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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Microsoft PowerPoint - Larson.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for What? for What? Planning for What? The Path Forward in the Western The Path Forward in the Western Interconnection Interconnection Doug Larson Doug Larson Western Interstate Energy Board Western Interstate Energy Board 1 1 Bottom Line Bottom Line Without agreement on the future for which Without agreement on the future for which we are planning and building transmission, we are planning and building transmission, our efforts are the equivalent of our efforts are the equivalent of pushing a string uphill. pushing a string uphill. 2 Outline of Presentation Outline of Presentation * * Explain the institutional and historical context for my Explain the institutional and historical context for my comments comments * * Outline the existing transmission planning, Outline the existing transmission planning,

2

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit...

3

Penn State Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory The Larson Transportation Institute (LTI)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and hybrid electric vehicle test platforms. Relevant HHVRL project history includes: · Combined BatteryPenn State Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory The Larson Transportation Institute (LTI) The Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory (HHVRL) at the Larson Transportation Institute (LTI

Lee, Dongwon

4

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Oxygen isotopes. References Peter B. Larson, Hugh P. Taylor Jr (1986) An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_San_Juan_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Larson_%26_Jr,_1986)&oldid=687474" Categories: Exploration Activities

5

Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The distribution of hydrothermally altered rocks was mapped over about 1 km2 in the Sevenmile Hole area. Two to four kilogram hand samples located by a handheld GPS were collected from many outcrops for laboratory analyses References Peter B. Larson, Allison Phillips, David John, Michael Cosca, Chad Pritchard, Allen Andersen, Jennifer Manion (2009) A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The

6

Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The distribution of hydrothermally altered rocks was mapped over about 1 km2 in the Sevenmile Hole area. Two to four kilogram hand samples located by a handheld GPS were collected from many outcrops K735for laboratory analyses References Peter B. Larson, Allison Phillips, David John, Michael Cosca, Chad Pritchard, Allen Andersen, Jennifer Manion (2009) A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The

7

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received funding from the Department for several transformational clean energy research projects. The Secretary is visiting UTC to highlight the importance of investing in innovation and clean energy to put people back to work, grow the economy, and win the future. He will be joined by U.S. Representatives John Larson and Joe Courtney for a tour

8

Isotopic Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2009) 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The 40Ar/39Ar data were collected from a single fragment of alunite from sample Y-05-25, approximately 0.5 cm3 in size. References Peter B. Larson, Allison Phillips, David John, Michael Cosca, Chad Pritchard, Allen Andersen, Jennifer Manion (2009) A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_Seven_Mile_Hole_Area_(Larson,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=68747

9

Medical Application Platform Apps Requirements Engineering Brian Larson, John Hatcliff, Sam Procter, Patrice Chalin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Application Platform Apps Requirements Engineering Brian Larson, John Hatcliff, Sam Procter agency guidance documents and process standards for medical devices (i.e., IEC 62304) generally consider medical devices to be stand-alone monolithic systems. The format and content of a system requirements

Huth, Michael

10

Bidders with Hard Valuation Problems Kate Larson KLARSON@CS.CMU.EDU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bidders with Hard Valuation Problems Kate Larson KLARSON@CS.CMU.EDU Tuomas Sandholm SANDHOLM. After time D the agent must stop. This is exactly the situation where agents have hard deadlines. Since i(t) be the set i(t) = {i(t)|t = n i=1 ti}. As mentioned earlier, the descriptive part

Chen, Yiling

11

Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 300 samples were collected from within and adjacent to the Lake City caldera. All specimens consist of single hand samples, approximately 1 kg in size. Care was taken to avoid oxidized or weathered rocks. Twenty

12

Kent Larson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Masterworks was selected as one of the Ten Best Books in Architecture, 2000 by the New York Times Review of Books. Related work was selected by Time magazine as a "Best...

13

Kent Larson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from fine-grain activity recognition using wearable accelerometers, a persuasive thermostat using GPS location of occupants, and a context-aware tunable LED lighting for office...

14

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Standard X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analyses were used in the laboratory to confirm the PIMA mineral identifications and to look for minerals that have poor SWIR response (e.g., quartz and feldspars) or were not present in great enough concentrations to be detected by the PIMA. Petrographic and electron microprobe analyses of selected samples were conducted in the laboratories of the GeoAnalytical Laboratory at Washington State

15

Garnet Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Garnet Wind Garnet Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Garnet Wind Facility Garnet Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Azusa Light & Water Developer Azusa Light & Water Energy Purchaser Azusa Light & Water Location Palm Springs CA Coordinates 33.918267°, -116.701076° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.918267,"lon":-116.701076,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

Alkali metal nitrate purification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process  

SciTech Connect

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250/sup 0/F and about 700/sup 0/F and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing watersoluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

Clavenna, L.R.; Eakman, J.M.; Kalina, T.; Wolfs, D.Y.

1980-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

19

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, LeRoy R. (Baytown, TX)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alkali Resistant Refractories - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Alkali Resistant Refractories Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

22

Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

Joshi, Ashok V. (Salt Lake City, UT); Balagopal, Shekar (Sandy, UT); Pendelton, Justin (Salt Lake City, UT)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Alkali metal/sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

Anand, Joginder N. (Clayton, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

Lee, S.H.D.

1991-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

25

Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

Lee, S.H.D.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

26

Photochemical studies of alkali halide vapors  

SciTech Connect

Thesis. An apparatus has been constructed for studying the photodissociation of alkali halides to produce excited alkali metal atoms. The key component is a low pressure H/sub 2/ arc continuum uv source. Radiation from this source, modulated by a chopping wheel and analyzed by a monochromator, enters a cell containing the alkali halide vapor. In the appropriate wavelength range, photodissociation occurs to produce the alkali atom in an excited /sup 2/p state, the flourescence from which is detected by a photomultiplier-lock-in amplifier combination. (auth)

Earl, B.L.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali...

28

Process for the disposal of alkali metals  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

Lewis, Leroy C. (Arco, ID)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Selection of non-adsorbing alkali components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project consists of three phases of laboratory experimental study. In phase I (screening), eight candidate materials, 304SS (serves as a base material for comparison), Hastelloy C-276, Hastelloy X, Haynes No. 188, Allonized 304SS, Pt-coated 304SS, and ceramic-coated 304SS, will be subjected to atmospheric TGA study under the simulated PFBC (oxidizing) environment with and without alkali vapor doping. Each candidate material will be evaluated for its resistance toward alkali-vapor capture. In addition, a post-test metallographic characterization of the sample will be performed to obtain a better understanding of the alkali capture mechanism and material behavior. The material(s) with little or no alkali-vapor adsorption will be selected as the promising material(s) for the Phase II study. In Phase II, the promising material(s) will be further tested in the TGA under elevated pressure to simulate the PFBC environment (in terms of temperature, pressure, and gas composition). The effect of pressure on the extent of alkali-vapor adsorption will be evaluated, and the test samples will be metallographically characterized. The most promising candidate material(s) will be identified and recommended for further tesfing in the actual PFBC environment. In Phase III, four materials will be selected from the eight candidate materials screened in the PFBC environment and will be evaluated for their alkali-vapor capture by atmospheric TGA under the coal gasification fuel gas (reducing) environment. The tested samples will also be metallographically characterized. The most promising material(s) will be identified and recommended for further testing in the actual coal gasification environment.

Lee, S.H.D.; Natesan, K.; Swift, W.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Selection of non-adsorbing alkali components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project consists of three phases of laboratory experimental study. In phase I (screening), eight candidate materials, 304SS (serves as a base material for comparison), Hastelloy C-276, Hastelloy X, Haynes No. 188, Allonized 304SS, Pt-coated 304SS, and ceramic-coated 304SS, will be subjected to atmospheric TGA study under the simulated PFBC (oxidizing) environment with and without alkali vapor doping. Each candidate material will be evaluated for its resistance toward alkali-vapor capture. In addition, a post-test metallographic characterization of the sample will be performed to obtain a better understanding of the alkali capture mechanism and material behavior. The material(s) with little or no alkali-vapor adsorption will be selected as the promising material(s) for the Phase II study. In Phase II, the promising material(s) will be further tested in the TGA under elevated pressure to simulate the PFBC environment (in terms of temperature, pressure, and gas composition). The effect of pressure on the extent of alkali-vapor adsorption will be evaluated, and the test samples will be metallographically characterized. The most promising candidate material(s) will be identified and recommended for further tesfing in the actual PFBC environment. In Phase III, four materials will be selected from the eight candidate materials screened in the PFBC environment and will be evaluated for their alkali-vapor capture by atmospheric TGA under the coal gasification fuel gas (reducing) environment. The tested samples will also be metallographically characterized. The most promising material(s) will be identified and recommended for further testing in the actual coal gasification environment.

Lee, S.H.D.; Natesan, K.; Swift, W.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

METATHESIS OF PLUTONIUM CARRIER LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATE WITH AN ALKALI  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plutonium fluoride precipitate is converted to plutonium hydroxide by digesting the precipitate with an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide solution.

Duffield, R.B.

1960-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

Dye, James L. (East Lansing, MI); Ceraso, Joseph M. (Lansing, MI); Tehan, Frederick J. (Utica, NY); Lok, Mei Tak (Urbana, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Primitive Alkali Basaltic Stratovolcano And Associated Eruptive Centres,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Primitive Alkali Basaltic Stratovolcano And Associated Eruptive Centres, Primitive Alkali Basaltic Stratovolcano And Associated Eruptive Centres, Northwestern Spitsbergen- Volcanology And Tectonic Significance Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Primitive Alkali Basaltic Stratovolcano And Associated Eruptive Centres, Northwestern Spitsbergen- Volcanology And Tectonic Significance Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Three Quaternary volcanic centres (Sverrefjell, Sigurdfjell and Halvdanpiggen) in northwestern Spitsbergen formed by off-ridge alkali basaltic volcanism associated with nearby ocean-floor spreading and subsequent tectonism. The Sverrefjell volcano is a unique stratovolcano constructed of primitive alkali basaltic pyroclastics with subordinate lavas. About 15-20 vol.% of this volcanic (and the other centres) comprises

34

Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX); Clavenna, LeRoy R. (Baytown, TX); Gorbaty, Martin L. (Fanwood, NJ); Tsou, Joe M. (Galveston, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

Alkali metal protective garment and composite material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

Ballif, III, John L. (Salt Lake City, UT); Yuan, Wei W. (Seattle, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

1985-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Neutral Oil Loss During Alkali Refining - ResearchGate  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Neutral Oil Loss During Alkali Refining. Albert J. Dijkstra. Journal of Oil & Fat Industries (Impact ... Experiments with cotton oil and soybean o ...

40

Microsoft PowerPoint - Larson.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

agreement on the future for which we are planning and building transmission, we are planning and building transmission, our efforts are the equivalent of our efforts are the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

Soung, Wen Y. (Houston, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

Seaborg, G.T.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or magnetic fields, or applying small changes in temperature, pressure, or doping-such intriguing control of a material's electronic properties is possible by exploiting strongly interacting or "correlated" electrons. Now a team of researchers from the University of Kiel in Germany and the ALS has found a novel, surprising way to continuously transform a layered metallic transition-metal compound, TaS2, into an insulator. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), they have demonstrated that adsorption of alkali atoms onto this material's surface gradually makes it more insulating, although in general, alkali adsorption should lead to more metallic behavior, as alkali atoms easily give away their loosely bound outermost electron.

44

Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

Virkar, Anil V. (Sandy, UT); Miller, Gerald R. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1983-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

45

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area (Redirected from Gabbs Alkali Flat Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

46

Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes  

SciTech Connect

A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

Doeff, Marca M. (Hayward, CA); Ma, Yanping (Berkeley, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard (Lafayette, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR ALKALI METALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A total of 107 abstracts is presented on analytical methods for alkali metals, as a part of a program for the evaluation of the performance of the primary cold trap from the Enrico Fermi Reactor. The abstracts are arranged into sections dealing with general aspects; sampling and dissolution techniques; and determination of uncombined alkali metal, oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and other impurities. (D.L.C.)

Garcia, E.E.; LaMont, B.D.

1964-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Faraday rotation and sensitivity of (100) bismuth-substituted ferrite garnet films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the Faraday rotation of in-plane magnetized bismuth-substituted ferrite garnet films grown by liquid phase epitaxy on (100) oriented gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. The Faraday spectra were measured for photon energies between 1.7- 2.6 eV. To interprete the spectra, we use a model based on two electric dipole transitions, one tetrahedral and one octahedral. Furthermore, the Faraday rotation sensitivity was measured at 2.3 eV, and found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predicitions. In particular, we find that the sensitivity increases linearly with the bismuth content and nonlinearly with the gallium content. 1 I.

L. E. Helseth; A. G. Solovyev; R. W. Hansen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Sampling apparatus for real-time alkali monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a sampling apparatus which provides representatives samples of high-temperature, high-pressure coal- derived process gases for analysis of alkali concentrations in either a gaseous phase or in a particulate-bearing gaseous phase by a real-time alkali monitor. The apparatus includes a sampling probe in the form of a ceramic tube that is inserted in the stream of combustion products for gathering a representative stream of gaseous products. Critical flow orifices are connected in series between the probe and an alkali monitor burner. A valved vent line connected in-line between the critical flow orifices is used to vent a significant percentage of the flow from the first critical flow orifice device to maintain the upstream pressure required to provide the desired flow rate through the second critical orifice to the alkali monitor burner. The gaseous products in the system between the probe and the burner is heated to inhibit condensation of alkali species. 2 figs.

French, W.E.; Logan, R.G.; Pineault, R.L.

1989-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

51

Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Wednesday, 29 March 2006 00:00 Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or magnetic fields, or applying small changes in temperature, pressure, or doping-such intriguing control of a material's electronic properties is possible by exploiting strongly interacting or "correlated" electrons. Now a team of researchers from the University of Kiel in Germany and the ALS has found a novel, surprising way to continuously transform a layered metallic transition-metal compound, TaS2, into an insulator. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), they have demonstrated that adsorption of alkali atoms onto this material's surface gradually makes it more insulating, although in general, alkali adsorption should lead to more metallic behavior, as alkali atoms easily give away their loosely bound outermost electron.

52

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

53

Method of recovery of alkali-metal constituents from coal-conversion residues. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal gasification operation or similar conversion process is carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst producing char particles containing alkali metal residues. Alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by burning the particles to increase their size and density and then leaching the particles of increased size and density with water, to extract the water-soluble alkali metal constituents.

Not Available

1981-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

Thermodynamic property evaluation and magnetic refrigeration cycle analysis for gadolinium gallium garnet  

SciTech Connect

Based on relevant material property data and previous model formulations, a magnetothermodynamic property map for gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was adapted for refrigeration cycle analysis in the temperature range 4-40 K and the magnetic field range 0-6 T. Employing methods similar to those previously developed for other materials and temperature ranges, assessments of limitations and relative performance were made for Carnot, ideal regenerative, and pseudo-constant field regenerative cycles. It was found that although Carnot cycle limitations on available temperature lift for gadolinium gallium garnet are not as severe as the limitations for materials previously examined, considerable improvement in cooling capacity and temperature lift combinations can be achieved by using regenerative cycles if serious loss mechanisms are avoided.

Murphy, R.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery  

SciTech Connect

A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed therebetween. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants therethrough at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed therebetween. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal therebetween. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal.

Elkins, Perry E. (Santa Ana, CA); Bell, Jerry E. (Santa Ana, CA); Harlow, Richard A. (Newport Beach, CA); Chase, Gordon G. (San Diego, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations  

SciTech Connect

A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

Jackovitz, John F. (Monroeville, PA); Pantier, Earl A. (Penn Hills, PA)

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed there between. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants there through at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed there between. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal there between. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal. 4 figs.

Elkins, P.E.; Bell, J.E.; Harlow, R.A.; Chase, G.G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Accommodation of Uranium into the Garnet Structure Sergey V.Yudintsev1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accommodation of Uranium into the Garnet Structure Sergey V.Yudintsev1 , Marya I. Lapina1 for uranium, the CaO ­ Fe2O3 ­ Al2O3 ­ SiO2 ­ ZrO2 ­ Gd2O3 ­ UO2 system was studied. Experiments were- corporation of U was found to be greatly dependent on the phase composition. Uranium content decreased from 18

Utsunomiya, Satoshi

59

Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

CANMET/Industry Research Consortium on Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deleterious chemical reaction that can result in the deterioration of concrete structures. This report presents the results of an R&D study, funded by a broadly-based multi-national industry consortium, that is developing an engineering data base on the long-term effectiveness of fly ash and other supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) in counteracting ASR in concrete.

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Oxygen-Consuming Chlor-Alkali Cell Configured To Minimize Peroxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen-Consuming Chlor-Alkali Cell Oxygen-Consuming Chlor-Alkali Cell Oxygen-Consuming Chlor-Alkali Cell Configured To Minimize Peroxide Formation Oxygen-consuming zero gap chlor-alkali cell was configured to minimize peroxide formation. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Oxygen-Consuming Chlor-Alkali Cell Configured To Minimize Peroxide Formation Oxygen-consuming zero gap chlor-alkali cell was configured to minimize peroxide formation. The cell included an ion-exchange membrane that divided the cell into an anode chamber including an anode and a cathode chamber including an oxygen gas diffusion cathode. The cathode included a single-piece of electrically conducting graphitized carbon cloth. Catalyst and polytetrafluoroethylene were attached to only one side of the cloth.

62

Alkali compounds catalyzed low temperature methanol synthesis over Cu-based catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel mixed catalyst system containing alkali compounds over Cu/MgO-Na catalyst was developed to synthesize methanol from syngas via ethyl formate in a slurry reactor. The results exhibited that among the used alkali formates (HCOOM, M=Li, Na, Cs, ... Keywords: CuMgO-Na/HCOONa/catalysis system, low temperature methanol synthesis, slurry phase

Baoshan Hu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

present in great enough concentrations to be detected by the PIMA. Petrographic and electron microprobe analyses of selected samples were conducted in the laboratories of the...

64

Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WHISKEY JOE WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING VALLEY ARNEGARD STAFFORD RICHBURG PRESCOTT BULL MOOSE S PASSPORT PHELPS BAY STAMPEDE BIG GULCH BLACKTAIL WESTHOPE WESTBERG DRY CREEK BEARS TAIL MINNESOTA ANTELOPE CREEK BLUE RIDGE NEWBURG E GRASSLAND NORTHGATE PLEASANT S SANDROCKS EAGLE NEST BEAR BUTTE DOLLAR JOE BIG MEADOW BARTA CHARLIE BOB HEART BUTTE RPD_MCKENZIECO_2 VALLEY ROAD GREAT NORTHERN

65

Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Selective Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print Wednesday, 24 September 2008 00:00 During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions has been known since the early 20th century, when Franz Hofmeister observed that some salts (ionic compounds) aided the solution of proteins in egg, some caused proteins to destabilize and precipitate, and others ranged in activity between the two extremes. Hofmeister then ranked "salt-out" (destabilizing) ions versus "salt-in" (stabilizing) ions according to the magnitude of their effects (the "Hofmeister effects"). However, despite enormous effort, why certain interactions are preferred over others is not completely understood. Recently, a team of researchers from UC Berkeley used the model systems of acetate and formate (two simple carboxylic acids) with a series of cations to test predictions made in the literature for preferential interactions. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used as this technique is highly sensitive to the chemical environments around a molecule. Experiments at ALS Beamline 8.0.1 confirmed strengthening of the interaction between the cations and the carboxylate group in the following order: potassium, sodium, and lithium.

66

2-M Probe At Gabbs Alkali Flat Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-M Probe At Gabbs Alkali Flat Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) 2-M Probe At Gabbs Alkali Flat Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Gabbs Alkali Flat Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Gabbs Alkali Flat Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 100 2-meter-deep temperature measurements were made during two separate surveys that took place in December 2007 and April 2008 (Figure 5). The area covered was 16 km in length parallel to the range front and a maximum of nearly 5 km out into the valley. The highest recorded temperature of 37°C was obtained approximately 100 m upslope from Rawhide hot springs. Near these springs, temperatures rapidly cool towards the

67

Investigation of the nature of electronic states in the alkali_metal oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hartree-Fock and Density functional theories have been applied to investigate the density of electronic states and electronic band structures. We studied: oxides, peroxides, nadoxides and ozonides, alkali-metal oxides M2O, peroxides M2O2, ...

O. O. Obolonskaya

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Laboratory investigation of combination of alkali/surfactant/polymer technology for Daqing EOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alkali/surfactant/polymer (ASP) formulas were developed for the Daqing oil field, Peoples Republic of China, with two surfactants from the US (Petrostep B-100 and a blend of TRS-18 and TRS-40) and one Chinese surfactant (PS-D{sub 2}). Each ASP solution gave interfacial tension (IFT) values in the range of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mN/m. Rheologic studies with polyacrylamide polymers indicate that solution viscosity decreases with alkali addition, as does the pseudoplasticity of the solution. Addition of surfactant to the alkali/polymer solution increases the solution viscosity with no slope change in the viscosity-vs.-shear-rate plot. Incremental oil recovery was higher than that with waterflood; 20% original oil in place (OOIP) for 0.2-PV ASP injection and 33% OOIP for 0.3-PV ASP injection in Daqing core. Surfactant and alkali retention were both flood in the Daqing oil field.

Gao Shutang; Li Huabin; Li Hongfu [Inst. of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Daqing (China)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

In situ formation of coal gasification catalysts from low cost alkali metal salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonaceous material, such as crushed coal, is admixed or impregnated with an inexpensive alkali metal compound, such as sodium chloride, and then pretreated with a stream containing steam at a temperature of 350.degree. to 650.degree. C. to enhance the catalytic activity of the mixture in a subsequent gasification of the mixture. The treatment may result in the transformation of the alkali metal compound into another, more catalytically active, form.

Wood, Bernard J. (Santa Clara, CA); Brittain, Robert D. (Cupertino, CA); Sancier, Kenneth M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

Quantum magnetism with polar alkali-metal dimers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that dipolar interactions between ultracold polar alkali-metal dimers in optical lattices can be used to realize a highly tunable generalization of the t-J model, which we refer to as the t-J-V-W model. The model features long-range spin-spin interactions J{sub z} and J{sub perpendicular} of XXZ type, long-range density-density interaction V, and long-range density-spin interaction W, all of which can be controlled in both magnitude and sign independently of each other and of the tunneling t. The spin's is encoded in the rotational degree of freedom of the molecules, while the interactions are controlled by applied static electric and continuous-wave microwave fields. Furthermore, we show that nuclear spins of the molecules can be used to implement an additional (orbital) degree of freedom that is coupled to the original rotational degree of freedom in a tunable way. The presented system is expected to exhibit exotic physics and to provide insights into strongly correlated phenomena in condensed-matter systems. Realistic experimental imperfections are discussed.

Gorshkov, Alexey V. [Institute for Quantum Information, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Manmana, Salvatore R.; Chen Gang [JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D. [Physics Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Rey, Ana Maria [JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Modelling Alkali Line Absorption and Molecular Bands in Cool DAZs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two peculiar stars showing an apparent extremely broadened and strong NaI D absorption have been discovered in surveys for cool white dwarfs by Oppenheimer et al. (2001) and Harris et al. (SDSS, 2003). We discuss the nature of these objects using PHOENIX atmosphere models for metal-poor brown dwarfs/very low mass stars, and new white dwarf LTE and NLTE models for hydrogen- and helium-dominated atmospheres with metals. These include complete molecular formation in chemical equilibrium and a model for the alkali resonance line broadening based on the damping profiles of Allard et al. (2003), as well as new molecular line opacities for metal hydrides. First results of our calculations indicate good agreement with a hydrogen-dominated WD atmosphere with a Na abundance roughly consistent with a state of high accretion. We analyse deviations of the abundances of Na, K, Mg and Ca from the cosmic pattern and comment on implications of these results for standard accretion scenarios.

Derek Homeier; Nicole F. Allard; France Allard; Peter H. Hauschildt; Andreas Schweitzer; Phillip C. Stancil; Philippe F. Weck

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

73

The effect of f[subscript O2] on the partitioning and valence of V and Cr in garnet/melt pairs and the relation to terrestrial mantle V and Cr content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chromium and vanadium are stable in multiple valence states in natural systems, and their distribution between garnet and silicate melt is not well understood. Here, the partitioning and valence state of V and Cr in experimental garnet/melt pairs have been studied at 1.8-3.0 GPa, with variable oxygen fugacity between IW-1.66 and the Ru-RuO{sub 2} (IW+9.36) buffer. In addition, the valence state of V and Cr has been measured in several high-pressure (majoritic garnet up to 20 GPa) experimental garnets, some natural megacrystic garnets from the western United States, and a suite of mantle garnets from South Africa. The results show that Cr remains in trivalent in garnet across a wide range of oxygen fugacities. Vanadium, on the other hand, exhibits variable valence state from 2.5 to 3.7 in the garnets and from 3.0 to 4.0 in the glasses. The valence state of V is always greater in the glass than in the garnet. Moreover, the garnet/melt partition coefficient, D(V), is highest when V is trivalent, at the most reduced conditions investigated (IW-1.66 to FMQ). The V{sup 2.5+} measured in high P-T experimental garnets is consistent with the reduced nature of those metal-bearing systems. The low V valence state measured in natural megacrystic garnets is consistent with f{sub O{sub 2}} close to the IW buffer, overlapping the range of f{sub O{sub 2}} measured independently by Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} techniques on similar samples. However, the valence state of V measured in a suite of mantle garnets from South Africa is constant across a 3 log f{sub O{sub 2}} unit range (FMQ-1.8 to FMQ-4.5), suggesting that the valence state of V is controlled by the crystal chemistry of the garnets rather than f{sub O{sub 2}} variations. The compatibility of V and Cr in garnets and other deep mantle silicates indicates that the depletion of these elements in the Earth's primitive upper mantle could be due to partitioning into lower mantle phases as well as into metal.

Righter, K.; Sutton, S.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Schmidt, G.; Yang, H.; Berthet, S.; Newville, M.; Choi, Y.; Downs, R.T.; Malavergne, V. (Paris); (NASA-JSC); (UC); (Ariz)

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Impact of the Source of Alkali on Sludge Batch 3 Melt Rate (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) melt rate tests in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) have indicated that improvements in melt rate can be achieved through an increase in the total alkali of the melter feed. Higher alkali can be attained by the use of an ''underwashed'' sludge, a high alkali frit, or a combination of the two. Although the general trend between melt rate and total alkali (in particular Na{sub 2}O content) has been demonstrated, the question of ''does the source of alkali (SOA) matter?'' still exists. Therefore the purpose of this set of tests was to determine if the source of alkali (frit versus sludge) can impact melt rate. The general test concept was to transition from a Na{sub 2}O-rich frit to a Na{sub 2}O-deficient frit while compensating the Na{sub 2}O content in the sludge to maintain the same overall Na{sub 2}O content in the melter feed. Specifically, the strategy was to vary the amount of alkali in frits and in the sludge batch 3 (SB3) sludge simulant (midpoint or baseline feed was SB3/Frit 418 at 35% waste loading) so that the resultant feeds had the same final glass composition when vitrified. A set of SOA feeds using frits ranging from 0 to 16 weight % Na{sub 2}O (in 4% increments) was first tested in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) to determine if indeed there was an impact. The dry-fed MRF tests indicated that if the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge (16% Na{sub 2}O feed) or the frit (the 0% Na{sub 2}O feed), then melt rate was negatively impacted when compared to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed currently being processed at DWPF. The MRF melt rates for the 4 and 12% SOA feeds were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 (8% SOA) feed. Due to this finding, a smaller subset of SOA feeds that could be processed in the DWPF (4 and 12% SOA feeds) was then tested in the Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF). The results from a previous SMRF test with SB3/Frit 418 (Smith et al. 2004) were used as the SMRF melt rate of the baseline feed. The SOA SMRF test results agreed with those of the MRF tests for these two feeds as the melt rates were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed. In other words, the source of alkali was close enough to the baseline feed as to not negatively impact melt rate. Based on these results, there appears to be an acceptable range of the source of alkali that results in the highest melt rate for a particular sludge batch. If, however, the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge or the frit, then melt rate will be lower. Although SB3 simulant sludge and Frit 418 were used for these tests, it was not the intent of these tests to determine an optimum source of alkali range for SB3. Rather, the findings of these tests should be used to help in the decision process for future sludge batch washing and/or blending strategies. The results, however, do confirm that the current processing of SB3 is being performed in the proper source of alkali range. Because all of this testing was performed on small-scale equipment with slurried, non-radioactive simulant, the exact impact of the source of alkali with SB3 in the DWPF melter could not be fully evaluated.

Smith, M

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The direct observation of alkali vapor species in biomass combustion and gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes new data from screening various feedstocks for alkali vapor release under combustion conditions. The successful development of a laboratory flow reactor and molecular beam, mass spectrometer interface is detailed. Its application to several herbaceous and woody feedstocks, as well as a fast-pyrolysis oil, under 800 and 1,100{degrees}C batch combustion, is documented. Chlorine seems to play a large role in the facile mobilization of potassium. Included in the report is a discussion of relevant literature on the alkali problem in combustors and turbines. Highlighted are the phenomena identified in studies on coal and methods that have been applied to alkali speciation. The nature of binding of alkali in coal versus biomass is discussed, together with the implications for the ease of release. Herbaceous species and many agricultural residues appear to pose significant problems in release of alkali species to the vapor at typical combustor temperatures. These problems could be especially acute in direct combustion fired turbines, but may be ameliorated in integrated gasification combined cycles.

French, R.J.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Potentials for fuel cells in refineries and chlor-alkali plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market potentials for fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries and chlor-alkali plants were evaluated. the most promising application appears to be in chlor-alkali plants where the production process is electricity intensive. Future anticipated changes in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries is not as attractive as in chlor-alkali plants. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is the most developed and the most competitive, but its use is limited by its being able to produce only low-pressure steam. Over the longer term, the molten carbonate and the solid oxide fuel cell both of which operate at significantly higher temperatures, are technically very attractive. However, they do not appear to be cost competitive with conventional systems.

Altseimer, J.H.; Roach, F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solid-phase epitaxy of silicon amorphized by implantation of the alkali elements rubidium and cesium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The redistribution of implanted Rb and Cs profiles in amorphous silicon during solid-phase epitaxial recrystallization has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. For the implantation dose used in these experiments, the alkali atoms segregate at the a-Si/c-Si interface during annealing resulting in concentration peaks near the interface. In this way, the alkali atoms are moved towards the surface. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in ion channeling configuration was performed to measure average recrystallization rates of the amorphous silicon layers. Preliminary studies on the influence of the alkali atoms on the solid-phase epitaxial regrowth rate reveal a strong retardation compared to the intrinsic recrystallization rate.

Maier, R.; Haeublein, V.; Ryssel, H.; Voellm, H.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; Frey, L. [Lehrstuhl fuer Elektronische Bauelemente (LEB), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Cauerstrasse 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Integrierte Systeme und Bauelementetechnologie (IISB), Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Elektronische Bauelemente (LEB), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Cauerstrasse 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany) and Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Integrierte Systeme und Bauelementetechnologie (IISB), Schottkystrasse 10, 9 (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Mikromechanik, Mikrofluidik/ Mikroaktorik (LMM), Universitaet des Saarlandes, Campus A5.1, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Elektronische Bauelemente (LEB), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Cauerstrasse 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany) and Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Integrierte Systeme und Bauelementetechnologie (IISB), Schottkystrasse 10,91 (Germany)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

Rapid Microwave Preparation of Highly Efficient Ce[superscript 3+]-Substituted Garnet Phosphors for Solid State White Lighting  

SciTech Connect

Ce{sup 3+}-substituted aluminum garnet compounds of yttrium (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) and lutetium (Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) - both important compounds in the generation of (In,Ga)N-based solid state white lighting - have been prepared using a simple microwave heating technique involving the use of a microwave susceptor to provide the initial heat source. Carbon used as the susceptor additionally creates a reducing atmosphere around the sample that helps stabilize the desired luminescent compound. High quality, phase-pure materials are prepared within a fraction of the time and using a fraction of the energy required in a conventional ceramic preparation; the microwave technique allows for a reduction of about 95% in preparation time, making it possible to obtain phase pure, Ce{sup 3+}-substituted garnet compounds in under 20 min of reaction time. It is estimated that the overall reduction in energy compared with ceramic routes as practiced in the lab is close to 99%. Conventionally prepared material is compared with material prepared using microwave heating in terms of structure, morphology, and optical properties, including quantum yield and thermal quenching of luminescence. Finally, the microwave-prepared compounds have been incorporated into light-emitting diode 'caps' to test their performance characteristics in a real device, in terms of their photon efficiency and color coordinates.

Birkel, Alexander; Denault, Kristin A.; George, Nathan C.; Doll, Courtney E.; Hry, Bathylle; Mikhailovsky, Alexander A.; Birkel, Christina S.; Hong, Byung-Chul; Seshadri, Ram (UCSB); (Mitsubishi)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reply to comment by J. Ganguly on Evaluation of thermobarometers for garnet peridotites'  

SciTech Connect

In the authors' 1984 and subsequent papers (Finnerty and Boyd, 1987; Finnerty, 1989) they evaluated more than 650 combinations of thermometers and barometers. Where possible they have used thermodynamic or mathematic formulations that authors have derived from their data. In cases where such formulations were either not provided or were incomplete, they have fitted data by the simplest possible procedures. Equation 9a of Lane and Ganguly (1980) requires calculation of the term X{sub Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}}{sup Opx} from analytical data in the form of weight-percent oxides. No procedure was given in their paper for calculation of this quantity. Different methods are required depending upon site occupancy models and upon whether the effects of components other than Mg, Al, and Si (MAS) are considered. Limiting their consideration to the MAS system, the authors tested alternate definitions of X{sub Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}}{sup Opx} by calculating P-T values for garnet peridotite xenoliths from northern Lesotho and comparing the estimates to those presented by Lane and Ganguly (1980, Fig. 5 LG80). When X{sub Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}}{sup Opx} was calculated as Al/(Al + 2Si), where the chemical symbols refer to the numbers of the respective cations calculated from the chemical analysis on a 6-oxygen basis, their estimates agreed with those in the Lane and Ganguly (1980) paper, insofar as could be determined by comparison with their Fig. 5. This formula was transferred into Program TEMPEST, and a plot generated with it was used as the basis for remarks in the text of the authors' paper. These remarks are correct, but an error was made in assembling the accompanying figures. A preliminary estimate calculated with the formula Al/(Al + Si) was inadvertently substituted for the correct figure and was included in their published paper (Fig. 4F). Pressure estimates in the invalid figure are low by about 10 kbar. The correct version of the original Fig. 4F is presented herein as Fig. 1.

Finnerty, A.A. (Balance Hydrologics, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States)); Boyd, F.R. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NOVEL REFRACTORY MATERIALS FOR HIGH ALKALI, HIGH TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

A project was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with a research team comprised of the academic institution Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T), and the industrial company MINTEQ International, Inc. (MINTEQ), along with representatives from the aluminum, chemical, glass, and forest products industries. The project was to address the need for new innovative refractory compositions by developing a family of novel MgO-Al 2O3, MgAl2O4, or other similar spinel structured or alumina-based unshaped refractory compositions (castables, gunnables, shotcretes, etc.) utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques (in-situ phase formation, altered conversion temperatures, accelerated reactions, etc). This family of refractory compositions would then be tailored for use in high-temperature, high-alkaline industrial environments like those found in the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries. Both practical refractory development experience and computer modeling techniques were used to aid in the design of this new family of materials. The newly developed materials were expected to offer alternative material choices for high-temperature, high-alkali environments that were capable of operating at higher temperatures (goal of increasing operating temperature by 100-200oC depending on process) or for longer periods of time (goal of twice the life span of current materials or next process determined service increment). This would lead to less process down time, greater energy efficiency for associated manufacturing processes (more heat kept in process), and materials that could be installed/repaired in a more efficient manner. The overall project goal was a 5% improvement in energy efficiency (brought about through a 20% improvement in thermal efficiency) resulting in a savings of 3.7 TBtu/yr (7.2 billion ft3 natural gas) by the year 2030. Additionally, new application techniques and systems were developed as part of this project to optimize the installation of this new family of refractory materials to maximize the properties of installed linings and to facilitate nuances such as hot installation and repair. Under this project, seven new shotcrete materials were developed for both primary and repair applications in aluminum, black liquor, coal gasification, and lime kiln environments. Developed materials were based on alumino-silicate, magnesia, and spinel forming systems. One of the developed materials was an insulating shotcrete to be used behind the high conductivity spinel linings developed under this project. Fundamental research work was carried out at MS&T throughout the life of the project to provide support for the development and production of the experimental refractory materials being developed. Work was also ongoing at ORNL and MS&T through the duration of the project on the measurement and characterization of key refractory properties as identified during year one of the project. Both materials currently being used in the industrial processes as identified and supplied by the industrial partners of this project and new materials being provided and developed by MINTEQ were evaluated as necessary. Additionally, energy savings estimates based on measured properties of the experimentally developed refractory systems from this project were made at MINTEQ to validate the energy savings estimates originally proposed for the project. As another part of the project, on-line inspection and hot repair techniques were considered. It was determined that although repair materials were successfully developed under this project for aluminum, black liquor, and coal gasification systems which enable hot repair, there was only minor interest from industry in implementing these materials. On-line inspection techniques were also identified under this project which are currently used in the steel industry, but implementation of these techniques in applications such as black liquor and coal gasification where higher temperature

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela [Minteq International, Inc.; Colavito, [Minteq International, Inc.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

Cassano, Anthony A. (Allentown, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

Cassano, A.A.

1985-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

83

Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) for Alkali-minimization Dyeing-printing Wastewater Biodegradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the laboratory scale anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was investigated by the use of granular sludge to treat alkali-minimization and dyeing-printing wastewater (ADW-water). The experiment showed that the start-up of reactor was completed ... Keywords: ABR, ADW-water, Granular sludge, UV254, VFA

Qijun Zhong; Bo Yang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Primary cell of high energy density in which the anode active material is an alkali metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primary cell of high specific energy in which the anode active material is an alkali metal and the cathode active material is sulphur oxychloride which simultaneously acts as an electrolyte solvent, said electrolyte further containing a dissolved salt and a co-solvent. The co-solvent is chosen from among phosphoryl chloride and benzoyl chloride; the dissolved salt is lithium tetrachloroaluminate.

Gabano, J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Alkali slurry ozonation to produce a high capacity nickel battery material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

Jackovitz, John F. (Monroeville, PA); Pantier, Earl A. (Penn Hills, PA)

1984-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

Impact of Alkali Source on Vitrification of SRS High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Savannah River Site is currently immobilizing high level nuclear waste sludge by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The processing strategy involves blending a large batch of sludge into a feed tank, washing the sludge to reduce the amount of soluble species, then processing the large ''sludge batch'' through the DWPF. Each sludge batch is tested by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using simulants and tests with samples of the radioactive waste to ''qualify'' the batch prior to processing in the DWPF. The DWPF pretreats the sludge by first acidifying the sludge with nitric and formic acid. The ratio of nitric to formic acid is adjusted as required to target a final glass composition that is slightly reducing (the target is for {approx}20% of the iron to have a valence of two in the glass). The formic acid reduces the mercury in the feed to elemental mercury which is steam stripped from the feed. After a concentration step, the glass former (glass frit) is added as a 50 wt% slurry and the batch is concentrated to approximately 50 wt% solids. The feed slurry is then fed to a joule heated melter maintained at 1150 C. The glass must meet both processing (e.g., viscosity and liquidus temperature) and product performance (e.g., durability) constraints The alkali content of the final waste glass is a critical parameter that affects key glass properties (such as durability) as well as the processing characteristics of the waste sludge during the pretreatment and vitrification processes. Increasing the alkali content of the glass has been shown to improve the production rate of the DWPF, but the total alkali in the final glass is limited by constraints on glass durability and viscosity. Two sources of alkali contribute to the final alkali content of the glass: sodium salts in the waste supernate and sodium and lithium oxides in the glass frit added during pretreatment processes. Sodium salts in the waste supernate can be reduced significantly by washing the solids to remove soluble species. The ''washing strategy'' for future sludge batches can be controlled to limit the soluble sodium remaining in the waste stream while balancing the alkali content of the frit to maintain acceptable glass properties as well as improve melter processing characteristics.

LAMBERT, D. P.; MILLER, D. H.; PEELER, D. K.; SMITH, M. E.; STONE, M. E.

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

88

Post-Harvest Processing Methods for Reduction of Silica and Alkali Metals in Wheat Straw  

SciTech Connect

Silica and alkali metals in wheat straw limit its use for bioenergy and gasification. Slag deposits occur via the eutectic melting of SiO2 with K2O, trapping chlorides at surfaces and causing corrosion. A minimum melting point of 950C is desirable, corresponding to SiO2:K2O of about 3:1. Mild chemical treatments were used to reduce Si, K, and Cl, while varying temperature, concentration, %-solids, and time. Dilute acid was more effective at removing K and Cl, while dilute alkali was more effective for Si. Reduction of minerals in this manner may prove economical for increasing utilization of the straw for combustion or gasification.

Thompson, David Neal; Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Shaw, Peter Gordon

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Petrography study on altered flint aggregate by alkali-silica reaction  

SciTech Connect

The aim of our study is to improve our understanding of an alkali-silica reaction (ASR) via petrography. We used a chemical concrete subsystem: flint aggregate, portlandite and KOH. The altered flint aggregate is followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after acid treatment at different intervals. After acid treatment, the observations showed an increase in aggregate porosity and revealed internal degradation of the aggregate. This degradation created amorphous zones. Before acid treatment, the analyses on polished sections by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) enabled visualization of K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} penetration into the aggregate. The appearance of amorphous zones and penetration of positive ions into the aggregate are correlated with the increase in the molar fraction of silanol sites. This degradation is specific to the alkali-silica reaction.

Bulteel, D. [Departement Genie Civil de l'Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Industrielles et des Mines de Douai, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, B.P. 838, F-59508, DOUAI Cedex (France)]. E-mail: bulteel@ensm-douai.fr; Rafai, N. [Laboratoire d'Etude et de Recherches des Materiaux a Arles, F-13631 ARLES (France); Degrugilliers, P. [Departement Genie Civil de l'Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Industrielles et des Mines de Douai, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, B.P. 838, F-59508, DOUAI Cedex (France); Garcia-Diaz, E. [Departement Genie Civil de l'Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Industrielles et des Mines de Douai, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, B.P. 838, F-59508, DOUAI Cedex (France)

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effect of cofiring coal and biofuel with sewage sludge on alkali problems in a circulating fluidized bed boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cofiring experiments were performed in a 12 MW circulating fluidized bed boiler. The fuel combinations were biofuel (wood+straw), coal+biofuel, coal+sewage sludge+biofuel, and sewage sludge+biofuel. Limestone or chlorine (PVC) was added in separate experiments. Effects of feed composition on bed ash and fly ash were examined. The composition of flue gas was measured, including on-line measurement of alkali chlorides. Deposits were collected on a probe simulating a superheater tube. It was found that the fuel combination, as well as addition of limestone, has little effect on the alkali fraction in bed ash, while chlorine decreases the alkali fraction in bed ash. Sewage sludge practically eliminates alkali chlorides in flue gas and deposits. Addition of enough limestone to coal and sludge for elimination of the SO{sub 2} emission does not change the effect of chlorine. Chlorine addition increases the alkali chloride in flue gas, but no chlorine was found in the deposits with sewage sludge as a cofuel. Cofiring of coal and biofuel lowers the alkali chloride concentration in the flue gas to about a third compared with that of pure biofuel. This is not affected by addition of lime or chlorine. It is concluded that aluminum compounds in coal and sludge are more important than sulfur to reduce the level of KCl in flue gas and deposits. 24 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

K.O. Davidsson; L.-E. Aamand; A.-L. Elled; B. Leckner [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Department of Energy and Environment

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

CANMET/Industry Research Consortium on Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity in Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deleterious chemical reaction that can result in the deterioration of concrete structures. This report presents the results of a research and development study, funded by a broadly-based multi-national industry consortium, that is developing an engineering database on the long-term effectiveness of fly ash and other supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) in counteracting ASR in concrete.

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Role of High Calcium Fly Ashes in Controlling Alkali-Silica Reactions in Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deleterious chemical reaction that can result in the deterioration of concrete structures. This report builds upon the results of a research and development study, funded by a broadly-based multi-national industry consortium, that is developing an engineering database on the long-term effectiveness of Class F fly ash and other supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) in counteracting ASR in concrete.

2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

95

SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS FOR HANDLING PLUTONIUM, URANIUM, THORIUM, THE ALKALI METALS, ZIRCONIUM, TITANIUM, MAGNESIUM, AND CALCIUM  

SciTech Connect

BS>This report compiles from various sources safety considerations for work with the special metals plutonium, uranium, thorium, the alkali group, magnesium, titanium, calcium, and zirconium. General criteria to be observed in handling all of these metals and their alloys are listed, as well as characteristics of individual metals with regard to health hazards, pyrophoricity, explosiveness, and other chemical reactions, in both handling and storage. (auth)

Stout, E.L. comp.

1957-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mineralogy, geochemistry and expansion testing of an alkali-reactive basalt from western Anatolia, Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the alkali-silica reaction performance of a basalt rock from western Anatolia, Turkey is reported. It is observed that the rock causes severe gel formation in the concrete microbar test. It appears that the main source of expansion is the reactive glassy phase of the basalt matrix having approximately 70% of SiO{sub 2}. The study presents the microstructural characteristics of unreacted and reacted basalt aggregate by optical and electron microscopy and discusses the possible reaction mechanism. Microstructural analysis revealed that the dissolution of silica is overwhelming in the matrix of the basalt and it eventually generates four consequences: (1) Formation of alkali-silica reaction gel at the aggregate perimeter, (2) increased porosity and permeability of the basalt matrix, (3) reduction of mechanical properties of the aggregate and (4) additional gel formation within the aggregate. It is concluded that the basalt rock is highly prone to alkali-silica reaction. As an aggregate, this rock is not suitable for concrete production.

Copuroglu, Oguzhan, E-mail: O.Copuroglu@CiTG.TUDelft.NL [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of CiTG, Materials and Environment, Stevinweg 1, 2628CN, Delft (Netherlands); Andic-Cakir, Ozge [Ege University, Civil Engineering Dept., 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M. [Geological Survey of Norway, Dept. of Mineral Characterization, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kuehnel, Radko [Burgemeester Merkusstraat 5, 2645 NJ, Delfgauw (Netherlands)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Potentials for Fuel Cells in Refineries and Chlor-Alkali Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The market potentials for fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries and chlor-alkali plants were evaluated. Costs of the total energy consumed (power plus steam) were calculated and compared with those for more conventional cogeneration systems. Questionnaires were sent to major plants in both industries to determine technical requirements and data required for the assessment of the market potential. The most promising application appears to be in chlor-alkali plants where the production process is electricity intensive. Future anticipated changes in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries is not as attractive as in chlor-alkali plants. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is the most developed and the most cost competitive, but its use is limited by its being able to produce only low-pressure steam. Over the longer term, the molten carbonate and the solid oxide fuel cell, both of which operate at significantly higher temperatures, are technically very attractive. However, they do not appear to be cost competitive with conventional systems.

Altseimer, J. H.; Roach, F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effect of silicate modulus and metakaolin incorporation on the carbonation of alkali silicate-activated slags  

SciTech Connect

Accelerated carbonation is induced in pastes and mortars produced from alkali silicate-activated granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS)-metakaolin (MK) blends, by exposure to CO{sub 2}-rich gas atmospheres. Uncarbonated specimens show compressive strengths of up to 63 MPa after 28 days of curing when GBFS is used as the sole binder, and this decreases by 40-50% upon complete carbonation. The final strength of carbonated samples is largely independent of the extent of metakaolin incorporation up to 20%. Increasing the metakaolin content of the binder leads to a reduction in mechanical strength, more rapid carbonation, and an increase in capillary sorptivity. A higher susceptibility to carbonation is identified when activation is carried out with a lower solution modulus (SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O ratio) in metakaolin-free samples, but this trend is reversed when metakaolin is added due to the formation of secondary aluminosilicate phases. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffractometry of uncarbonated paste samples shows that the main reaction products in alkali-activated GBFS/MK blends are C-S-H gels, and aluminosilicates with a zeolitic (gismondine) structure. The main crystalline carbonation products are calcite in all samples and trona only in samples containing no metakaolin, with carbonation taking place in the C-S-H gels of all samples, and involving the free Na{sup +} present in the pore solution of the metakaolin-free samples. Samples containing metakaolin do not appear to have the same availability of Na{sup +} for carbonation, indicating that this is more effectively bound in the presence of a secondary aluminosilicate gel phase. It is clear that claims of exceptional carbonation resistance in alkali-activated binders are not universally true, but by developing a fuller mechanistic understanding of this process, it will certainly be possible to improve performance in this area.

Bernal, Susan A., E-mail: susana.bernal@gmail.co [Materials Engineering Department, Composite Materials Group, CENM, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Mejia de Gutierrez, Ruby [Materials Engineering Department, Composite Materials Group, CENM, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Provis, John L., E-mail: jprovis@unimelb.edu.a [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rose, Volker [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

DuraLith Alkali-Aluminosilicate Geopolymer Waste Form Testing for Hanford Secondary Waste  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the work reported here was to develop additional information regarding the DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer as a waste form for liquid secondary waste to support selection of a final waste form for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary liquid wastes to be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility on the Hanford Site. Testing focused on optimizing waste loading, improving waste form performance, and evaluating the robustness of the waste form with respect to waste variability.

Gong, W. L.; Lutz, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

100

Alkali Treatment of Acidic Solution from Hanford K Basin Sludge Dissolution  

SciTech Connect

Nitric acid solutions will be created from the dissolution of Hanford K Basin sludge. These acidic dissolver solutions must be made alkaline by treatment with NaOH solution before they are disposed to ~ the Tank Waste Remediation System on the Hanford Site. During the alkali treatments, sodium diuranate, hydroxides of iron and aluminum, and radioelements (uranium, plutonium, and americium) will precipitate from the dissolver solution. Laboratory tests, discussed here, were pefiormed to provide information on these precipitates and their precipitation behavior that is important in designing the engineering flowsheet for the treatment process. Specifically, experiments were conducted to determine the optimum precipitation conditions; the completeness of uranium, plutonium, and americium precipitation; the rate of sedimentation; and the physico-chemical characteristics of the solids formed by alkali treatment of simulated acidic dissolver solutions. These experiments also determined the redistribution of uranium, plutonium, and americium flom the sodium di~ate and iron and al&inurn hydroxide precipitates upon contact with carbonate- and EDTA-bearing simulated waste solutions. Note: EDTA is the tetrasodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

AA Bessonov; AB Yusov; AM Fedoseev; AV Gelis; AY Garnov; CH Delegard; GM Plavnik; LN Astafurova; MS Grigoriev; NA Budantseva; NN Krot; SI Nikitenko; TP Puraeva; VP Perminov; VP Shilov

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of this program was to determine the feasibility of using continuous high-temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce silicon in large quantities and of suitable purity for use in the production of photovoltaic solar cells. Equilibrium calculations showed that a range of conditions were available where silicon was produced as a condensed phase but the byproduct alkali metal salt was a vapor. A process was proposed using the vapor phase reaction of Na with SiCl/sub 4/. Low pressure experiments were performed demonstrating that free silicon was produced and providing experience with the construction of reactant vapor generators. Further experiments at higher reagent flow rates were performed in a low temperature flow tube configuration with co-axial injection of reagents. Relatively pure silicon was produced in these experiments. A high temperature graphite flow tube was built and continuous separation of Si from NaCl was demonstrated. A larger-scaled well-stirred reactor was built. Experiments were performed to investigate the compatibility of graphite-based reactor materials of construction with sodium. At 1100 to 1200 K none of these materials were found to be suitable. At 1700 K the graphites performed well with little damage except to coatings of pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide which were damaged.

Olson, D.B.; Miller, W.J.; Gould, R.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Dual alkali approaches for the capture and separation of CO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The Solvay process utilizes two alkalis in sequential order to convert CO{sub 2} to sodium carbonate for commercial use. The ability to transform CO{sub 2} into sodium carbonate cost-effectively would be a breakthrough in CO{sub 2} sequestration by providing benign long-term storage of CO{sub 2}. However, the Solvay process was not designed for CO{sub 2} sequestration and is not practical for use in the sequestration of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel power plants. This paper investigates methods to modify the process in order to make it effective for the control of power plant CO{sub 2} emissions. The new modified process, called the Dual Alkali Approach, attempts to replace either or both bases, ammonia and lime, in the Solvay process with other compounds to make CO{sub 2} capture and separation efficient. Ammonia was replaced with different amines in aqueous solutions of salts and it was found that bicarbonate precipitation did occur. A method to regenerate the amine in the second step has not been implemented. However, the second step in Solvay Process has been implemented without using lime, namely, ammonia has been regenerated from an ammonium chloride solution using activated carbon. The HCl adsorbed in the activated carbon was removed by water to regenerate the activated carbon.

Huang, H.P.; Shi, Y.; Li, W.; Chang, S.G.

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques  

SciTech Connect

Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

In situ parametric study of alkali release in pulverized coal combustion: Effects of operating conditions and gas composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work concerns a parametric study of alkali release in a lab-scale, pulverized coal combustor (drop tube reactor) at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were made at steady reactor conditions using excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence (ELIF) and with direct optical access to the flue gas pipe. In this way, absolute gas-phase alkali species could be determined in situ, continuously, with sub-ppb sensitivity, directly in the flue gas. A hard coal was fired in the range 1000-1300{sup o}C, for residence times in the range 3-5 s and for air numbers {lambda} (air/fuel ratios) from 1.15 to 1.50. In addition, the amount of chlorine, water vapor and sulfur, respectively, was increased in known amounts by controlled dosing of HCl, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} into the combustion gas to determine effects of these components on release or capture of the alkali species. The experimental results are also compared with values calculated using ash/fuel analyses and sequential extraction to obtain a fuller picture of alkali release in pulverized fuel combustion. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

H. Schuermann; P.B. Monkhouse; S. Unterberger; K.R.G. Hein [Universitaet Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany). Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Interactions of hydrogen with alkali promoted Ru/SiO{sub 2} catalysts: A proton NMR study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Role of H spillover to the silica support was studied using chemisorption; a strongly bound component of spilled over H was found in the silica support which interfered with accurate measurements of active metal sites via volumetric strong H chemisorption. The volumetric chemisorption technique was modified so that measurement times were reduced from 12--36 h to 1 h. The active Ru surface was characterized means of changes in proton spin counts and NMR Knight shifts vs alkali loading. Na, K blocked the active surface of Ru metal, but Cs was pushed off by H chemisorption. The alkali promoters restricted H mobility on both metal surface and at the metal support interfaces; this is consistent with effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. {sup 1}H NMR was used to study the effect of the active metal and promoter on support hydroxyl groups. The OH group density in the silica support decreased with metal and/or promoter loading, but not on a one-to-one basis; the exchange efficiency of the hydroxyls decreased with atomic size of the alkali metal. An additional downfield proton resonance was detected which was assigned to the alkali hydroxide species in the support.

Ozbay, U.D.

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

106

Rheological properties of water-coal slurries based on brown coal in the presence of sodium lignosulfonates and alkali  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of the oxidized surface of brown coal on the structural and rheological properties of water-coal slurries was found. The kinetics of structure formation processes in water-coal slurries based on as-received and oxidized brown coal was studied. The effect of lignosulfonate and alkali additives on the samples of brown coal was considered.

D.P. Savitskii; A.S. Makarov; V.A. Zavgorodnii [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine). Dumanskii Institute of Colloid and Water Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ultralow-power local laser control of the dimer density in alkali-metal vapors through photodesorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultralow-power diode-laser radiation is employed to induce photodesorption of cesium from a partially transparent thin-film cesium adsorbate on a solid surface. Using resonant Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that this photodesorption process enables an accurate local optical control of the density of dimer molecules in alkali-metal vapors.

Jha, Pankaj K.; Scully, Marlan O. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Dorfman, Konstantin E. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Yi Zhenhuan; Yuan Luqi; Welch, George R. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Sautenkov, Vladimir A. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Joint Institute of High Temperature, RAS, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Rostovtsev, Yuri V. [University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Zheltikov, Aleksei M. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

108

Alkali removal at about 1400{sup o}C for the pressurized pulverized coal combustion combined cycle. 1. Thermodynamics and concept  

SciTech Connect

The limitation of fossil fuel resources and the necessity of reducing CO{sub 2} emission require an increase of the efficiency of power plants by using combined cycle power systems. The pressurized pulverized coal combustion (PPCC) combined cycle is a coal fired combined cycle concept which is able to achieve efficiencies in excess of 53%. The direct use of the hot flue gas for driving a gas turbine requires a hot gas cleanup to achieve corrosion prevention of the turbine blading. One of the main problems is the release of alkalis during the coal combustion process. Therefore, the thermodynamic basics for the control of alkali vapor pressures in the hot flue gas of PPCC have been investigated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric measurements on alkali oxide activities in and alkali partial pressures over coal ash slags with and without additives and alkali laden model sorbents. The obtained results reveal that the requirements of the gas turbine manufacturers regarding alkali concentration in the hot flue gas should be satisfiable by certain aluminosilicate sorbents. On the basis of these results, a concept for alkali vapor removal is proposed. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Winfried Willenborg; Michael Mueller; Klaus Hilpert [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development of laser optogalvanic spectroscopy as a probe of alkali atoms in an MHD environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Application of Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy (LOGS) to MHD combustion systems requires selection of an appropriate alkali atom electronic transition to monitor. These studies suggest that in MHD combustion systems, it is desirable to use cesium, which occurs as an impurity in potassium compounds, as a surrogate for potassium rather than to directly monitor potassium in order to obtain reliable determinations of seed concentration. Studies were also performed to investigate the effect of electrode corrosion on the normalized LOGS signal intensity at a fixed wavelength (578.238 nm). During six-hour experiments in a near-stoichiometric flame, the normalized LOGS signal intensity decreased by 40-50% for a -960 V rod electrode and by 10-20% for a -500 V rod electrode. These changes are attributed to buildup of an oxide coating on the electrode, reducing the collection efficiency of the electrode.

Monts, D.L.; Qian, S.; Cook, R.L.; Shepard, W.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Sputtering and secondary ion emission properties of alkali metal films and adsorbed monolayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The secondary ion emission of alkali metal adsorbed monlayer and multilayer films has been studied. Profiling with sub-monolayer resolution has been performed by Auger, x-ray photoemission and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Characteristic differences in the sputtering yields, and ion fraction have been observed which are associated with both the surface bonding properties and the mechanism leading to the formation of secondary ions. By sputtering with a negative bias applied to the sample, positive secondary ions are returned to the surface, resulting in a reduced sputter-induced erosion rate. Comparison with the results obtained with K and Li overlayers sputtered without sample bias provides an experimental value of both the total and secondary ion sputtering yields. The first and second monolayers can be readily identified and the first monolayer exhibits a lower sputtering yield and higher secondary ion fraction. This result is related to adsorption theory and measured values are compared with those obtained by thermal desorption measurements.

Krauss, A R; Gruen, D M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy conservation in the primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries  

SciTech Connect

The primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries together use nearly 13% of the electrical energy consumed by US industry. As part of its mission to promote energy conservation in basic US industries, the DOE surveys the present technological status of the major electrochemical industries and evaluates promising technological innovations that may lead to reduced energy requirements. This study provides technical and economic analyses in support of a government program of research and development in advanced electrolytic technology. This program is intended to supplement the development efforts directed toward energy savings by private industry. Sections II and III of this report cover aluminum and chlorine production processes only, since these two industries represent over 90% of the electrical energy requirements of all electrolytic industries in the United States. Section IV examines barriers to accelerated research and development by the electrolytic industries, and makes suggestions for government actions to overcome these barriers.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Studies of non-proportionality in alkali halide and strontium iodide scintillators using SLYNCI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently a collaboration of LLNL and LBNL has constructed a second generation Compton coincidence instrument to study the non-proportionality of scintillators. This device, known as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light-Yield Non-proportionality Characterization Instrument), has can completely characterize a sample with less than 24 hours of running time. Thus, SLYNCI enables a number of systematic studies of scintillators since many samples can be processed in a reasonable length of time. These studies include differences in nonproportionality between different types of scintillators, different members of the same family of scintillators, and impact of different doping levels. The results of such recent studies are presented here, including a study of various alkali halides, and the impact of europium doping level in strontium iodide. Directions of future work area also discussed.

Ahle, Larry; Bizarri, Gregory; Boatner, Lynn; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Payne, Stephen A.; Shah, Kanai; Sheets, Steven; Sturm, Benjamin, W.

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

113

Studies of Non-Proportionality in Alkali Halide and Strontium Iodide Scintillators Using SLYNCI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently a collaboration of LLNL and LBNL has constructed a second generation Compton coincidence instrument to study the non-proportionality of scintillators [1-3]. This device, known as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light-Yield Non-proportionality Characterization Instrument), has can completely characterize a sample with less than 24 hours of running time. Thus, SLYNCI enables a number of systematic studies of scintillators since many samples can be processed in a reasonable length of time. These studies include differences in nonproportionality between different types of scintillators, different members of the same family of scintillators, and impact of different doping levels. The results of such recent studies are presented here, including a study of various alkali halides, and the impact of europium doping level in strontium iodide. Directions of future work area also discussed.

Ahle, L; Bizarri, G; Boatner, L; Cherepy, N J; Choong, W; Moses, W W; Payne, S A; Shah, K; Sheets, S; Sturm, B W

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

114

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A fixed granular-bed sorber for measurement and control of alkali vapors in PFBC (pressurized fluidized-bed combustion)  

SciTech Connect

Alkali vapors (Na and K) in the hot flue gas from the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) of coal could cause corrosion problems with the gas turbine blades. In a laboratory-scale PFBC test with Beulah lignite, a fixed granular bed of activated bauxite sorbent was used to demonstrate its capability for measuring and controlling alkali vapors in the PFBC flue gas. The Beulah lignite was combusted in a bed of Tymochtee dolomite at bed temperatures ranging from 850 to 875{degrees}C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. The time-averaged concentration of sodium vapor in the PFBC flue gas was determined from the analysis of two identical beds of activated bauxite and found to be 1.42 and 1.50 ppmW. The potassium vapor concentration was determined to be 0.10 ppmW. The sodium material balance showed that only 0.24% of the total sodium in the lignite was released as vapor species in the PFBC flue gas. This results in an average of 1.56 ppmW alkali vapors in the PFBC flue gas. This average is more than 1.5 orders of magnitude greater than the currently suggested alkali specification limit of 0.024 ppm for an industrial gas turbine. The adsorption data obtained with the activated bauxite beds were also analyzed mathematically by use of a LUB (length of unused bed)/equilibrium section concept. Analytical results showed that the length of the bed, L{sub o} in centimeters, relates to the break through time, {theta}{sub b} in hours, for the alkali vapor to break through the bed as follows: L{sub o} = 33.02 + 1.99 {theta}{sub b}. This formula provides useful information for the engineering design of fixed-bed activated bauxite sorbers for the measurement and control of alkali vapors in PFBC flue gas. 26 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Kimzeyite garnet phosphors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phosphor of formula I is included in a phosphor composition in a lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light, Ca.sub.3-x-zSr.sub.xCe.sub.zM.sup.1.sub.2M.sup.2AlSiO.sub.12 (I) wherein M.sup.1 is Hf, Zr, or a combination thereof; M.sup.2 is Al, or a combination of Al and Ga; z<3-x; and 0.2>x.gtoreq.0. The lighting apparatus includes a semiconductor light source in addition to the phosphor composition.

Lyons, Robert Joseph

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Effects of Using Alkali-Silica Reaction Affected Recycled Concrete Aggregate in Hot Mix Asphalt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of using alkali-silica reaction (ASR) affected recycled concrete aggregate (ASR-RCA) in hot mix asphalt (HMA) were investigated in this study. Dilatometer and modified beam tests were performed to determine the possibility of new ASR occurring in reactive aggregates within the HMA or re-expansion of existing gel. The Lottman test and micro-calorimeter were used to determine the moisture susceptibility of HMA made with ASR-RCA. A differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to evaluate the drying of an artificial gel and x-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to check for the potential presence of gel in the filler fraction of the ASR-RCAs. Micro-deval and freeze-thaw tests were evaluated for their potential to indicate the presence of excess micro-cracks or ASR gel. Expansion testing indicated that both ASR-RCAs were still reactive with 0.5 N NaOH solution saturated with calcium hydroxide (CH) at 60 degrees C. Dilatometer testing of HMA specimens in NaOH CH solution at 60 degrees C indicated a reaction between the asphalt binder and the solution, but little, if any, ASR. The lack of expansion in the modified beam test supports the binder-solution interaction. However, dilatometer testing in deicer solution at the same temperature indicated that some ASR may have occurred along with the primary binder-solution interaction. The volume change characteristics associated with the binder-solution interaction with and without ASR was supported by the change in pH and alkali concentration of the test solution. DSC/TGA testing indicated that the artificial gel dehydrated at approximately 100 degrees C. XRD analysis of the filler indicated that some gel may have accumulated in this fraction. Moisture damage testing indicated good resistance to moisture damage by HMA mixtures made with ASR-RCA especially compared to a virgin siliceous aggregate. Micro-deval and freeze-thaw tests can detect the presence of micro-cracks due to ASR in ASR-RCAs as higher mass loss than the virgin aggregate. The potential distress mechanisms that may occur when using ASR-RCA in an HMA pavement were identified. Results obtained using accelerated laboratory conditions were extrapolated based on anticipated field conditions. Guidelines for the mitigation of potential distresses in HMA made with ASR-RCA are presented.

Geiger, Brian James

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Li6La3SnMO12 (M = Sb, Nb, Ta), a Family of Lithium Garnets with High Li-Ion Conductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the influence of covalent bonding within the garnet framework on the conductivity of Li+ in the interstitial space, the Li+ conductivities in the family of Sn-based compounds Li6La3 SnMO12 (M = Sb, Nb, Ta) have been obtained and are compared with those of Li6La3ZrMO12. Refinement of the neutron diffraction pattern of Li6La3 SnNbO12shows that the interstitial tetrahedral sites (24d ) are about half-occupied and most of the Li in the interstitial bridging octahedral sites are displaced from the center position (48g ). The Sb-based compound has the largest lattice parameter while the Ta-based compound has the highest Li+-ion conductivity of 0.42 10 4 Scm 1.

Bridges, Craig A [ORNL; Goodenough, J. B. [University of Texas, Austin; Gupta, Dr Asha [University of Texas, Austin; Nakanishi, Masahiro [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Li, Yutao [University of Texas, Austin; Han, Jiantao [University of Texas, Austin; Dong, Youzhong [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, PR China; Wang, Long [University of Texas, Austin; Xu, Maowen [University of Texas, Austin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Eric D. Larson July 8, 1994 Summary Report on Visit to Cuba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity production from oil. If biomass-gasifier/gasturbine techn.ologywere used,the electricity potential and atuniversitieswere familiar with CEES work on biomass- gasifier/gasturbine power generationand were very interestedin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The influence of high quantity of fly ash on reducing the expansion due to ASR in the presence of alkalis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A testing program was devised to study the role of high volume fly ash (HVFA) in reducing the expansion caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). A series of modified ASTM C 1260 tests were performed, where the replacement of cement by Class F fly ash was 58% by mass of cement. A reactive siliceous aggregate was used. The influence of inherent alkalis in cement to the reaction was also studied. The test results confirm that HVFA significantly helps in controlling expansion caused by ASR. The test period was extended to 28 days to assess if more reproducible results can be obtained. The results indicate that reducing the alkalinity of the sodium hydroxide solution by 50%, to 0.5N is sufficient to determine the potential reactivity of aggregates. The reduction of alkalinity of sodium hydroxide to 0.25N, however, produced results, which were beyond interpretation. Concrete using High Volume Fly Ash was tested for strength to ascertain if the reactive aggregates or the percentage of internal alkalis in the cement influenced the strength. This report discusses the test results for only part of a broader research program in progress at the Texas Transportation Institute, Texas A&M University.

Mohidekar, Saleel D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Solution-Derived, Chloride-Containing Minerals as a Waste Form for Alkali Chlorides  

SciTech Connect

Sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2] and cancrinite [(Na,K)6Ca2Al6Si6O24Cl4] are environmentally stable, chloride-containing minerals and are a logical waste form option for the mixed alkali chloride salt waste stream that is generated from a proposed electrochemical separations process during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Due to the volatility of chloride salts at moderate temperatures, the ideal processing route for these salts is a low-temperature approach such as the sol-gel process. The sodalite structure can be easily synthesized by the sol-gel process; however, it is produced in the form of a fine powder with particle sizes on the order of 110 m. Due to the small particle size, these powders require additional treatment to form a monolith. In this study, the sol-gel powders were pressed into pellets and fired to achieve > 90% of theoretical density. The cancrinite structure, identified as the best candidate mineral form in terms of waste loading capacity, was only produced on a limited basis following the sol-gel process and converted to sodalite upon firing. Here we discuss the sol-gel process specifics, chemical durability of select waste forms, and the steps taken to maximize chloride-containing phases, decrease chloride loss during pellet firing, and increase pellet densities.

Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef; McCloy, John S.; Lepry, William C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Universal ultracold collision rates for polar molecules of two alkali-metal atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universal collision rate constants are calculated for ultracold collisions of two like bosonic or fermionic heteronuclear alkali-metal dimers involving the species Li, Na, K, Rb, or Cs. Universal collisions are those for which the short range probability of a reactive or quenching collision is unity such that a collision removes a pair of molecules from the sample. In this case, the collision rates are determined by universal quantum dynamics at very long range compared to the chemical bond length. We calculate the universal rate constants for reaction of the reactive dimers in their ground vibrational state $v=0$ and for vibrational quenching of non-reactive dimers with $v \\ge 1$. Using the known dipole moments and estimated van der Waals coefficients of each species, we calculate electric field dependent loss rate constants for collisions of molecules tightly confined to quasi-two-dimensional geometry by a one-dimensional optical lattice. A simple scaling relation of the quasi-two-dimensional loss rate cons...

Julienne, Paul S; Idziaszek, Zbigniew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

An Alkali-Vapor Cell with Metal Coated Windows for Efficient Application of an Electric Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the implementation of a cylindrical T-shaped alkali-vapor cell for laser spectroscopy in the presence of a longitudinal electric field. The two windows are used as two electrodes of the high-voltage assembly, which is made possible by a metallic coating which entirely covers the inner and outer sides of the windows except for a central area to let the laser beams in and out of the cell. This allows very efficient application of the electric field, up to 2 kV/cm in a rather dense superheated vapor, even when significant photoemission takes place at the windows during pulsed laser irradiation. The body of the cell is made of sapphire or alumina ceramic to prevent large currents resulting from surface conduction observed in cesiated glass cells. The technique used to attach the monocrystalline sapphire windows to the cell body causes minimal stress birefringence in the windows. In addition, reflection losses at the windows can be made very small. The vapor cell operates with no buffer gas and has no ...

Sarkisyan, D; Guena, J; Lintz, M; Bouchiat, M A; Sarkisyan, David; Gu\\'{e}na, Jocelyne; Lintz, Michel; Bouchiat, Marie-Anne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of alkali-metal impurities on fracture toughness of 2090 Al-Li-Cu extrusions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of alkali-metal impurity (AMI) content, temperature, and crack-mouth-opening displacement (CMOD) rate on the fracture toughness of 2090-T8 Al-Li-Cu alloy extrusions were studied, particularly for short-transverse (S-L) orientations. Decreasing AMI content resulted in increasing room-temperature fracture toughness, especially for underaged S-L and T-L specimens. Unlike most Al-Li based alloys, material with very low (AMIs produced by vacuum refining had a high S-L fracture toughness (up to 38 MPa{radical}m for proof strengths {approximately}440 MPa) as well as high toughness in other orientations. The increase in room-temperature fracture toughness with decreasing AMI content was associated with a decrease in the proportion o brittle intergranular and cleavage-like islands, and a corresponding increase in the proportion of high energy dimpled fracture modes, on fracture surfaces. Both the present and previous studies indicate that the brittle islands result from liquid-metal embrittlement due to the presence of discrete sodium-potassium rich liquid phases. For medium to high AMI contents (5 to 37 wt ppm), S-L fracture toughness increased with decreasing temperature due to solidification of these phases and a consequent decrease in the mobility of embrittling atoms. The ability of embrittling atoms to keep up with crack tips also depended on crack velocity so that CMOD rate influenced fracture toughness. The grain structure (degree of recrystallization) appeared to be another important parameter affecting fracture toughness.

Sweet, E.D.; Bennett, C.G.; Musulin, I. [Comalco Research Centre, Thomastown, Victoria (Australia); Lynch, S.P.; Nethercott, R.B. [Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Alkali-free bioactive glasses for bone tissue engineering: A preliminary investigation  

SciTech Connect

An alkali-free series of bioactive glasses has been designed and developed in the glass system CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 along diopside (CaMgSi2O6) fluorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3F] tricalcium phosphate (3CaOP2O5) join. The silicate network in all the investigated glasses is predominantly coordinated in Q2 (Si) units while phosphorus tends to remain in orthophosphate (Q0) environment. The in vitro bioactivity analysis of glasses has been made by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) while chemical degradation has been studied in Tris-HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Some of the investigated glasses exhibit hydroxyapatite (HA) formation on their surface with in 1-12 h of their immersion in SBF solution. The sintering and crystallization kinetics of glasses has been investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and hot-stage microscopy (HSM), respectively while the crystalline phase evolution in resultant glass-ceramics (GCs) has been studied in the temperature range of 800-900 oC using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The cell growth and osteogenic differentiation for glasses has been studied in vitro on sintered glass powder compacts using rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The as designed glasses are ideal candidates for their potential applications in bone tissue engineering in the form of bioactive glasses as well as glass/GC scaffolds.

Goel, Ashutosh; Kapoor, Saurabh; Rajagopal, Raghu R.; Pascual, Maria J.; Kim, Hae-Won; Ferreira, Jose M.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

127

Alkali injection system with controlled CO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ ratios for combustion of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature combustion process for an organic fuel containing sulfur in which the nitrogen of air is replaced by carbon dioxide for combination with oxygen with the ratio of CO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ being controlled to generate combustion temperatures above 2000/sup 0/K for a gas-gas reaction with SO/sub 2/ and an alkali metal compound to produce a sulfate and in which a portion of the carbon-dioxide rich gas is recycled for mixing with oxygen and/or for injection as a cooling gas upstream from heating exchangers to limit fouling of the exchangers, with the remaining carbon-dioxide rich gas being available as a source of CO/sub 2/ for oil recovery and other purposes. Several advantages are associated with the invention. First, by using a low CO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ ratio, higher flame temperatures can be achieved, thereby substantially promoting the gas-gas reaction between alkali atoms and sulfur gases. Second, by providing a means for injecting additional CO/sub 2/ at various locations removed from the combustion zone, the heat transfer rate and cooling of the alkali sulfates can be tightly controlled without suffering either the loss in efficiency inherent in conventional gas recycle techniques or the added cost associated with the larger mass throughput rate and heat transfer surface area. Third, there is the ability to use the concept in retrofit applications by tailoring the CO/sub 2/ quantity recycled to match the heat utilization performance previously achieved using air as the oxidizing medium. Fourth, a natural reduction in nitrous oxides is achieved by eliminating the reaction of oxygen with the nitrogen in the oxidizer.

Berry, G.F.

1986-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Performance-based approach to evaluate alkali-silica reaction potential of aggregate and concrete using dilatometer method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The undesirable expansion of concrete because of a reaction between alkalis and certain type of reactive siliceous aggregates, known as alkali-silica reactivity (ASR), continues to be a major problem across the entire world. The renewed interest to minimize distress resulting from ASR has emphasized the need to develop predictable modeling of concrete ASR behavior under field conditions. Current test methods are either incapable or need long testing periods in which to only offer rather limited predictive estimates of ASR behavior in a narrow and impractical band of field conditions. Therefore, an attempt has been made to formulate a robust performance approach based upon basic properties of aggregate and concrete ASR materials derived from dilatometry and a kinetic-based mathematical expressions for ASR behavior. Because ASR is largely an alkali as well as a thermally activated process, the use of rate theory (an Arrhenius relationship between temperature and the alkali solution concentration) on the dilatometer time-expansion relationship, provides a fundamental aggregate ASR material property known as activation energy. Activation energy is an indicator of aggregate reactivity which is a function of alkalinity, particle size, crystallinity, calcium concentration, and others. The studied concrete ASR material properties represent a combined effects of mixture related properties (e.g., water-cementitious ratio, porosity, presence of supplementary cementitious materials, etc.) and maturity. Therefore, the proposed performance-based approach provides a direct accountability for a variety of factors that affect ASR, such as aggregate reactivity (activation energy), temperature, moisture, calcium concentration, solution alkalinity, and water-cementitious material ratio. Based on the experimental results, the following conclusion can be drawn concerning the performance-based approach to evaluate ASR potential of aggregate and concrete using dilatometer method; (i) the concept of activation energy can be used to represent the reactivity of aggregate subjected to ASR, (ii) the activation energy depends on the reactivity of aggregate and phenomenological alkalinity of test solution, and (iii) The proposed performance-based model provides a means to predict ASR expansion development in concrete.

Shon, Chang Seon

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF2 and BaF2. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 {per_thousand}nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF2, BaF2, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs+ relative to Na+, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF{sub 2} and BaF{sub 2}. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs{sup +} relative to Na{sup +}, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

Wang Zhiguo; Gao Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Xie Yulong [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Campbell, Luke W. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Structural Assessment of D-Regions Affected by Alkali-Silica Reaction/Delayed Ettringite Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to investigate the effects of Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) and Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) on D-regions in reinforced concrete (RC) bridge bents. Four large-scale RC specimens, which represent cantilever and straddle bents in Texas bridges in each specimen, were constructed. The first specimen represented the unexposed control specimen, while the other three were conditioned in the field with supplemental watering to promote ASR/DEF and served as the exposed specimens. The control and two exposed specimens with various levels of ASR/DEF, after eight months and two years of field conditioning, were load tested to failure. The last specimen remains in field with additional exposure to promote ASR/DEF and will be load tested in future studies. The width and length of preload-induced cracks and developing cracks that initiated in the exposed specimens and grew over time, indicating concrete expansion due to ASR/DEF mechanisms, were measured. Petrographic analysis results of concrete cores extracted from the exposed specimens after their load testing confirmed the formation of ASR gel and minimum accumulation of ettringite. The structural testing results showed that the failure mechanism in all three tested specimens was due to a brittle shear failure in the beam-column joint. However, slightly greater stiffness, strength, and ductility were observed in the exposed specimens as a result of the activation of the reinforcing steel in the specimens due to the expansion of the concrete primarily from ASR, which effectively prestressed and confined the core concrete. Sectional analysis and Strut-and-Tie Modeling (STM) of the experimental specimens were applied. Three-dimensional nonlinear Finite Element Analyses (FEA) were also conducted to numerically simulate the overall structural performance, internal response, and out-of-plane behavior of the experimental specimens. The effects of varying constitutive relations of the concrete in tension on models of the specimens were compared with the measured experimental response. A method to mimic ASR/DEF effects on exposed specimens was proposed and incorporated into the FEA approach. As a result, forces that prestress and confine the core concrete were effectively applied through the reinforcing steel prior to subsequent structural loading. The three-dimensional FEA approach was able to simulate the out-of-plane behavior of the beam-column joint and the proposed method yielded comparable results with the measured overall and internal behavior of specimens.

Liu, Shih-Hsiang 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: thermal cycle stability and chemical compatibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel (SOFC) applications. The glass containing ~17 mole% alkalis (K2O and Na2O) remains vitreous and compliant during SOFC operation, unlike conventional SOFC sealing glasses, which experience substantial devitrification after the sealing process. The non-crystallizing compliant sealing glass has lower glass transition and softening temperatures since the microstructure remains glassy without significant crystallite formation, and hence can relieve or reduce residual stresses and also has the potential for crack healing. Sealing approaches based on compliant glass will also need to satisfy all the mechanical, thermal, chemical, physical, and electrical requirements for SOFC applications, not only in bulk properties but also at sealing interfaces. In this first of a series of papers we will report the thermal cycle stability of the glass when sealed between two SOFC components, i.e., a NiO/YSZ anode supported YSZ bilayer and a coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect material. High temperature leak rates were monitored versus thermal cycles between 700-850oC using back pressures ranging from 0.2 psi to 1.0 psi. Isothermal stability was also evaluated in a dual environment consisting of flowing dilute H2 fuel versus ambient air. In addition, chemical compatibility at the alumina and YSZ interfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results shed new light on the topic of SOFC glass seal development.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Williams, Riley T.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, E.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cathodoluminescence microscopy and petrographic image analysis of aggregates in concrete pavements affected by alkali-silica reaction  

SciTech Connect

Various microscopic techniques (cathodoluminescence, polarizing and electron microscopy) were combined with image analysis with the aim to determine a) the modal composition and degradation features within concrete, and b) the petrographic characteristics and the geological types (rocks, and their provenance) of the aggregates. Concrete samples were taken from five different portions of Highway Nos. D1, D11, and D5 (the Czech Republic). Coarse and fine aggregates were found to be primarily composed of volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as of quartz and feldspar aggregates of variable origins. The alkali-silica reaction was observed to be the main degradation mechanism, based upon the presence of microcracks and alkali-silica gels in the concrete. Use of cathodoluminescence enabled the identification of the source materials of the quartz aggregates, based upon their CL characteristics (i.e., color, intensity, microfractures, deformation, and zoning), which is difficult to distinguish only employing polarizing and electron microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR in concrete pavements on the Highways Nos. D1, D5 and D11 (Czech Republic). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathodoluminescence was combined with various microscopic techniques and image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR was attributed to aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Source materials of aggregates were identified based on cathodoluminescence characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz comes from different volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic parent rocks.

Stastna, A., E-mail: astastna@gmail.com [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Sachlova, S.; Pertold, Z.; Prikryl, R. [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Leichmann, J. [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Financial support of this research project has lead to advances in the study of atomic structure through precision measurements of atomic lifetimes, energy splittings, and transitions energies. The interpretation of data from many areas of physics and chemistry requires an accurate understanding of atomic structure. For example, scientists in the fields of astrophysics, geophysics, and plasma fusion depend on transition strengths to determine the relative abundances of elements. Assessing the operation of discharges and atomic resonance line filters also depends on accurate knowledge of transition strengths. Often relative transition strengths are measured precisely, but accurate atomic lifetimes are needed to obtain absolute values. Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes and energy splittings also provide fundamentally important atomic structure information. Lifetimes of allowed transitions depend most strongly on the electronic wave function far from the nucleus. Alternatively, hyperfine splittings give important information about the electronic wave function in the vicinity of the nucleus as well as the structure of the nucleus. Our main focus throughout this project has been the structure of atomic cesium because of its connection to the study of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC). The interpretation of atomic PNC experiments in terms of weak interaction coupling constants requires accurate knowledge of the electronic wave function near the nucleus as well as far from the nucleus. It is possible to address some of these needs theoretically with sophisticated many-electron atomic structure calculations. However, this program has been able to address these needs experimentally with a precision that surpasses current theoretical accuracy. Our measurements also play the important role of providing a means for testing the accuracy of many-electron calculations and guiding further theoretical development, Atomic systems such as cesium, with a single electron outside of a closed shell, provide the simplest open shell systems for detailed comparisons between experiment and theory. This program initially focused on measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes in alkali atomic systems. Our first measurements of atomic lifetimes in cesium surpassed the precision and accuracy of previous measurements and sparked renewed interest in the need for greater precision in lifetime measurements throughout the atomic physics community. After enhancing the capabilities of the laser systems built for these initial measurements, we began a study hyperfine energy splittings in cesium using a thermal atomic beam. The results surpassed previous measurements by more than an order of magnitude and lead to the first observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment in cesium demonstrating the inadequacy of the nuclear shell model for predicting high order nuclear moments. The laser system and atomic beam apparatus developed for these endeavors turned out to be perfectly suited for exploring the possibility of making absolute optical frequency measurements of atomic transitions. We initiated collaboration with researchers at NIST so that the desired optical frequencies could be reference with respect to the primary microwave frequency standard (Cs atomic fountain NIST-FI) via a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Our first absolute optical frequency measurement, of the cesium D2 line, surpassed the accuracy of a previous measurement by more than an order of magnitude. An absolute optical frequency measurement of the cesium D1 line, now near completion, also surpasses previous results and places us in a position to be able to report a new value for the fine structure constant which is the fundamental dimensionless constant that underlies all electromagnetic interactions.

Tanner, Carol E.

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

Improved Recovery Boiler Performance Through Control of Combustion, Sulfur, and Alkali Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involved the following objectives: 1. Determine black liquor drying and devolatilization elemental and total mass release rates and yields. 2. Develop a public domain physical/chemical kinetic model of black liquor drop combustion, including new information on drying and devolatilization. 3. Determine mechanisms and rates of sulfur scavenging in recover boilers. 4. Develop non-ideal, public-domain thermochemistry models for alkali salts appropriate for recovery boilers 5. Develop data and a one-dimensional model of a char bed in a recovery boiler. 6. Implement all of the above in comprehensive combustion code and validate effects on boiler performance. 7. Perform gasification modeling in support of INEL and commercial customers. The major accomplishments of this project corresponding to these objectives are as follows: 1. Original data for black liquor and biomass data demonstrate dependencies of particle reactions on particle size, liquor type, gas temperature, and gas composition. A comprehensive particle submodel and corresponding data developed during this project predicts particle drying (including both free and chemisorbed moisture), devolatilization, heterogeneous char oxidation, char-smelt reactions, and smelt oxidation. Data and model predictions agree, without adjustment of parameters, within their respective errors. The work performed under these tasks substantially exceeded the original objectives. 2. A separate model for sulfur scavenging and fume formation in a recovery boiler demonstrated strong dependence on both in-boiler mixing and chemistry. In particular, accurate fume particle size predictions, as determined from both laboratory and field measurements, depend on gas mixing effects in the boilers that lead to substantial particle agglomeration. Sulfur scavenging was quantitatively predicted while particle size required one empirical mixing factor to match data. 3. Condensed-phase thermochemistry algorithms were developed for salt mixtures and compared with sodium-based binary and higher order systems. Predictions and measurements were demonstrated for both salt systems and for some more complex silicate-bearing systems, substantially exceeding the original scope of this work. 4. A multi-dimensional model of char bed reactivity developed under this project demonstrated that essentially all reactions in char beds occur on or near the surface, with the internal portions of the bed being essentially inert. The model predicted composition, temperature, and velocity profiles in the bed and showed that air jet penetration is limited to the immediate vicinity of the char bed, with minimal impact on most of the bed. The modeling efforts substantially exceeded the original scope of this project. 5. Near the completion of this project, DOE withdrew the BYU portion of a multiparty agreement to complete this and additional work with no advanced warning, which compromised the integration of all of this material into a commercial computer code. However, substantial computer simulations of much of this work were initiated, but not completed. 6. The gasification modeling is nearly completed but was aborted near its completion according to a DOE redirection of funds. This affected both this and the previous tasks.

Baxter, Larry L.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Kinetics of Moisture Absorption for Alkali Extracted Steam-Exploded Fiber Filled High-Density Polyethylene Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acacia mangium wood fiber derived from steam-explosion and fiber fractionation treatment was used as fillers for high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The alkali extracted steam-exploded fibers (AEF) obtained were acetylated to produce acetylated fibers (AAEF) having three different weight percent gain (WPG). Composites of AEF or AAEF and HDPE were prepared via 2-roll mill, compression molded and cut into dumbbell specimens. All samples were immersed in water at room temperature for 30 days. The process of absorption of water by all composites followed the kinetics and mechanisms described by the Fick's theory. Diffusion coefficient (D) values increased with filler loading but decreased with increasing WPG of the AAEF fiber. Further decrease was observed when maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was added to the composite system. This was due to improved fiber-matrix adhesion that restricts movement of water molecules from further penetrate inside the composite structures.

Taib, R. M.; Ramarad, S.; Ishak, Z. A. M. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Rozman, H. D. [School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

137

Calculation of activities and solubilities of alkali metal perchlorates at high ionic strengths in multicomponent aqueous systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equations of Nyvlt, of Bromley, and of Pitzer for the representation of activity coefficients of electrolytes in multicomponent ionic systems have been used to fit solubility data for some alkali metal perchlorates and ammonium perchlorate in mixture with other electrolytes at ionic strengths varying from 0.08 mol-kg/sup -1/ to as high as 24 mol-kg/sup -1/. Only the Pitzer equations can be used reliably to fit the solubility data over the whole range of ionic strengths encountered for ternary systems but there are certain limitations and certain assumptions which have to be made concerning the Pitzer ionic interaction parameters. A method is also proposed for the calculation of the Pitzer single electrolyte parameters, ..beta../sup 0/, ..beta../sup 1/, and C/sup phi/, for the less soluble perchlorates from fitting their solubility data over a wide range of high ionic strengths.

Chan, C.; Khoo, K.H.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Studies of Non-Proportionality in Alkali Halide and Strontium Iodide Scintillators Using SLYNCI 6-16-2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently a collaboration of LLNL and LBNL has constructed a second generation Compton coincidence instrument to study the non-proportionality of scintillators. This device, known as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light-Yield Non-proportionality Characterization Instrument), has can completely characterize a sample with less than 24 hours of running time. Thus, SLYNCI enables a number of systematic studies of scintillators since many samples can be processed in a reasonable length of time. These studies include differences in non-proportionality between different types of scintillators, different members of the same family of scintillators, and impact of different doping levels. The results of such recent studies are presented here, including a study of various alkali halides, and the impact of europium doping level in strontium iodide. Directions of future work area also discussed.

Ahle, Larry [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Bizarri, Gregory [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Cherepy, Nerine [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Choong, Woon-Seng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Moses, W. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Payne, Stephen A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Shah, Kanai [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA; Sheets, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Sturm, Benjamin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Alkali injection system with controlled CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 ratios for combustion of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature combustion process for an organic fuel containing sulfur n which the nitrogen of air is replaced by carbon dioxide for combination with oxygen with the ratio of CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 being controlled to generate combustion temperatures above 2000 K. for a gas-gas reaction with SO.sub.2 and an alkali metal compound to produce a sulfate and in which a portion of the carbon-dioxide rich gas is recycled for mixing with oxygen and/or for injection as a cooling gas upstream from heating exchangers to limit fouling of the exchangers, with the remaining carbon-dioxide rich gas being available as a source of CO.sub.2 for oil recovery and other purposes.

Berry, Gregory F. (Naperville, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Studies on the production of ultra-clean coal by alkali-acid leaching of low-grade coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of low-grade coal in thermal power stations is leading to environmental pollution due to the generation of large amounts of fly ash, bottom ash, and CO{sub 2} besides other pollutants. It is therefore important to clean the coal before using it in thermal power stations, steel plants, or cement industries etc. Physical beneficiation of coal results in only limited cleaning of coal. The increasing environmental pollution problems from the use of coal have led to the development of clean coal technologies. In fact, the clean use of coal requires the cleaning of coal to ultra low ash contents, keeping environmental norms and problems in view and the ever-growing need to increase the efficiency of coal-based power generation. Therefore this requires the adaptation of chemical cleaning techniques for cleaning the coal to obtain ultra clean coal having ultra low ash contents. Presently the reaction conditions for chemical demineralization of low-grade coal using 20% aq NaOH treatment followed by 10% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching under reflux conditions have been optimized. In order to reduce the concentration of alkali and acid used in this process of chemical demineralization of low-grade coals, stepwise, i.e., three step process of chemical demineralization of coal using 1% or 5% aq NaOH treatment followed by 1% or 5% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching has been developed, which has shown good results in demineralization of low-grade coals. In order to conserve energy, the alkali-acid leaching of coal was also carried out at room temperature, which gave good results.

Nabeel, A.; Khan, T.A.; Sharma, D.K. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

On-sun test results from second-generation and advanced-concepts alkali-metal pool-boiler receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two 75-kW{sub t} alkali-metal pool-boiler solar receivers have been successfully tested at Sandia National Laboratories` National Solar Thermal Test Facility. The first one, Sandia`s `` second-generation pool-boiler receiver,`` was designed to address commercialization issues identified during post-test assessment of Sandia`s first-generation pool-boiler receiver. It was constructed from Haynes alloy 230 and contained the alkali-metal alloy NaK-78. The absorber`s wetted side had a brazed-on powder-metal coating to stabilize boiling. This receiver was evaluated for boiling stability, hot- and warm-restart behavior, and thermal efficiency. Boiling was stable under all conditions. All of the hot restarts were successful. Mild transient hot spots observed during some hot restarts were eliminated by the addition of 1/3 torr of xenon to the vapor space. All of the warm restarts were also successful. The heat-transfer crisis that damaged the first receiver did not recur. Thermal efficiency was 92.3% at 750{degrees}C with 69.6 kW{sub t} solar input. The second receiver tested, Sandia`s ``advanced-concepts receiver,`` was a replica of the first-generation receiver except that the cavities, which were electric-discharge-machined in the absorber for boiling stability, were eliminated. This step was motivated by bench-scale test results that showed that boiling stability improved with increased heated-surface area, tilt of the heated surface from vertical, and added xenon. The bench-scale results suggested that stable boiling might be possible without heated-surface modification in a 75-kW{sub t} receiver. Boiling in the advanced-concepts receiver with 1/3 torr of xenon added has been stable under all conditions, confirming the bench-scale tests.

Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.; Cordeiro, P.G.; Dudley, V.E.; Rawlinson, K.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Crystal field disorder effects in the optical spectra of Nd{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}-doped calcium lithium niobium gallium garnets laser crystals and ceramics  

SciTech Connect

The optical spectroscopic properties of RE{sup 3+} (Nd, 1 at. % or Yb, 1 to 10 at. %)-doped calcium-lithium-niobium-gallium garnet (CLNGG) single crystals and ceramics in the 10 K-300 K range are analyzed. In these compositionally disordered materials, RE{sup 3+} substitute Ca{sup 2+} in dodecahedral sites and the charge compensation is accomplished by adjusting the proportion of Li{sup +}, Nb{sup 5+}, and Ga{sup 3+} to the doping concentration. The crystals and ceramics show similar optical spectra, with broad and structured (especially at low temperatures) bands whose shape depends on temperature and doping concentration. At 10 K, the Nd{sup 3+4}I{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 4}F{sub 3/2,5/2} and Yb{sup 3+2}F{sub 7/2}{yields}{sup 2}F{sub 5/2} absorption bands, which show prospect for diode laser pumping, can be decomposed in several lines that can be attributed to centers with large differences in the crystal field. The positions of these components are the same, but the relative intensity depends on the doping concentration and two main centers dominate the spectra. Non-selective excitation evidences broad emission bands, of prospect for short-pulse laser emission, whereas the selective excitation reveals the particular emission spectra of the various centers. The modeling reveals that the nonequivalent centers correspond to RE{sup 3+} ions with different cationic combinations in the nearest octahedral and tetrahedral coordination spheres, and the most abundant two centers have 4Nb and, respectively, 3Nb1Li in the nearest octahedral sphere. At 300 K, the spectral resolution is lost. It is then inferred that the observed optical bands are envelopes of the spectra of various structural centers, whose resolution is determined by the relative contribution of the temperature-dependent homogeneous broadening and the effects of crystal field disordering (multicenter structure, inhomogeneous broadening). The relevance of spectroscopic properties for selection of pumping conditions and of laser design that would enable utilization of the broad optical bands for efficient laser emission and reduced heat generation is discussed.

Lupei, V.; Lupei, A.; Gheorghe, C.; Gheorghe, L.; Achim, A. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lab. ECS, Bucharest (Romania); Ikesue, A. [World-Lab Co. Ltd., Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Thin air-plasma-treated alkali fluoride layers for improved hole extraction in copper phthalocyanine/C70-based solar cells  

SciTech Connect

Alkali fluorides, mostly LiF and CsF, are well-known to improve electron injection/extraction in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic solar cells (OSCs). They are also utilized, though to a lesser extent, for hole injection in OLEDs. Here we demonstrate a new role for such fluorides in enhancing OSCs hole extraction.We show that an ultrathin air-plasmatreated alkali fluoride layer between the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and the active layer in copper phthalocyanine CuPc?C70-based OSCs increases the short circuit current by up to ?17% for cells with LiF and ?7% for cells with NaF or CsF. The effects of the fluoride layer thickness and treatment duration were evaluated, as were OSCs with oxidized and plasma-treated Li and UV-ozone treated LiF. Measurements included current voltage, absorption, external quantum efficiency (EQE), atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which showed the presence of alkali atoms F and O at the treated ITO/fluoride surface. The EQE of optimized devices with LiF increased at wavelengths >560 nm, exceeding the absorption increase. Overall, the results indicate that the improved performance is due largely to enhanced hole extraction, possibly related to improved energy-level alignment at the fluorinated ITO/CuPc interface, reduced OSC series resistance, and in the case of LiF, improved absorption.

Xiao, Teng; Cui, Weipan; Cai, Min; Liu, Rui; Anderegg, James W.; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

145

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: the effect of protective alumina coating on electrical stability in dual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkali-containing silicate glass was recently proposed as a potential sealant for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The glass contains appreciable amount of alkalis and retains its glassy microstructure at elevated temperatures over time. It is more compliant as compared to conventional glass-ceramics sealants and could potentially heal cracks during thermal cycling. In previous papers the thermal cycle stability, thermal stability and chemical compatibility were reported with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and YSZ-coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect. In this paper, we report the electrical stability of the compliant glass with aluminized AISI441 interconnect material under DC load in dual environment at 700-800oC. Apparent electrical resistivity was measured with a 4-point method for the glass sealed between two aluminized AISI441 metal coupons as well as plain AISI441 substrates. The results showed good electrical stability with the aluminized AISI441 substrate, while unstable behavior was observed for un-coated substrates. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and correlated with the measured resistivity results. Overall, the alumina coating demonstrated good chemical stability with the alkali-containing silicate sealing glass under DC loading.

Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

An Improved Red Spectrum of the Methane or T-dwarf SDSS 1624+0029 Role of the Alkali Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Keck II low resolution spectrum shortward of ome-micron is presented forSDSS 1624+0029, the first field methane or T dwarf discovered in the SloanDigital Sky Survey. Significant flux is detected down to the spectrum's shortwavelength limit of 6200 AA. The spectrum exhibits a broad absorption featurecentered at 7700 AA, which we interpret as the K I 7665/7699 resonance doublet.The observed flux declines shortward of 7000 AA, due most likely to the redwing of the Na I doublet. Both Cs I doublet lines are detected more stronglythan in an earlier red spectrum. Neither Li I absorption nor H$\\alpha$ emissionare detected. An exploratory model fit to the spectrum suggests that the shapeof the red spectrum can be primarily accounted for by the broad wings of the KI and Na I doublets. This behavior is consistent with the argument proffered byBurrows, Marley and Sharp that strong alkali absorption is principallyresponsible for depressing T dwarf spectra shortward of 1$\\mu$m. In particular,there seems no compelling rea...

Liebert, J; Burrows, A; Burgasser, A J; Kirkpatrick, J D; Gizis, J E; Liebert, James; Burrows, Adam; Burgasser, Adam J.; Gizis, John E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fischer-Tropsch Fuels from Coal and Biomass Thomas G. Kreutz, Eric D. Larson, Guangjian Liu, Robert H. Williams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Processes. Developments in Thermochemical Biomass Conversion", Eds. Bridgwater, A.V. and BoocockHydrogen from Biomass for Urban Transportation Y. D. Yeboah (PI), K. B. Bota and Z. Wang Clark amounts of fossil-derived CO2 are released to the atmosphere. Renewable biomass is an attractive

148

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

Marra, J.; Billings, A.

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Dynamics of alkali ions-neutral molecules reactions: Radio frequency-guided beam experimental cross-sections and direct quasiclassical trajectory studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different reactive processes taking place in collisions between alkali ions and neutral i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Cl molecules in the low (center of mass frame) energy range have been studied using an octopole radiofrequency guided-ion-beam apparatus developed in our laboratory. Cross-section energy dependences for all these reactions have been obtained in absolute units. Ab initio electronic structure calculations for those colliding systems evolving on the ground single potential surface have given relevant information on the main topological features of the surfaces. For some of the reactions a dynamic study by 'on the fly' trajectories has complemented the available experimental and electronic structure information.

Aguilar, J.; Andres, J. de; Lucas, J. M.; Alberti, M.; Huarte-Larranaga, F.; Bassi, D.; Aguilar, A. [Departament de Quimica Fisica, Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trento, 38123 Povo-Trento (Italy); Departament de Quimica Fisica, Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 3, Appendix B: NO{sub x} and alkali vapor control strategies: Final report  

SciTech Connect

CRS Sirrine (CRSS) is evaluating a novel IGCC process in which gases exiting the gasifier are burned in a gas turbine combustion system. The turbine exhaust gas is used to generate additional power in a conventional steam generator. This results in a significant increase in efficiency. However, the IGCC process requires development of novel approaches to control SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions and alkali vapors which can damage downstream turbine components. Ammonia is produced from the reaction of coal-bound nitrogen with steam in the reducing zone of any fixed bed coal gasifier. This ammonia can be partially oxidized to NO{sub x} when the product gas is oxidized in a gas turbine combustor. Alkali metals vaporize in the high-temperature combustion zone of the gasifier and laser condense on the surface of small char or ash particles or on cooled metal surfaces. It these alkali-coated materials reach the gas turbine combustor, the alkali will revaporize condense on turbine blades and cause rapid high temperature corrosion. Efficiency reduction will result. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) was contracted by CRSS to evaluate and recommend solutions for NO{sub x} emissions and for alkali metals deposition. Various methods for NO{sub x} emission control and the potential process and economic impacts were evaluated. This included estimates of process performance, heat and mass balances around the combustion and heat transfer units and a preliminary economic evaluation. The potential for alkali metal vaporization and condensation at various points in the system was also estimated. Several control processes and evaluated, including an order of magnitude cost for the control process.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Evidence of a transition to reorientational disorder in the cubic alkali-metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neutron powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study indicates that Cs{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} undergoes a second-order phase transition near 529 K that can be described as a reorientational disordering of the B{sub 12}H{sub 12}{sup 2-} icosahedral anions between two lowest-energy configurations within the cubic structure. Such a disordering requires the addition of another mirror plane to the low-temperature Fm3-bar structural symmetry to become Fm3-bar m. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements suggest the possible persistence of some short-range anion order at and above the transition. Additional DSC measurements of the lighter alkali-metal cubic isomorphs, Rb{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and K{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, also indicate second-order transitions for these compounds near 742 K and 811 K, respectively. These results are suggestive of similar order-disorder phase changes as for Cs{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, although confirmation of their existence requires analogous diffraction measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Cs{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} undergoes an order-disorder phase transition near 529 K. Similar transitions are observed for K{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Rb{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}. Highlights: > Diffraction and DSC reveal that Cs{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} undergoes a 2nd-order phase transition near 529 K. > This phase transition is from the low-temperature Fm3-bar symmetry to Fm3-bar m at high temperatures. > DSC of Rb{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and K{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} indicate 2nd-order transitions near 742 K and 811 K, respectively.

Verdal, Nina, E-mail: nina.verdal@nist.gov [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Wu, Hui [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2115 (United States); Udovic, Terrence J. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Stavila, Vitalie [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Zhou Wei; Rush, John J. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2115 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Alkali/TX sub 2 catalysts for CO/H sub 2 conversion to C sub 1 -C sub 4 alcohols  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to investigate and develop novel catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohols by a highly selective process. Therefore, the variations of catalyst activity and selectivity for the synthesis of alcohols from H{sub 2}/CO {le}1 synthesis gas for a series of A/TX{sub 2} compounds, where A is a surface alkali dopant, T is a transition metal, and X is a S, Se, or Te, will be determined. The alkali component A, which is essential for C-O and C-C bond forming reactions leading to alcohols, will be highly dispersed on the TX{sub 2} surfaces by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical complexation/anchoring (CCA) methods. Catalysts that have been prepared during this quarter include RuS{sub 2}, NbS{sub 2}, K/MoS{sub 2}, and K/Crown either/MoS{sub 2}. Catalysts tested include KOH/MoS{sub 2} and K/Crown ether/MoS{sub 2}. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Brimer, A.; Richards, M.; Kieke, M.; Bastian, R.D.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Combined stability in isothermal ageing and thermal cycling with YSZ coated ferritic stainless steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkali-containing silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass contains about 17 mole% alkalis (K+Na) and has low glass transition and softening temperatures. It remains vitreous and compliant around 750-800oC after sealing without substantial crystallization, as contrary to conventional glass-ceramic sealants, which experience rapid crystallization after the sealing process. The glassy nature and low characteristic temperatures can reduce residual stresses and result in the potential for crack healing. In a previous study, the glass was found to have good thermal cycle stability and was chemically compatible with YSZ coating during short term testing. In the current study, the compliant glass was further evaluated in a more realistic way in that the sealed glass couples were first isothermally aged for 1000h followed by thermal cycling. High temperature leakage was measured. The chemical compatibility was also investigated with powder mixtures at 700 and 800oC to enhance potential interfacial reaction. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and evaluated with regard to the leakage and chemical compatibility results.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: the effect of protective YSZ coating on electrical stability in dual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, compliant sealing glass has been proposed as a potential candidate sealant for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. In a previous paper, the thermal stability and chemical compatibility were reported for a compliant alkali-containing silicate glass sealed between anode supported YSZ bi-layer and YSZ-coated stainless steel interconnect. In this paper, we will report the electrical stability of the compliant glass under a DC load and dual environment at 700-800 degrees C. Apparent electrical resistivity was measured with a 4-point method for the glass sealed between two plain SS441 metal coupons or YSZ-coated aluminized substrates. The results showed instability with plain SS441 at 800 degrees C, but stable behavior of increasing resistivity with time was observed with the YSZ coated SS441. In addition, results of interfacial microstructure analysis with scanning electron microscopy will be correlated with the measured resistivity results. Overall, the YSZ coating demonstrated chemically stability with the alkali-containing compliant silicate sealing glass under electrical field and dual environments.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Three Alkali-Metal-Gold-Gallium Systems. Ternary Tunnel Structures and Some Problems with Poorly Ordered Cations  

SciTech Connect

Six new intermetallic compounds have been characterized in the alkali metal (A = Na, Rb, Cs)goldgallium systems. Three isostructural compounds with the general composition A0.55Au2Ga2, two others of AAu3Ga2 (A = Rb, Cs), and the related Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 were synthesized via typical high-temperature reactions and their crystal structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis: Na0.56(9)Au2Ga2 (I, I4/mcm, a = 8.718(1) , c = 4.857(1) , Z = 4), Rb0.56(1)Au2Ga2 (II, I4/mcm, a = 8.950(1) , c = 4.829(1) , Z = 4), Cs0.54(2)Au2Ga2 (III, I4/mcm, a = 9.077(1) , c = 4.815(1) , Z = 4), RbAu3Ga2 (IV, Pnma, a = 13.384(3) , b = 5.577(1) , c = 7.017(1) , Z = 4), CsAu3Ga2 (V, Pnma, a = 13.511(3) , b = 5.614(2) , c = 7.146(1) , Z = 4), Na13Au41.2(1)Ga30.3(1) (VI, P6 mmm, a = 19.550(3) , c = 8.990(2) , Z = 2). The first three compounds (IIII) are isostructural with tetragonal K0.55Au2Ga2 and likewise contain planar eight-member Au/Ga rings that stack along c to generate tunnels and that contain varying degrees of disordered NaCs cations. The cation dispositions are much more clearly and reasonably defined by electron density mapping than through least-squares refinements with conventional anisotropic ellipsoids. Orthorhombic AAu3Ga2 (IV, V) are ordered ternary Rb and Cs derivatives of the SrZn5 type structure, demonstrating structural variability within the AAu3Ga2 family. All attempts to prepare an isotypic NaAu3Ga2 were not successful, but yielded only a similar composition Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 (NaAu3.17Ga2.33) (VI) in a very different structure with two types of cation sites. Crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) analysis obtained from tight-binding electronic structure calculations for idealized IIV via linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) methods emphasized the major contributions of heteroatomic AuGa bonding to the structural stability of these compounds. The relative minima (pseudogaps) in the DOS curves for IV correspond well with the valence electron counts of known representatives of this structure type and, thereby, reveal some magic numbers to guide the search for new isotypic compounds. Theoretical calculation of total energies vs volumes obtained by VASP (Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package) calculations for KAu3Ga2 and RbAu3Ga2 suggest a possible transformation from SrZn5- to BaZn5-types at high pressure.

Smetana, Volodymyr; Miller, Gordon J.; Corbett, John D.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

Characterization of open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators. Quarterly technical summary report No. 2, October 1--December 31, 1976. [Negative ion formation, electron/slag interaction, and alkali/slag interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study on how nonfuel components of coal will affect the electron and alkali seed chemistry in a high temperature coal combustion system like those envisioned for direct fired MHD generators is described. Three specific problems are being considered. The first problem area is to characterize the formation of negative ions due to electron attachment processes in the combustion flow. While some stable negative ions may be formed from hydrocarbon combustion species (OH, HCO/sup -//sub 3/), the bulk of the stable negative ions are expected to be formed from oxidized inorganic coal slag constituents (CO/sup -//sub 2/, PO/sup -//sub 2/, AlO/sup -//sub 2/, etc). Negative ion formation can reduce the conductivity of the MHD plasma, particularly at the low temperature end of the MHD channel, thus decreasing the efficiency of power generation. This phenomena is expected to be particularly severe in electrode boundary layers, and particular attention will be paid to conditions characteristic of flow along the electrodes. The second problem area involves the role slag condensation may play in determining the electron density through recombination, also adversely affecting conductivity in the core flow. The competitive balance between thermionic emission from slag droplets and electron/ion recombination on the droplet surfaces may be severely tipped in favor of electron loss processes, depending on the slag properties. Also, the heterogeneous interaction of alkali seed with particles formed by slag condensation in the generator channel is studied. Alkali seed material can be chemically bound into the molten slag particles tightly enough that seed recovery becomes prohibitively expensive. The loss of significant amounts of alkali seed with the slag could have a serious economic impact on proposed MHD systems. An approach, involving both theoretical modeling and experimental measurements, has been devised to explore the negative ion formation, the electron/slag interaction, and the alkali/slag interaction problems.

Kolb, C.E.; Yousefian, V.; Wormhoudt, J.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Kerrebrock, J.L.

1977-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Characterization of open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators. Quarterly technical summary report No. 3, January 1--March 31, 1977. [Negative ion formation, electron/slag interaction, and alkali/slag interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this contract effort is to understand how nonfuel components of coal will affect the electron and alkali seed chemistry in a high temperature coal combustion system like that envisioned for direct fired MHD generators. Three specific problems are being considered during this contract period. The first problem area is to characterize the formation of negative ions due to electron attachment processes in the combustion flow. While some stable negative ions may be formed from hydrocarbon combustion species (OH/sup -/), the bulk of the stable negative ions are expected to be formed from oxidized inorganic coal slag constituents (BO/sup -//sub 2/, PO/sup -//sub 2/, AlO/sup -//sub 2/, etc). Negative ion formation can reduce the conductivity of the MHD plasma, particularly at the low temperature end of the MHD channel, thus decreasing the efficiency of power generation. The second problem area involves the role slag condensation may play in determining the electron density through recombination, also adversely affecting conductivity in the core flow. The competitive balance between thermionic emission from slag droplets and electron/ion recombination on the droplet surfaces may be severely tipped in favor of electron loss processes, depending on the slag properties. The third problem area is the heterogeneous interaction of alkali seed with particles formed by slag condensation in the generator channel. Alkali seed material can be chemically bound into the molten slag particles tightly enough that seed recovery becomes prohibitively expensive. The loss of significant amounts of alkali seed with the slag could have a serious economic impact on proposed MHD systems. A coupled approach, involving both theoretical modeling and experimental measurements, has been devised to explore the negative ion formation, the electron/slag interaction, and the alkali/slag interaction problems. Research progress is reported.

Kolb, C.E.; Yousefian, V.; Wormhoudt, J.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Kerrebrock, J.L.

1977-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Steam Reforming Technology Demonstration for Conversion of DOE Sodium-Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory into a Leach-Resistant Alkali Aluminosilicate Waste Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The patented THOR{sup R} fluidized-bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), currently under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site.1 SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. The SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, and alkali and aluminum nitrates, along with many other inorganic compounds, including substantial levels of radionuclides. As part of the implementation of the THOR{sup R} process at INTEC, an engineering-scale technology demonstration (ESTD) was conducted using a specially designed pilot plant located at Hazen Research, Inc. in Golden Colorado. This ESTD confirmed the efficacy of the THOR{sup R} FBSR process to convert the SBW into a granular carbonate-based waste form suitable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE authorized, as a risk reduction measure, the performance of an additional ESTD to demonstrate the production of an insoluble mineralized product, in the event that an alternate disposition path is required. The additional ESTD was conducted at the Hazen Research facility using the THOR{sup R} process and the same SBW simulant employed previously. An alkali aluminosilicate mineral product was produced that exhibited excellent leach resistance and chemical durability. The demonstration established general system operating parameters for a full-scale facility; provided process off-gas data that confirmed operation within regulatory limits; determined that the mineralized product exhibits superior leach resistance and durability, compared to Environmental Assessment (EA) and Low-activity Reference Material (LRM) glasses, as indicated by the Product Consistency Test (PCT); ascertained that Cs and Re (a surrogate for Tc) were non-volatile and were retained in the mineral product; and showed that heavy metals were converted into mineral forms that were not leachable, as determined by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. (authors)

Ryan, K.; Bradley Mason, J.; Evans, B.; Vora, V. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, Aiken, SC (United States); Olson, A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The war of the roses: demilitarizing invasion biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demilitarizing invasion biology BMH Larson new socialdemilitarizing invasion biology Brendon MH Larson Biologistsmetaphors within invasion biology. I argue that these

Larson, BMH

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals. First quarterly report, October 3-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is directed toward the development of processes involving high temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon in volume at low cost. Experiments are being performed to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, determine the effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction, and make preliminary engineering and economic analyses of a scaled-up process. Samples of the silicon product will be delivered to JPL for evaluation of solar cell performance. During this reporting period the silicon reactor test apparatus reached operational capabilities after a shutdown for two months. Several design improvements were made while returning it to an operational stage. During the initial series of experiments complete product separation of the silicon from the salt was achieved and small samples (approx. = 3 to 40 g) of fused silicon were collected. The test apparatus is now being operated on a routine basis for periods of about twenty minutes. Finally, the initial work began on the engineering and economic analysis for scale-up of the silicon production process.

Dickson, C.R.; Gould, R.K.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Amorphisation mechanism of a flint aggregate during the alkali-silica reaction: X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption XANES contributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flint samples at different stages of the Alkali-Silica Reaction were prepared and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and silicon K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure techniques (XANES). The results are compared to those of measurements performed on alpha quartz c-SiO{sub 2} and rough flint aggregate. The molar fraction of Q{sub 3} sites is determined as a function of the time of reaction. Up to 14 h of attack, the effect of the reaction seems of little importance. From 30 to 168 h, we showed an acceleration of the effect of the reaction on the crystal structure of the aggregate resulting in an amorphisation of the crystal. During this period, the amorphous fraction increases linearly with the number of Q{sub 3} sites. The results of the XANES confirm the amorphisation of the aggregate during the reaction and show the presence of silicon in a tetrahedral environment of oxygen whatever the time of attack.

Verstraete, J.; Khouchaf, L.; Bulteel, D.; Garcia-Diaz, E.; Flank, A.M; Tuilier, M.H

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Robert H. Larson. The British Army and the Theory of Armored Warfare. Newark: Universityof Delaware Press, 1984. 265 pp. Charts, notes, bibliography, and index.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the leading theorists of armored warfare, J.F.C. Fuller andtheir superiority in armored warfare. This book insightfullytank and the theory of armored warfare during this crucial

Raugh, Jr., Harold E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ogden, Williams and Larson, Toward a Hydrogen-Based Transportation System, final draft, 8 May 2001 Toward a Hydrogen-Based Transportation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................................................................10 H2 from Renewable Electric Energy Sources .........................................................................................................13 Methanol as an Initial Fuel for Fuel Cell Cars

165

Directed reflectivity, long life AMTEC condenser (DRC). Final report of Phase II SBIR program[Alkali Metal ThermoElectric Converter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) is a static energy conversion device that operates at high thermal to electric conversion efficiencies that are essentially independent of size, have reached 19% and are expected to reach 25% to 30% in 1997. AMTEC systems have been chosen by NASA and DOE for spacecraft applications and have considerable promise for a wide variety of terrestrial applications. Reduction of parasitic heat losses in AMTEC systems related to radiative heat transfer from the hot side to the condenser can make a substantial contribution to system efficiency. Through design, analysis and the fabrication and testing of cells and systems, the proposed program to develop a Directed Reflectivity Condenser (DRC) has investigated the feasibility of an improved AMTEC condenser component. Phase 1 work showed the potential for adding from 4% to 7% to overall system efficiency for identical operating conditions using the concept. A detailed thermal analysis of several DRC capped cell designs was carried out and some of the conditions under which a DRC, used as the condenser at an end cap of a cylindrical converter, can reduce thermal radiation related losses were determined. A model experimental converter was built and tested to compare DRC and planar condenser surfaces. The results of both analysis and experiment indicate that for moderate aspect ratios of a cylindrical, end condensed converter, the DRC can reduce overall thermal losses by up to 4%. The initial effort in Phase 2 extended the analysis to a novel 150 watt radial AMTEC cell design. This analysis indicated that for the effective aspect ratio of this new converter design, the system performance at the 100+ watt level was not significantly improved by use of a DRC type condenser surface. Further analyses however showed that for cylindrical, end-condensed converters, optimized for use with internal radiation shields, the use of DRC surfaces on the side walls of the converter could be more effective than on the condenser end surface itself. The experimental work in Phase 2 was intended to incorporate a DRC into this cell design and use its measured performance to refine the state-of-the-art AMTEC analytical models. Because the analysis had indicated that the new radial converter design, which may be useful for systems at the {approx} 100 watt level was not much assisted by the DRC properties, this program was redirected toward the simpler cylindrical converter design with the corner cube surfaces on the side walls. The Phase II program was proposed and planned with a funding level substantially below the maximum potentially available for Phase II programs at that time. At the time, there were two other funded government sponsored programs at AMPS for which positive results of the analyses described in this report were expected to lead to incorporation of the DRC concept into converters scheduled to be built for these programs. The programs of interest were the Air Force program titled ''Radiation Tolerant, Eclipse Compatible, Solar AMTEC System'' (F29601-99-C-0132) and the DOE/NASA Advanced Radioisotope Power System (ARPS) program. Shortly after its start, the Air Force program was canceled due to elimination of AF SBIR funds at AFRL and the ARPS program was reduced to a level that could not support introduction of novel concept testing. As a result of these two circumstances, the direct testing of the DRC concept in a full up converter was not completed in the Phase II period.

Hunt, Thomas K.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Fischer Tropsch synthesis : an in-situ TPR-EXAFS/XANES investigation of the influence of Group I alkali promoters on the local atomic and electronic structure of carburized iron/silica catalysts.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The promoting impact of alkali metals (i.e., Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) on the carburization rate of Fe in Fe/Si catalysts was investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A multisample holder was used, allowing nearly simultaneous examination of the catalysts during activation in a CO/He mixture. With the white line intensity and shape as a fingerprint for oxidation state, TPR/XANES analysis enabled us to measure the relative composition of the different compounds as a function of the carburization time, temperature, and atomic number of the group 1 promoter. At the same time, TPR/EXAFS provided information on the changes in local atomic structure that accompanied the oxidation state changes. The rate of carburization increased in the following order: unpromoted < Li < Na < K = Rb = Cs. After 10 h of treatment the samples containing K, Rb, and Cs were completely carburized, and residual quantities of iron oxides were detected in both unpromoted and Li-promoted samples. The EXAFS spectra after carburization could be fitted well by considering a model containing Hagg carbide and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. After 10 h of CO/He treatment at 290 C, the main component observed was Hagg carbide. A model containing Hagg and {var_epsilon}-carbides, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, was also investigated. However, the r-factor was not significantly impacted by including {var_epsilon}-carbide in the fitting, and the resulting contribution of {var_epsilon}-carbide in each catalyst from the model was virtually negligible. Selectivity differences are thus not likely due to changes in the carbide distribution. Rather, the alkali promoter increases the CO dissociative adsorption rate, resulting in an increase in the surface coverage of dissociated CO and an inhibition in the olefin readsorption rate. This in turn results in higher olefin selectivities, in agreement with previous catalytic tests.

Ribeiro, M. C.; Jacobs, G.; Davis, B. H.; Cronauer, D. C.; Kropf, A. J.; Marshall, C. L. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Univ. of Kentucky)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Pure and Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) Nanoparticles ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental Assessment of Li-CNT Battery Production ... The Production of High-Quality Magnesite Ore Concentrate With Permroll Type Magnetic Separator.

168

PHOTOSENSITIZED IONIZATION OF ALKALI METAL VAPORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy for the cesium system. volts/cm~ 339C~ 0.15 torr.system. conditions: 2.67 volts/em, 390C~ 0.068 torr. "il~ a temperature of 300C~ volts/cm~ the migration velocity

Lee, Yuan-tseh; Mahan, Bruce H.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Neutron imaging of alkali metal heat pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature heat pipes are two-phase, capillary driven heat transfer devices capable of passively providing high thermal fluxes. Such a device using a liquid-metal coolant can be used as a solution for successful thermal management on hypersonic flight vehicles. Imaging of the liquid-metal coolant inside will provide valuable information in characterizing the detailed heat and mass transport. Neutron imaging possesses an inherent advantage from the fact that neutrons penetrate the heat pipe metal walls with very little attenuation, but are significantly attenuated by the liquid metal contained inside. Using the BT-2 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, preliminary efforts have been conducted on a nickel-sodium heat pipe. The contrast between the attenuated beam and the background is calculated to be approximately 3%. This low contrast requires sacrifice in spatial or temporal resolution so efforts have since been concentrated on lithium (Li) which has a substantially larger neutron attenuation cross section. Using the CG-1D beam line at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the first neutron images of high-temperature molybdenum (Mo)-Li heat pipes have been achieved. The relatively high neutron cross section of Li allows for the visualization of the Li working fluid inside the heat pipes. The evaporator region of a gravity assisted cylindrical heat pipe prototype 25 cm long was imaged from start-up to steady state operation up to approximately 900 C. In each corner of the square bore inside, the capillary action raises the Li meniscus above the bulk Li pool in the evaporator region. As the operational temperature changes, the meniscus shapes and the bulk meniscus height also changes. Furthermore, a three-dimensional tomographic image is also reconstructed from the total of 128 projection images taken 1.4o apart in which the Li had already cooled and solidified.

Kihm, Ken [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kirchoff, Eric [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Golden, Matt [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rosenfeld, J. [Thermacore Inc.; Rawal, S. [Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company; Pratt, D. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Walker, Lakeisha MH [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Real-time alkali monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected emission lines, such as the sodium emission line, may be detected in the presence of interfering background radiation. A combustion flame is fed by a diverted portion of a process stream and the common end of a bifurcated or quadfurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted to collect light from the flame. The light is guided through the branches of the fiber optic cable to bandpass filters, one of which is adapted to each of the branches of the fiber optic light guide. The bandpass filters are centered at wavelengths corresponding to the emission lines to be detected and two separate filters are required for each species being detected. The first filter has a bandwidth of about 3 nms and the second filter has a bandwidth of about 10 nms. Light detectors are located to view the light passing through the bandpass filters and amplifiers are connected to receive signals from the light detectors. The amplifier corresponding to the bandpass filter having the narrower bandwidth is preset to scale the signal by a factor equal to the ratio of the wide and narrow bandwidths of the bandpass filters. This scaling produces a scaled signal from which the difference between the scaled signal on the other signal can be calculated to produce a signal having an amplitude directly proportional to the concentration of the species of interest and independent of background radiation. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Goff, D.R.; Romanosky, R.R.; Hensel, P.

1988-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

171

Real-time alkali monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium emission line, may be detected in the presence of interfering background radiation. A combustion flame is fed by a diverted portion of a process stream and the common end of a bifurcated or quadfurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted to collect light from the flame. The light is guided through the branches of the fiber optic cable to bandpass filters, one of which is adapted to each of the branches of the fiber optic light guide. The bandpass filters are centered at wavelengths corresponding to the emission lines to be detected and two separate filters are required for each species being detected. The first filter has a bandwidth of about 3 nms and the second filter has a bandwidth of about 10 nms. Light detectors are located to view the light passing through the bandpass filters and amplifiers are connected to receive signals from the light detectors. The amplifier corresponding to the bandpass filter having the narrower bandwidth is preset to scale the signal by a factor equal to the ratio of the wide and narrow bandwidths of the bandpass filters. This scaling produces a scaled signal from which the difference between the scaled signal on the other signal can be calculated to produce a signal having an amplitude directly proportional to the concentration of the species of interest and independent of background radiation.

Goff, David R. (Christiansburg, VA); Romanosky, Robert R. (Prosperity, PA); Hensel, Peter (Morgantown, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Characterization of Ballistocardiogram Recorded at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla in Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Zempel, J. M., Vincent, J. L., Larson-Prior, L. J., and Snyder, A. Z.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization of Ballistocardiogram Recorded at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla in Simultaneous EEG of BKG at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla: ·3 subjects Experimental protocol: ·Functional images were simultaneously in the scanner (1.5 and 3 Tesla) with the same EEG equipment (amplifier, cap, cables) in consecutive sessions. ·3

Larson-Prior, Linda

173

Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006); M. M. Reif and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}) and halide (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998); Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}]=-1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol{sup -1}, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets L{sub E}, M{sub E}, and H{sub E} for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective ionic radius entering into the calculation of the correction terms is also evaluated and found to be very limited. Ultimately, it is expected that comparison with other experimental ionic properties (e.g., derivative single-ion solvation properties, as well as data concerning ionic crystals, melts, solutions at finite concentrations, or nonaqueous solutions) will permit to validate one specific set and thus, the associated {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] value (atomistic consistency assumption). Preliminary results (first-peak positions in the ion-water radial distribution functions, partial molar volumes of ionic salts in water, and structural properties of ionic crystals) support a value of {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] close to -1100 kJ{center_dot}mol{sup -1}.

Reif, Maria M.; Huenenberger, Philippe H. [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

New hypodiphosphates of the alkali metals: Synthesis, crystal structure and vibrational spectra of the hypodiphosphates(IV) M{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (M=Rb and Cs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new hypodiphosphates(IV) Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (1) and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (2) were synthesized by soft chemistry reactions from aqueous solutions of hypophosphoric acid and the corresponding heavy alkali-metal carbonates. Their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize isotypic in the triclinic space group P-1 with one formula unit in the unit cell. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units in staggered conformation for the P{sub 2}O{sub 6} skeleton and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. In the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} ion the hydrogen atoms are in a 'trans-trans' conformation. O{center_dot}H-O hydrogen bonds between the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups consolidate the structures into a three-dimensional network. The FT-Raman and {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H and MAS NMR spectra of the title compounds have been recorded and interpreted, especially with respect to their assignment to the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups. Thermogravimetric data of 2 have been interpreted in terms of a thermal decomposition model. - Graphical Abstract: The layered compounds Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] have been synthesized and investigated. Both crystallize isotypic. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and single-crystal structure of new alkali hypodiphosphates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures are characterized by [(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})]{sup 2-} units and M{sup +} cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units are linked by short hydrogen bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds are characterized by {sup 31}P MAS-NMR spectra.

Wu, Peng [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie der TU Clausthal, Paul-Ernst-Strasse 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)] [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie der TU Clausthal, Paul-Ernst-Strasse 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Wiegand, Thomas; Eckert, Hellmut [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie and Graduate School of Chemistry, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstr. 28/30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)] [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie and Graduate School of Chemistry, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstr. 28/30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Gjikaj, Mimoza, E-mail: mimoza.gjikaj@tu-clausthal.de [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie der TU Clausthal, Paul-Ernst-Strasse 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)] [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie der TU Clausthal, Paul-Ernst-Strasse 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Policy Flash 2013-65 Procurement Evaluation & Re-Engineering Team (PERT) and Establishment of a 5-year Cycle with Corresponding Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq...

176

Policy Flash 2013-65  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq...

177

Policy Flash 2013-57 New Strategic Sourcing Acquisition Guide Chapter 7.2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq...

178

The Alkali Roasting of Complex Oxide Minerals for High Purity ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the Growth of Algae Electrodeposition of PbTe Thermoelectric Materials in NaOH Solutions.

179

Mitigation of autogenous shrinkage in alkali activated slag ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A drop of paraffin oil was added to the ... heat flow related to the initial peak decreases much ... suggesting the initial and secondary peaks may overlap. ...

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

180

Evaluation of Alkali Bromide Salts for Potential Pyrochemical Applications  

SciTech Connect

Transient techniques were employed to study the electrochemical behavior, reduction mechanism and transport properties of REBr3 (RE - La, Nd and Gd) in pure LiBr, LiBr-KBr (eutectic) and LiBr-KBr-CsBr (eutectic) melts. Gd(III) showed a reversible single step soluble-insoluble exchange phenomenon in LiBr melt at 973K. Although La (III), Nd(III) and Gd(III) ions showed reversible behavior in eutectic LiBr-KBr melts, these ions showed a combination of temperature dependent reversible and pseudo-reversible behavior. While both La(III) and Gd(III) showed one step reduction, the reduction of Nd(III) was observed to be a two step process. La metal could be electrodeposited from the ternary electrolyte at a temperature of 673K. Various electrochemical measurements suggest that both binary and ternary bromide melts can potentially be used to electrodeposit high purity RE metals at comparatively lower operating temperatures.

Prabhat K. Tripathy; Steven D. Herrmann; Guy L. Fredrickson; Tedd E. Lister; Toni Y. Gutknecht

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mechanical and Chemical Development of Alkali Activated Slag ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery Materials ... The Challenge of Allocation in LCA: The Case of Open-Loop Recycling.

182

CHARGE TRANSFER BETWEEN POSITIVE ALKALI IONS AND ATOMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s r e p o r t e d by CNG have been reduced by 15% . . . . .u l d a m a s h v i l l i (CNG) I Also shown a r e . ' a d '

Gentry, W.R.; Lee, Yuan-tseh; Mahan, Bruce H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Polyanionic Polymers with High Alkali-Ion Conductivity and ...  

Very few electrolytes have been developed thus far that exhibit the above combination of performance ... cells without significant extra cost. ... Cyc ...

184

The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems  

SciTech Connect

The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation of autogenous shrinkage in alkali activated slag  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ment Initiative BoR/DOEdu 431,946 13-001 Allouche, Erez Geopolymer Concrete Mix Design, Testing Funding Agency $ Awarded Erez Allouche Geopolymer Concrete Mix Design, Testing & Oversight Dept. of Energy-Diamond Microelectrode Array- Based Detection LBRN/INBRE 250,000 13-012 Allouche, Erez Testing of Geopolymer Binders

Bentz, Dale P.

186

The Alkali Roasting and Leaching of Ilmenite Minerals For the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the Growth of Algae Electrodeposition of PbTe Thermoelectric Materials in NaOH Solutions.

187

Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Print Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or magnetic fields, or applying small changes in temperature,...

188

Pyrolysis and gasification of lignin and effect of alkali addition .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lignin, a byproduct of the chemical pulping can be gasified to produce fuel gas and value-added products. Two lignins, MeadWestvaco (MWV) lignin and Sigma Aldrich (more)

Kumar, Vipul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

190

Lanthanide-alkali Metal Halide Systems: Characterization and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of Precious Metals from Chloride Media Using Microalgae Waste from Biofuel Extraction Segregation Roasting of a Saprolitic Laterite Ore: An...

191

E7: Ionic and Electronic Transport in Alkali Peorxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D8: The Effect of Circulating Coal Slurry Water Hardness on Coal Preparation .... J1: Design and Manufacture of Fluidized Bed Reactor in Pilot Scale for Multiple...

192

Spin Noise Exchange in Coupled Alkali-Metal Vapors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics of spin exchange collisions has fueled a large number of discoveries in fundamental physics, chemistry and biology, and has led to several applications in medical imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance. We here report on the experimental observation and theoretical justification of a novel effect, the transfer of spin noise from one atomic species to another, through the mechanism of spin exchange. Essentially, we extend the foundational studies of spin exchange into the deeper layer of quantum fluctuations. The signature of spin noise exchange is an increase of the total spin noise power at low magnetic fields where the two-species spin noise resonances overlap.

A. T. Dellis; M. Loulakis; I. K. Kominis

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

193

NOVEL REFRACTORY MATERIALS FOR HIGH ALKALI, HIGH TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refractory materials can be limited in their application by many factors including chemical reactions between the service environment and the refractory material, mechanical degradation of the refractory material by the service environment, temperature limitations on the use of a particular refractory material, and the inability to install or repair the refractory material in a cost effective manner or while the vessel was in service. The objective of this project was to address the need for new innovative refractory compositions by developing a family of novel MgO-Al 2O3 spinel or other similar magnesia/alumina containing unshaped refractory composition (castables, gunnables, shotcretes, etc) utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques (in-situ phase formation, altered conversion temperatures, accelerated reactions, etc). This family of refractory compositions would then be tailored for use in high-temperature, high-alkaline industrial environments like those found in the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

NOvel Refractory Materials for High Alkali, High Temperature Environments  

SciTech Connect

Refractory materials can be limited in their application by many factors including chemical reactions between the service environment and the refractory material, mechanical degradation of the refractory material by the service environment, temperature limitations on the use of a particular refractory material, and the inability to install or repair the refractory material in a cost effective manner or while the vessel was in service. The objective of this project was to address the need for new innovative refractory compositions by developing a family of novel MgO-Al2O3 spinel or other similar magnesia/alumina containing unshaped refractory composition (castables, gunnables, shotcretes, etc) utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques (in-situ phase formation, altered conversion temperatures, accelerated reactions, etc). This family of refractory compositions would then be tailored for use in high-temperature, highalkaline industrial environments like those found in the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries. A research team was formed to carry out the proposed work led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and was comprised of the academic institution Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T), and the industrial company MINTEQ International, Inc. (MINTEQ), along with representatives from the aluminum, chemical, glass, and forest products industries. The two goals of this project were to produce novel refractory compositions which will allow for improved energy efficiency and to develop new refractory application techniques which would improve the speed of installation. Also methods of hot installation were sought which would allow for hot repairs and on-line maintenance leading to reduced process downtimes and eliminating the need to cool and reheat process vessels.

Hemrick, J.G.; Griffin, R. (MINTEQ International, Inc.)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Charpy Impact Resistance of Alkali Treated Curaua Fiber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes Magnesium Sheets Produced by Extrusion Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on...

196

Influence of alkalis on porosity percolation in hydrating cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3rd Nordic SympBuilding Physics 1993;93: 74552. [13] CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. 68th ed. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press; 1987. ...

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Influence of Alkalis on Porosity Percolation in Hydrating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2004) 2045-2056. [10] CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 68th edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1987. [11] HFW ...

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

198

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGULATIONS Although incinerator flue gas emission limits for acid gases have been imposed by the federal, such as sodium chlorite (NaCI02), is added to oxidize flue gas NO to N02, which can be removed by a sodium of saturated flue gas to approximately 60°C ( 140°F), the total (par ticulate and gaseous) mercury emissions

Zevenhoven, Ron

199

Early solar system garnet-like mineral named for Livermore cosmochemis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a piece of the meteorite Allende, which contains some of the oldest objects in the solar system. A new mineral, hutcheonite, is named in honor of Hutcheon. Photos by Julie...

200

Co-precipitation synthesis and sintering of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) powders: the eect of precipitant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum sintering was performed in a furnace heated by a tungsten-mesh heater (Model M60-3X8-WW-23, Nemus co-precipitated from a mixed solution of aluminum and yttrium nitrates using ammonia water of ammonia water produced a hydroxide pre- cursor with an approximate composition of Al(OH)3 .0.3[Y2(OH)5(NO3

Lee, Jong-Heun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Transparent yttrium aluminium garnet obtained by spark plasma sintering of lyophilized gels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lyophilized YAG gel, synthesized by the coprecipitation technique, has been sintered to transparency by spark plasma sintering method at 1500C. Whereas conventionally dried gels show large agglomerates, over 1 m, powders from lyophilized ...

M. Surez; A. Fernndez; J. L. Menndez; R. Torrecillas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Dr. Daniel A. Veronica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to NIST, Dan managed the Karl Larson Building Energy Systems Laboratory at ... engineering and deck officer on US Navy nuclear submarines, and ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

A portable cryoplunger for onsite intact cryogenic ...  

KENNETH H. DOWNING, 1DAVID M. LARSON, ROSEANN CSENCSITS,1 AND JILLIAN F. BANFIELD3,4 ... large surface to volume ratio means that evaporation can be ...

204

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics and Technology Seminar - One West Speaker: Del Larson, University of Texas, Arlington Title: ECOFusion: An Electron-Cooled, Cellular Approach to Harnessing...

205

A C S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Henry and Sharlene Glass Robert and Tracey Grimm Ezra Heitowit Boris and Susan Kayser Peter Koehler Donald and Judith Larson Gary and Grace Leonard John and Ann Marriner...

206

President Obama Announces New Plan to Create STEM Master Teaching...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on WhiteHouse.gov's Office of Sience and Technology Policy by Phil Larson. Today, the Obama Administration announced the President's plan to create a national Science, Math,...

207

EWG/ICV Participants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Jeff Kurtz, MITRE, jkurtz@mitre.org. Ron Larson, DARPA, rlarson@darpa. mil. Sharon ... gov. Kevin Mills, DARPA, klmills@darpa.mil. ...

208

Abstracts of Awards for FY 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CAD Input Conversion Software For Virtual MCNP (Monte ... 650-274-8357 Email: paul_larson@mninter.net. ... of a MEMS Viscosity Meter for Refrigerant ...

209

Investigation of magnetic structure and magnetization process of yttrium iron garnet film by Lorentz microscopy and electron holography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. On the left-hand sides of b and c , schematic diagrams are added to show domain walls with white and black by photons or scanning probes.9 In this paper, the domain structure of YIG films, including its variation as shown by the white rectangle in Fig. 1. The corresponding TEM results are shown in Fig. 2, where

Krishnan, Kannan M.

210

MERCURY FLOWS IN EUROPE AND THE WORLD: THE IMPACT OF DECOMMISSIONED CHLOR-ALKALI PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

care and due diligence, in accordance with the terms of Study Contract N B4-3040/2002/340756/MAR/D3,

Rue De; La Loi; Sprl Concorde

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Thermochemical correlation of material transport in an alkali metal heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The use of high-power heat pipes in space power systems requires a means of life prediction. The design lifetimes required make experimental determination of life impractical. Thermochemical modeling of heat pipe corrosive failure modes has been investigated as a means of making such prediction. Results have been applied to tests of molybdenum-lithium heat pipes operating from 1400 to 1500/sup 0/K. A free energy minimization routine coupled to a hydrodynamic model of the operating heat pipe has been used to give local equilibrium values of reaction products as a function of operating time. The predicted reactions for critical regions of the heat pipe were compared with limited results of post-test examinations. Corrosive damage to the heat pipe wick structure was correlated with high oxygen and nitrogen activity in the evaporator region of the heat pipe.

Merrigan, M.A.; Feber, R.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

OPTIMIZED SYSTEM FOR D- PRODUCTION FROM CHARGE EXCHANGE IN ALKALI METALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Beams, PRELEC, K. Ed. (Brookhaven, 1977), P 290. [ 7]Beams, PRELEC, K. , ed. (Brookhaven 1977). [ 9] HOOPER, E.and ion. K Prelec, ed. (Brookhaven, 1977). p. GELLER, R. ,

Hooper Jr., E.B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Oxygen-Consuming Chlor-Alkali Cell Configured To Minimize Peroxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with the catalyst side away from the membrane, electrolysis of sodium chloride to chlorine and caustic (sodium hydroxide) proceeded with minimal peroxide formation. U.S. Patent...

214

Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power. 1 fig.

Erickson, D.C.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

215

The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950{degree}C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800{degree} to 950{degree}C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na{sub 2}O, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820{degree}. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 {mu}m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Studies of non-proportionality in alkali halide and strontium iodide scintillators using SLYNCI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, Officeof Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA- 22) of the

Ahle, Larry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Strategies for Liquid-Anode Alkali Batteries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The a uthors g ratefully a cknowledge t he s upport o f t he D epartment o f E nergyOffice o f E lectricity's E nergy S torage P rogram. S TRATEGIES F OR L IQUID A NODE A LKALI B...

218

Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts  

SciTech Connect

A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power.

Erickson, Donald C. (Annapolis)

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Structure and dynamics in yttrium-based molten rare earth alkali fluorides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport properties of molten LiF-YF3 mixtures have been studied by pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, potentiometric experiments, and molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated diffusion coefficients and electric conductivities compare very well with the measurements accross a wide composition range. We then extract static (radial distribution functions, coordination numbers distributions) and dynamic (cage correlation functions) quantities from the simulations. Then, we discuss the interplay between the microscopic structure of the molten salts and their dynamic properties. It is often considered that variations in the diffusion coefficient of the anions are mainly driven by the evolution of its coordination with the metallic ion (Y3+ here). We compare this system with fluorozirconate melts and demonstrate that the coordination number is a poor indicator of the evolution of the diffusion coefficient. Instead, we propose to use the ionic bonds lifetime. We show that the weak Y-F ionic bonds in LiF-YF3 do not induce the expected tendency of the fluoride diffusion coefficient to converge toward the one of yttrium cation when the content in YF3 increases. Implications on the validity of the Nernst-Einstein relation for estimating the electrical conductivity are discussed.

Maximilien Levesque; Vincent Sarou-Kanian; Mathieu Salanne; Mallory Gobet; Henri Groult; Catherine Bessada; Paul A. Madden; Anne-Laure Rollet

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Method and system for producing lower alcohols. [Heteropolyatomic lead salt coated with alkali metal formate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved catalyst for the reaction of carbon monoxide with water to produce methanol and other lower alcohols. It is a further object to provide a process for the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and water in which a relatively inexpensive catalyst permits the reaction at low pressures. It is also an object to provide a process for the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and water in which a relatively inexpensive catalyst permits the reaction at low pressures. It is also an object to provide a process for the production of methanol in which ethanol is also directly produced. It is another object to provide a process for the production of mixtures of methanol with ethanol and propanol from the reaction of carbon monoxide and water at moderate pressure with inexpensive catalysts. It is likewise an object to provide a system for the catalytic production of lower alcohols from the reaction of carbon monoxide and water at moderate pressure with inexpensive catalysts. In accordance with the present invention, a catalyst is provided for the reaction of carbon monoxide and water to produce lower alcohols. The catalyst includes a lead heteropolyatomic salt in mixture with a metal formate or a precursor to a metal formate.

Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.; Heiberger, J.J.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test ResultsCast Stone and Alkali Alumino-Silicate Geopolymer  

SciTech Connect

PNNL is conducting screening tests on the candidate waste forms to provide a basis for comparison and to resolve the formulation and data needs identified in the literature review. This report documents the screening test results on the Cast Stone cementitious waste form and the Geopolymer waste form. Test results suggest that both the Cast Stone and Geopolymer appear to be viable waste forms for the solidification of the secondary liquid wastes to be treated in the ETF. The diffusivity for technetium from the Cast Stone monoliths was in the range of 1.2 10-11 to 2.3 10-13 cm2/s during the 63 days of testing. The diffusivity for technetium from the Geopolymer was in the range of 1.7 10-10 to 3.8 10-12 cm2/s through the 63 days of the test. These values compare with a target of 1 10-9 cm2/s or less. The Geopolymer continues to show some fabrication issues with the diffusivities ranging from 1.7 10-10 to 3.8 10-12 cm2/s for the better-performing batch to from 1.2 10-9 to 1.8 10-11 cm2/s for the poorer-performing batch. In the future more comprehensive and longer term performance testing will be conducted, to further evaluate whether or not these waste forms will meet the regulation and performance criteria needed to cost-effectively dispose of secondary wastes.

Pierce, Eric M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Parker, Kent E.; Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

Low temperature alkali metal-sulfur batteries. Final report, December 1, 1974-November 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on the development of rechargeable, ambient-temperature Li/sulfur and Li/metal sulfide batteries is reported. The Li/S system has the cathode material dissolved in the electrolyte, as Li/sub 2/S/sub n/. Tetrahydrofuran, 1M LiAsF/sub 6/, is one of the more attractive electrolytes discovered for this cell, since it can dissolve up to approx. 10M S as Li/sub 2/Sn. Despite the oxidative nature of the electrolyte, Li is stable in it and can be electrodeposited from it on battery charge. Cells of the configuration Li 5M S (as Li/sub 2/S/sub n/), THF, 1M LiAsF/sub 6//carbon can be discharged at 50/sup 0/C with a utilization of nearly 1.5e/sup -//S at the C/3 rate. This corresponds to the rate-capacity goal for this battery in its proposed vehicular or load-leveling applications. Further improvements in rate are possible. Rechargeability of 135 cycles of 0.1 e/sup -//S and approx. 45 cycles of 0.5 e/sup -//S was demonstrated. The self-discharge reaction keeps the Li electrode free of electrically isolated dendrites. Ultimate failure on cycling is due to cathode depletion via precipitation of Li/sub 2/S on the anode in a form insoluble in the electrolyte. Attempts to solubilize the Li/sub 2/S by the internal generation of an oxidizing scavenger (e.g., Br/sub 2/) or by addition of Lewis acids have met only with limited success. Cells of configuration Li/THF, 1M LiAsF/sub 6//insoluble metal sulfide were investigated, using the following cathodes: CuS, NiS, SiS/sub 2/, MnS/sub 2/, FeS, and Bi/sub 2/S/sub 3/. Of these, the most promising new material in terms of energy density and rechargeability is CuS. Well over 100 cycles for Li/CuS cells with moderate cathode loadings were demonstrated. CuS compares favorably with TiS/sub 2/ in terms of energy density and rechargeability and is superior in terms of economics. 39 figures, 19 tables.

Brummer, S.B.; Rauh, R.D.; Abraham, K.M.; Dampier, F.W.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Pearson, G.F.; Surprenant, J.K.; Buzby, J.M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Structure and dynamics in yttrium-based molten rare earth alkali fluorides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport properties of molten LiF-YF$_3$ mixtures have been studied by pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, potentiometric experiments, and molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated diffusion coefficients and electric conductivities compare very well with the measurements accross a wide composition range. We then extract static (radial distribution functions, coordination numbers distributions) and dynamic (cage correlation functions) quantities from the simulations. Then, we discuss the interplay between the microscopic structure of the molten salts and their dynamic properties. It is often considered that variations in the diffusion coefficient of the anions are mainly driven by the evolution of its coordination with the metallic ion (Y$^{3+}$ here). We compare this system with fluorozirconate melts and demonstrate that the coordination number is a poor indicator of the evolution of the diffusion coefficient. Instead, we propose to use the ionic bonds lifetime. We show th...

Levesque, Maximilien; Salanne, Mathieu; Gobet, Mallory; Groult, Henri; Bessada, Catherine; Madden, Paul A; Rollet, Anne-Laure

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Experimental development of a chemical flood and the geochemistry of novel alkalis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Surfactant-Polymer (SP) and Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP) floods are tertiary oil recovery processes that mobilize residual oil to waterflood. These Chemical EOR processes are most valuable when (more)

Winters, Matthew Howard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Alkali/ Alkaline-Earth Content Effects on Properties of High-Alumina ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance ... Glasses tested had a high content of alumina (>20 wt%), moderate to high content of boria, and...

226

Fining Effect and Fining Agents in High Alkali Alumino-silicate Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary and Ternary Phase Diagram Studies of Thermal Energy Storage Materials ... of Core-shell Structured Multiferroic Nanocomposites for Energy Harvesting .... Low-temperature Spin Spray Deposited Ferrite/Piezoelectric Thin Film ... Multi-

227

The role of biomass in California's hydrogen economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scaling. Biomass and Bioenergy 13, Jenkins, B.M. , Bakker-western Canada. Biomass and Bioenergy 24, 445464. Larson,optimum size. Biomass and Bioenergy 31, 137144. De La Torre

Parker, Nathan C; Ogden, Joan; Fan, Yueyue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

1710 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 39, NO. 6, NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2003 An Integrated Flywheel Energy Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data from an average male human (Tilley, 1993; Department of Defense (DOD-HDBK-743A), 1991 of Anthropometry of US Military Personnel. DOD-HDBK-743A. Larson, S.G., Schmitt, D., Lemelin, P., Hamrick, M., 2000

Sanders, Seth

229

This paper appeared in the IBM Systems Journal, 33(3):501{529, 1994. Emerging Technology Supporting the Process Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data from an average male human (Tilley, 1993; Department of Defense (DOD-HDBK-743A), 1991 of Anthropometry of US Military Personnel. DOD-HDBK-743A. Larson, S.G., Schmitt, D., Lemelin, P., Hamrick, M., 2000

Heineman, George T.

230

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monday, April 6, 2009 11:00 am Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 "Atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of polymers and lipids" Ronald G. Larson Department of...

231

Management Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Threshold Stress at 750 o C 12 Larson-Miller Plot Alloy 617 13 Coble Creep Nabarro Herring Creep Ideal Strength Sliding of Dislocations 1.E-07 1.E-06 1.E-05 1.E-04 1.E-03...

232

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A. Goldman, Doug Larson, Tom Carr, Larry Rath, Peter Balash, and Wan Yih-Huei. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis. Berkeley: LBNL, 2008. Phadke, Amol, Charles A. Goldman,...

233

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the apprentices enrolled in the program," says Kathy Larson, Vice President of Sustainability at Frontier community." Each year, one apprentice will receive tuition assistance to learn better organic farming

California at Santa Cruz, University of

234

Microstructural Stability and Creep of Ru-Containing Nickel-Base ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

distilled water and 65 ml butyl cellusolve. .... The creep curves of UM-F27 and UM -F30 ..... Larson Miller curves of commercial alloys were plotted with data.

235

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 129 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

France Dr. Roger Larson Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 129 Graduate School of Oceanography University of Rhode/TAMU Jacl^G. Baldauf Assistant Manager Science Operations ODP/TAMU L August 1989 #12;Material

236

Self-acousto-optic modulation and orthogonality violation in the transverse modes of a broad-area Nd-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet single-shot laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-acousto-optic Raman-Nath modulation and nonorthogonal transversal modes are found in a broad-area Nd:YAG single-shot laser. The device is free from the thermal-induced effects previously related to orthogonality violation and the acousto-optic modulation comes from a shock wave produced by the discharge of the flash lamps that optically pump the laser. The experimental findings are reproduced by a general model of a class B laser.

Soler Rus, M. Odin; Cabrera-Granado, E.; Guerra Perez, J. M. [Departamento de Optica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, ES-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Off-center impurity in alkali halides: reorientation, electric polarization and pairing to F center. IV. Reorientational rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This last Part IV is aimed at deriving relaxation rates (times) of an off-center Li+ impurity. We follow Christov's reaction rate method to define general rate equations in terms of the exact Mathieu eigenvalues, as well as of harmonic-oscillator eigenvalues approximating for the energy spectrum near the bottom of the reorientational wells. To calculate the rate in each particular case, we derive configurational tunneling probabilities by either Mathieu eigenfunctions or by harmonic oscillator eigenfunctions. The electron-transfer probability is calculated by generalizing Landau-Zener's method. Typical examples are considered and compared with experimental relaxation times in KCl:Li+.

Baldacchini, G; Grassano, U M; Scacco, A; Petrova, P; Mladenova, M; Ivanovich, M; Georgiev, M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen TRACE ELEMENTS, ALKALI METALS 19.6.2001 8-1 Chapter 8 Trace elements,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­3109. (28) Niksa, S.; Fujiwara, N. Predicting extents of mercury oxidation in coal-derived flue gases. J, 1365­1371. (6) Presto, A. A.; Granite, E. J. Survey of catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas mercury (Hg0) from simulated coal-combustion flue gas. Experiments were carried out in fixed-bed reactors

Laughlin, Robert B.

239

NEGATIVE ION PRODUCTION BY BACK-SCATTERING FROM ALKALI-METAL SURFACES BOMBARDED BY IONS OF HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a few hundred electron Volts. In an effort to gain insightof the order of tens of electron Volts should be emitted asdifference of up t o 120 Volts was applied between the anode

Schneider, Peter Juergen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

2002 Archived Selected Headlines of Solid-State Lighting Headlines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has applied for WIPO protection for a garnet phosphor for converting UV and blue LED light to white light. A device incorporating a UV LED and the garnet phosphor emits at 490...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DOE Solar Decathlon: University of Colorado at Boulder: Living in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado's competition-winning house integrated into the Larson home in Golden, Colorado. Colorado's competition-winning house integrated into the Larson home in Golden, Colorado. Enlarge image BASE+ has been integrated into the home of Ronal and Gretchen Larson in Golden, Colorado. (Credit: Carol Anna/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Who: University of Colorado at Boulder What: BASE+ House Where: Private residence Golden, CO 80401 Map This House Public tours: Call the Colorado Renewable Energy Society hotline at 303-806-5317 for information about the annual Denver-Area Solar and Green Homes Tour. Solar Decathlon 2002 University of Colorado at Boulder: Living in a Panorama The University of Colorado won the first U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon with its BASE+ (Building a Sustainable Environment) house. Originally designed as an adaptable construction model, the house was later

242

Clean Cities: Honolulu Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Honolulu Clean Cities Coalition Honolulu Clean Cities Coalition The Honolulu Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Honolulu Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Robert Primiano 808-768-3500 rprimiano@honolulu.gov Margaret Larson 808-587-3813 margaret.s.larson@dbedt.hawaii.gov Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinators Coord Robert Primiano Coord Coord Margaret Larson Coord Photo of Robert Primiano Robert Primiano has been the Clean Cities Coordinator for the Honolulu Clean Cities Coalition since 2001. Over the past eight years, Primiano has coordinated the coalition's participation in many educational and promotional events in Honolulu. He is an executive board member of the local APWA chapter and heads the fleet division for Honolulu's municipal

243

Interpretation of monazite ages obtained via in situ analysis E.J. Catlos a,*, L.D. Gilley b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Barreiro, 1990; Harri- son et al., 1997) and inclusions in garnet are armored against daughter product loss

244

No Slide Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Acquisition Infrastructure Acquisition Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Transportation External Coordination Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting Presented by: Presented by: Ned Larson Ned Larson Office of National Transportation April 22, 2004 April 22, 2004 Albuquerque, NM Albuquerque, NM 2 Key Programmatic Interfaces * Disposal allocations * Waste Specifications * Waste Acceptance * Roles and Responsibilities Waste Acceptance Standard Contract Waste Generators (Utilities/DOE) * Facility interfaces * Site limitations * Service needs * Mode preference * Waste data * Schedules Repository Cask Receiving Fuel and Canister Handling * Cask System Envelopes * Handling interfaces * Operating requirements * Vehicle interfaces * Fleet Management Facility (FMF) Interfacing * Operating requirements

245

University of Southern California Solar Decathlon 2011 Project Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

l u x H o m e l u x H o m e TM Team USC Construction Documents Project Manual U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2013 teaM uSc Project Manual Faculty Contact: Gary Paige School of Architecture Los Angeles, CA 90007 paigegary@gmail.com (310) 488 - 4516 Student Contact: Evyn Larson School of Architecture Los Angeles, CA 90007 evyn.larson@gmail.com (408) 802 - 3695 As-Built Construction Documents August 22, 2013 7 C D E

246

U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marci Larson Marci Larson Branch Chief Office for Domestic Preparedness TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION WORKING GROUP APRIL 21-23, 2004 ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO ODP Background 30 April 1998 - ODP established to improve state and local WMD incident response capabilities nationwide Equipment grants Coordinated training programs Exercise support Technical assistance 1 March 2003 - Transitioned to Department of Homeland Security 2 Secretary --------------------------- Deputy Secretary Under Secretary Science and Technology Under Secretary Information Analysis and Infrastructure Protection Under Secretary Border & Transportation Security Under Secretary Emergency Preparedness and Response Under Secretary Management Citizenship & Immigration Service Ombudsman (1)

247

ESARDA paper, IRSN-SCM SA, May 2007 Implementation of an experimental design to evaluate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERDC/ELTR-12-25 Army Range Technology Program Large-Scale Physical Separation of Depleted Uranium-Scale Physical Separation of Depleted Uranium from Soil Steven Larson, Victor Medina, John Ballard, Chris Griggs) at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) to evaluate this technique for removal of depleted uranium (DU) metal from

248

CO2 Mitigation Potential of Biomass Energy Plantations in DevelopingRegions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 Mitigation Potential of Biomass Energy Plantations in DevelopingRegions Eric D. Larson.princeton.edu/~cees #12;Contents 1. Introduction 1 2. Modernization of Biomass Production, Conversion, and Use 2 3 Availability for Biomass Energy 5 --Using Degraded Lands for Biomass Energy 6 --Food Versus Fuel 7 --A

249

818 nature geoscience | VOL 2 | DECEMBER 2009 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience commentarY | focus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessmentof Biomass Conversionto Fischer-Tropsch Cooking Fuels for Rural China Eric D. Larson and Haiming Jin A variety of liquid hydrocarbonscan beproducedvia Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from biomass. We ~ via Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis for use in i .cooking. F-T synthesisinvolves the ; production

Schrag, Daniel

250

1100 , SNBL 1100 , SNBL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessmentof Biomass Conversionto Fischer-Tropsch Cooking Fuels for Rural China Eric D. Larson and Haiming Jin A variety of liquid hydrocarbonscan beproducedvia Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from biomass. We ~ via Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis for use in i .cooking. F-T synthesisinvolves the ; production

Titov, Anatoly

251

Methanol and hydrogen from biomass for transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methanol and hydrogen from biomass for transportation [1] Robert H. Williams, Eric D. Larson, Ryan from biomass via indirectly heated gasifiers and their use in fuel cell vehicles would make it possible for biomass to be used for road transportation, with zero or near-zero local air pollution and very low levels

252

BIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS ERIC D. LARSON Milano Milan, Italy ABSTRACT Cogeneration of heat and power at kraft pulp/paper mills from on-site bioma modeling of gasifier/gas turbine pulp-mill cogeneration systemsusing gasifier designs under commercial

253

Abbreviations, Symbols, and Tradenames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...test LEC liquid-encapsulated Czochralski LED light-emitting diode LHC large hadron collider LIMS laser ionization mass spectroscopy LMP Larson-Miller parameter In natural logarithm (base e ) LNG liquefied natural gas log common logarithm (base 10) LPE liquid-phase epitaxy LT long transverse (direction) m meter m...

254

Brazil Week "Vanderbilt"and the Vanderbilt logo are registered trademarks and service marks of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazil Week "Vanderbilt"and the Vanderbilt logo are registered trademarks and service marks of Citizenship in Late-Nineteenth-Century Brazil" 4:00 p.m. Buttrick Hall 123 Futebol Tournament All are invited.d.larson@vanderbilt.edu. 5:30 p.m. Alumni Lawn Wednesday SEPT World on Wednesday "Vanderbilt and Brazil: Past Present

Bordenstein, Seth

255

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about $0.50/gJ to the price of biomass-derived hydrogen (biomass (Larson and Katofsky, 1992). The fuel retati pricebiomass instead of from solar power, the production cost would be much lower (Table 5), and the breakeven gasoline price

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Biomass Plantation Inergy Systems and Sustainable DevelD~ment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.m Biomass Plantation Inergy Systems and Sustainable DevelD~ment ERIC D. LARSON AND ROBERT H ranks ir ar the bor- rom of the ladderofPreferred Biomass DEV'ELOPING COUNTRIES energ Planning Di\\ision found biomass' poren- Biomassenerg)'userodayalsoconmburesro indoor airpollution rial

257

27 OCTOBER 2006 VOL 314 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org582 CREDITS:TIMCONNOR;(INSET)COURTESYOFTHENATIONALPARKSERVICE/YOSEMITEMUSEUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relationship between gravity and surface hydrology is difficult to quantify [van Dam and Francis, 1998 and nontidal variations of gravity in Boulder, Colorado, Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 393-396, 1998. van Dam, T., K Postglacial Rebound with GPS and Absolute Gravity Kristine M. Larson Department of Aerospace Engineering

Palmer, Margaret A.

258

Micro Contacts and Micro Manipulation with MEMS Actuator Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relationship between gravity and surface hydrology is difficult to quantify [van Dam and Francis, 1998 and nontidal variations of gravity in Boulder, Colorado, Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 393-396, 1998. van Dam, T., K Postglacial Rebound with GPS and Absolute Gravity Kristine M. Larson Department of Aerospace Engineering

Donald, Bruce Randall

259

Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Celluloses on Water-catalyzed Self-degradation of 200-degree C-heated Alkali-Activated Cement  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the usefulness of sodium carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC) in promoting self-degradation of 200C-heated sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash cementitious material after contact with water. CMC emitted two major volatile compounds, CO2 and acetic acid, creating a porous structure in cement. CMC also reacted with NaOH from sodium silicate to form three water-insensitive solid reaction products, disodium glycolate salt, sodium glucosidic salt, and sodium bicarbonate. Other water-sensitive solid reaction products, such as sodium polysilicate and sodium carbonate, were derived from hydrolysates of sodium silicate. Dissolution of these products upon contact with water generated heat that promoted cements self-degradation. Thus, CMC of high molecular weight rendered two important features to the water-catalyzed self-degradation of heated cement: One was the high heat energy generated in exothermic reactions in cement; the other was the introduction of extensive porosity into cement.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. , 1990. Uranium and (super 10) Be enrichments by fluidsabove 300 C. (Fig. Enrichments of uranium 238 U over 230 Th

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Donval, J. P. , 2005. Chlorine isotopic compositions ofand Davis, S. , 1984. Natural chlorine isotope variations.precision measurement of chlorine stable isotope ratios.

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Enhancement of specific heat capacity of high-temperature silica-nanofluids synthesized in alkali chloride salt eutectics for solar thermal-energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chloride salt eutectics for solar thermal-energy storage applications Donghyun Shin, Debjyoti Banerjee solution, resulting in degradation of the thermal properties. Solar energy conversion to electricity is achieved primarily by using (a) photovoltaic technology, or (b) by harnessing solar thermal-energy

Banerjee, Debjyoti

263

Ex-situ and in-situ spectroscopic studies of the passive film on alkali and alkaline earth metals in nonaqueous solvents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The adsorption of carbon dioxide on potassium-dosed Ag(111) has been investigated with temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), work function measurements, and Auger electron (AES), X-ray photoelectron (XPS), and high resolution electron energy loss (HREELS), spectroscopies. Unlike the behavior observed for other K-modified single-crystal metal surfaces, the TPD spectra of near-saturation coverages of CO{sub 2} on K/Ag(111) for K coverages in the range 0.13 < {Theta}{sub K} < 0.47 exhibit a sharply defined m/e = 44 peak at 796 +/{minus} 6 K with no evidence for the desorption of CO at any temperature. Similar TPD experiments involving mixtures of natural and {sup 18}0-labelled CO{sub 2} indicate that the oxygen atoms undergo partial scrambling, suggesting that the overall process cannot be represented in terms of a simple adsorption/desorption of CO{sub 2}. The HREELS spectra of CO{sub 2}-saturated K/Ag(111) show, in addition to very minor features, a sharp peak at about 1480 cm{sup {minus}1}, and XPS spectra of the same interface display a C(ls) peak with a binding energy characteristic of an electron-rich carbon species. This information is consistent with the presence of a carbon-bound CO species on the surface. Evidence against the complete dissociation of CO{sub 2} was obtained from TPD which failed to reveal features associated with carbonate (decomposition) expected to be formed via the reaction of CO{sub 2} and adsorbed O. It is proposed that CO{sub 2} on K/Ag(111) binds through the carbon to the surface leading to the partial'' dissociation (or activation) of each CO{sub 2} molecule into adsorbed CO and O. Within this model, such adsorbed O would serve as a bridge between the carbon atoms of neighboring activated'' CO{sub 2} molecules, and therefore undergo exchange prior to or during thermal desorption.

Wang, K.; Chottiner, G.S.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Scherson, D.A. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Chemistry)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Ex-situ and in-situ spectroscopic studies of the passive film on alkali and alkaline earth metals in nonaqueous solvents. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The adsorption of carbon dioxide on potassium-dosed Ag(111) has been investigated with temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), work function measurements, and Auger electron (AES), X-ray photoelectron (XPS), and high resolution electron energy loss (HREELS), spectroscopies. Unlike the behavior observed for other K-modified single-crystal metal surfaces, the TPD spectra of near-saturation coverages of CO{sub 2} on K/Ag(111) for K coverages in the range 0.13 < {Theta}{sub K} < 0.47 exhibit a sharply defined m/e = 44 peak at 796 +/{minus} 6 K with no evidence for the desorption of CO at any temperature. Similar TPD experiments involving mixtures of natural and {sup 18}0-labelled CO{sub 2} indicate that the oxygen atoms undergo partial scrambling, suggesting that the overall process cannot be represented in terms of a simple adsorption/desorption of CO{sub 2}. The HREELS spectra of CO{sub 2}-saturated K/Ag(111) show, in addition to very minor features, a sharp peak at about 1480 cm{sup {minus}1}, and XPS spectra of the same interface display a C(ls) peak with a binding energy characteristic of an electron-rich carbon species. This information is consistent with the presence of a carbon-bound CO species on the surface. Evidence against the complete dissociation of CO{sub 2} was obtained from TPD which failed to reveal features associated with carbonate (decomposition) expected to be formed via the reaction of CO{sub 2} and adsorbed O. It is proposed that CO{sub 2} on K/Ag(111) binds through the carbon to the surface leading to the ``partial`` dissociation (or activation) of each CO{sub 2} molecule into adsorbed CO and O. Within this model, such adsorbed O would serve as a bridge between the carbon atoms of neighboring ``activated`` CO{sub 2} molecules, and therefore undergo exchange prior to or during thermal desorption.

Wang, K.; Chottiner, G.S.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Scherson, D.A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Chemistry

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluids fuel extremophilic Archaea on a Mariana forearc serpentinite mud volcano: Ocean Drillingfluid flow in the western Nankai subduction zone, Japan. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the oceans. Chemical Geology: Isotope Geoscience section 80(Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana State University, for her Li isotopeisotopes and origin of high-Cl magmas of the Stillwater Complex, Montana. Geology

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Alkali/TX[sub 2] catalysts for CO/H[sub 2] conversion to C[sub 1]-C[sub 4] alcohols  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to determine the patterns of variations of catalyst activity and selectivity for the synthesis of alcohols from H[sub 2]/CO synthesis gas. Since the source of carbon can be coal-derived synthesis gas, this research makes a contribution to the technology for high quality clean transportation fuels and for basic chemicals from coal. Catalysts prepared were principally based on MoS[sub 2], RuS[sub 2], TaS[sub 2], and NbS[sub 2]. Catalytic testing of these materials was carried out both before and after surface doping with Cs. In alcohol synthesis activation of hydrogen by the catalyst surface is essential. Knowledge of transition metal disulfide surface properties is important before the mechanism of hydrogen dissociation can be addressed. The electronic structures of MoS[sub 2], RuS[sub 2], and NbS[sub 2] were studied both theoretically and experimentally. Experimental valence bands were obtained by high resolution electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (HR-ESCA, also referred to as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and theoretical valence bands were calculated using solid state extended Hueckel theory. Comparison of two-dimensional (2-D) MoS[sub 2] theoretical valence bands with the experimental HR-ESCA valence bands of polycrystalline MoS[sub 2] led to parametrization of the S 3s, S 3p, and Mo 4d atomic ionization potentials and Slater-type coefficients and exponents. The S 3s and S 3p parameters obtained for MoS[sub 2] were used to obtain the NbS[sub 2] and RuS[sub 2] theoretical valence bands.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Richards-Babb, M.; Bastian, R.; Kieke, M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range kg/yr Cl sources and sinks Water or rock mass mol/kgtemperature at the source of fluid-rock reactions, asto identify the fluid-rock reactions at source. In addition,

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ion Partitioning at the liquid/vapor interface of a multi-component alkali halide solution: A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model for aqueous sea salt aerosols Sutapa Ghosal, 1 Matthewwith sea salt ice and aerosols has been implicated in theof aqueous sea salt aerosols and particles have been

Ghosal, Sutapa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract N/A Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation Elaine J. Bell,Lawrence T. Larson,Russell W. Juncal. 1980. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province,

272

TEC Meeting Summaries - April 2004 Presentations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 2004 Presentations April 2004 Presentations TEC Meeting Summaries - April 2004 Presentations Albuquerque, New Mexico Presentations ( April 21-23, 2004) Documents Available for Download Introductions and Meeting Welcome - TEC 101 Judith Holm Program Updates from OCRWM and EM - OCRWM Gary Lanthrum Federal Agency Panel - NRC_Snyder Federal Agency Panel - DOT_Blackwell Federal Agency Panel - DOH_Larson Regional Group Updates on Transportation Activities - CSG-NE_Paull-Wilds Regional Group Updates on Transportation Activities - CSG-MW_Sattler Regional Group Updates on Transportation Activities - SSEB_Wells Regional Group Updates on Transportation Activities - WIEB_Larson Regional Group Updates on Transportation Activities - WGA_Mackie Communications/Lessons Learned Study of DOE FY03 SNF Shipments -

273

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass Project Summary Full Title: Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass, without and with Carbon Capture and Storage Project ID: 226 Principal Investigator: Eric D. Larson Keywords: Biomass; Fischer Tropsch; hydrogen Purpose Develop and analyze process designs for gasification-based thermochemical conversion of switchgrass into Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, dimethyl ether (DME), and hydrogen. All process designs will have some level of co-production of electricity, and some will include capture of byproduct CO2 for underground storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric D. Larson Organization: Princeton University Telephone: 609-258-4966 Email: elarson@princeton.edu

274

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 26490 of 26,764 results. 81 - 26490 of 26,764 results. Download Policy Flash 2013-57 New Strategic Sourcing Acquisition Guide Chapter 7.2 Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq... http://energy.gov/management/downloads/policy-flash-2013-57-new-strategic-sourcing-acquisition-guide-chapter-72 Download 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements... http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/2q-cy2005-pdf-facility-representative-program-performance-indicators

275

The House of the Future at MIT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The House of the Future at MIT The House of the Future at MIT Speaker(s): Kent Larson Date: December 6, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 During this seminar, Professor Larson will discuss two related housing initiatives at MIT: Changing Places/Houses in The MIT Home of the Future Consortium. Change is accelerating, but the places we create are largely static and unresponsive. "Changing Places" is an MIT research consortium that explores how new technologies, materials, and strategies for design can make possible dynamic, evolving places that respond to the complexities of life. Open Source Building Alliance Providing individuals with choice creates competition and incentives for innovation. Mass-customization requires a modular component-based approach, which creates a pathway for new players to enter the $852

276

Regenerable sorbents for CO.sub.2 capture from moderate and high temperature gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making a granular sorbent to capture carbon dioxide from gas streams comprising homogeneously mixing an alkali metal oxide, alkali metal hydroxide, alkaline earth metal oxide, alkaline earth metal hydroxide, alkali titanate, alkali zirconate, alkali silicate and combinations thereof with a binder selected from the group consisting of sodium ortho silicate, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO.sub.4.2H.sub.2O), alkali silicates, calcium aluminate, bentonite, inorganic clays and organic clays and combinations thereof and water; drying the mixture and placing the sorbent in a container permeable to a gas stream.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 16   Ceramic heat exchanger systems...Soaking pit 870??1230 1600??2250 Fe, Si, alkalis Solar Turbines ? 4??8 OD ? 180 long (440 tubes) Aluminum melt furnaces 1010 1850 Alkali salts Plate fin GTE 0.6, 1.6 25??46 Multiple 870??1370 1600??2250 Clean (good), alkalis (poor) Coors 0.25, 1.0 30 ? 30 ? 46 Multiple Clean (good), alkalis (poor) Radiant...

278

Eur. Phys. J. D (2010) DOI: 10.1140/epjd/e2010-10118-y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the appli- cations in geocosmical alkali plasma research [10]. Near the critical point and at higher

Ebeling, Werner

279

Deterioration of Iowa Highway Concrete Pavements: A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... system. Shale fragments show evidence of alkali-silica reactivity, but little significant cracking is present (Figure 29). No ...

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

280

Production and extraction of sugars from switchgrass ...  

the water consumption requirements of more traditional IL pretreatment approaches. Results and discussion Alkali extraction using sugar standards

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Best Practices Guide for High-Volume Fly Ash Concretes:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Concrete Mixtures [7]. This online, interactive tool provides guidelines ... cement type (alkali level), opening time requirements, and paving weather. ...

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Alkali/TX{sub 2} catalysts for CO/H{sub 2} conversion to C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} alcohols. Final technical progress report, September 1, 1988--August 31, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to determine the patterns of variations of catalyst activity and selectivity for the synthesis of alcohols from H{sub 2}/CO synthesis gas. Since the source of carbon can be coal-derived synthesis gas, this research makes a contribution to the technology for high quality clean transportation fuels and for basic chemicals from coal. Catalysts prepared were principally based on MoS{sub 2}, RuS{sub 2}, TaS{sub 2}, and NbS{sub 2}. Catalytic testing of these materials was carried out both before and after surface doping with Cs. In alcohol synthesis activation of hydrogen by the catalyst surface is essential. Knowledge of transition metal disulfide surface properties is important before the mechanism of hydrogen dissociation can be addressed. The electronic structures of MoS{sub 2}, RuS{sub 2}, and NbS{sub 2} were studied both theoretically and experimentally. Experimental valence bands were obtained by high resolution electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (HR-ESCA, also referred to as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and theoretical valence bands were calculated using solid state extended Hueckel theory. Comparison of two-dimensional (2-D) MoS{sub 2} theoretical valence bands with the experimental HR-ESCA valence bands of polycrystalline MoS{sub 2} led to parametrization of the S 3s, S 3p, and Mo 4d atomic ionization potentials and Slater-type coefficients and exponents. The S 3s and S 3p parameters obtained for MoS{sub 2} were used to obtain the NbS{sub 2} and RuS{sub 2} theoretical valence bands.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Richards-Babb, M.; Bastian, R.; Kieke, M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, L.T.

1987-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO.sub.2 sequestration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Relationship Between Engineering Properties, Mineralogy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... rubber O-ring seal and PTFE back-up ring; 3, sleeve car- rier; 4 ... cured at 2001C and containing 40% of alumina where only hydro- garnet crystals ...

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

Basalt petrogenesis beneath slow- and ultraslow-spreading Arctic mid-ocean ridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To explore the ability of melting mafic lithologies to produce alkaline ocean-island basalts (OIB), an experimental study was carried out measuring clinopyroxene (Cpx)melt and garnet (Gt)-melt partition coefficients during ...

Elkins, Lynne J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dept of Homeland Security Dept of Homeland Security Office for Domestic Preparedness Training Marci Larson Branch Chief - Central Division 2 ODP Training Overview ODP Training Overview ODP provides comprehensive training and technical assistance to prevent, deter, respond to and recover from threats and incidents of terrorism. ODP provides funding through formula grants to institutionalize terrorism training at the state and local levels. 3 Training Program Training Program Comprehensive Training Curriculum 40+ courses delivered at no cost to federal, state, and local emergency responders Course design, development and delivery reflect current training needs at the state level 4 ODP Training Courses ODP Training Courses Levels of Training - Awareness - Performance (Operations and Technician)

289

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DATE: June 5, 2013 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: New Strategic Sourcing Acquisition Guide Chapter 7.2 SUMMARY: The Senior Procurement Executive has issued guidance for strategic sourcing requirements in new DOE Acquisition Guide Chapter 7.2. This Flash will be available online at the following website: http://energy.gov/management/office-management/operational- management/procurement-and-acquisition/policy-flashes. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at

290

Workshop Advisory Committee Gabe Aeppli (LCN London)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Advisory Committee Gabe Aeppli (LCN London) Massimo Altarelli (Euro-XFEL ) Andrea Cavalleri (Oxford/DESY) Lin Chen (Argonne/Northwestern) George Crabtree (Argonne) Helmut Dosch (DESY) Janos Hajdu (Uppsala) Sol Gruner (Cornell) Jerry Hastings (SLAC) Rus Hemley (Carnegie Institute) Eric Isaacs (Argonne) Ben Larson (Oak Ridge) Richard Lee (Livermore) Ingolf Lindau (SLAC) Denny Mills (Argonne) Keith Moffat (Univ. Chicago) David Moncton (MIT) Harald Reichert (ESRF) Jo Stöhr (SLAC) Lou Terminello (PNNL) Linda Young (Argonne) Soichi Wakatsuki (KEK) Workshop Coordinator Anne Owens Workshop Chairs Uwe Bergmann, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Gopal Shenoy, Argonne National Laboratory Edgar Weckert, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DES

291

WMAP 3-year polarization data: Implications for the reionization history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the delay of structure formation can not fully account for the reduction of electron optical depth from WMAP1 to WMAP3 when the radiative transfer effects and feedback mechanisms are took into account in computing the reionization history of the Universe. We also show that a PopIII stellar cluster with a mass of 80Mo and a heavy Larson initial mass function has an ionizing efficiency high enough to account for WMAP3 results, while in the case of WMAP1, a higher stellar mass of 1000Mo was required.

L. A. Popa

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Expert Meeting Report: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect

The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011 at the Nolte Building on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Featured speakers included John Carmody and Pat Huelman of the University of Minnesota, Charlie Curcija of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover need and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals.

Ojczyk, C.; Carmody, J.; Haglund, K.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Thermochemical cyclic system for splitting water and/or carbon dioxide by means of cerium compounds and reactions useful therein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen from water comprises reacting ceric oxide with monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate to yield a solid reaction product, oxygen and water. The solid reaction product, alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate, and water, are reacted to yield hydrogen, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Ceric oxide is recycled. Trialkali metal phosphate, carbon dioxide and water are reacted to yield monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate and alkali metal bicarbonate, which are recycled. The cylic process can be modified for producing carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide by reacting the alkali metal cerous phosphate and alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate in the absence of water to produce carbon monoxide, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Carbon monoxide can be converted to hydrogen by the water gas shift reaction.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Robinson, Paul R. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxins and furans, HCl, chlorine gas, Pb, manganese, andas calorific value and chlorine, ash, and trace element (influence setting time Chlorine, sulfur, and alkali, which

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ultrasonic-assisted alkaline leaching of vanadium from stone coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... used to extract vanadium from the stone coal, with alkali as leaching reagent. ... of low grade copper sulfide ore(Chalcopyrite) of Sarcheshmeh copper mine.

296

MATERIALS OR NL-1977 Methods of Use of Calcium Hexa Aluminate ...  

Provides chemical resistance to refractory aggregate in high alkali/alkaline environments MATERIALS OR Methods of Use of Calcium Hexa Aluminate ...

297

Biodiesel production from a butter factory effluent / H.P. Visser.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of biodiesel from a butter factory effluent was the main focus of the study. The alkali transesterification reaction was used to produce the (more)

Visser, Hendrik Petrus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hot Demonstrations of Nuclear-Waste Processing Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The more chemically active fission products (alkali, alkaline earths, and rare earths) are oxidized as chlorides in the salt, while the more noble fission products

299

High temperature elemental losses and mineralogical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

future energy crops. Combustion in biomass fueled boilers,in ash during combustion of biomass fuels is important forC. Combustion characteristics of high alkali biomass. Final

Thy, P.; Jenkins, B. M.; Grundvig, S.; Shiraki, R.; Lesher, C. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Double perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkali metal doped double perovskites containing manganese and at least one of cobalt, iron and nickel are useful in the oxidative coupling of alkane to higher hydrocarbons.

Campbell, K.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Finite Element Stress Computations Applied to Images of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Shale in the coarse sand was deemed to be alkali- reactive and potentially a source of cracking and, being dark, was easily distinguished from the ...

2001-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Finite Element Stress Computations Applied to Images of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Shale in the coarse sand was deemed to be alkali-reactive and potentially a source of cracking and, being dark, was easily distinguished from the ...

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

Workshop: 4b: Questionnaire Design  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

MECS 1991 (Cont) Focus Group Attendees Fertilizers, Pulp and Paper, Petroleum Refining, Motor Vehicle Manufacturer, Steel, Chlor-alkalies, ...

304

Process simulation, economic analysis and synthesis of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil using supercritical methanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biodiesel production using supercritical methanol received attention as an alternative method to replace the conventional alkali-catalyzed method being practiced in industry. Due to its flexibility (more)

Lee, Soo Jin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of devices depending upon the application, while offering a considerable reduction in power consumption and maintenance costs. Typically, alkali-metal coatings with generally...

306

High thermal energy storage density molten salts for parabolic trough solar power generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New alkali nitrate-nitrite systems were developed by using thermodynamic modeling and the eutectic points were predicted based on the change of Gibbs energy of fusion. (more)

Wang, Tao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Vapor Cell Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... biomagnetics. The sensors are based on a heated sample of alkali atoms, which are spin-polarized with a polarized light field. ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

308

Liquid phase thermal swing chemical air separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature swing absorption separation of oxygen from air is performed with an oxygen acceptor of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite. 2 figs.

Erickson, D.C.

1988-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

309

PRODUCTION AND DESTRUCTION OF D- BY CHARGE TRANSFER IN METAL VAPORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alkali-vapor target of the heat- pipe type. The beam leavingthe incident beam. The heat-pipe target and the collimation

Schlachter, A.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Lesquerella fendleri Protein Fractionation and Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

tionate plant protein is to separate protein into water-soluble albumin, salt- soluble globulin, ethanol-soluble prolamin, and alkali-soluble glutelin. More basic...

311

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) affects some quartz and shale in the tine aggregate, but is not considered to be a significant cause of the deterioration. ...

312

Color tuning of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce phosphor and their blend for white LEDs  

SciTech Connect

Gadolinium or lanthanum co-doped (0.5 mole) yttrium aluminum garnet doped with cerium phosphors were synthesized by a citric acid gel method and the effect of co-dopants on the structural and luminescent properties were studied. A significant peak shift in the photoluminescence spectra of yttrium aluminum garnet doped cerium was observed from 535 to 556 and 576 nm for gadolinium or lanthanum co-doped phosphors, respectively. The color tuned phosphor were blended with yttrium aluminum garnet doped cerium which showed a considerable improvement in the Commission International De Eclairage chromaticity co-ordinate values of gallium nitride based blue light emitting diode pumped white light. White light emitted from yttrium aluminum garnet doped cerium shows a Commission International De Eclairage value of (0.229, 0.182) whereas the yttrium aluminum garnet doped cerium phosphor blended with gadolinium or lanthanum co-doped phosphor shows (0.262, 0.243) and (0.295, 0.282), respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility to use these phosphor blends to enhance the white light generation in the field of white-light emitting diode solid-state lighting.

Kottaisamy, M. [Materials Research Laboratory, Kalasalingam University, Krishnankoil 626 190 (India)], E-mail: mmksamy66@yahoo.com; Thiyagarajan, P.; Mishra, J.; Ramachandra Rao, M.S. [Materials Science Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Multi-Expert System for chlorine electrolyzer monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chlor-Alkali production is one of the largest industrial scale electro-synthesis in the world. Plants with more than 1000 individual reactors are common, where chlorine and hydrogen are only separated by 0.2mm thin membranes. Wrong operating conditions ... Keywords: Chlor-Alkali membrane cell process, Chlorine plant, Decision forests, Dynamic selection, Ensemble of classifiers

Luana Batista; Luis Da Costa; Said Berriah; Helmut Lademann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

New Developments in TRI?P and RIASH at KVI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The status of the TRI?P facility at KVI is reviewed. Recent results on ion catcher devices are described. A thermo?ionizer for use with alkali and earth?alkali elements is close to completion. Concerning the use of superfluid helium as stopping medium

P. Dendooven; TRI?P group; RIASH group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Methods for tritium labeling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reagents and processes for reductively introducing deuterium or tritium into organic molecules are described. The reagents are deuterium or tritium analogs of trialkyl boranes, borane or alkali metal aluminum hydrides. The process involves forming these reagents in situ from alkali metal tritides or deuterides.

Andres, Hendrik (Hochwald, CH); Morimoto, Hiromi (El Cerrito, CA); Williams, Philip G. (Oakland, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Method of bonding metals to ceramics and other materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite and method of forming same wherein the composite has a non-metallic portion and an alloy portion wherein the alloy comprises an alkali metal and a metal which is an electrical conductor such as Cu, Ag, Al, Sn or Au and forms an alloy with the alkali metal. A cable of superconductors and composite is also disclosed.

Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; DeWald, A.P.; Chienping Ju; Rigsbee, J.M.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

Preparation of Enamel Frits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Typical end uses and required service criteria...and heat exchangers Thermal shock resistant Laundry units Exteriors Alkali resistant Interiors Alkali resistant Oven liners Conventional Acid resistant Pyrolytic Acid and thermal shock resistant Ranges Exteriors Acid resistant Top Acid and thermal shock resistant Grates and burners Acid and thermal...

318

[Diffusion/dispersion transport of chemically reacting species]. Progress report, FY 1992--1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: calculation of activity coefficients for aqueous silica in alkali metal chloride solutions; calculation of degrees of formation of polyatomic clusters of Al in alkali chloride solutions; bulk composition-pH diagrams for arkosic sediments; and chemical interaction of petroleum, oil field brines, and authigenic mineral assemblages. Plans for future research are given.

Helgeson, H.C.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, and Membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

Pivovar, Bryan S. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorn, David L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane  

SciTech Connect

Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

Pivovar, Bryan S. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorn, David L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

AOCS Official Method Ce 2b-11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Methylation of Lipids in Foods by Alkali Hydrolysis AOCS Official Method Ce 2b-11 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads EAFDDE2C2B1F81398CE9DF42FBCA214D Definition This method describes a simultaneous alkali hydrolysi

322

Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

Kucera, G.H.; Smith, J.L.; Sim, J.W.

1983-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

323

Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

Pivovar, Bryan S. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorn, David L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

Pivovar, Bryan S. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorn, David L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile comprises soaking the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution and distributing an oxygen-containing gas throughout the coal refuse pile for a time period sufficient to effect oxidation of coal contained in the coal refuse pile. The method further comprises leaching the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution to solubilize and extract the oxidized coal as alkali salts of humic acids and collecting the resulting solution containing the alkali salts of humic acids. Calcium hydroxide may be added to the solution of alkali salts of humic acid to form precipitated humates useable as a low-ash, low-sulfur solid fuel.

Yavorsky, Paul M. (Monongahela, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Scintillator assembly for alpha radiation detection and an associated method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A scintillator assembly for use in conjunction with a photomultiplier or the like in the detection of alpha radiation utilizes a substrate or transparent yttrium aluminum garnet and a relatively thin film of cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet coated upon the substrate. The film material is applied to the substrate in a sputtering process, and the applied film and substrate are annealed to effect crystallization of the film upon the substrate. The resultant assembly provides relatively high energy resolution during use in a detection instrument and is sufficiently rugged for use in field environments.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McElhaney, Stephanie A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Scintillator assembly for alpha radiation detection and an associated method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A scintillator assembly for use in conjunction with a photomultiplier or the like in the detection of alpha radiation utilizes a substrate or transparent yttrium aluminum garnet and a relatively thin film of cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet coated upon the substrate. The film material is applied to the substrate in a sputtering process, and the applied film and substrate are annealed to effect crystallization of the film upon the substrate. The resultant assembly provides relatively high energy resolution during use in a detection instrument and is sufficiently rugged for use in field environments. 4 figs.

Lauf, R.J.; McElhaney, S.A.; Bates, J.B.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microsoft Word - 3.4.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 rd grade Author: Kelly Larson Editors: Beverly Baker, Angelique Harhsman, Rebecca Shankland, and Sue Watts Layout & Design: Claire Roybal of Claire Roybal & Associates Ltd. Pajarito Plateau Field Science Curriculum 3 rd Grade Lesson 4 Page 44 OVERVIEW OF LESSON In this activity, students will investigate the importance of camouflage in nature in two activities. In the first, the students will attempt to fool their classmates by hiding a paper moth in plain view using camouflage. In the second activity, they will observe how matching color can be effective in camouflage by collecting different colored "worms" in a grassy area. STUDENT OBJECTIVES * Students will demonstrate the importance of camouflage. * Students will learn about the different types of

329

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information · Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations are stable and their physical properties ... can be observed, thus allowing details of their structures to be determined. Besides trivalent ions ... Olah demonstrated the existence of higher coordinate carbocations ... . These species do not violate the octet rule, but involve 2-electron 3-center bonding. '1

330

Event Speakers List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

John "Skip" Laitner Senior Fellow and former Director of Economic and Social AnalysisAmerican Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) John "Skip" Laitner Senior Fellow and former Director of Economic and Social AnalysisAmerican Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Boris Lamontagne Researcher National Research Council (NRC), Canada Ole Langniss MS Economical Engineering Institute for Technical Thermodynamics, Stuttgart, Germany Steven Lanzisera Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Kent Larson Director, Smart Cities/Changing Places Group at MIT MediaLab Massachusetts Institute of Technology Bérangère Lartigue Carnegie MellonPaul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France Isabelle Lavedrine Fluid Dynamic Specialist Arup Research and Development Conor Laver Vice President EnergyScore Cards (and Bright Power) Saniya LeBlanc Ph.D. Graduate Stanford University

331

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Blog Archive » Let the Competition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Let the Competition Begin! Let the Competition Begin! Thursday, October 3, 2013 By Carol Anna With a snip of giant scissors, a ribbon holding back throngs of student decathletes, sponsors, officials, and other well-wishers fell aside, and the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 officially opened. Photo of a group of people cheering as a young woman cuts a ceremonial ribbon. Evyn Larson, center, a student from the University of Southern California, officially marks the opening of Solar Decathlon 2013 by cutting a ribbon on October 3, 2013, at Orange County Great Park, in Irvine, Calif. Credit: Stefano Paltera/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Opening day began with Solar Decathlon teams gathering for an all-team photo at the east end of the Solar Decathlon village at the Orange County

332

Expert Meeting Report: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Windows Options for New and Existing Homes Windows Options for New and Existing Homes Expert Meeting Report: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011 at the Nolte Building on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Featured speakers included John Carmody and Pat Huelman of the University of Minnesota, Charlie Curcija of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover need and promote dialog among researchers and

333

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Manchester Software  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manchester Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program. Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date 06/09/09 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element &Site Building Name: lAB Name of Infonnatlon Manchester Software 1099 Reporting System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 202021 New PIA GJ Update D Name, Title I Contact Information Phone, Email Bryan Larson, System Owner 208-526-8685 Technical Lead, Manchester

334

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification-Based Liquid Fuels and Electricity Gasification-Based Liquid Fuels and Electricity from Biomass with Carbon Capture and Storage Eric D. Larson, Haiming Jin * , Robert H. Williams, Fuat E. Celik Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey *Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire May 2-5, 2005, Hilton Alexandria Mark Center, Alexandria Virginia 1 Outline of talk 1. Motivation for this work. 2. Economic rationale for large-scale biomass conversion facilities (favored for CCS). 3. Approach to our analysis. 4. Process overviews for electricity and synfuels from switchgrass. 5. Energy and carbon balances. 6. Capital cost estimates and their calibration. 7. Electricity and synfuel economics, including impact of carbon price. 2 Motivation: Beyond carbon-neutral biomass

335

DOE Technical Conference - March 29, 2006  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poonum Agrawal Poonum Agrawal Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability US Department of Energy DOE Technical Conference March 29, 2006 2 DOE David Meyer Poonum Agrawal Lot Cooke, General Counsel Ellen Lutz Larry Mansueti Andrew Mclain, General Counsel David Neumeyer Julia Souder, Section 368 Coordination Western Congestion Assessment Task Force (WCATF) Rob Kondziolka, Salt River Project Doug Larson, WIEB Dean Perry, SSG-WI Jay Loock, WECC DOE 1221 Project Team CRA International Stephen Henderson Alex Rudkevich Ira Shavel Advisors Jim Byrne, Consultant Kurt Conger, Consultant Joe Eto, LBL Alison Silverstein, Consultant Robert Thomas, Cornell University Jim Whitehead, TVA Energetics Lauren Giles 3 Requires DOE to issue a national transmission congestion study by

336

May 7, 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PO BOX 670 PO BOX 670 3700 W. MAIN STREET THATCHER, ARIZONA 85552 Office 928-428-2290 Fax 928-428-7061 Web Site Thatcheraz.com TOWN COUNCIL Terry Hinton, Town Manager Robert Rivera, Mayor Charles Morris William Mulleneaux, Vice Mayor Donald Innes Eric Merriman Wayne Griffin Kenneth Larson VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL TO: DSWFPP@wapa.gov 7/27/10 Mr. Darrick Moe Desert Southwest Regional Manager Western Area Power Authority P.O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 Re: SPPR Proposed ED5 to Palo Verde Transmission Project The Town of Thatcher Municipal Utility is a member of the Southwest Public Power Resource ('SPPR") Group and supports the proposed ED5

337

Microsoft Word - 2nd grade PRINT FINAL-katiebeth.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 nd grade Author: Kelly Larson Editors: Beverly Baker, Angelique Harshman, Rebecca Shankland, and Sue Watts Layout & Design: Claire Roybal of Claire Roybal & Associates Ltd. Pajarito Plateau Field Science Curriculum 2 nd Grade Lesson 2 Page 7 OVERVIEW OF LESSON In this activity, students will locate and observe an ant trail (a line of ants) without interfering in any way. Next they will test the responses of ants using various experiments. Students will determine how ants communicate based on their observations. All results are recorded on a data sheet and shared in a class discussion. STUDENT OBJECTIVES * Students will observe and record ant interactions. * Students will predict and identify how ants respond to various foods.

338

Microsoft Word - Document2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information 1 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Western Interconnection Demand Response Team This Western Governors' Association project will provide decision makers in the western states with information on near-term steps that can be taken to address immediate power supply constraints using demand management techniques. Scheduled deliverables include a research paper and a regional workshop. Contact: Doug Larson Western Interstate Energy Board 1515 Cleveland Place, Suite 200 Denver, CO 80202-5114 General Tel: 303-623-9378 Direct Extension: 303-573-8910 Fax: 303-534-7309 Demand Responsiveness for Electric Reliability This National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) project will provide state decision makers across the country with information on "cutting edge programs" and

339

Draft  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2005, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. EST 8, 2005, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. EST Conference Call Minutes Participants: Co-Chairs: Jay Jones (RW), Alex Thrower (EM) Members: Jane Beetem (MO Department of Natural Resources), Kevin Blackwell (FRA), Ray English (Office of Naval Reactors, DOE), Scott Field (Western Interstate Energy Board [WIEB]), Bob Fronczak (Association of American Railroads), Paul Johnson (ORNL), Doug Larson (Western Interstate Energy Board [WIEB]), Bill Mackie (Western Governors' Association), Roger Mulder (Texas Energy Conservation Office), Ellen Ott (DOE General Counsel), Tammy Ottmer (WIEB-Colorado), Jim Reed (NCSL), Tim Runyon (Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety), Conrad Smith (CSG-East), Ruth Weiner (Sandia National Laboratories) Contractor Support: Ralph Best (BSC), Peter Bolton (BAH)Randy Coppage (BAH),

340

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

204 Federal Register 204 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 68 / Friday, April 9, 2010 / Notices settlement agreement (Agreement) on behalf of the City; District; Bureau of Indian Affairs; National Park Service; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; United States Forest Service; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Washington Department of Ecology; Kalispel Tribe; the Lands Council; American Whitewater; Selkirk Conservation Alliance; the Town of Cusick, Washington; Rick Larson; and Al Six. The Agreement resolves among the signatories all issues associated with issuance of a new license for the Boundary Project, including fish passage, fish and wildlife habitat enhancement, water quality, fish supplementation, recreation, cultural properties, and other matters. The surrender of the District's Sullivan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Draft  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2005, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. EST 24, 2005, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. EST Conference Call Minutes Participants: Co-Chairs: Jay Jones (RW), Alex Thrower (EM) Members: Jane Beetem (MO Department of Natural Resources), Kevin Blackwell (FRA), Ray English (Office of Naval Reactors, DOE), Bob Fronczak (Association of American Railroads), Bob Halstead (Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects), Eric Huang (DOE), Paul Johnson (ORNL), Doug Larson (Western Interstate Energy Board [WIEB]), Adam Levin (Exelon Generation Company), Jim Reed (NCSL), Conrad Smith (CSG-East), Steve Sullivan (American Shortline Railroad Association),Ruth Weiner (Sandia National Laboratories) Contractor Support: Ralph Best (BSC), Randy Coppage (BAH),Ed Davis (BSC), Michele Enders (SAIC), Lee Finewood (BAH),and Ron Ross (BSC)

342

President Obama Announces New Plan to Create STEM Master Teaching Corps |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces New Plan to Create STEM Master Teaching Announces New Plan to Create STEM Master Teaching Corps President Obama Announces New Plan to Create STEM Master Teaching Corps July 18, 2012 - 3:43pm Addthis *Editor's Note: This blog was originally posted on WhiteHouse.gov's Office of Sience and Technology Policy by Phil Larson. Today, the Obama Administration announced the President's plan to create a national Science, Math, Technology, and Engineering (STEM) Master Teacher Corps. The STEM Master Teacher Corps will begin in 50 locations across the country, each with 50 exceptional STEM educators. Over the next four years the Corps will expand to include 10,000 of the best STEM teachers in the nation. In joining the STEM Master Teachers Corps, these educators will make a commitment to champion the cause of STEM education in

343

Radiometry J. Michalsky, L. Harrison, M. Beik, W. Berkheiser III, and J. Schlemmer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Michalsky, L. Harrison, J. Michalsky, L. Harrison, M. Beik, W. Berkheiser III, and J. Schlemmer Atmospheric Sciences Research Center University at Albany State University of New York Albany, NY 12205 depths without the necessity of human intervention (Harrison and Michalsky 1993); 3) the cosine bench for measuring the cosine response functions of the RSRs and other radiometers (Michalsky et al. 1992); 4) rotating shadowband spectroradiometer progress (Harrison et al., in press); and 5) the effects of Mount Pinatubo on the aerosol above the Oklahoma-Kansas Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site (Michalsky and Larson 1993). Introduction Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer The MFRSR (see Figure 1) is a ground-based instrument for simultaneously measuring total horizontal, diffuse

344

kato-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparison of Modeled and Measured Surface A Comparison of Modeled and Measured Surface Shortwave Irradiance for a Molecular Atmosphere S. Kato* and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania *Now at Hampton University Hampton, Virginia E. G. Dutton NOAA-Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory Boulder, Colorado N. Laulainen and N. Larson Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction There is a growing body of evidence that models overestimate clear-sky downward shortwave surface irradiances (Charlock and Alberta 1996, Kato et al. 1997, Kinne et at. 1997, Wild et al. 1981). Kato et al. (1997) showed that their model, with the best available gaseous absorption cross section data, accurately computes direct irradiance provided that the model has as input accurate

345

Proceedings of the March 25-26, 2009 Conference for the 2009 National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Proceedings of the March 25-26, 2009 Conference for the 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Session 3 A technical workshop on the 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study was held on March 25-26, 2009 to receive input from subject matter experts on the historical transmission data and studies of future transmission projections in the Western and Eastern Interconnections. Session 3: Studies of Future Congestion in the Western Interconnection Presentation by Scott Cauchois, Transmission Expansion Policy and Planning Committee.pdf Presentation by Brad Nickell, Western Electricy Coordinating Council.pdf Presentation by Rob Kondziolka, Salt River Project.pdf Presentation by Doug Larson, Western Interstate Energy Board.pdf More Documents & Publications

346

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FIFTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION - DOE/NETL FIFTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION - DOE/NETL May 8 - 11, 2006 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Comparing Climate-Change Mitigating Potentials of Alternative Synthetic Liquid Fuel Technologies Using Biomass and Coal Robert H. Williams 1 , Eric D. Larson 1 , Haiming Jin 2 1 Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University Guyot Hall, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ, 08544 2 TX Energy, 1330 Post Oak Boulevard, Suite 1600, Houston, TX, 77056 Abstract The climate-change mitigation potentials of alternative options for making synthetic liquid fuel from coal and biomass without and with CO 2 capture and storage are explored. The emphasis is on making Fischer-Tropsch liquids, with comparisons to cellulosic ethanol. Particular attention is

347

Draft  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 24, 2005, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. EST February 24, 2005, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. EST Conference Call Minutes Participants: Co-Chairs: Jay Jones (RW), Alex Thrower (EM) Members: Jane Beetem (MO Department of Natural Resources), Kevin Blackwell (FRA), Dennis Brooks (Texas Energy Conservation Office), Patrick Edwards (PA Public Utility Commission), Ray English (Office of Naval Reactors, DOE), Paul Genoa ( Nuclear Energy Institute), Eric Huang (DOE), Paul Johnson (ORNL), Doug Larson (Western Interstate Energy Board [WIEB]), Bill Mackie (Western Governors' Association [WGA]), Roger Mulder (Texas Energy Conservation Office), Ken Niles (WIEB), Jim Reed (NCSL), Lisa Sattler (CSG-Midwest), Conrad Smith (CSG-East), Sara Wochos (CSG-Midwest) Contractor Support: Ralph Best (BSC), Ed Davis (BSC), Michele Enders (SAIC),

348

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2009 4, 2009 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Thursday, May 14 THERE WILL BE NO PHYSICS AND DETECTOR SEMINAR THIS WEEK THERE WILL BE NO THEORETICAL PHYSICS SEMINAR TODAY 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - One West Speaker: Del Larson, University of Texas, Arlington Title: ECOFusion: An Electron-Cooled, Cellular Approach to Harnessing Fusion Power Friday, May 15 11 a.m. Academic Lecture Series - One West Speaker: Vincenzo Cirigliano, Los Alamos National Laboratory Title: Kaons as Laboratories for Fundamental Physics: Course 2, Lecture 3 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Joint Experimental-Theoretical Physics Seminar - One West

349

BERAC Meeting April 29-30, 2004 Washington DC | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

29-30, 2004 Washington DC 29-30, 2004 Washington DC Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (40KB) BER Committees of Visitors BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting April 29-30, 2004 Washington DC Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting April 29-30, 2004 Washington, DC Agenda .pdf file (15KB) Presentations Ray Orbach .ppt file (1.5MB) Ari Patrinos .ppt file (72.2MB), The State of BER Jill Banfield .ppt file (20.5MB), Structure, Reactivity, and Behavior of Nanoparticles in the Environment Steve Larson .ppt file (420KB), Radiopharmaceutical Subcommittee Report Joel Parriott/Bill Valdez .ppt file (710KB), Program Plans and Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) Roadmaps

350

High temperature post-irradiation performance of spent pressurized-water-reactor fuel rods under dry-storage conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-irradiation studies on failure mechanisms of well characterized PWR rods were conducted for up to a year at 482, 510 and 571/sup 0/C in unlimited air and inert gas atmospheres. No cladding breaches occurred even though the tests operated many orders of magnitude longer in time than the lifetime predicted by Blackburn's analyses. The extended lifetime is due to significant creep strain of the Zircaloy cladding which decreases the internal rod pressures. The cladding creep also contributes to radial cracks, through the external oxide and internal FCCI layers, which propagated into and arrested in an oxygen stabilized ..cap alpha..-Zircaloy layer. There were no signs of either additional cladding hydriding, stress-corrosion cracking or fuel pellet degradation. Using the Larson-Miller formulization, a conservative maximum storage temperature of 400/sup 0/C is recommended to ensure a 1000-year cladding lifetime. This accounts for crack propagation and assumes annealing of the irradiation-hardened cladding.

Einziger, R.E.; Atkin, S.D.; Stellrecht, D.E.; Pasupathi, V.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The life and times of Coretta Scott King  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-1- -1- FOIL GAS BEARING SUPPORTED HIGH SPEED BLOWERS 11 th Annual SECA Workshop Pittsburgh, PA Sponsor: Department of Energy Presented by: Dr. Giri Agrawal (Principal Investigator) R&D Dynamics Corporation Date: July 29, 2010 -2- -2- Outline 1. R&D Dynamics Overview Update 2. Foil Gas Bearing Supported Cathode/Anode Recycle Blowers for Large Megawatt Size SOFC Power Plants 3. Low Cost Cathode Blower -3- -3- 1. R&D DYNAMICS OVERVIEW UPDATE -4- -4- Design, Develop and Production Manufacture Oil-Free, Efficient, and Affordable High-Speed Turbomachinery OUR BUSINESS -5- -5- R&D Dynamics New Facility Inauguration Left: Attorney General Richard Blumenthal, Middle: President of R&D Dynamics Dr.Giri Agrawal, Right: Congressman John B.Larson Ribbon Cutting Ceremony of R&D Dynamics New 75,000

352

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Western Interstate Interstate Western Interstate Energy Board Energy Board Energy arm of the Western Energy arm of the Western Governors Governors ' ' Association Association Doug Larson, Executive Director EIS Rail Shipping Routes WIEB WIEB ' ' s s Work Is Guided by Western Work Is Guided by Western Governors Governors ' ' Policies Policies 1. Mode and route specific analysis 2. Full scale cask testing 3. Assessing terrorism risks 4. Financial and technical assistance to states (based on the user pays principle) 5. Effective coordination with states 6. Do not turn governmental decisions over to contractors (privatization) WGA Resolutions 03-16 Private Storage of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel 02-05 Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste 01-03 Assessing the Risks of Terrorism and Sabotage Against High-Level Nuclear Waste Shipments

353

Draft  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2005, 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. EST 7, 2005, 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. EST Conference Call Minutes Participants: Co-Chairs: Jay Jones (RW), Alex Thrower (EM) Members: Kevin Blackwell (FRA), Patrick Brady (Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad), Ray English (Office of Naval Reactors, DOE), Paul Johnson (ORNL), Doug Larson (Western Interstate Energy Board [WIEB]), Bill Mackie (Western Governors' Association [WGA]), Ellen Ott (Office of General Counsel, DOE), Tim Runyon (Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety), Lisa Sattler (CSG-Midwest), Ruth Weiner (SNL), Sara Wochos (CSG-Midwest) Contractor Support: Ralph Best (BSC), Andrea Dravo (BAH), Michele Enders (SAIC), Susan Knisely (BAH ), Julie Offner (BAH), and Ron Ross (BSC) Summary: The conference call began at 12:30 p.m. Eastern time on Thursday, January 27, 2005. Jay

354

BES_NERSC_Workshop_Final_P6.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defect
Physics
of
Structural
Materials
for
Energy Defect
Physics
of
Structural
Materials
for
Energy 
 
Ab
initio
methods
for
simulating
the
structure,
interactions
and
 dynamics
of
defects
in
structural
materials
for
extreme
 environments 
 G. Malcolm Stocks, Don M. Nicholson, Markus Eisenbach, Paul Kent, Aurelian Rusanu, Fernando Reboredo, Randy Hood (LLNL), Jeongnim Kim (NCSA) Energy Frontier Center for Defect Physics in Structural Materials (CDP) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Thanks to: Easo George, Ben Larson, Gene Ice, Roger Stoller, Yuri Osetskiy, Steve Zinkle, Rad Radhakrishnan Project
Overview 
 "Crystals are like people: it is the defects in them that make them interesting" Sir Charles Frank  Collective effects of defects determine real materials properties

355

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy DUF 6 MATERIALS USE ROADMAP Edited by: M. Jonathan Haire Allen G. Croff August 27, 2001 DUF 6 Materials Use Workshop Participants August 24-25, 1999 Name Organization Halil Avci ANL Bob Bernero Consultant Lavelle Clark PNNL Carl Cooley DOE/EM-50 Allen Croff ORNL Juan Ferrada ORNL Charles Forsberg ORNL John Gasper ANL Bob Hightower ORNL Julian Hill PNNL Ed Jones LLNL Asim Khawaja PNNL George Larson Consultant Paul Lessing INEEL Dan O'Connor ORNL Robert Price DOE/NE-30 Nancy Ranek ANL Mark Senderling DOE/RW-46 Roger Spence ORNL John Tseng DOE/EM-21 John Warren DOE/NE-30 Ken Young LLNL iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

356

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

204 Federal Register 204 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 68 / Friday, April 9, 2010 / Notices settlement agreement (Agreement) on behalf of the City; District; Bureau of Indian Affairs; National Park Service; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; United States Forest Service; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Washington Department of Ecology; Kalispel Tribe; the Lands Council; American Whitewater; Selkirk Conservation Alliance; the Town of Cusick, Washington; Rick Larson; and Al Six. The Agreement resolves among the signatories all issues associated with issuance of a new license for the Boundary Project, including fish passage, fish and wildlife habitat enhancement, water quality, fish supplementation, recreation, cultural properties, and other matters. The surrender of the District's Sullivan

357

Turbulence in the Molecular Interstellar Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The observational record of turbulence within the molecular gas phase of the interstellar medium is summarized. We briefly review the analysis methods used to recover the velocity structure function from spectroscopic imaging and the application of these tools on sets of cloud data. These studies identify a near-invariant velocity structure function that is independent of local the environment and star formation activity. Such universality accounts for the cloud-to-cloud scaling law between the global line-width and size of molecular clouds found by Larson (1981) and constrains the degree to which supersonic turbulence can regulate star formation. In addition, the evidence for large scale driving sources necessary to sustain supersonic flows is summarized.

Mark H. Heyer; Chris Brunt

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Sodium purification apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for and method of collecting and storing oxide impurities contained in high-temperature liquid alkali metal are disclosed. A method and apparatus are provided for nucleating and precipitating oxide impurities by cooling, wherein the nucleation and precipitation are enhanced by causing a substantial increase in pressure drop and corresponding change in the velocity head of the alkali metal. Thereafter the liquid alkali metal is introduced into a quiescent zone wherein the liquid velocity is maintained below a specific maximum whereby it is possible to obtain high oxide removal efficiencies without the necessity of a mesh or filter. 1 fig.

Gould, M.I.

1980-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

359

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

{sup 13}CO CORES IN THE TAURUS MOLECULAR CLOUD  

SciTech Connect

Young stars form in molecular cores, which are dense condensations within molecular clouds. We have searched for molecular cores traced by {sup 13}CO J = 1 {yields} 0 emission in the Taurus molecular cloud and studied their properties. Our data set has a spatial dynamic range (the ratio of linear map size to the pixel size) of about 1000 and spectrally resolved velocity information, which together allow a systematic examination of the distribution and dynamic state of {sup 13}CO cores in a large contiguous region. We use empirical fit to the CO and CO{sub 2} ice to correct for depletion of gas-phase CO. The {sup 13}CO core mass function ({sup 13}CO CMF) can be fitted better with a log-normal function than with a power-law function. We also extract cores and calculate the {sup 13}CO CMF based on the integrated intensity of {sup 13}CO and the CMF from Two Micron All Sky Survey. We demonstrate that core blending exists, i.e., combined structures that are incoherent in velocity but continuous in column density. The core velocity dispersion (CVD), which is the variance of the core velocity difference {delta}v, exhibits a power-law behavior as a function of the apparent separation L: CVD (km s{sup -1}) {proportional_to}L(pc){sup 0.7}. This is similar to Larson's law for the velocity dispersion of the gas. The peak velocities of {sup 13}CO cores do not deviate from the centroid velocities of the ambient {sup 12}CO gas by more than half of the line width. The low velocity dispersion among cores, the close similarity between CVD and Larson's law, and the small separation between core centroid velocities and the ambient gas all suggest that molecular cores condense out of the diffuse gas without additional energy from star formation or significant impact from converging flows.

Qian Lei; Li Di [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Goldsmith, Paul F., E-mail: lqian@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: ithaca.li@gmail.com [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Metalworking Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Several models of metalworking lasers of both domestic and foreign manufacture are commercially available. The majority of these are of either the neodymium yttrium-aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) solid-state type or the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas type. These lasers may have pulsed or...

362

AOCS Official Method Da 8-48  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total Anhydrous Soap and Combined Alkali AOCS Official Method Da 8-48 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the total anhydrous

363

Patents -- John B. Goodenough  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Patents - John B. Goodenough Patents - John B. Goodenough Goodenough Page · Resources with Additional Information US 4,049,891 COMPOSITIONS FOR FAST ALKALI-METAL-ION TRANSPORT - Goodenough, John B.; Hong, Henry Y-P; September 20, 1977 Fast alkali-metal-ion transporters are provided having low resistivities and low-activation-energy mobilities at temperatures at which alkali metals are molten. The novel compounds promote alkali-metal-ion transport in three dimensions within their crystalline structure and have the general formula: or wherein A is potassium, sodium or lithium, Z' is a tetrahedrally coordinated cation or mixtures thereof, X is an octahedrally coordinated cation or mixtures thereof, n is a number greater than 1 and less than 4, m is a number from 1 up to 2 and Z' is a mixture of at least two Z' cations.

364

Plutonium and americium separation from salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Salts or materials containing plutonium and americium are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, heated, and contacted with an alkali metal carbonate solution to precipitate plutonium and americium carbonates which are thereafter readily separable from the solution.

Hagan, Paul G. (Northglenn, CO); Miner, Frend J. (Boulder, CO)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Method of preparing electrolyte for use in fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolyte compact for fuel cells includes a particulate support material of lithium aluminate that contains a mixture of alkali metal compounds, such as carbonates or hydroxides, as the active electrolyte material. The porous lithium aluminate support structure is formed by mixing alumina particles with a solution of lithium hydroxide and another alkali metal hydroxide, evaporating the solvent from the solution and heating to a temperature sufficient to react the lithium hydroxide with alumina to form lithium aluminate. Carbonates are formed by reacting the alkali metal hydroxides with carbon dioxide gas in an exothermic reaction which may proceed simultaneously with the formation with the lithium aluminate. The mixture of lithium aluminate and alkali metal in an electrolyte active material is pressed or otherwise processed to form the electrolyte structure for assembly into a fuel cell.

Kinoshita, Kimio (Downers Grove, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Data Base for Liquid Breeders and Coolants APEX Interim Report November, 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equation: [1] R.W. Ohse (Ed.) Handbook of Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Alkali Metals, Intern.E.J. Schins, Liquid Metals for Heat Pipes, Properties, Plots and Data Sheets, JRC- Ispra (1967) [3] R

California at Los Angeles, University of

367

AOCS Official Method Da 4a-48  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free Acid or Free Alkali AOCS Official Method Da 4a-48 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the free (uncombined) acid or alkal

368

AOCS Official Method Db 3-48  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free Acid or Free Alkali AOCS Official Method Db 3-48 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the free (uncombined) acid as oleic

369

AOCS Official Method Cd 3b-76  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saponification Value AOCS Official Method Cd 3b-76 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The saponification value is the amount of alkali necessary to

370

Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal  

SciTech Connect

Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

Reggel, Leslie (Pittsburgh, PA); Raymond, Raphael (Bethel Park, PA); Blaustein, Bernard D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

371

Method for producing catalysis from coal  

SciTech Connect

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fundamentals: Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... The alumina solubility in the KF-NaF-CaF2-AlF3 system depending on alkali fluorides ratio and calcium fluoride concentration in the...

373

Re^Os evidence for replacement of ancient mantle lithosphere beneath the North China craton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

^Os data for peridotite xenoliths carried in Paleozoic kimberlites and Tertiary alkali basalts confirm, coupled with the presence of cold, refractory mantle xenoliths carried in kimberlite pipes that erupt

Mcdonough, William F.

374

PREPARATION OF URANIUM MONOSULFIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for preparing uranium monosulfide from uranium tetrafluoride dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride. A hydrogen-hydrogen sulfide gas mixture passed through the solution precipitates uranium monosulfide. (AEC)

Yoshioka, K.

1964-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

375

Poster Presentations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(Smedley-Alkali) .pdf file (455KB) GaAs Detectors (Durbin) .pdf file (2.0MB) Detector R&D @ LBNL (Denes) .pdf file (2.5MB) Advanced Beam Physics @ UCLA (Musumeci) .pdf file...

376

A TABULATION AND EVALUATION OF ION EXCAHNGE DATA ON SMECTITIES, CERTAIN ZEOLITIES AND BASALT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with alkali metal cations. Hanford Lab. Publ. HW-SA-3031, 35Mineral reaction work at Hanford. p. 115-150 in "The use ofFiscal Year 1980 for Rockwell Hanford Operations of Rockwell

Benson, L.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

McKee, Douglas W. (Burnt Hills, NY); Spiro, Clifford L. (Scotia, NY); Kosky, Philip G. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures.for Starch Recovery from Corn. Illinois Marketing Board,the Net Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol. An Economic Research

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

AOCS Official Method Da 5-44  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free Alkali and Potassium Carbonate AOCS Official Method Da 5-44 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines free potassium hydroxide

380

AOCS Official Method Cd 3-25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saponification Value AOCS Official Method Cd 3-25 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The saponification value is the amount of alkali necessary to s

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mechanism and behavior of nucleate boiling heat transfer to the alkalai liquid metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of boiling heat transfer to the alkali liquid metals is postulated from an examination of the events and phases of the nucleate boiling cycle. The model includes the important effect of microlayer evaporation which ...

Deane, Charles William

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Microsoft Word - Blurbs for Nik.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Unstable if heated ALK-alkali 2 Violent chemical change COR-corrosive 3 Shock or heat may detonate OX-oxidizer 4 Rapidly capable of detonation or explosion...

383

A rapid protocol for construction and production of high-capacity adenoviral vectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................... 34 Appendix E ­ Radioactive Materials into the Department by individuals. Equipment such as magnetic stirrers - hot plates, heating mantles, balances, ovens or solution that could be injurious if it entered the mouth, eg. strong acids, alkalis and solvents

Ford, James

384

NANYANG TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In the Lower Furnace Coal Ash Corrosion Mechanism Ash Oxide Scale Metal Ash deposition Molten Salt Formation of molten alkali iron sulfates (Na, K) 3 Fe(SO 4 ) 3 and fluxing...

385

Sodium heat engine electrical feedthrough  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric generator device which converts heat energy to electrical energy is disclosed. An alkali metal is used with a solid electrolyte and a hermetically sealed feedthrough structure. 4 figs.

Weber, N.

1985-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

386

Non-Lead/Acid Battery Recyclers:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in H2O solution such as Citric Acid, Acetic Acid, Acetates or ... MnO2 is soluble in sulfuric acid only at ... cells were treated by alkali followed by acids. ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

Sustainable Materials Processing and Production - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials community is strategically positioned to establish sustainable material production and ... Proceedings Plan, Definite: A print-only volume ... of Alkali Activated Slag Fine Aggregate Concrete by Design Of Experiment (DOE).

388

qdmatn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 'Sf,l" or "DMin keys are accidertaliy pressed, plexe depress pV/Sf ... In case of drawing stean, acid or alkali corrosive gas, organic solvent or lercury ...

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

AOCS Official Method F 7-44  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total Alkalinity AOCS Official Method F 7-44 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the total alkalinity of the fixed alkali, amm

392

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| under AEC Contract A T (30-1)-3780 " ■ ' Annual Report (1970) Principal In-vestigator: Martin Karpins Institution: Harvard University The research performed under this contract can best be sunmarized under several headings. (a) Alkali-Halideg Alkali-Halide (MX^ M*X*) Exchange Reactions. This project is being continued. A careful study of certain

393

Ca(OH)[sub 2]-treated ceramic microsphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Geothermal wells with lost circulation problems are treated with a lightweight, high temperature (i.e. 350 C) cement slurry which incorporates pressure resistant hollow microspheres into the slurry wherein the spheres have been pretreated with an alkali compound such as Ca(OH)[sub 2] for up to 20 hours and at 100--300 C. Preferably, the alkali solution is a saturated aqueous solution and the treatment is for 10 hours. 2 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1990-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

Ca(OH)[sub 2]-treated ceramic microsphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Geothermal wells with lost circulation problems are treated with a lightweight, high temperature (i.e. 350 C) cement slurry which incorporates pressure resistant hollow microspheres into the slurry wherein the spheres have been pretreated with an alkali compound such as Ca(OH)[sub 2] for up to 20 hours and at 100--300 C. Preferably, the alkali solution is a saturated aqueous solution and the treatment is for 10 hours. 2 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

Ca(OH).sub.2 -treated ceramic microsphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Geothermal wells with lost circulation problems are treated with a lightweight, high temperature (i.e. 350.degree. C.) cement slurry which incorporates pressure resistant hollow microspheres into the slurry wherein the spheres have been pretreated with an alkali compound such as Ca(OH).sub.2 for up to 20 hours and at 100.degree.-300.degree. C. Preferably, the alkali solution is a saturated aqueous solution and the treatment is for 10 hours.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ca(OH).sub.2 -treated ceramic microsphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Geothermal wells with lost circulation problems are treated with a lightweight, high temperature (i.e. 350.degree. C.) cement slurry which incorporates pressure resistant hollow microspheres into the slurry wherein the spheres have been pretreated with an alkali compound such as Ca(OH).sub.2 for up to 20 hours and at 100.degree.-300.degree. C. Preferably, the alkali solution is a saturated aqueous solution and the treatment is for 10 hours.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Condensed phase preparation of 2,3-pentanedione  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A condensed phase process for the preparation of purified 2,3-pentanedione from lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate is described. The process uses elevated temperatures between about 200.degree. to 360.degree. C. for heating a reaction mixture of lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate to produce the 2,3-pentanedione in a reaction vessel. The 2,3-pentanedione produced is vaporized from the reaction vessel and condensed with water.

Miller, Dennis J. (Okemos, MI); Perry, Scott M. (Beaumont, TX); Fanson, Paul T. (Stockbridge, MI); Jackson, James E. (Haslett, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Condensed phase preparation of 2,3-pentanedione  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A condensed phase process for the preparation of purified 2,3-pentanedione from lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate is described. The process uses elevated temperatures between about 200 to 360 C for heating a reaction mixture of lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate to produce the 2,3-pentanedione in a reaction vessel. The 2,3-pentanedione produced is vaporized from the reaction vessel and condensed with water. 5 figs.

Miller, D.J.; Perry, S.M.; Fanson, P.T.; Jackson, J.E.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

1983-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

400

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, Howard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stohl, Frances V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cathode composition for electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell includes a negative electrode containing an alkali metal such as lithium, an electrolyte of molten salt containing ions of that alkali metal and a positive electrode containing a mixture of metallic sulfides. The positive electrode composition is contained within a porous structure that permits permeation of molten electrolyte and includes a mixture of about 5% to 30% by weight Cu.sub.2 S in FeS.

Steunenberg, Robert K. (Naperville, IL); Martin, Allan E. (Woodridge, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Palos Hills, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EXAMINING FUEL ELEMENTS FOR LEAKAGE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and a device for the continuous monitoring of fuel elements while in use in a liquid-metal-cooled, argonblanketed nuclear reactor are presented. A fraction of the argon gas is withdrawn, contacted with a negative electrical charge for attraction of any alkali metal formed from argon by neutron reaction, and recycled into the reactor. The electrical charge is introduced into water, and the water is examined for radioactive alkali metals. (AEC)

Smith, R.R.; Echo, M.W.; Doe, C.B.

1963-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fuel cell oxygen electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A.sub.x WO.sub.3 where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt.sub.y WO.sub.3 where y is at least 0.8.

Shanks, Howard R. (Ames, IA); Bevolo, Albert J. (Ames, IA); Danielson, Gordon C. (Ames, IA); Weber, Michael F. (Wichita, KS)

1980-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

Spin precession modulation in a magnetic bilayer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on modulation of the spin precession in a Co/garnet bilayer by femtosecond laser excitation using time-resolved magneto-optical tools. Damped oscillations in the Faraday rotation transients representing precessional motion of the magnetization vector are observed in both the 2 nm Co layer and 1.8 {mu}m garnet of the bilayer with distinct frequencies differing by about a factor of two. The excitation efficiency of these precessions strongly depends on the out-of-plane magnetic field. The modulation effect with the coupling in a magnetic bilayer can be useful for non-thermally controlling the magnetization of nanomagnets and ultrafast switching in magnetic nanodevices.

Stupakiewicz, A.; Maziewski, A. [Laboratory of Magnetism, Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, Bialystok (Poland); Pashkevich, M. [Laboratory of Magnetism, Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, Bialystok (Poland); Scientific-Practical Materials Research Centre of the NASB, P. Brovki 19, Minsk (Belarus); Stognij, A.; Novitskii, N. [Scientific-Practical Materials Research Centre of the NASB, P. Brovki 19, Minsk (Belarus)

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

Laser Cutting and Size Reduction. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The project utilizes a Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser to cut and size reduce equipment in the 324 Laboratory B Hot Cell located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This project will demonstrate the ability of the Nd:Yag laser to remotely and safely dismantle equipment faster, cheaper, and more efficiently than baseline cutting methods, such as the plasma torch and the water knife, in a highly radioactive area using fiber optics.

None

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The University of Mississippi Medical Center SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Megawatt nC Nano-Coulomb Nd:YAG Neodymium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet NFPA National Fire Protection Act NPH adequate means of egress. Stairs comply with the requirements of NFPA 101 and egress paths 8 2 1997 5 18 3 0 7 89 3 2 4 7 1998 5 110 1 0 7 3 3 0 3 0 1999 94 43 9 34 7 1 1 9 3 4 2000 11 54 3 0

Correia, John J.

407

Manifestations of nuclear anapole moments in solid state NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest to use insulating garnets doped by rare earth ions for measurements of nuclear anapole moments. A parity violating shift of the NMR frequency arises due to the combined effect of the lattice crystal field and the anapole moment of the rare-earth nucleus. We show that there are two different observable effects related to frequency: 1) A shift of the NMR frequency in an external electric field applied to the solid. The value of the shift is about \\Delta \

T. N. Mukhamedjanov; O. P. Sushkov; J. M. Cadogan

2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

Scintillators with potential to supersede lanthanum bromide  

SciTech Connect

New scintillators for high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy have been identified, grown and characterized. Our development efforts have focused on two classes of high light yield materials: Europium-doped alkaline earth halides and Cerium-doped garnets. Of the halide single crystals we have grown by the Bridgman method - SrI{sub 2}, CaI{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaI{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} - SrI{sub 2} is the most promising. SrI{sub 2}(Eu) emits into the Eu{sup 2+} band, centered at 435 nm, with a decay time of 1.2 {micro}s and a light yield of up to 115,000 photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 3% FWHM at 662 keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. Transparent ceramics fabrication allows production of Gadolinium- and Terbium-based garnets which are not growable by melt techniques due to phase instabilities. While scintillation light yields of Cerium-doped ceramic garnets are high, light yield non-proportionality and slow decay components appear to limit their prospects for high energy resolution. We are developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying energy dependent scintillation light yield non-proportionality and how it affects energy resolution. We have also identified aspects of optical design that can be optimized to enhance energy resolution.

Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Aszatlos, Steve; Hull, Giulia; Kuntz, J.; Niedermayr, Tom; Pimputkar, S.; Roberts, J.; Sanner, R.; Tillotson, T.; van Loef, Edger; Wilson, Cody; Shah, Kanai; Roy, U.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Poster Presentations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Poster Presentations Poster Presentations Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Poster Presentations Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page High Stability LINACs (Yu) .pdf file (284KB) Coherent LS @ MIT (Graves) .pdf file (1.2MB) XLD-2011 Workshops (Brock) .pdf file (2.6MB) Status of MAX IV (Ericksson) .pdf file (3.0MB) Multi Alkali Cathode (Rao) .pdf file (733KB) Echo-7 (Raubenheimer) .pdf file (783KB) Alkali Antimonide Cathodes (Smedley-Alkali) .pdf file (455KB) GaAs Detectors (Durbin) .pdf file (2.0MB) Detector R&D @ LBNL (Denes) .pdf file (2.5MB)

411

Glenn T. Seaborg - Patents - 1960 through 1961  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60 – 1961) 60 – 1961) Seaborg Page · Resources with Additional Information · Patents (1954–1958, 1959, 1962–1965) US 2,940,819 (Concentration Process for Plutonium Ions, in an Oxidation State Not Greater than +4, in Aqueous Acid Solution) G.T. Seaborg, S.G. Thompson; Jun 14, 1960. A process for concentrating plutonium is given in which plutonium is first precipitated with bismuth phosphate and then, after redissolution, precipitated with a different carrier such as lanthanum fluoride, uranium acetate, bismuth hydroxide, or niobic oxide. US 2,947,601 (Complex Fluorides of Plutonium and an Alkali Metal) G.T. Seaborg; Aug 2, 1960. A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides, such as KPuF5, KPu2F9, NaPuF5, and RbPuF5, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal-fluoride.

412

Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage  

SciTech Connect

A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a borohydride material of the formula: M(BH.sub.4).sub.x where M is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing an alanate material of the formula: M.sub.1(AlH.sub.4).sub.x where M.sub.1 is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing a halide material of the formula: M.sub.2Hal.sub.x where M.sub.2 is an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal or transition metal and Hal is a halide and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.4; combining the borohydride, alanate and halide materials such that 5 to 50 molar percent from the borohydride material is present forming a reaction product material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the alanate material.

Mohtadi, Rana F. (Northville, MI); Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Gray, Joshua (Aiken, SC); Stowe, Ashley C. (Knoxville, TN); Sivasubramanian, Premkumar (Aiken, SC)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

Sharp, William (Sandy) [SharpConsultant; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations; Keiser, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

Barton, J.

1954-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

418

Method for immobilizing radioactive iodine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactive iodine, present as alkali metal iodides or iodates in an aqueous solution, is incorporated into an inert solid material for long-term storage by adding to the solution a stoichiometric amount with respect to the formation of a sodalite (3M.sub.2 O.3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. 6SiO.sub.2.2MX, where M=alkali metal; X=I.sup.- or IO.sub.3.sup.-) of an alkali metal, alumina and silica, stirring the solution to form a homogeneous mixture, drying the mixture to form a powder, compacting and sintering the compacted powder at 1073 to 1373 K (800.degree. to 1100.degree. C.) for a time sufficient to form sodalite.

Babad, Harry (Richland, WA); Strachan, Denis M. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

PROCESSING OF URANIUM-METAL-CONTAINING FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for recovering uranium from neutronbombarded uranium- aluminum alloys. The alloy is dissolved in an aluminum halide--alkali metal halide mixture in which the halide is a mixture of chloride and bromide, the aluminum halide is present in about stoichiometric quantity as to uranium and fission products and the alkali metal halide in a predominant quantity; the uranium- and electropositive fission-products-containing salt phase is separated from the electronegative-containing metal phase; more aluminum halide is added to the salt phase to obtain equimolarity as to the alkali metal halide; adding an excess of aluminum metal whereby uranium metal is formed and alloyed with the excess aluminum; and separating the uranium-aluminum alloy from the fission- productscontaining salt phase. (AEC)

Moore, R.H.

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Analysis of Durability of Advanced Cementitious Materials for Rigid Pavement Construction in California Report Prepared for CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report. Two forms of aggregate reactions known to occur in California are addressed: alkaliaggregate reaction and oxidation reactions. The alkali aggregate reaction is greatly dependent upon the alkali content of the cement. Clays used in the manufacture of Portland cements may contribute high alkali concentrations to the pore solution. Low-alkali Portland cements may be specified when needed to provide resistance to alkali-aggregate reactions. Portland-pozzolan blends and calcium aluminate cements and blends are expected to exhibit improved alkaliaggregate reaction resistance in sulfate-rich environments, while the resistance of calcium sulfoaluminate cements is expected to be similar to that of Portland cement. Fly ash-based cements may exhibit improved resistance, but the alkali concentration contributed by the set accelerator should be investigated. The oxidation of sulfide and sulfate minerals, such as pyrite, in aggregate may cause concrete cracking and aggregate pop-outs. Portland-pozzolan blends and fly ash-based cements are expected to exhibit improved resistance to this oxidation reaction because of decreased permeability to water. Carbonation or chloride attack from CaCl 2 -containing admixtures, seawater, or de-icing salts may initiate corrosion of steel dowels, which are used to transfer load between pavement slabs. The Building Code limits the maximum chloride ion content for the purpose of corrosion protection of reinforced concrete to 0.15 percent by weight of cement. In addition to low chloride content, low concrete permeability and high pore solution alkalinity are essential for corrosion resistance. Low permeability concrete produced from Portland cement, Portlandpozzolan blends, and calcium sulfoaluminate cements is expected provide resistance t...

Kimberly Kurtis And; Kimberly E. Kurtis; Paulo Monteiro

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems  

SciTech Connect

CRS Sirrine (CRSS) is evaluating a novel IGCC process in which gases exiting the gasifier are burned in a gas turbine combustion system. The turbine exhaust gas is used to generate additional power in a conventional steam generator. This results in a significant increase in efficiency. However, the IGCC process requires development of novel approaches to control SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions and alkali vapors which can damage downstream turbine components. Ammonia is produced from the reaction of coal-bound nitrogen with steam in the reducing zone of any fixed bed coal gasifier. This ammonia can be partially oxidized to NO{sub x} when the product gas is oxidized in a gas turbine combustor. Alkali metals vaporize in the high-temperature combustion zone of the gasifier and laser condense on the surface of small char or ash particles or on cooled metal surfaces. It these alkali-coated materials reach the gas turbine combustor, the alkali will revaporize condense on turbine blades and cause rapid high temperature corrosion. Efficiency reduction will result. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) was contracted by CRSS to evaluate and recommend solutions for NO{sub x} emissions and for alkali metals deposition. Various methods for NO{sub x} emission control and the potential process and economic impacts were evaluated. This included estimates of process performance, heat and mass balances around the combustion and heat transfer units and a preliminary economic evaluation. The potential for alkali metal vaporization and condensation at various points in the system was also estimated. Several control processes and evaluated, including an order of magnitude cost for the control process.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

Leininger, Thomas F. (Chino Hills, CA); Robin, Allen M. (Anaheim, CA); Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Suggitt, Robert M. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

424

Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

Schwarz, James A. (Fayetteville, NY); Noh, Joong S. (Syracuse, NY); Agarwal, Rajiv K. (Las Vegas, NV)

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

425

Recovery of protactinium from molten fluoride nuclear fuel compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for separating protactinium from a molten fluonlde salt composition consisting essentially of at least one alkali and alkaline earth metal fluoride and at least one soluble fluoride of uranium or thorium which comprises oxidizing the protactinium in said composition to the + 5 oxidation state and contacting said composition with an oxide selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal oxide, an alkaline earth oxide, thorium oxide, and uranium oxide, and thereafter isolating the resultant insoluble protactinium oxide product from said composition. (Official Gazette)

Baes, C.F. Jr.; Bamberger, C.; Ross, R.G.

1973-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas, device for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the simultaneous removal of oxides and heavy metals from a fluid is provided comprising combining the fluid with compounds containing alkali and sulfur to create a mixture; spray drying the mixture to create a vapor phase and a solid phase; and isolating the vapor phase from the solid phase. A device is also provided comprising a means for spray-drying flue gas with alkali-sulfide containing liquor at a temperature sufficient to cause the flue gas to react with the compounds so as to create a gaseous fraction and a solid fraction and a means for directing the gaseous fraction to a fabric filter.

Huang, Hann-Sheng; Livengood, Charles David

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Enhanced Oil Recovery Using the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline Surfactant Polymer (ASP) process is a tertiary method of oil recovery that has promising results for future development. It has already been implemented in different areas of the United States such as Wyoming, west Texas, also in Canada and China. The success of this process depends on the proper combination of alkali, surfactant, and polymer and their compatibility with a reservoir. Therefore, the main objective of the proposed research is to identify chemical interactions between ASP chemicals and reservoir fluids and rock. I hypothesize that testing different alkalis, polymers and surfactants will result not only in getting different profiles of rheological properties of ASP system, but also analyzing compatibility degrees of chemicals with formation fluids and rock properties such as rock wettability, oil mobility and sweep efficiency which will be affected by the designed ASP system. In this paper the results of chemical interactions between ASP chemicals and reservoir fluids are presented and the phenomena occurred are described. The experiments conducted are considered to be unique for a selected oil sample with certain values of API gravity, viscosity, and chemical composition. Lab experiments conducted show the effect of polymer, alkali and surfactant addition to an aqueous solution. Polymers were tested with alkali as a function of shear rate for the purposes of the buildup water viscosity in EOR. Different types of alkali at different concentrations are tested for alkali optimal concentration determination. The effect of adding surfactant at different concentrations has been tested, and acidic number of tested oil sample was identified. Polymers tested with alkali result in non-Newtonian behavior of the testing solution and display a shear thinning beneficial effect for the buildup water viscosity in EOR. The results show that acidic number of crude oil is a critical parameter that affects the optimal concentration for mixing chemicals and interfacial tension profile. The alkali and surfactant added to crude oil result in a significant reduction of interfacial tension and lead to increase of oil mobilization which is a desired output after ASP injection in EOR process.

Musharova, Darya

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

PRODUCTION OF ELECTROLYTIC THORIUM CELL FEED BY A WET CHEMICAL METHOD. Process Report  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce a substantially oxide-free chloride. a specialized technique, based on the chemical characteristics of the ammonium thorium chloride complexes, has been found optimum. The procedure involves the formation of a solution of thorium chloride and ammonium chloride, evaporation of the solution to form a hydrated ammonium thorium chloride complex, dehydration of the complex by low-temperature drying, and ignition of the complex, after inter-mixture with an alkali chloride, to remove ammonium chloride and to form a thorium alkali chloride mixture for electrolysis. (L.T.W.)

Fisher, C.E.

1955-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Radiolysis of Salts and Long-Term Storage Issues for Both Pure and Impure PuO{sub 2} Materials in Plutonium Storage Containers  

SciTech Connect

The Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) project sponsored a literature search on the effects of radiation on salts, with focus on alkali chlorides. The goal of the survey was to provide a basis for estimating the magnitude of {alpha} radiation effects on alkali chlorides that can accompany plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) into storage. Chloride radiolysis can yield potentially corrosive gases in plutonium storage containers that can adversely affect long-term stability. This literature search was primarily done to provide a tutorial on this topic, especially for personnel with nonradiation chemistry backgrounds.

Lav Tandon

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

Au, Ming (Augusta, GA)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

431

Method for removing semiconductor layers from salt substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing a CVD semiconductor layer from an alkali halide salt substrate following the deposition of the semiconductor layer. The semiconductor-substrate combination is supported on a material such as tungsten which is readily wet by the molten alkali halide. The temperature of the semiconductor-substrate combination is raised to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the substrate but less than the temperature of the semiconductor and the substrate is melted and removed from the semiconductor by capillary action of the wettable support.

Shuskus, Alexander J. (West Hartford, CT); Cowher, Melvyn E. (East Brookfield, MA)

1985-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

432

Production of chlorine from chloride salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

PLUTONIUM ELECTROREFINING CELLS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrorefining cells for obtaining 99.98% plutonium are described. The cells consist of an impure liquid plutonium anode, a molten PuCl/sub 3/-- alkali or alkaline earth metal chloanode, a molten PuCl/sub 3/-alkali or alkaline earth metal chloride electrolyte, and a nonreactive cathode, all being contained in nonreactive ceramic containers which separate anode from cathode by a short distance and define a gap for the collection of the purified liquid plutonium deposited on the cathode. Important features of these cells are the addition of stirrer blades on the anode lead and a large cathode surface to insure a low current density. (AEC)

Mullins, L.J. Jr.; Leary, J.A.; Bjorklund, C.W.; Maraman, W.J.

1963-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

434

PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

New Developments in TRI{mu}P and RIASH at KVI  

SciTech Connect

The status of the TRI{mu}P facility at KVI is reviewed. Recent results on ion catcher devices are described. A thermo-ionizer for use with alkali and earth-alkali elements is close to completion. Concerning the use of superfluid helium as stopping medium, evidence that second sound pulses can be used to extract ions from the helium surface has been obtained. Based on the observation of highly efficient ion transport in helium, neon and argon gas below about 100 K, we propose the operation of noble gas ion catchers at cryogenic temperatures.

Dendooven, P. [KVI, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

Heteroatom incorporated coke for electrochemical cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an electrode for a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) calcined coke particles: (i) that contain at least 0.5 weight percent of nitrogen heteroatoms and at least 1.0 weight percent sulfur heteroatoms, and (ii) that have an average particle size from 2 microns to 40 microns with essentially no particles being greater than 50 microns. (b) a binder This invention also relates to a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrically conductive salt, and (c) a counterelectrode.

Lewis, Irwin Charles (Strongsville, OH); Greinke, Ronald Alfred (Medina, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Heteroatom incorporated coke for electrochemical cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an electrode for a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) calcined coke particles: (1) that contain at least 0.5 weight percent of nitrogen heteroatoms and at least 1.0 weight percent sulfur heteroatoms, and (2) that have an average particle size from 2 microns to 40 microns with essentially no particles being greater than 50 microns and (b) a binder. This invention also relates to a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrically conductive salt, and (c) a counterelectrode. 5 figs.

Lewis, I.C.; Greinke, R.A.

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh diesel soot. (2007) Title Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh diesel soot. (2007) Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Jimenez, Jorge, Candis S. Claiborn, Timothy Larson, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Air and Waste Management Association Volume 57 Issue 7 Pagination 868-873 Abstract In this study, a correction was developed for the aethalometer to measure real-time black carbon (BC) concentrations in an environment dominated by fresh diesel soot. The relationship between the actual mass-specific absorption coefficient for BC and the BC-dependent attenuation coefficients was determined from experiments conducted in a diesel exposure chamber that provided constant concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM; PM(2.5); PM < 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) from diesel exhaust. The aethalometer reported BC concentrations decreasing with time from 48.1 to 31.5 microg m(-3) when exposed to constant PM(2.5) concentrations of 55 +/- 1 microg m(-3) and b(scat) = 95 +/- 3 Mm(-1) from diesel exhaust. This apparent decrease in reported light-absorbing PM concentration was used to derive a correction K(ATN) for loading of strong light-absorbing particles onto or into the aethalometer filter tape, which was a function of attenuation of light at 880 nm by the embedded particles

439

Gas-cooling by dust during dynamical fragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that the abrupt switch, from hierarchical clustering on scales larger than 0.04 pc, to binary (and occasionally higher multiple) systems on smaller scales, which Larson has deduced from his analysis of the grouping of pre-Main-Sequence stars in Taurus, arises because pre-protostellar gas becomes thermally coupled to dust at sufficiently high densities. The resulting change from gas-cooling by molecular lines at low densities to gas-cooling by dust at high densities enables the matter to radiate much more efficiently, and hence to undergo dynamical fragmentation. We derive the domain where gas-cooling by dust facilitates dynamical fragmentation. Low-mass (i.e. solar mass) clumps - those supported mainly by thermal pressure - can probably access this domain spontaneously, albeit rather quasistatically, provided they exist in a region where external perturbations are few and far between. More massive clumps probably require an impulsive external perturbation, for instance a supersonic collision with another clump, in order for the gas to reach sufficiently high density to couple thermally to the dust. Impulsive external perturbations should promote fragmentation, by generating highly non-line ar substructures which can then be amplified by gravity during the subsequent collapse.

A. P. Whitworth; H. M. J. Boffin; N. Francis

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

X-ray diffraction data for plutonium compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of x-ray diffraction information relating to powder photographs of plutonium compounds. The information is presented in a format and style substantially as recommended by the International Center for Diffraction Data. Los Alamos National Laboratory has been involved in the study of the properties of plutonium and its compounds. During the past 45 years, the Powder Diffraction File of the Laboratory has grown to more than 20,000 films. F.H. Ellinger and his coworkers have used this data to establish a large number of plutonium binary phase diagrams. These phase diagrams have been published in a special report of the Laboratory, LA-3870, Constitution of Plutonium Alloys,'' authored by F.H. Ellinger, W.N. Miner, D.R. O'Boyle, and F.W. Schonfeld. A phase diagram, however, should never be regarded as really complete as new techniques of alloy preparation or x-ray and optical metallography continually discover new phases that must be incorporated in the diagram. In addition to the phase diagrams, the crystal structures of a number of plutonium intermetallic compounds have been determined at Los Alamos and published in the general literature by D.T. Cromer, A.C. Larson, and R.B. Roof over the last 35 years.

Roof, R.B.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Stellar IMF as a Property of Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to interpret the stellar IMF as a property of the turbulence in the star--forming gas. Gravitationally unstable density enhancements in the turbulent flow collapse and form stars. Their mass distribution can be derived analytically from the power spectrum of the turbulent flow and the isothermal shock jump conditions in the magnetized gas. For a power spectrum index \\beta=1.74, consistent with Larson's velocity dispersion--size relation as well as with new numerical and analytic results on supersonic turbulence, we obtain a power law mass distribution of dense cores with a slope equal to 3/(4-\\beta)=1.33, consistent with the slope of Salpeter's stellar IMF. Below one solar mass, the mass distribution flattens and turns around at a fraction of a solar mass, as observed for the stellar IMF in a number of stellar clusters, because only the densest cores are gravitationally unstable. The mass distribution at low masses is determined by the Log--Normal distribution of the gas density. The intermittent nature of this distribution is responsible for the generation of a significant number of collapsing cores of brown dwarf mass.

Paolo Padoan; Ake Nordlund

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

442

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of activities/events conducted in response to the Objectives and Tasks described in the 1998 contract Statement Of Work for the Planning and Predesign activities of the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH). The report follows the format of the contract for ease in finding accomplishments. Although specific emphasis will be placed on activities related directly to the NPTH, activities from other artificial production related projects may also be noted because of overlap in staff duties and production facilities. Additionally, the project leader's role has evolved as other Tribal fisheries projects have been developed and assigned to the Production Services Division, Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT). Thus, implementation of the project leader role for the NPTH actually entails specific duties of the Hatchery Supervisor, the Production Coordinator as well as the Production Director. The Production Director, Ed Larson was absent mos t of January and part of February before he began working part time from home while recovering from back surgery.

Johnson, David B.; Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

Preparation of polyimide/zinc oxide nanocomposite films via an ion-exchange technique and their photoluminescence properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyimide (PI) composite films with ZnO nanoparticles embedded in the surface layer were prepared by alkali hydrolyzation following ion exchange in Zn(NO3)2 solution and thermal treatment of the zinc ion-doped PI films in air atmosphere. ...

Shuxiang Mu; Dezhen Wu; Shengli Qi; Zhanpeng Wu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

445

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

THE ECONOMICAL PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetic data for a Mo-Ni-K/C catalyst were completed. Kinetic schemes were derived for the formation of methanol and ethanol over this catalyst. TPR results on alkali-substituted Mo/C are beginning to be amenable to a systematic quantitative analysis.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Preparation of certain m-aminophenols and the use thereof for preparation of laser dyes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are provided for making certain m-aminophenols using a sulfonation/alkali fusion procedure. The aminophenols are key intermediates in the synthesis of dyes, particularly efficient, stable dyes for laser application. Preparations of some rhodamine and phenoxazone dyes from the m-aminophenols are described.

Hammond, P.R.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

448

Molten carbonate fuel cell research at ORNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities at ORNL during the period July 1976 to February 1977 on the molten carbonate fuel cell program, funded by the ERDA Division of Conservation Research and Technology, are summarized. This period marks the initiation of molten carbonate fuel cell research at ORNL, making use of the extensive background of expertise and facilities in molten salt research. The activities described include a literature survey on molten carbonates, design, acquisition and installation of apparatus for experimental studies of molten carbonates, initial experiments on materials compatibility with molten carbonates, electrolysis experiments for the determination of transference numbers, and theoretical studies of transport behavior and the coupling of mass flows in molten carbonate mixtures. Significant accomplishments were the theoretical prediction of a possibly appreciable change in the alkali ion ratio at molten carbonate fuel cell electrodes, operated at high current densities, as a result of mobility differences of the alkali ions; design, construction and assembly of an electrolysis cell, and initiation of measurements of composition profiles in mixed alkali carbonate electrolytes; initiation of differential scanning calorimetry of pure alkali carbonates for quantitative measurement of transition enthalpies, eventually leading to new, more reliable values of the enthalpies and free energies of formation of the pure and mixed carbonates.

Braunstein, J.; Bronstein, H. R.; Cantor, S.; Heatherly, D.; Vallet, C. E.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

BIOINFORMATICS Inferring Gene Regulatory Networks from Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Translational Genomics Research Institute, 400 North Fifth Street, Suite 1600, Phoenix, Arizona 85004, U results, the future research directions are also outlined. 2 SYSTEMS AND METHODS 2.1 Genetic Network and regulates myosin alkali light chain1 (mlc1), myosin heavy chain (mhc), myosin 61F (myo61F), paramyosin (prm

Babu, M. Madan

450

Destruction of organic wastes with molten oxidizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of biologically hazardous organic chemical wastes by using liquefied strongly oxidizing inorganic salts, such as the alkali metal nitrates, at high temperatures and atmospheric pressure, to yield inorganic salts, carbon dioxide, and water. The oxidizing salts are regenerated and recycled.

Bradshaw, R.W.; Holmes, J.T.; Tyner, C.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Pyrolytic conversion of plastic and rubber waste to hydrocarbons with basic salt catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a process for improving the pyrolytic conversion of waste selected from rubber and plastic to low molecular weight olefinic materials by employing basis salt catalysts in the waste mixture. The salts comprise alkali or alkaline earth compounds, particularly sodium carbonate, in an amount of greater than about 1 weight percent based on the waste feed.

Wingfield, Jr., Robert C. (Southfield, MI); Braslaw, Jacob (Southfield, MI); Gealer, Roy L. (West Bloomfield, MI)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Version 1.0 Lithium hyper ne splitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Version 1.0 Lithium hyper#12;ne splitting Krzysztof Pachucki #3; Institute of Theoretical Physics approach for the calculation of relativistic m#11; 6 corrections to the lithium ground state hyper#12;ne problem. We will concentrate on lithium as the simplest alkali-metal atom, for which several precise

Pachucki, Krzysztof

453

Liquefaction and desulfurization of coal using synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for desulfurizing and liquefying coal by heating said coal at a temperature of 375.degree.-475.degree. C in the presence of a slurry liquid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, steam, and a catalyst comprising a desulfurization catalyst and an alkali metal salt.

Fu, Yuan C. (Bethel Park, PA)

1977-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

454

Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

Quigley, David R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Nucleic acids encoding metal uptake transporters and their uses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides LCT1 nucleic acids which encode metal ion uptake transporters. The invention also provides methods of modulating heavy metal and alkali metal uptake in plants. The methods involve producing transgenic plants comprising a recombinant expression cassette containing an LCT1 nucleic acid linked to a plant promoter.

Schroeder, Julian I. (La Jolla, CA); Antosiewicz, Danuta M. (Warsaw, PL); Schachtman, Daniel P. (Tranmere, AU); Clemens, Stephan (San Diego, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

ccsd-00004205,version2-9Mar2005 Calculation of accurate permanent dipole moments of the lowest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inhomogeneous external electric fields [18]. Besides, the "`historical"' approach based on photoassociation and trapping of molecules with a permanent electric dipole moment (usually labelled as dipolar molecules) using computed the rates for the photoassociation of mixed alkali pairs, and for the susbsequent formation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

457

ccsd00004205, Calculation of accurate permanent dipole moments of the lowest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inhomogeneous external electric #12;elds [18]. Besides, the "`historical"' approach based on photoassociation of molecules with a permanent electric dipole moment (usually labelled as dipolar molecules) using computed the rates for the photoassociation of mixed alkali pairs, and for the susbsequent formation

458

AvAilAble for licensing Battery overcharge protection, increased safety and long-term stability.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AvAilAble for licensing Battery overcharge protection, increased safety and long-term stability of lithium-ion batteries. The electrolytes can be alkali metal salts or polar aprotic solvents of overcharge tolerance--the dangerous voltage of the battery will never be reached even when over

Kemner, Ken

459

Soybean Oil-based Biodiesel Production Catalyzed with Na2O/Al2O3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid alkali catalyst was prepared with CH3COONa immobilized on alumina by impregnation method. Represented with SEM, IR and BET techniques, the catalysts indicated relatively uniform particle size distribution with perfect particle surface area, pore ... Keywords: biodiesel, impregnation method, representation, catalyst, transesterification

Yingming Chen; Xiaodong Chen; Junhua Peng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Mound Isotope Power Systems; AMTEC Integral Cell Wall Compression Test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion) device is tested under a compression load at a rate of 0.0025 inches/minute. The integral cell wall is made of Haynes Alloy 25. The wall buckled at 724 pounds load.

None

1997-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SEPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM FROM MOLTEN SALT REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selectively precipitating protactinium from a neutron- irradiated fused fluoride salt composition comprising at least one metal fluoride selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal fluoride and an alkaline earth metal fluoride containing dissolved thorium-232 values is presented. An inorganic metal oxide corresponding to any of the metal fluorides of the composition is also added. (AEC)

Shaffer, J.H.; Strain, J.E.; Cuneo, D.R.; Kelly, M.J.

1963-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

462

PRODUCTION OF METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described producing metallic thorium, titanium, zirconium, or hafnium from the fluoride. In the process, the fluoride is reduced with alkali or alkaline earth metal and a booster compound (e.g. iodine or a decomposable oxysalt) in a sealed bomb at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature above the melting point of the metal to be produced.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

1961-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

463

Method of preparing pure fluorine gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple, inexpensive system for purifying and storing pure fluorine is described. The method utilizes alkali metal-nickel fluorides to absorb tank fluorine by forming nickel complex salts and leaving the gaseous impurities which are pumped away. The complex nickel fluoride is then heated to evolve back pure gaseous fluorine.

Asprey, Larned B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Catalytic coal liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Sunder, Swaminathan (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Immobilization of radioiodine in synthetic boracite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear waste storage product is disclosed in which radioiodine is incorporated in a synthetic boracite. The boracite may be prepared by reacting a transition metal iodide with an alkali horate under mild hydrothermal conditions, drying the reaction product, and then hot pressing.

Babad, H.; Strachan, D.M.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

466

International Kimberlite Conference Long Abstract 1 ECLOGITES FROM THE GRIB KIMBERLITE PIPE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8th International Kimberlite Conference Long Abstract 1 ECLOGITES FROM THE GRIB KIMBERLITE PIPE xenoliths in kimberlites and alkali basalts are of great scientific interest because they can provide kimberlite pipe, Grib, in the Arkhangelsk Province of Russia. GEOLOGY OF THE ARKHANGELSK REGION The East

Taylor, Lawrence A.

467

Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized 10 and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

Moore, W.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Lithium ion conducting electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to highly conductive alkali-metal ion non-crystalline electrolyte systems, and more particularly to novel and unique molten (liquid), rubbery, and solid electrolyte systems which are especially well suited for use with high current density electrolytic cells such as primary and secondary batteries.

Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Liu, Changle (Midland, MI); Xu, Kang (Montgomery Village, MD); Skotheim, Terje A. (Tucson, AZ)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

0270~6474/83/0305-0942$02.00/0 Copyright 0 Society for Neuroscience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this corresponds to the diffusion potential across tight junc- tions selective for K+; it varies, when other alkali, 1967a; Sand et al., 1975; Kroese et al., 1980). It is not found, however, in semicircular canals of the chamber in vitro. Apical surfaces are ringed with tight junctions (unpublished observations), which

Corey, David P.

470

Regenerable process for the selective removal of sulfur dioxide from effluent gases  

SciTech Connect

A regenerable process is claimed for scrubbing SO/sub 2/ from effluent gases using an aqueous alkanolamine and the corresponding sulfite as the solvent, such amine having a boiling point below about 250/sup 0/ C. At one atmosphere pressure and wherein the alkanolamine solutions containing heat stable salts (Hss) is regenerated by alkali addition, crystallization and vacuum distillation of the amine.

Atwood, G.R.; Kosseim, A.J.; Sokolik, J.E.

1983-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

471

Process for producing dimethyl ether form synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

Pierantozzi, Ronald (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Process for producing dimethyl ether from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

Pierantozzi, R.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

473

Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

Campbell, K.D.

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

474

Bio-and Electro-Ceramics, Films and Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Molten-Salt Synthesis of Pure and Doped LaAlO3 Nanoparticles: ... reaction and the benefits of molten alkali metal nitrates as reaction media. ... firing and cooling down to room-temperature this powder precursor mixture.

475

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

476

Chlorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons Dr. K. Squibb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cement kilns - iron ore sintering, steel production and scrap metal recovery #12;Polychlorinated banned in 1977 For use in: electrical capacitors and transformers (977 kg/transformer) heat exchangers: Very stable, chemically and thermally Resistant to acids and alkalis Excellent conductor of heat Low

Kane, Andrew S.

477

Polyhedral Ionic Molecules Alexander I. Boldyrev and Jack Simons*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Chemistry, The UniVersity of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 ReceiVed NoVember 25, 1996. ReVised Manuscript species composed of closed-shell atomic ions are known to prefer densely packed structures similar, for example, in alkali halide tetramers, no other ionic polyhedral structures containing only atomic ions

Simons, Jack

478

Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

Moore, William E. (Manassas, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

Minh, Nguyen Q. (Woodridge, IL); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Tucson, AZ); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "larson garnet alkali" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Ultralow-Power Four-Wave Mixing with Rb in a Hollow-Core Photonic Band-Gap Fiber Pablo Londero,* Vivek Venkataraman, Amar R. Bhagwat, Aaron D. Slepkov, and Alexander L. Gaeta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an alkali-metal vapor system with a large ($30 MHz) ground state decoherence rate. DOI: 10.1103/Phys-resonance transmission, and is the excited-state radiative decay rate. Another critical feature is a long spin density matrix for the ensemble of atomic states, and transit-time broadening effects are added

Gaeta, Alexander L.

482