration and areal density on ultrathin foil acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Xiaomei; Shen Baifei; Ji Liangliang; Wang Fengchao; Wen Meng; Wang Wenpeng; Xu Jiancai; Yu Yahong [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of laser pulse duration and areal density of target in the interaction of a circularly polarized pulse with an ultrathin overdense foil is investigated. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that with an appropriate laser-pulse rising front, the light pressure acceleration regime is effective even though the thin foil is transparent. As the laser intensity evolves, three stages in the acceleration process can be identified: at first the total reflection of the laser pulse, followed by partial reflection, and then near total reflection again due to the Doppler effect. The influences of the rising front of laser pulse and areal density of the ultrathin foil are investigated. It is found that an optimal laser pulse rising front exists for obtaining high (saturation) ion energy with the same laser energy within a short time. An optimal areal density also exists for obtaining the highest energy. For the same laser pulse, a higher areal density or a higher density with same areal density is more appropriate for obtaining a stationary state for making light pressure acceleration mechanism more effective.

  9. XI UV Laser Trigger System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickeen, B.K.; Morelli, G.L.; Paiva, R.A.; Powell, C.A.; Sundvold, P.D.

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The X1 accelerator project at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico utilizes SF6 insulated, multi-stage, UV laser triggered gas switches. A 265 nm UV laser system was designed and built to generate eight simultaneous output pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulse width. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser was frequency quadrupled using a two-stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy was frequency doubled with a KTP crystal to 530 nm, achieving 65% conversion efficiency. The 530 nm output was frequency doubled with KD*P crystal to 265 nm, achieving conversion efficiency of 31%. The 265 nm beam pulse was split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and stable energy output were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged into a rugged, o-ring sealed, aluminum structure 10''x19''x2.75''. The size of the electronics was 12''x8''x8''. Subsequent accelerator system requirements dictated a redesign of the triggering system for an output beam with less angular divergence. An unstable, crossed porro prism resonator was designed and incorporated into the system. The beam divergence of the redesigned system was successfully decreased to 0.97 mrad in the UV. The resulting frequency doubling efficiencies were 55% to 530 nm and 25% to 265 nm. The optical output remained at 10 mJ in each channel with an 11 nsec pulse width.

  10. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Física, Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514, Campus de Goiabeiras, CEP 29075-910, Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S., E-mail: win_unac@hotmail.com, E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br, E-mail: winfried.zimdahl@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Grupo de Física Teórica, Rodovia BR 101 Norte, km 60, Campus de São Mateus, CEP 29932-540, São Mateus, Espírito Santo (Brazil)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the standard ?CDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  11. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  12. Accelerator technology program. Status report, October 1984-March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jameson, R.A.; Schriber, S.O. (comps.)

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities of the racetrack-microtron development programs are highlighted, one of which is being done in collaboration with the National Bureau of Standards and the other with the University of Illinois; the BEAR (Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket) project; work in beam dynamics; the proposed LAMPF II accelerator; and the Proton Storage Ring. Discussed next is radio-frequency and microwave technology, followed by activities in accelerator theory and simulation, and free-electron laser technology. The report concludes with a listing of papers published during this reporting period.

  13. LCLS Laser (in Polish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most powerful now in the world, American X-ray laser LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source), has been working as a research and user facility since 2009. It is further developed to LCLSII machine at the Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC in Menlo Park CA. In a certain sense, LCLS is a response to the EXFEL machine and a logical extension of LCLS. All these machines are light sources of the fifth generation. EXFELis expected to open user facility in 2016, at a cost of over 1 bil Euro. LCLS II, which design started in 2010, will be operational in 2017. The lasers LCLS, LCLS II and EXFEL use SASE and SEED methods to generate light and are powered by electron liniacs, LCLS by a wrm one, and EXFEL by a cold one. The liniacs have energies approaching 20 GeV, and are around 2 - 3 km in length. EXFEL liniac uses SRF TESLA cavity technology at 1,3GHz. A prototype of EXFEL was FLASH laser. SLAC Laboratory uses effectively over 50 years experience in research, building and exploitation of linear electron acce...

  14. Negative hydrogen ion sources for accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Peters, J.; /DESY; Sherman, J.; /Los Alamos

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of H{sup -} ion sources are in use at accelerator laboratories around the world. A list of these ion sources includes surface plasma sources with magnetron, Penning and surface converter geometries as well as magnetic-multipole volume sources with and without cesium. Just as varied is the means of igniting and maintaining magnetically confined plasmas. Hot and cold cathodes, radio frequency, and microwave power are all in use, as well as electron tandem source ignition. The extraction systems of accelerator H{sup -} ion sources are highly specialized utilizing magnetic and electric fields in their low energy beam transport systems to produce direct current, as well as pulsed and/or chopped beams with a variety of time structures. Within this paper, specific ion sources utilized at accelerator laboratories shall be reviewed along with the physics of surface and volume H{sup -} production in regard to source emittance. Current research trends including aperture modeling, thermal modeling, surface conditioning, and laser diagnostics will also be discussed.

  15. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their whole lives to accelerator physics. As high energysome appreciation of accelerator physics. We cannot, nor dolectures on basic accelerator physics; then you will hear

  16. Injection of a Phase Modulated Source into the Z-Beamlet Laser for Increased Energy Extraction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rambo, Patrick K.; Armstrong, Darrell J.; Schwarz, Jens; Smith, Ian C; Shores, Jonathon; Speas, Christopher; Porter, John L.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Z-Beamlet laser has been operating at Sandia National Laboratories since 2001 to provide a source of laser-generated x-rays for radiography of events on the Z-Accelerator. Changes in desired operational scope have necessitated the increase in pulse duration and energy available from the laser system. This is enabled via the addition of a phase modulated seed laser as an alternative front-end. The practical aspects of deployment are discussed here.

  17. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutton, Andrew (Yorktown, VA)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  18. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yves A. Gallant

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the current status of Fermi acceleration theory at relativistic shocks. I first discuss the relativistic shock jump conditions, then describe the non-relativistic Fermi mechanism and the differences introduced by relativistic flows. I present numerical calculations of the accelerated particle spectrum, and examine the maximum energy attainable by this process. I briefly consider the minimum energy for Fermi acceleration, and a possible electron pre-acceleration mechanism.

  19. Laser goniometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fairer, George M. (Boulder, CO); Boernge, James M. (Lakewood, CO); Harris, David W. (Lakewood, CO); Campbell, DeWayne A. (Littleton, CO); Tuttle, Gene E. (Littleton, CO); McKeown, Mark H. (Golden, CO); Beason, Steven C. (Lakewood, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  20. Parametric Study of Emerging High Power Accelerator Applications Using Accelerator Systems Model (ASM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berwald, D H; Myers, T J; Paulson, C C; Peacock, M A; Piaszczyk, C M; Rathke, J W; Piechowiak, E M

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric Study of Emerging High Power Accelerator Applications Using Accelerator Systems Model (ASM)

  1. Radiation from Accelerated Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohab Abou-Zeid; Miguel S. Costa

    2000-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

  2. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, Lawrie E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jachim, Stephen P. (Los Alamos, NM); Natter, Eckard F. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  3. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  4. Linear induction accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  5. Accelerating QDP++ using GPUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Winter

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) are getting increasingly important as target architectures in scientific High Performance Computing (HPC). NVIDIA established CUDA as a parallel computing architecture controlling and making use of the compute power of GPUs. CUDA provides sufficient support for C++ language elements to enable the Expression Template (ET) technique in the device memory domain. QDP++ is a C++ vector class library suited for quantum field theory which provides vector data types and expressions and forms the basis of the lattice QCD software suite Chroma. In this work accelerating QDP++ expression evaluation to a GPU was successfully implemented leveraging the ET technique and using Just-In-Time (JIT) compilation. The Portable Expression Template Engine (PETE) and the C API for CUDA kernel arguments were used to build the bridge between host and device memory domains. This provides the possibility to accelerate Chroma routines to a GPU which are typically not subject to special optimisation. As an application example a smearing routine was accelerated to execute on a GPU. A significant speed-up compared to normal CPU execution could be measured.

  6. CESR Test Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, David L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured in 2008 as a test accelerator to investigate the physics of ultra-low emittance damping rings. During the approximately 40 days/year available for dedicated operation as a test accelerator, specialized instrumentation is used to measure growth and mitigation of the electron cloud, emittance growth due to electron cloud, intra-beam scattering, and ions, and single and multi-bunch instabilities generated by collective effects. The flexibility of the CESR guide field optics and the integration of accelerator modeling codes with the control system have made possible an extraordinary range of experiments. Findings at CesrTA with respect to electron cloud effects, emittance tuning techniques, and beam instrumentation for measuring electron cloud, beam sizes, and beam positions are the basis for much of the design of the ILC damping rings as documented in the ILC-Technical Design Report. The program has allowed the Cornell group to cultivate the kind of talen...

  7. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemery, Francois

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collinear high-gradient ${\\cal O} (GV/m)$ beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios $>2$, a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting "drive" bunch to an accelerated "witness" bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative current profiles which are smooth which also lead to enhanced transformer ratios. We especially explore a laser-shaping method capable of generating one the suggested distributions directly out of a photoinjector and discuss a linac concept that could possible drive a dielectric ...

  8. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Kwang-Je (Burr Ridge, IL); Zholents, Alexander (Walnut Creek, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  9. Fields of an ultrashort tightly-focused laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytic expressions for the electromagnetic fields of an ultrashort, tightly focused, laser pulse in vacuum are derived from scalar and vector potentials, using on equal footing two small parameters connected with the waist size of the laser beam and its duration. Compared with fields derived from a complex-source-point approach and a Lax series expansion approach, the derived fields are shown to be well-behaved and accurate even in the subcycle pulse regime. Terms stemming from the scalar potential are shown to be non-negligible and could significantly influence laser-matter interactions, in particular, direct electron acceleration in vacuum by an ultrashort laser pulse.

  10. Laser Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Weijian; Ng, Kar Wei; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavity optomechanics explores the coupling between the optical field and the mechanical oscillation to induce cooling and regenerative oscillation in a mechanical oscillator. So far, optomechanics relies on the detuning between the cavity and an external pump laser, where the laser acts only as a power supply. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator that supports a mirror of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and the optical field, greatly enhancing the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we used an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror in a VCSEL, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity with > 550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micro-mechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical. This new scheme not only offers an efficient approach for high-...

  11. Laser barometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

  12. Beyond injection: Trojan horse underdense photocathode plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidding, B.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Xi, Y.; O'Shea, B.; Andonian, G.; Schiller, D.; Barber, S.; Williams, O.; Pretzler, G.; Koenigstein, T.; Kleeschulte, F.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Corde, S.; White, W. W.; Muggli, P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Lotov, K. [Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany) and Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado (United States) and 1348 Redwood Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80304 (United States); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) and Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview on the underlying principles of the hybrid plasma wakefield acceleration scheme dubbed 'Trojan Horse' acceleration is given. The concept is based on laser-controlled release of electrons directly into a particle-beam-driven plasma blowout, paving the way for controlled, shapeable electron bunches with ultralow emittance and ultrahigh brightness. Combining the virtues of a low-ionization-threshold underdense photocathode with the GV/m-scale electric fields of a practically dephasing-free beam-driven plasma blowout, this constitutes a 4th generation electron acceleration scheme. It is applicable as a beam brightness transformer for electron bunches from LWFA and PWFA systems alike. At FACET, the proof-of-concept experiment 'E-210: Trojan Horse Plasma Wakefield Acceleration' has recently been approved and is in preparation. At the same time, various LWFA facilities are currently considered to host experiments aiming at stabilizing and boosting the electron bunch output quality via a trojan horse afterburner stage. Since normalized emittance and brightness can be improved by many orders of magnitude, the scheme is an ideal candidate for light sources such as free-electron-lasers and those based on Thomson scattering and betatron radiation alike.

  13. Queen's researchers play part in laser breakthrough A new approach that will pave the way for a range of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    . By simply directing a high-power, ultra-short laser pulse onto a thin solid foil, it is now possibleQueen's researchers play part in laser breakthrough A new approach that will pave the way a revolutionary laser-driven acceleration technique has been developed by an international team of physicists

  14. Ion acceleration from thin foil and extended plasma targets by slow electromagnetic wave and related ion-ion beam instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulanov, S. V. [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan); A. M. Prokhorov Institute of General Physics RAS, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M. [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan); Pegoraro, F. [Physical Department, University of Pisa, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Bulanov, S. S. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, 94720 (United States); Leemans, W. P. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, 94720 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When ions are accelerated by the radiation pressure of a laser pulse, their velocity cannot exceed the pulse group velocity which can be considerably smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. This is demonstrated in two cases corresponding to a thin foil target irradiated by high intensity laser light and to the hole boring produced in an extended plasma by the laser pulse. It is found that the beams of accelerated ions are unstable against Buneman-like and Weibel-like instabilities which results in the broadening of the ion energy spectrum.

  15. Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex Bogacz

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  16. Surface plasmon assisted electron acceleration in photoemission from gold nanopillars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagel, Phillip M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high intensity, ultrafast laser pulses. Lasers that generateexcited directly by ultrafast laser pulses without requiring

  17. Optimization of the Combined Proton Acceleration Regime with a Target Composition Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, W P; Zheng, C Y; Liu, Z J; Yan, X Q

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D PIC) simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly-polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. With an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target, followed by an underdense tritium plasma gas, protons with higher energies (from about $20$ GeV up to about $30$ GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about $18\\%$ down to about $5\\%$ in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hy...

  18. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, W.B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984). Colson, W. B. , "Free electron laser theory," Ph.D.aspects of the free electron laser," Laser Handbook i,Quant. Elect. Bendor Free Electron Laser Conference, Journal

  19. APT accelerator. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D. [comp.] [ed.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  20. Particle Acceleration by MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jungyeon Cho; A. Lazarian

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in understanding of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence call for revisions in the picture of particle acceleration. We make use of the recently established scaling of slow and fast MHD modes in strong and weak MHD turbulence to provide a systematic study of particle acceleration in magnetic pressure (low-$\\beta$) and gaseous pressure (high-$\\beta$) dominated plasmas. We consider the acceleration by large scale compressions in both slow and fast particle diffusion limits. We compare the results with the acceleration rate that arises from resonance scattering and Transit-Time Damping (TTD). We establish that fast modes accelerate particles more efficiently than slow modes. We find that particle acceleration by pitch-angle scattering and TTD dominates acceleration by slow or fast modes when the spatial diffusion rate is small. When the rate of spatial diffusion of particles is high, we establish an enhancement of the efficiency of particle acceleration by slow and fast modes in weak turbulence. We show that highly supersonic turbulence is an efficient agent for particle acceleration. We find that even incompressible turbulence can accelerate particles on the scales comparable with the particle mean free path.

  1. Researchers' Hottest New Laser Beams 14.2 kW | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    press release The linear accelerator portion of the FEL. On Thursday, Oct. 26, Free-Electron Laser (FEL) team members knew they were within reach of a goal they'd pursued for two...

  2. Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser Joins With Others in New...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser Joins With Others in New Research Venture NEWPORT NEWS, VA, April 29, 2009 - The U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will...

  3. Accelerators AND Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In theACME -Toggle FermilabAccelerators

  4. Thomson parabola spectrometry for gold laser-generated plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ando, L. [Physics Department of Messina University, V.le F. S. D'Alcontres 31, 9816 S. Agata (Italy); Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma generated from thin gold films irradiated in high vacuum at high intensity ({approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) laser shot is characterized in terms of ion generation through time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometry. Gold ions and protons, accelerated in forward direction by the electric field developed in non-equilibrium plasma, have been investigated. Measurements, performed at PALS laboratory, give information about the gold charge states distributions, the ion energy distributions and the proton acceleration driven as a function of film thickness, laser parameters, and angular emission. The ion diagnostics of produced plasma in forward direction permits to understand some mechanisms developed during its expansion kinetics. The role of the focal position of a laser beam with respect to the target surface, plasma properties, and the possibility to accelerate protons up to energies above 3 MeV has been presented and discussed.

  5. Final Report for "Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulations".

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J. R.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Stoltz, P. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Cowan, B.; Schwartz, B. T.; Bell, G.; Paul, K.; Veitzer, S.

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the work that has been accomplished over the past 5 years under the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator and Simulations (ComPASS) at Tech-X Corporation. Tech-X had been involved in the full range of ComPASS activities with simulation of laser plasma accelerator concepts, mainly in collaboration with LOASIS program at LBNL, simulation of coherent electron cooling in collaboration with BNL, modeling of electron clouds in high intensity accelerators, in collaboration with researchers at Fermilab and accurate modeling of superconducting RF cavity in collaboration with Fermilab, JLab and Cockcroft Institute in the UK.

  6. Effect of Electromagnetic Pulse Transverse Inhomogeneity on the Ion Acceleration by Radiation Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lezhnin, K V; Beskin, V S; Kando, M; Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the ion acceleration by radiation pressure a transverse inhomogeneity of the electromagnetic pulse results in the displacement of the irradiated target in the off-axis direction limiting achievable ion energy. This effect is described analytically within the framework of the thin foil target model and with the particle-in-cell simulations showing that the maximum energy of accelerated ions decreases while the displacement from the axis of the target initial position increases. The results obtained can be applied for optimization of the ion acceleration by the laser radiation pressure with the mass limited targets.

  7. Dual wavelength laser damage testing for high energy lasers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, Briggs W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark W.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As high energy laser systems evolve towards higher energies, fundamental material properties such as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the optics limit the overall system performance. The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories uses a pair of such kiljoule-class Nd:Phosphate Glass lasers for x-ray radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator. These two systems, the Z-Beamlet system operating at 527nm/ 1ns and the Z-Petawatt system operating at 1054nm/ 0.5ps, can be combined for some experimental applications. In these scenarios, dichroic beam combining optics and subsequent dual wavelength high reflectors will see a high fluence from combined simultaneous laser exposure and may even see lingering effects when used for pump-probe configurations. Only recently have researchers begun to explore such concerns, looking at individual and simultaneous exposures of optics to 1064 and third harmonic 355nm light from Nd:YAG [1]. However, to our knowledge, measurements of simultaneous and delayed dual wavelength damage thresholds on such optics have not been performed for exposure to 1054nm and its second harmonic light, especially when the pulses are of disparate pulse duration. The Z-Backlighter Facility has an instrumented damage tester setup to examine the issues of laser-induced damage thresholds in a variety of such situations [2] . Using this damage tester, we have measured the LIDT of dual wavelength high reflectors at 1054nm/0.5ps and 532nm/7ns, separately and spatially combined, both co-temporal and delayed, with single and multiple exposures. We found that the LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps can be significantly lowered, from 1.32J/cm{sup 2} damage fluence with 1054/0.5ps only to 1.05 J/cm{sup 2} with the simultaneous presence of 532nm/7ns laser light at a fluence of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2}. This reduction of LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps continues as the fluence of 532nm/7ns laser light simultaneously present increases. The reduction of LIDT does not occur when the 2 pulses are temporally separated. This paper will also present dual wavelength LIDT results of commercial dichroic beam-combining optics simultaneously exposed with laser light at 1054nm/2.5ns and 532nm/7ns.

  8. Control of focusing forces and emittances in plasma-based accelerators using near-hollow plasma channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A near-hollow plasma channel, where the plasma density in the channel is much less than the plasma density in the walls, is proposed to provide independent control over the focusing and accelerating forces in a plasma accelerator. In this geometry the low density in the channel contributes to the focusing forces, while the accelerating fields are determined by the high density in the channel walls. The channel also provides guiding for intense laser pulses used for wakefield excitation. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in a nearly symmetric fashion. Near-hollow plasma channels can effectively mitigate emittance growth due to Coulomb scattering for high energy physics applications.

  9. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Sampayan, Stephen (Manteca, CA); Slenes, Kirk (Albuquerque, NM); Stoller, H. M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  10. Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan [Universities of Lancaster, Liverpool and Manchester and Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

  11. Thomas Precession by Uniform Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Pardy

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the nonlinear transformations between coordinate systems which are mutually in a constant symmetrical accelerated motion. The maximal acceleration limit follows from the kinematical origin and it is an analogue of the maximal velocity in special relativity. We derive the dependence of mass, length, time, Doppler effect, Cherenkov effect and transition radiation angle on acceleration as an analogue phenomena in special theory of relativity. The last application of our method is the Thomas precession by uniform acceleration with the possible role in the modern physics and cosmology. The comparison of derived results with other relativistic methods is necessary.

  12. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  13. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  14. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  15. Thomas Precession by Uniform Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the nonlinear transformations between coordinate systems which are mutually in a constant symmetrical accelerated motion. The maximal acceleration limit follows from the kinematical origin and it is an analogue of the maximal velocity in special relativity. We derive the dependence of mass, length, time, Doppler effect, Cherenkov effect and transition radiation angle on acceleration as an analogue phenomena in special theory of relativity. The last application of our method is the Thomas precession by uniform acceleration with the possible role in the modern physics and cosmology. The comparison of derived results with other relativistic methods is necessary.

  16. Lab Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fermilab scientists developed techniques to retrofit some of the 30,000 particle accelerators in use around the world to make them more efficient and powerful.

  17. Laser barometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Kevin R. (Westminster, CO); Shiels, David (Thornton, CO); Rash, Tim (Aurora, CO)

    2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  18. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Oliver

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Without compression, the size of a bitmap index increasesnumber of bitmaps per index. Compression is used to reduceindex software called FastBit [9]. It implements the fastest known bitmap compression

  19. SCINTILLATOR DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE DETECTION OF LASER ACCELERATED ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    (Chromox), CsI:Tl, and polyvinyl toluene (PVT) screens to protons in the 2 - 8 MeV range using a CCD camera resolution to determine bunch size, and should be relatively inexpensive and robust when exposed to high is a low Z organic compound com- prised of covalently bonded vinyl toluene chains, and as such it is easily

  20. Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, Anthony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dot line), which increases to ? 3.5 compared with the vacuum focal value of ? 1.5, producing a bubble

  1. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vay, J.-L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1:2:4) Mean beam position (m) VAX Sen c >SA- i— s( i) c 3- a2) - - - S(1:2:3)! S(1:2:4); VAX c c 3 0J u xi E2i SO) S(l:4) Mean beam position (m) VAX Figure 20: (left) Average beam

  2. Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data LWFAIllustrationSmall.png In collaboration with researchers of the LOASIS program (LBNL) and the SciDAC SDM center (LBNL) we have been working on various efforts aimed at...

  3. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matlis, N. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. R. Plateau, e. Esarey, M . Battaglia, C. B. Schroeder, S.T. Stoehlker, M . Battaglia, T. S. Kim, E. Cormier- Michel,

  4. COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, a board computational accelerator physics initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cary, J.R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a broad computational accelerator physics initiative † J Rbroad computational accelerator physics initiative J R Caryand future to the accelerator physics community of the

  5. Particle Production Reactions in Laser-Boosted Lepton Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah J. Müller; Christoph H. Keitel; Carsten Müller

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for ever higher energies in lepton colliders gives rise to the investigation of new accelerator schemes for elementary particle physics experiments. One perceivable way to increase the collision energy would be to combine conventional lepton acceleration with strong laser fields, making use of the momentum boost a charged particle experiences inside a plane electromagnetic wave. As an example for a process taking place in such a laser-boosted collision, Higgs boson creation is studied in detail. We further discuss other possible particle production processes that could be implemented in such a collider scheme and specify the required technical demands.

  6. Particle Production Reactions in Laser-Boosted Lepton Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Sarah J; Müller, Carsten

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for ever higher energies in lepton colliders gives rise to the investigation of new accelerator schemes for elementary particle physics experiments. One perceivable way to increase the collision energy would be to combine conventional lepton acceleration with strong laser fields, making use of the momentum boost a charged particle experiences inside a plane electromagnetic wave. As an example for a process taking place in such a laser-boosted collision, Higgs boson creation is studied in detail. We further discuss other possible particle production processes that could be implemented in such a collider scheme and specify the required technical demands.

  7. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 71 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility the irradiated cells. Both the microbeam and the track segment facilities continue to be utilized in various investigations of this phenomenon. The single- particle microbeam facility provides precise control of the number

  8. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 1 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility for Radiological Research (CRR). Using the mi- crobeam facility, 10% of the cells were irradiated through particle beam as well as the first fo- cused microbeam in the new microbeam facility. · Another significant

  9. The Radiological Research Accelerator THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility #12;84 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY Director: David J. Brenner, Ph.D., D.Sc., Manager: Stephen A. Marino, M.S. An NIH SupportedV/µm 4 He ions using the microbeam facility (Exp. 73) also continued. The transformation frequency

  10. Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions D. P of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions D. P. Higginson,1,2 J. M. Mc of laser energy in a 9 ps pulse. In this technique, a short-pulse, high-energy laser accelerates deuterons

  11. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Zisman

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 \\times 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance ("cooling"). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  12. Single shot cell irradiations with laser-driven protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humble, N.; Schmid, T. E.; Zlobinskaya, O.; Wilkens, J. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München (Germany); Allinger, K.; Hilz, P.; Ma, W.; Reinhardt, S. [Physics Department, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)] [Physics Department, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany); Bin, J.; Kiefer, D.; Schreiber, J. [Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); Drexler, G. A.; Friedl, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beams are relevant for radiobiological studies in basic research and for application in tumor therapy. Here we present a method to generate nanosecond proton bunches with single shot doses of up to 7 Gray by a tabletop high-power laser. Although in their infancy, laser-ion accelerators allow studying fast radiobiological processes at small-scale laboratories as exemplarily demonstrated by measurements of the relative biological effectiveness of protons in human tumor cells.

  13. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  14. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Carol J. (Warrenville, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  15. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C.J.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

  16. I Investigation of Pellet Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I Investigation of Pellet Acceleration by an Arc heated Gas Gun An Interim Report INVESTIGATION OP PELLET ACCELERATION BY AN ARC HEATED GAS GUN* An Interim Report on the Investigations carried, and K.-V. Weisberg Abstract. Deep penetration of pellets into the JET plasma may prove to be a useful

  17. SBA Growth Accelerator Fund Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is accepting applications for the Growth Accelerator Fund Competition to identify the nation's innovative accelerators and similar organizations and award them cash prizes they may use to fund their operations costs and allow them to bring startup competitions to scale and new ideas to life.

  18. Controlled Electron Injection into Plasma Accelerators and SpaceCharge Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fubiani, Gwenael J.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma based accelerators are capable of producing electron sources which are ultra-compact (a few microns) and high energies (up to hundreds of MeVs) in much shorter distances than conventional accelerators. This is due to the large longitudinal electric field that can be excited without the limitation of breakdown as in RF structures.The characteristic scale length of the accelerating field is the plasma wavelength and for typical densities ranging from 1018 - 1019 cm-3, the accelerating fields and scale length can hence be on the order of 10-100GV/m and 10-40 mu m, respectively. The production of quasimonoenergetic beams was recently obtained in a regime relying on self-trapping of background plasma electrons, using a single laser pulse for wakefield generation. In this dissertation, we study the controlled injection via the beating of two lasers (the pump laser pulse creating the plasma wave and a second beam being propagated in opposite direction) which induce a localized injection of background plasma electrons. The aim of this dissertation is to describe in detail the physics of optical injection using two lasers, the characteristics of the electron beams produced (the micrometer scale plasma wavelength can result in femtosecond and even attosecond bunches) as well as a concise estimate of the effects of space charge on the dynamics of an ultra-dense electron bunch with a large energy spread.

  19. Particle Accelerators, 1990, Vol. 32, pp. 241-247 Reprints available directly from the publisher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Philip J.,

    profile is importa.nt for the study of laser acceler- ation of particles. For a specific relation betweenParticle Accelerators, 1990, Vol. 32, pp. 241-247 Reprints available directly from the publisher in plasma. Carrying out numerical particle simulation runs in which a deviation from this relation

  20. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  1. Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Ditmire

    2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

  2. Random Aspects of Beam Physics and Laser-Plasma Interactions Andrew Emile Charman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    and radiation phase space manipulation, overlap, and control. We begin by studying questions of optimal longitudinal pulse-shaping in laser wake- field accelerators, based on a one-dimensional model with prescribed on the laser amplifier by modeling a realistic transfer function with possible phase or amplitude masks, we

  3. Energy Doubling of 42 GeV Electrons in a Meter-scale Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenfeld, Ian; Clayton, Christopher E.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Huang, Chengkun; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas,; Kirby, Neil; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao; /SLAC /UCLA /Southern California U.

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy frontier of particle physics is several trillion electron volts, but colliders capable of reaching this regime (such as the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider) are costly and time-consuming to build; it is therefore important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators, a drive beam (either laser or particle) produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultrahigh accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. Here we show that an energy gain of more than 42 GeV is achieved in a plasma wakefield accelerator of 85 cm length, driven by a 42 GeV electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx} 52GV m{sup -1}. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3-km-long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. This is an important step towards demonstrating the viability of plasma accelerators for high-energy physics applications.

  4. Velocity bunching in travelling wave accelerator with low acceleration gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui-Xuan; Li, Wei-Wei; Jia, Qi-Ka

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analytical and simulated results concerning the influences of the acceleration gradient in the velocity bunching process, which is a bunch compression scheme that uses a traveling wave accelerating structure as a compressor. Our study shows that the bunch compression application with low acceleration gradient is more tolerant to phase jitter and more successful to obtain compressed electron beam with symmetrical longitudinal distribution and low energy spread. We also present a transverse emittance compensation scheme to compensate the emittance growth caused by the increasing of the space charge force in the compressing process that is easy to be adjusted for different compressing factors.

  5. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  6. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 528 (2004) 1518 First lasing at the high-power free electron laser at Siberian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -power free electron laser at Siberian center for photochemistry research E.A. Antokhin, R.R. Akberdin, V in April 2003 on a high-power free electron laser (FEL) constructed at the Siberian Center. 2. Accelerator­recuperator Full-scale Novosibirsk free electron laser is to be based on multi

  7. Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Service Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Service Request Form National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Service request form Estimate when(s) to control for this experiment (if more than one, please prioritize): Radiological Research Accelerator

  8. FPGA Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbordt, Martin

    ' & $ % FPGA Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation Joshua Model Thesis submitted UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Thesis FPGA Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation Joshua Model ABSTRACT Molecular dynamics simulation

  9. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS A.M. Sessler TWO-IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS Andrew M. SesslerBruck, "Circular Particle Accelerators," PUF, Paris (1966).

  10. High-power terahertz optically pumped NH{sub 3} laser for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishchenko, V. A.; Petrushevich, Yu. V.; Sobolenko, D. N.; Starostin, A. N. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The parameter of a terahertz (THz) laser intended for plasma diagnostics in electrodynamic accelerators and tokamaks with a strong magnetic field are discussed. Generation of THz radiation in an ammonia laser under the action of high-power pulsed optical pumping by the radiation of a 10P(32) CO{sub 2} laser is simulated numerically. The main characteristics of the output radiation, such as its spectrum, peak intensity, time dependence, and total energy, are calculated.

  11. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolie, Victor W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations.

  12. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolie, V.W.

    1990-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations. 3 figs.

  13. Spectral modification of shock accelerated ions using hydrodynamically shaped gas target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tresca, O; Cook, N; Maharjan, C; Polyanskiy, M N; Najmudin, Z; Shkolnikov, P; Pogorelsky, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a $\\lambda = 10$ $\\mu$m CO$_2$ laser on optically shaped H$_2$ and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse ($I\\lesssim10^{14}\\, {\\rm Wcm^{-2}}$) was used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This was followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse ($I>10^{16}\\, {\\rm Wcm^{-2}}$) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions were accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies ($> 110$ mJ & $energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findin...

  14. Higgs Boson Creation in Laser-Boosted Lepton Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah J. Müller; Christoph H. Keitel; Carsten Müller

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroweak processes in high-energy lepton collisions are considered in a situation where the incident center-of-mass energy lies below the reaction threshold, but is boosted to the required level by subsequent laser acceleration. Within the framework of laser-dressed quantum field theory, we study the laser-boosted process $\\ell^+ \\ell^- \\to HZ^0$ in detail and specify the technical demands needed for its experimental realization. Further, we outline possible qualitative differences to field-free processes regarding the detection of the produced Higgs bosons.

  15. Experimental test accelerator (ETA) II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1981-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) is designed to produce a 10 kAmp electron beam at an energy of 4.5 MeV in 40 nsec pulses at an average rate of 2 pps. The accelerator also operates in bursts of 5 pulses spaced by as little as one millisec at an average rate of 5 pps. The machine is currently operating near 80% of its design values and has accumulated over 2.5 million pulses - mostly at a rate of one pps. The plasma cathode electron source, the remainder of the accelerator, and the operating characteristics of the machine are discussed.

  16. Cosmic Particle Acceleration: Basic Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Jones

    2000-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic-rays are ubiquitous, but their origins are surprisingly difficult to understand. A review is presented of some of the basic issues common to cosmic particle accelerators and arguments leading to the likely importance of diffusive shock acceleration as a general explanation. The basic theory of diffusive shock acceleration is outlined, followed by a discussion of some of the key issues that still prevent us from a full understanding of its outcomes. Some recent insights are mentioned at the end that may help direct ultimate resolution of our uncertainties.

  17. ASTA at Fermilab: Accelerator Physics and Accelerator Education Programs at the Modern Accelerator R&D Users Facility for HEP and Accelerator Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; Piot, P.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the current and planned beam physics research program and accelerator education program at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab.

  18. Accelerating CHP Deployment, United States Energy Association...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerating CHP Deployment, United States Energy Association (USEA), August 2011 Accelerating CHP Deployment, United States Energy Association (USEA), August 2011 The United...

  19. BNL | CO2 Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 Laser The ATF is one of the only two facilities worldwide operating picosecond, terawatt-class CO2 lasers. Our laser system consists of a picoseconds pulse-injector based on...

  20. Accelerating DSMC data extraction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations, the majority of computation time is consumed after the flowfield reaches a steady state. This situation occurs when the desired output quantities are small compared to the background fluctuations. For example, gas flows in many microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have mean speeds more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal speeds of the molecules themselves. The current solution to this problem is to collect sufficient samples to achieve the desired resolution. This can be an arduous process because the error is inversely proportional to the square root of the number of samples so we must, for example, quadruple the samples to cut the error in half. This work is intended to improve this situation by employing more advanced techniques, from fields other than solely statistics, for determining the output quantities. Our strategy centers on exploiting information neglected by current techniques, which collect moments in each cell without regard to one another, values in neighboring cells, nor their evolution in time. Unlike many previous acceleration techniques that modify the method itself, the techniques examined in this work strictly post-process so they may be applied to any DSMC code without affecting its fidelity or generality. Many potential methods are drawn from successful applications in a diverse range of areas, from ultrasound imaging to financial market analysis. The most promising methods exploit relationships between variables in space, which always exist in DSMC due to the absence of shocks. Disparate techniques were shown to produce similar error reductions, suggesting that the results shown in this report may be typical of what is possible using these methods. Sample count reduction factors of approximately three to five were found to be typical, although factors exceeding ten were shown on some variables under some techniques.

  1. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers.

  2. Accelerator Cavities as a Probe of Millicharged Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Gies; J. Jaeckel; A. Ringwald

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate Schwinger pair production of millicharged fermions in the strong electric field of cavities used for particle accelerators. Even without a direct detection mechanism at hand, millicharged particles, if they exist, contribute to the energy loss of the cavity and thus leave an imprint on the cavity's quality factor. Already conservative estimates substantially constrain the electric charge of these hypothetical particles; the resulting bounds are competitive with the currently best laboratory bounds which arise from experiments based on polarized laser light propagating in a magnetic field. We propose an experimental setup for measuring the electric current comprised of the millicharged particles produced in the cavity.

  3. Linear Accelerator | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photo below). Selective phasing of the electric field accelerates the electrons to 450 million volts (MeV). At 450 MeV, the electrons are relativistic: they are traveling at...

  4. The Sustainable Building-Accelerator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maassen, W.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stages to generate optimal design solutions. The ''Sustainable Building - Accelerator'' supports stakeholders to decide on sustainable solutions by giving them cost and benefit information of design solutions. This information provides them...

  5. Israel Careers ACCELERATE YOUR FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    Lithography Control products within the product lifecycle process including defining requirements, settingIsrael Careers ACCELERATE YOUR FUTURE Product Marketing Manager Job Description: Product Marketing Manager at the Optical Metrology Division is responsible for product strategy and customer interface

  6. Laser Safety Management Policy Statement ............................................................................................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Fordyce A.

    Laser Safety Management Policy Statement...........................................................2 Laser Users.............................................................................................................2 Unit Laser Safety Officer (ULSO

  7. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  8. BNL | ATF Laser Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be continuously escorted by someone who has such training: The training consists of an eye exam, BNL general laser safety lecture, and formal ATF laser familiarization. Untrained...

  9. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  10. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA); Poole, Brian R. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  11. BRIEF HISTORY OF FFAG ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Colleagues of mine have asked me few times why we have today so much interest in Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerators when these were invented a long time ago, and have always been ignored since then. I try here to give a reply with a short history of FFAG accelerators, at least as I know it. I take also the opportunity to clarify few definitions.

  12. Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, S; Kamiyama, D; Nagashima, T; Barada, D; Gu, Y J; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q; Wang, P X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters and the collimation target sizes. The intense short-pulse lasers are now available, and are used to generate an ion beam. The issues in the laser ion acceleration include an ion beam collimation, ion energy spectrum control, ion production efficiency, ion energy control, ion beam bunching, etc. The laser-produced ion beam tends to expand in the transverse and longitudinal directions during the ion beam propagation. The ion beam collimation is focused in this paper.

  13. Advanced Accelerator Concepts Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A major focus of research supported by this Grant has been on the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. We first trapped antihydrogen in 2010 and soon thereafter demonstrated trapping for 1000s. We now have observed resonant quantum interactions with antihydrogen. These papers in Nature and Nature Physics report the major milestones in anti-atom trapping. The success was only achieved through careful work that advanced our understanding of collective dynamics in charged particle systems, the development of new cooling and diagnostics, and in- novation in understanding how to make physics measurements with small numbers of anti-atoms. This research included evaporative cooling, autoresonant excitation of longitudinal motion, and centrifugal separation. Antihydrogen trapping by ALPHA is progressing towards the point when a important theories believed by most to hold for all physical systems, such as CPT (Charge-Parity-Time) invariance and the Weak Equivalence Principle (matter and antimatter behaving the same way under the influence of gravity) can be directly tested in a new regime. One motivation for this test is that most accepted theories of the Big Bang predict that we should observe equal amounts of matter and antimatter. However astrophysicists have found very little antimatter in the universe. Our experiment will, if successful over the next seven years, provide a new test of these ideas. Many earlier detailed and beautiful tests have been made, but the trapping of neutral antimatter allows us to explore the possibility of direct, model-independent tests. Successful cooling of the anti atoms, careful limits on systematics and increased trapping rates, all planned for our follow-up experiment (ALPHA-II) will reach unrivaled precision. CPT invariance implies that the spectra of hydrogen and antihydrogen should be identical. Spectra can be measured in principle with great precision, and any di#11;erences we might observe would revolutionize fundamental physics. This is the physics motivation for our experiment, one that requires only a few dozen researchers but must effectively integrate plasma, accelerator, atomic, and fundamental physics, as well as combine numerous technologies in the control, manipulation, and measurement of neutral and non-neutral particles. The ELENA ring (to which we hope to contribute, should funding be provided) is expect, when completed, to significantly enhance the performance of antihydrogen trapping by increasing by a factor of 100 the number of antiprotons that can be successfully trapped and cooled. ELENA operation is scheduled to commence in 2017. In collaboration with LBNL scientists, we proposed a frictional cooling scheme. This is an alternative cooling method to that used by ELENA. It is less complicated, experimentally unproven, and produces a lower yield of cold antiprotons. Students and postdoctoral researchers work on the trapping, cooling, transport, and nonlinear dynamics of antiprotons bunches that are provided by the AD to ALPHA; they contribute to the operation of the experiment, to software development, and to the design and operation of experiments. Students are expected to spend at summers at CERN while taking courses; after completion of courses they typically reside at CERN for most of the half-year run. The Antiproton Decelerator [AD] at CERN, along with its experiments, is the only facility in the world where antiprotons can be trapped and cooled and combined with positrons to form cold antihydrogen, with the ultimate goal of studying CPT violation and, subsequently, gravitational interactions of antimatter. Beyond the ALPHA experiment, the group worked on beam physics problems including limits on the average current in a time-dependent period cathode and new methods to create longitudinally coherent high repetition rate soft x-ray sources and wide bandwidth mode locked x-ray lasers. We completed a detailed study of quantum mechanical effects in the transit time cooling of muons.

  14. Fiber Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs and EventsFiber Lasers NIF

  15. Laser Faraday

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sandLaser Decontamination ofFaraday

  16. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.; Auerbach, J.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Whitlock, R.R.; Obenshain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 ..mu..m and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 10/sup 7/ cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils.

  17. High Gradient Two-Beam Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Y. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Kazakov, S. Yu. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Kuzikov, S. V. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod, 603600 (Russian Federation); Hirshfield, J. L. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-gradient two-beam electron accelerator structure using detuned cavities is described. A self-consistent theory based on a circuit model is presented to calculate idealized acceleration gradient, transformer ratio, and efficiency for energy transfer from the drive beam to the accelerated beam. Experimental efforts are being carried out to demonstrate this acceleration concept.

  18. RADIO EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARE PARTICLE ACCELERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIO EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARE PARTICLE ACCELERATION A. O. Benz Abstract The solar corona is a very be considered as a particle accelerator. The free mobility of charged particles in a dilute plasma to accelerate particles in resonance. From a plasma physics point of view, acceleration is not surprising

  19. Ultra-high vacuum photoelectron linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, David U.L.; Luo, Yan

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An rf linear accelerator for producing an electron beam. The outer wall of the rf cavity of said linear accelerator being perforated to allow gas inside said rf cavity to flow to a pressure chamber surrounding said rf cavity and having means of ultra high vacuum pumping of the cathode of said rf linear accelerator. Said rf linear accelerator is used to accelerate polarized or unpolarized electrons produced by a photocathode, or to accelerate thermally heated electrons produced by a thermionic cathode, or to accelerate rf heated field emission electrons produced by a field emission cathode.

  20. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); ( HEP); (LLC)

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  1. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, July-December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A. (comps.)

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the major projects of the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division during the last 6 months of calendar year 1981. We have continued work on the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator; we are doing studies of octupole focusing. We have completed the design study on an unusual electron-linear radiographic machine that could obtain x rays of turbine engines operating under simulated flight-maneuver conditions on a centrifuge. In September we completed the 5-y PIon Generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) program to develop the concept and technology for an accelerator-based facility to treat cancer in a hospital environment. The design and construction package for the site, building, and utilities for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility has been completed, and we have begun to concentrate on tests of the rf power equipment and on the design, procurement, and installation of the 2-MeV proto-type accelerator. The Proton Storage Ring project has continued to mature. The main effort on the racetrack microtron (RTM) has been on the design and construction of various components for the demonstration RTM. On the gyrocon radio-frequency generator project, the gyrocon was rebuilt with a new electron gun and new water-cooled gun-focus coil; these new components have performed well. We have initiated a project to produce a klystron analysis code that will be useful in reducing the electrical-energy demand for accelerators. A free-electron laser amplifier experiment to test the performance of a tapered wiggler at high optical power has been successfully completed.

  2. Accelerator Physics Accelerators form the backbone of SLAC's on-site experimental program. Research at SLAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    #12;Accelerator Physics Accelerators form the backbone of SLAC's on-site experimental program. Research at SLAC is continually improving accelerators, both here and at other laboratories, and paving the way for a new generation of particle acceleration technology. SLAC's famous linear accelerator

  3. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  4. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  5. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  6. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  7. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  8. Bella Energy formely Sun Electric Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes Jump to:formely Sun Electric Systems Jump

  9. Role of stochastic heating in wakefield acceleration when optical injection is used

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassou, S.; Bourdier, A.; Drouin, M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of an electron in two counterpropagating waves is investigated. Conditions for stochastic acceleration are derived. The possibility of stochastic heating is confirmed when two waves interact with low density plasma by performing PIC (Particle In Cell) code simulations. It is shown that stochastic heating can play an important role in laser wakefield acceleration. When considering low density plasma interacting with a high intensity wave perturbed by a low intensity counterpropagating wave, stochastic heating can provide electrons with the right momentum for trapping in the wakefield. The influence of stochastic acceleration on the trapping of electrons is compared to the one of the beatwave force which is responsible for cold injection. To do so, several polarizations for the colliding pulses are considered. For some value of the plasma density and pulse duration, a transition from an injection due to stochastic acceleration to a cold injection dominated regime—regarding the trapped charge—has been observed from 2D and 3D PIC code simulations. This transition is ruled by the ratio of the interaction length of the pulses to the longitudinal size of the bubble. When the interaction length of the laser pulses reaches the radius of the accelerating cavity stochastic heating becomes dominant, and might be necessary to get electrons trapped into the wakefield, when wakefield inhibition grows with plasma density.

  10. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  11. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  12. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  13. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1

  14. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  15. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia G , G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN { the AWAKE experiment { has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  16. Efficient control of accelerator maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jehan Boreux; Timoteo Carletti; Charalampos Skokos; Yannis Papaphilippou; Michel Vittot

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the Hamiltonian Control Theory was used in [Boreux et al.] to increase the dynamic aperture of a ring particle accelerator having a localized thin sextupole magnet. In this letter, these results are extended by proving that a simplified version of the obtained general control term leads to significant improvements of the dynamic aperture of the uncontrolled model. In addition, the dynamics of flat beams based on the same accelerator model can be significantly improved by a reduced controlled term applied in only 1 degree of freedom.

  17. Accelerated dynamics simulations of nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberuaga, B. P. (Blas Pedro); Stuart, S. J. (Steve J.); Voter, A. F.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the application of accelerated dynamics techniques to the study of carbon nanotubes. We have used the parallel replica method and temperature accelerated dynamics simulations are currently in progress. In the parallel replica study, we have stretched tubes at a rate significantly lower than that used in previous studies. In these preliminary results, we find that there are qualitative differences in the rupture of the nanotubes at different temperatures. We plan on extending this investigation to include nanotubes of various chiralities. We also plan on exploring unique geometries of nanotubes.

  18. Weak-Chaos Ratchet Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana; Vladislav B. Roitberg

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical Hamiltonian systems with a mixed phase space and some asymmetry may exhibit chaotic ratchet effects. The most significant such effect is a directed momentum current or acceleration. In known model systems, this effect may arise only for sufficiently strong chaos. In this paper, a Hamiltonian ratchet accelerator is introduced, featuring a momentum current for arbitrarily weak chaos. The system is a realistic, generalized kicked rotor and is exactly solvable to some extent, leading to analytical expressions for the momentum current. While this current arises also for relatively strong chaos, the maximal current is shown to occur, at least in one case, precisely in a limit of arbitrarily weak chaos.

  19. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melen, R.E.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors.

  20. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M.A.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].