National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for larson garnet alkali

  1. Doug Larson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doug Larson Doug Larson NIF Facility Manager and Chief Engineer, NIF & Photon Science NIF Facility Manager Doug Larson has nearly 30 years of experience in LLNL's fusion programs, including NIF technology development, Beamlet, Nova, and TMX. He received his B.S. degree from the University of New Mexico in electrical engineering in 1983. Previous positions have included project engineer for Beamlet, pulsed power engineer for Nova, Beamlet,and NIF, leadership of NIF line-replaceable unit

  2. Larson,Cheryl A * PS-6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5; Larson,Cheryl A - PS-6; Chalier,Annick E - PFP-6 Subject: FW: proposed contract language re: Tier 2 rates, environmental attributes Attachments: proposed contract language...

  3. QER- Comment of Pat Larson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    First in Massachusetts and other New England states, we need to mount a major campaign to conserve energy. That means getting people and businesses to USE LESS. There are many ways for people to do this. For example, people could use less electricity by shutting off air conditioners and helping cut back electricity use in public buildings such as schools. If we are serious about doing something about the crisis related to climate change, the electric rate system could be re-structured. People who use less pay less, and people who use more (over a certain amount) pay more. Second energy efficiency should be a top priority. We do not need new gas pipelines, such as the proposed Northeast Expansion project in the planning stages by Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co. (owned by Kinder Morgan). This proposed pipeline would cut across protected forests, farmland, and small towns in northern and western parts of Massachusetts. Massachusetts does not need this new proposed gas pipeline. We should fix the leaks in established gas pipelines (Sen. Markey's proposal) to boost efficiency and also use less energy. Continuing to extract fossil fuels such as oil and gas and build new transmission systems is not a good idea at this point in our history as we face a very serious climate change crisis. Patricia Larson

  4. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole...

  5. Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field...

  6. Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  7. Isotopic Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  8. Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  9. Larson,Cheryl A * PS6 From: Roberts,Timothy C - PGL-5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Larson,Cheryl A * PS6 From: Roberts,Timothy C - PGL-5 Sent: Wednesday, October 22, 2008 3:29 PM To: Larson,Cheryl A - PS-6; Barham,Theodore J - PGL-5 Subject: FW: Slice Contract...

  10. Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

  11. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Visit Research Center in East Hartford | Department of Energy Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received

  12. Garnet Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Garnet Wind Facility Garnet Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Azusa Light & Water...

  13. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  14. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  15. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  16. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  17. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  18. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  19. Garnet VRX sro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    VRX sro Jump to: navigation, search Name: Garnet VRX sro Place: esk Budjovice, Czech Republic Zip: 371 36 Product: Czech developer operating a 1.5MW PV plant in the Czech...

  20. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  1. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  2. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  3. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  4. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joshi, Ashok V.; Balagopal, Shekar; Pendelton, Justin

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  5. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  6. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  7. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  8. Diamond films treated with alkali-halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1997-01-01

    A secondary electron emitter is provided and includes a substrate with a diamond film, the diamond film is treated or coated with an alkali-halide.

  9. Diamond films treated with alkali-halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1997-04-08

    A secondary electron emitter is provided and includes a substrate with a diamond film, the diamond film is treated or coated with an alkali-halide. 5 figs.

  10. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  11. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  12. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  13. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING

  14. Trace-element zoning in garnets from sheared mantle xenoliths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, W.L.; Cousens, D.R.; Ryan, C.G.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. ); Smith, D. ); Boyd, F.R. )

    1989-02-01

    Proton-microprobe analyses of garnets from sheared high-temperature ultramafic xenoliths reveal marked zonation of trace elements, paralleling trends in major and minor elements. Garnet rims (600-1,000 {mu}m wide) are enriched in Fe, Ti, Zr, Y and Ga, and either enriched or depleted in Cr, relative to cores. Zoning profiles for Ti and Zr are S-shaped and extend further into the grains than the Cr and Ga gradients. The profiles are consistent with the formation of Ti, Zr, Y-enriched garnet overgrowths, followed by diffusive equilibration between rim and core over years to hundreds of years. This enrichment in Fe, Ca, Al and incompatible elements is ascribed to melt infiltration and consequent melt-crystal exchange and garnet growth, shortly before eruption. Zr/Y is 1 to 2 in garnet cores but 4 to 5 in rims, and so the infiltrating melt may have been relatively alkalic. Major and trace element concentrations in such high-temperature sheared xenoliths are not likely to resemble those of primitive mantle or of residual mantle depleted by melt extraction.

  15. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  16. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  17. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  18. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Wednesday, 29 March 2006 00:00 Turning a...

  19. METATHESIS OF PLUTONIUM CARRIER LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATE WITH AN ALKALI

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duffield, R.B.

    1960-04-01

    A plutonium fluoride precipitate is converted to plutonium hydroxide by digesting the precipitate with an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide solution.

  20. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  1. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  2. Sublattice Magnetic Relaxation in Rare Earth Iron Garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Walsh, Brian

    2013-07-08

    The magnetic properties of rare earth garnets make them attractive materials for applications ranging from optical communications to magnetic refrigeration. The purpose of this research was to determine the AC magnetic properties of several rare earth garnets, in order to ascertain the contributions of various sublattices. Gd3Fe5O¬12, Gd3Ga5O12, Tb3Fe5O12, Tb3Ga5O12, and Y3Fe5O12 were synthesized by a solid state reaction of their oxides and verified by x-ray diffraction. Frequency-dependent AC susceptibility and DC magnetization were measured versus temperature (10 – 340 K). Field cooling had little effect on AC susceptibility, but large effect on DC magnetization, increasing magnetization at the lowest temperature and shifting the compensation point to lower temperatures. Data suggest that interaction of the two iron lattices results in the two frequency dependent magnetic relaxations in the iron garnets, which were fit using the Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius laws.

  3. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  4. Charge-coupled substituted garnets (Y 3-x Ca 0.5x M 0.5x )Fe₅O₁₂...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    garnet structure has been proposed as a potential crystalline nuclear waste form for accommodation of actinide elements, especially uranium (U). In this study, yttrium iron garnet ...

  5. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BREHM, W.F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  6. Thermal Expansion in the Garnet-Type Solid Electrolyte

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Li7-xAlx/3)La3Zr2O12 as a Function of Al Content - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research September 25, 2015, Research Highlights Thermal Expansion in the Garnet-Type Solid Electrolyte (Li7-xAlx/3)La3Zr2O12 as a Function of Al Content Evolution of the lattice constant as a function of temperature with the evolution of the (211) peak of cubic (Li6.1Al0.3)La3Zr2O12 during heating (inset). Scientific Achievement The study identified the lattice expansion lithium lanthanum zirconium oxide

  7. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  8. Effect of furnace operating conditions on alkali vaporization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ALKALI METALS; EVAPORATION; FURNACES; ...

  9. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  10. Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser: A New Combination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser-Compton Light Source Technology Short-Pulse Lasers High-Powered Lasers Journal Articles home science photon science directed energy Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser: A ...

  11. Jidong Chlorine and Alkali Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Place: Tangshan, Hebei Province, China Zip: 63021 Sector: Hydro Product: Chinese chemical products manufacturer whose products including chlorine, alkali, hydrochloric acid...

  12. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  13. Cubic Ionic Conductor Ceramics for Alkali Ion Batteries - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Ionic Conductor Ceramics for Alkali Ion Batteries Brookhaven National Laboratory ... Better materials for use as electrodes in lithium or sodium ion batteries are still being ...

  14. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  15. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  16. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  17. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  18. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  19. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  20. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  1. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or...

  2. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

    1995-08-22

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  3. Interference of atomic alkali species with laser-induced breakdown

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectroscopy of aerosols in high-temperature applications. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Interference of atomic alkali species with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aerosols in high-temperature applications. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interference of atomic alkali species with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aerosols in high-temperature applications. No abstract prepared. Authors: Molina, Alejandro ; Shaddix, Christopher R. ; Sickafoose, Shane M. ;

  4. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Wednesday, 29 March 2006 00:00 Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or magnetic fields, or applying small changes in temperature, pressure, or doping-such intriguing control of a material's electronic properties is possible by exploiting strongly interacting or "correlated" electrons.

  5. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  6. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print Wednesday, 24 September 2008 00:00 During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of

  7. Solvation Structure and Transport Properties of Alkali Cations in Dimethyl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sulfoxide Under Exogenous Static Electric Fields - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research June 14, 2015, Research Highlights Solvation Structure and Transport Properties of Alkali Cations in Dimethyl Sulfoxide Under Exogenous Static Electric Fields Top: Snapshots of molecular dynamics simulations of alkali ions in DMSO at 298 K and zero-applied electric field: (left) Li+ and (right) Cs+. Sulfur atoms are shown in yellow, oxygen atoms in red, and methyl groups in gray. Graph: Average

  8. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  9. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  10. Effect of furnace operating conditions on alkali vaporization, batch

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carryover, and the formation of SO2 and NO in an oxy-fuel fired container glass furnace. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect furnace operating conditions on alkali vaporization, batch carryover, and the formation of SO2 and NO in an oxy-fuel fired container glass furnace. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of furnace operating conditions on alkali vaporization, batch carryover, and the formation of SO2 and NO in an oxy-fuel fired container glass furnace. No abstract prepared.

  11. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  12. Magnetic states of the two-leg-ladder alkali metal iron selenides...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    states of the two-leg-ladder alkali metal iron selenides AFe2Se3 Prev Next Title: Magnetic states of the two-leg-ladder alkali metal iron selenides AFe2Se3 Authors: Luo, ...

  13. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  14. Temperature evolution of electromotive force from Pt on yttrium-iron-garnet under ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohshima, Ryo; Emoto, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Teruya; Ando, Yuichiro; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2015-05-07

    Temperature evolution of electromotive force from Pt due to the inverse spin Hall effect is studied. Pure spin current is injected from yttrium-iron-garnet by using spin pumping technique. The electromotive force from the Pt monotonically decreases with decreasing temperature, and it is showed that there is a deviation between the measured and the calculated electromotive forces.

  15. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  16. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elkins, Perry E.; Bell, Jerry E.; Harlow, Richard A.; Chase, Gordon G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed therebetween. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants therethrough at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed therebetween. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal therebetween. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal.

  17. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elkins, P.E.; Bell, J.E.; Harlow, R.A.; Chase, G.G.

    1983-03-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed there between. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants there through at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed there between. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal there between. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal. 4 figs.

  18. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  19. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or magnetic fields, or applying small changes in temperature, pressure, or doping-such intriguing control of a material's electronic properties is possible by exploiting strongly interacting or "correlated" electrons. Now a team of researchers from the University of Kiel in Germany and the ALS has found a novel,

  20. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or magnetic fields, or applying small changes in temperature, pressure, or doping-such intriguing control of a material's electronic properties is possible by exploiting strongly interacting or "correlated" electrons. Now a team of researchers from the University of Kiel in Germany and the ALS has found a novel,

  1. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or magnetic fields, or applying small changes in temperature, pressure, or doping-such intriguing control of a material's electronic properties is possible by exploiting strongly interacting or "correlated" electrons. Now a team of researchers from the University of Kiel in Germany and the ALS has found a novel,

  2. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  3. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  4. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  5. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  6. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  7. Lithological influence of aggregate in the alkali-carbonate reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Buendia, A.M. . E-mail: angel.lopez@aidico.es; Climent, V. . E-mail: vcliment@grupogla.com; Verdu, P.

    2006-08-15

    The reactivity of carbonate rock with the alkali content of cement, commonly called alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR), has been investigated. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) can also contribute in the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in carbonate rock, mainly due to micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz or clay content in carbonate aggregate. Both ACR and ASR can occur in the same system, as has been also evidenced on this paper. Carbonate aggregate samples were selected using lithological reactivity criteria, taking into account the presence of dedolomitization, partial dolomitization, micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz. Selected rocks include calcitic dolostone with chert (CDX), calcitic dolostone with dedolomitization (CDD), limestone with chert (LX), marly calcitic dolostone with partial dolomitization (CD), high-porosity ferric dolostone with clays (FD). To evaluate the reactivity, aggregates were studied using expansion tests following RILEM AAR-2, AAR-5, a modification using LiOH AAR-5Li was also tested. A complementary study was done using petrographic monitoring with polarised light microscopy on aggregates immersed in NaOH and LiOH solutions after different ages. SEM-EDAX has been used to identify the presence of brucite as a product of dedolomitization. An ACR reaction showed shrinkage of the mortar bars in alkaline solutions explained by induced dedolomitization, while an ASR process typically displayed expansion. Neither shrinkage nor expansion was observed when mortar bars were immersed in solutions of lithium hydroxide. Carbonate aggregate classification with AAR pathology risk has been elaborated based on mechanical behaviours by expansion and shrinkage. It is proposed to be used as a petrographic method for AAR diagnosis to complement the RILEM AAR1 specifically for carbonate aggregate. Aggregate materials can be classified as I (non-reactive), II (potentially reactive), and III (probably reactive), considering induced dedolomitization ACR (dedolomitization degree) and ASR.

  8. Crystallized alkali-silica gel in concrete from the late 1890s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Gress, David . E-mail: dlgress@unh.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu

    2006-08-15

    The Elon Farnsworth Battery, a concrete structure completed in 1898, is in an advanced state of disrepair. To investigate the potential for rehabilitation, cores were extracted from the battery. Petrographic examination revealed abundant deposits of alkali silica reaction products in cracks associated with the quartz rich metasedimentary coarse aggregate. The products of the alkali silica reaction are variable in composition and morphology, including both amorphous and crystalline phases. The crystalline alkali silica reaction products are characterized by quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The broad extent of the reactivity is likely due to elevated alkali levels in the cements used.

  9. Alkali-lead-iron phosphate glass and associated method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.; Franco, S.C.S.

    1994-03-29

    A glass composition and method of preparation utilizes a mixture consisting of phosphorus oxide within the range of about 40 to 49 molar percent, lead oxide within the range of about 10 to 25 molar percent, iron oxide within the range of about 10 to 17 molar percent and an alkali oxide within the range of about 23 to 30 molar percent. The glass resulting from the melting and subsequent solidifying of the mixture possesses a high degree of durability and a coefficient of thermal expansion as high as that of any of a number of metals. Such features render this glass highly desirable in glass-to-metal seal applications. 6 figures.

  10. Alkali-lead-iron phosphate glass and associated method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.; Franco, Sofia C. S.

    1994-01-01

    A glass composition and method of preparation utilizes a mixture consisting of phosphorus oxide within the range of about 40 to 49 molar percent, lead oxide within the range of about 10 to 25 molar percent, iron oxide within the range of about 10 to 17 molar percent and an alkali oxide within the range of about 23 to 30 molar percent. The glass resulting from the melting and subsequent solidifying of the mixture possesses a high degree of durability and a coefficient of thermal expansion as high as that of any of a number of metals. Such features render this glass highly desirable in glass-to-metal seal applications.

  11. Unidirectional anisotropy in the spin pumping voltage in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilela-Leao, L. H.; Salvador, C.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2011-09-05

    Detailed measurements of the dc voltage generated in a thin Pt layer deposited on films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) have been carried out to study the spin pumping effect produced by magnetostatic (MS) modes excited by a microwave field. In relatively thick YIG films the modes are far apart so that one can identify clearly the spin pumping voltage in V{sub SP} produced by each MS mode. We have discovered that when the sputter deposition of the thin Pt layer is made on the YIG film magnetized by a static magnetic field, V{sub SP} exhibits a strong unidirectional anisotropy.

  12. Modification of the crystal structure of gadolinium gallium garnet by helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostafiychuk, B. K.; Yaremiy, I. P. Yaremiy, S. I.; Fedoriv, V. D.; Tomyn, U. O.; Umantsiv, M. M.; Fodchuk, I. M.; Kladko, V. P.

    2013-12-15

    The structure of gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) single crystals before and after implantation by He{sup +} ions has been investigated using high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods and the generalized dynamic theory of X-ray scattering. The main types of growth defects in GGG single crystals and radiation-induced defects in the ion-implanted layer have been determined. It is established that the concentration of dislocation loops in the GGG surface layer modified by ion implantation increases and their radius decreases with an increase in the implantation dose.

  13. Synthesis and studies on microhardness of alkali zinc borate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhashini, Bhattacharya, Soumalya Shashikala, H. D. Udayashankar, N. K.

    2014-04-24

    The mixed alkali effect on zinc borate glasses have been reported. The glass systems of nominal composition 10Zn+xLi{sub 2}O+yNa{sub 2}O+80B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = y = 0, 5, 10, 15 mol%) were prepared using standard melt quenching method. The structural, physical and mechanical properties of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction(XRD), density measurement and Vickers hardness measurement, respectively. A consistent increase in the density was observed, which explains the role of the modifiers (Li{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}O) in the network modification of borate structure. The molar volume is decreasing linearly with the alkali concentration, which is attributed to the conversion of tetrahedral boron (BO{sub 4/2}){sup −} into (BO{sub 3/2}){sup −}. The microhardness studies reveals the anisotropy nature of the material. It further confirms that the samples belong to hard glass category.

  14. Origin of high Li? conduction in doped Li?La?Zr?O?? garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yan; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Liang, Chengdu; An, Ke

    2015-08-06

    Substitution of a native ion in the crystals with a foreign ion that differs in valence (aliovalent doping) has been widely attempted to upgrade solid-state ionic conductors for various charge carriers including O?, H?, Li?, Na?, etc. The doping helps promote the high-conductive framework and dredge the tunnel for fast ion transport. The garnet-type Li?La?Zr?O?? (LLZO) is a fast Li? solid conductor, which received much attention as an electrolyte candidate for all-solid-state lithium ion batteries, showing great potential to offer high energy density and minimize battery safety concerns to meet extensive applications in large energy storage systems such as those for electric vehicles and aerospace. In the Li-stuffed garnet framework of LLZO, the 3D pathway formed by the incompletely occupied tetrahedral sites bridged by a single octahedron enables the superior Li? conductivity. For optimal performance, many aliovalent-doping efforts have been made throughout metal elements (Al?, Ta??) and metalloid elements (Ga?, Te??) in the periodic table with various valences to stabilize the high-conductive phase and increase the Li vacancy concentration.

  15. Origin of high Li⁺ conduction in doped Li₇La₃Zr₂O₁₂ garnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Yan; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Liang, Chengdu; An, Ke

    2015-08-06

    Substitution of a native ion in the crystals with a foreign ion that differs in valence (aliovalent doping) has been widely attempted to upgrade solid-state ionic conductors for various charge carriers including O²⁻, H⁺, Li⁺, Na⁺, etc. The doping helps promote the high-conductive framework and dredge the tunnel for fast ion transport. The garnet-type Li₇La₃Zr₂O₁₂ (LLZO) is a fast Li⁺ solid conductor, which received much attention as an electrolyte candidate for all-solid-state lithium ion batteries, showing great potential to offer high energy density and minimize battery safety concerns to meet extensive applications in large energy storage systems such as thosemore » for electric vehicles and aerospace. In the Li-stuffed garnet framework of LLZO, the 3D pathway formed by the incompletely occupied tetrahedral sites bridged by a single octahedron enables the superior Li⁺ conductivity. For optimal performance, many aliovalent-doping efforts have been made throughout metal elements (Al³⁺, Ta⁵⁺) and metalloid elements (Ga³⁺, Te⁶⁺) in the periodic table with various valences to stabilize the high-conductive phase and increase the Li vacancy concentration.« less

  16. Influence of lithium hydroxide on alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulteel, D.; Garcia-Diaz, E.; Degrugilliers, P.

    2010-04-15

    Several papers show that the use of lithium limits the development of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in concrete. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of lithium's role on the alteration mechanism of ASR. The approach used is a chemical method which allowed a quantitative measurement of the specific degree of reaction of ASR. The chemical concrete sub-system used, called model reactor, is composed of the main ASR reagents: reactive aggregate, portlandite and alkaline solution. Different reaction degrees are measured and compared for different alkaline solutions: NaOH, KOH and LiOH. Alteration by ASR is observed with the same reaction degrees in the presence of NaOH and KOH, accompanied by the consumption of hydroxyl concentration. On the other hand with LiOH, ASR is very limited. Reaction degree values evolve little and the hydroxyl concentration remains about stable. These observations demonstrate that lithium ions have an inhibitor role on ASR.

  17. A light water excess heat reaction suggests that cold fusion may be alkali-hydrogen fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, R.T. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports that Mills and Kneizys presented data in support of a light water excess heat reaction obtained with an electrolytic cell highly reminiscent of the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion cell. The claim of Mills and Kneizys that their excess heat reaction can be explained on the basis of a novel chemistry, which supposedly also explains cold fusion, is rejected in favor of their reaction being, instead, a light water cold fusion reaction. It is the first known light water cold fusion reaction to exhibit excess heat, it may serve as a prototype to expand our understanding of cold fusion. From this new reactions are deduced, including those common to past cold fusion studies. This broader pattern of nuclear reactions is typically seen to involve a fusion of the nuclides of the alkali atoms with the simplest of the alkali-type nuclides, namely, protons, deuterons, and tritons. Thus, the term alkali-hydrogen fusion seems appropriate for this new type of reaction with three subclasses: alkali-hydrogen fusion, alkali-deuterium fusion, and alkali-tritium fusion. A new three-dimensional transmission resonance model (TRM) is sketched. Finally, preliminary experimental evidence in support of the hypothesis of a light water nuclear reaction and alkali-hydrogen fusion is reported. Evidence is presented that appears to strongly implicate the transmission resonance phenomenon of the new TRM.

  18. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of alkali metals in high-temperature

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gas (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of alkali metals in high-temperature gas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of alkali metals in high-temperature gas Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements of alkali in the high-temperature exhaust of a glass furnace show an attenuation of the Na and K LIBS signals that correlates with the stoichiometry of the bath gas surrounding the spark. The results

  19. Breakdown of ionic character of molecular alkali bromides in inner-valence photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpenko, A. Iablonskyi, D.; Kettunen, J. A.; Cao, W.; Huttula, M.; Aksela, H.; Urpelainen, S.

    2014-05-28

    The inner-valence region of alkali bromide XBr (X=Li, Na, K, Rb) vapours has been studied experimentally by means of synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental spectra were analyzed by comparing them with available theoretical results and previous experiments. Ionic character of alkali bromides is seen to change in the inner-valence region with increasing atomic number of the alkali atom. A mechanism involving mixing between Br 4s and Rb 4p orbitals has been suggested to account for the fine structure observed in inner-valence ionization region of RbBr.

  20. Phase-controllable spin wave generation in iron garnet by linearly polarized light pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimine, Isao; Iida, Ryugo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Satoh, Takuya; Stupakiewicz, Andrzej; Maziewski, Andrzej

    2014-07-28

    A phase-controlled spin wave was non-thermally generated in bismuth-doped rare-earth iron garnet by linearly polarized light pulses. We controlled the initial phase of the spin wave continuously within a range of 180 by changing the polarization azimuth of the excitation light. The azimuth dependences of the initial phase and amplitude of the spin wave were attributed to a combination of the inverse Cotton-Mouton effect and photoinduced magnetic anisotropy. Temporally and spatially resolved spin wave propagation was observed with a CCD camera, and the waveform was in good agreement with calculations. A nonlinear effect of the spin excitation was observed for excitation fluences higher than 100 mJ/cm{sup 2}.

  1. Spin valve effect of the interfacial spin accumulation in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lichuan; Zhang, Dainan; Zhang, Huaiwu Tang, Xiaoli; Bai, Feiming; Zhong, Zhiyong; Fan, Xin; Xiao, John Q.

    2014-09-29

    We report the spin valve effect in yttrium iron garnet/platinum (YIG/Pt) bilayers. The spin Hall effect (SHE) generates spin accumulation at the YIG/Pt interface and can be opened/closed by magnetization switching in the electrical insulator YIG. The interfacial spin accumulation was measured in both YIG/Pt and YIG/Cu/Pt structures using a planar Hall configuration. The spin valve effect remained, even after a 2 nm thick Cu layer was inserted between the YIG and Pt layers, which aimed to exclude the induced magnetization at the YIG/Pt interface. The transverse Hall voltage and switching field were dependent on the applied charge current density. The origin of this behavior can be explained by the SHE induced torque exerted on the domain wall, caused by the transfer of the spin angular momentum from the spin-polarized current to the YIG magnetic moment.

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of three-magnon process driven by ferromagnetic resonance in yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunha, R. O.; Holanda, J.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.; Vilela-Leo, L. H.; Rodrguez-Surez, R. L.

    2015-05-11

    We report an investigation of the dynamics of the three-magnon splitting process associated with the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in films of the insulating ferrimagnet yttrium iron garnet (YIG). The experiments are performed with a 6??m thick YIG film close to a microstrip line fed by a microwave generator operating in the 26?GHz range. The magnetization precession is driven by the microwave rf magnetic field perpendicular to the static magnetic field, and its dynamics is observed by monitoring the amplitude of the FMR absorption peak. The time evolution of the amplitude reveals that if the frequency is lowered below a critical value of 3.3?GHz, the FMR mode pumps two magnons with opposite wave vectors that react back on the FMR, resulting in a nonlinear dynamics of the magnetization. The results are explained by a model with coupled nonlinear equations describing the time evolution of the magnon modes.

  3. Pressure effect on elastic anisotropy of crystals from ab initio simulations: The case of silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoud, A.; Erba, A. Dovesi, R.; Doll, K.

    2014-06-21

    A general methodology has been devised and implemented into the solid-state ab initio quantum-mechanical CRYSTAL program for studying the evolution under geophysical pressure of the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. This scheme, which fully exploits both translational and point symmetry of the crystal, is developed within the formal frame of one-electron Hamiltonians and atom-centered basis functions. Six silicate garnet end-members, among the most important rock-forming minerals of the Earth's mantle, are considered, whose elastic anisotropy is fully characterized under high hydrostatic compressions, up to 60 GPa. The pressure dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and shear-wave birefringence of seismic wave velocities for these minerals are accurately simulated and compared with available single-crystal measurements.

  4. Integration of nonlinear dielectric barium strontium titanate with polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Q.X.; Groves, J.R.; Arendt, P.; Fan, Y.; Findikoglu, A.T.; Foltyn, S.R.; Jiang, H.; Miranda, F.A.

    1999-03-01

    Biaxially oriented nonlinear dielectric Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3} (BST) films have been grown on polycrystalline ferrite yttrium iron garnet (YIG) substrates. We use a structurally and chemically compatible MgO buffer to improve the crystallinity of the BST on polycrystalline YIG substrates, where the biaxially oriented MgO is deposited by an ion-beam assisted-deposition technique. The biaxially oriented BST has a dielectric loss of less than 0.01 and a capacitance tunability of greater than 25{percent} at a direct current bias voltage of 40 V at room temperature. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Band-gap and band-edge engineering of multicomponent garnet scintillators from first principles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yadav, Satyesh K.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Nikl, Martin; Jiang, Chao; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-11-24

    Complex doping schemes in R3Al5O12 (where R is the rare-earth element) garnet compounds have recently led to pronounced improvements in scintillator performance. Specifically, by admixing lutetium and yttrium aluminate garnets with gallium and gadolinium, the band gap is altered in a manner that facilitates the removal of deleterious electron trapping associated with cation antisite defects. Here, we expand upon this initial work to systematically investigate the effect of substitutional admixing on the energy levels of band edges. Density-functional theory and hybrid density-functional theory (HDFT) are used to survey potential admixing candidates that modify either the conduction-band minimum (CBM) or valence-bandmore » maximum (VBM). We consider two sets of compositions based on Lu3B5O12 where B is Al, Ga, In, As, and Sb, and R3Al5O12, where R is Lu, Gd, Dy, and Er. We find that admixing with various R cations does not appreciably affect the band gap or band edges. In contrast, substituting Al with cations of dissimilar ionic radii has a profound impact on the band structure. We further show that certain dopants can be used to selectively modify only the CBM or the VBM. Specifically, Ga and In decrease the band gap by lowering the CBM, while As and Sb decrease the band gap by raising the VBM, the relative change in band gap is quantitatively validated by HDFT. These results demonstrate a powerful approach to quickly screen the impact of dopants on the electronic structure of scintillator compounds, identifying those dopants which alter the band edges in very specific ways to eliminate both electron and hole traps responsible for performance limitations. Furthermore, this approach should be broadly applicable for the optimization of electronic and optical performance for a wide range of compounds by tuning the VBM and CBM.« less

  6. Method and composition for testing for the presence of an alkali metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guon, Jerold

    1981-01-01

    A method and composition for detecting the presence of an alkali metal on the surface of a body such as a metal plate, tank, pipe or the like is provided. The method comprises contacting the surface with a thin film of a liquid composition comprising a light-colored pigment, an acid-base indicator, and a nonionic wetting agent dispersed in a liquid carrier comprising a minor amount of water and a major amount of an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of the lower aliphatic alcohols, ketones and ethers. Any alkali metal present on the surface in elemental form or as an alkali metal hydroxide or alkali metal carbonate will react with the acid-base indicator to produce a contrasting color change in the thin film, which is readily discernible by visual observation or automatic techniques.

  7. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  8. Evaluation of alkali concentration in conditions relevant to oxygen/natural

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gas glass furnaces by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Evaluation of alkali concentration in conditions relevant to oxygen/natural gas glass furnaces by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of alkali concentration in conditions relevant to oxygen/natural gas glass furnaces by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. A number of industrial combustion systems are adopting oxygen-enhanced firing

  9. Detection of alkali-silica reaction swelling in concrete by staining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1998-01-01

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and rhodamine B is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR). These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  10. Detection of alkali-silica reaction swelling in concrete by staining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Carey, J.W.

    1998-04-14

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobalt nitrite and rhodamine B is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR). These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na-K-Ca-Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca-Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  11. In situ formation of coal gasification catalysts from low cost alkali metal salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Bernard J.; Brittain, Robert D.; Sancier, Kenneth M.

    1985-01-01

    A carbonaceous material, such as crushed coal, is admixed or impregnated with an inexpensive alkali metal compound, such as sodium chloride, and then pretreated with a stream containing steam at a temperature of 350.degree. to 650.degree. C. to enhance the catalytic activity of the mixture in a subsequent gasification of the mixture. The treatment may result in the transformation of the alkali metal compound into another, more catalytically active, form.

  12. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straessle, R.; Ptremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140?C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  13. Chemical leaching of coal to remove ash, alkali and vanadium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smit, F.J.; Huggins, D.K.; Berggren, M.; Anast, K.R.

    1986-04-15

    A process is described for upgrading powdered coal to improve the usefulness thereof as a fuel for internal combustion engines which consists of: (a) pressure-leaching powdered coal having a particle size ranging from about 28 mesh to about 200 mesh in an aqueous caustic solution at a temperature ranging from about 175/sup 0/C, to about 350/sup 0/C., the amount of caustic in the solution ranging from about 5% to about 30% by weight, the amount of coal being sufficient to form a slurry comprising about 10% to 30% by weight of solids, (b) hydrochloric acid leaching the caustic leached coal to dissolve acid-soluble constituents resulting from the caustic leach, (c) pressure leaching the acid-leached coal with a liquid from the group consisting of water and dilute aqueous ammonia to remove sodium and chlorine, and thereafter (d) filtering and washing the pressure leached coal, whereby the coal is characterized by up to about 0.85% by weight of ash, up to about 150 ppm of alkali metals and up to about 4 ppm vanadium.

  14. Method of treating alkali metal sulfide and carbonate mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohl, Arthur L. (Woodland Hills, CA); Rennick, Robert D. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Savinsky, Martin W. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

    1978-01-01

    A method of removing and preferably recovering sulfur values from an alkali metal sulfide and carbonate mixture comprising the steps of (1) introducing the mixture in an aqueous medium into a first carbonation zone and reacting the mixture with a gas containing a major amount of CO.sub.2 and a minor amount of H.sub.2 S; (2) introducing the resultant product from step 1 into a stripping zone maintained at subatmospheric pressure, and contacting this product with steam to produce a gaseous mixture, comprising H.sub.2 S and water vapor, and a liquor of reduced sulfide content; (3) introducing the liquor of reduced sulfide content into a second carbonation zone, and reacting the liquor with substantially pure gaseous CO.sub.2 in an amount sufficient to precipitate bicarbonate crystals and produce an offgas containing CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S for use in step 1; (4) recovering the bicarbonate crystals from step 3, and thermally decomposing the crystals to produce an alkaline metal carbonate product and a substantially pure CO.sub.2 offgas for use in step 3.

  15. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  16. Kenaf Bast Fibers—Part I: Hermetical Alkali Digestion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Jinshu; Shi, Sheldon Q.; Barnes, H. Michael; Horstemeyer, Mark; Wang, Jinwu; Hassan, El-Barbary M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a hermetical alkali digestion process to obtain single cellulosic fibers from kenaf bast. Kenaf bast were hermetically digested into single fiber using a 5% sodium hydroxide solution for one hour at four different temperatures (80 ° C, 110 ° C, 130 ° C, and 160 ° C). The hermetical digestion process used in this study produced fibers with high cellulose content (84.2–92.3%) due to the removal of lignin and hemicelluloses. The surface hardness and elastic modulus of the fibers digested at 130 ° C and 160 ° C were improved significantlymore » compared with those digested at 80 ° C. The tensile modulus and tensile strength of the individual fibers reduced as the digestion temperature increased from 110 ° C to 160 ° C. Micropores were generated in fiber cell wall when the fibers were digested at 130 ° C and 160 ° C. The studies on the composites that were made from polypropylene reinforced with the digested fibers indicated that the compatibility between the digested fibers and polypropylene matrix was poor.« less

  17. Optical spectroscopy of sputtered nanometer-thick yttrium iron garnet films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakubisova-Liskova, Eva Visnovsky, Stefan; Chang, Houchen; Wu, Mingzhong

    2015-05-07

    Nanometer (nm)-thick yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, YIG) films present interest for spintronics. This work employs spectral ellipsometry and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) spectra to characterize nm-thick YIG films grown on single-crystal Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} substrates by magnetron sputtering. The thickness (t) of the films ranges between 10 nm and 40 nm. Independent on t, the polar MOKE hysteresis loops saturate in the field of about 1.8 kOe, consistent with the saturation magnetization in bulk YIG (4πM{sub s} ≈ 1.75 kG). The MOKE spectrum measured at photon energies between 1.3 eV and 4.5 eV on the 38-nm-thick film agrees with that measured on single-crystal YIG bulk materials. The MOKE spectrum of the 12-nm-thick film still preserves the structure of the bulk YIG but its amplitude at lower photon energies is modified due to the fact that the radiation penetration depth exceeds 20 nm. The t dependence of the MOKE amplitude is consistent with MOKE calculations. The results indicate that the films are stoichiometric, strain free, without Fe{sup 2+}, and preserve bulk YIG properties down to t ≈ 10 nm.

  18. Structure and scintillation yield of Ce-doped AlGa substituted yttrium garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidletskiy, Oleg; Kononets, Valerii; Lebbou, Kheirreddine; Neicheva, Svetlana; Voloshina, Olesya; Bondar, Valerii; Baumer, Vyacheslav; Belikov, Konstantin; Gektin, Alexander; Grinyov, Boris; Joubert, Marie-France

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Range of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. ? Light yield of mixed crystals reaches 130% of the YAG:Ce value at x ? 0.4. ? ?1% of antisite defects is formed in YGG:Ce, but no evidence of this is obtained for the rest of crystals. -- Abstract: Structure and scintillation yield of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are studied. Crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. Distribution of host cations in crystal lattice is determined. Quantity of antisite defects in crystals is evaluated using XRD and atomic emission spectroscopy data. Trend of light output at Al/Ga substitution in Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce is determined for the first time. Light output in mixed crystals reaches 130% comparative to Ce-doped yttriumaluminum garnet. Luminescence properties at Al/Ga substitution are evaluated.

  19. The direct observation of alkali vapor species in biomass combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, R.J.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes new data from screening various feedstocks for alkali vapor release under combustion conditions. The successful development of a laboratory flow reactor and molecular beam, mass spectrometer interface is detailed. Its application to several herbaceous and woody feedstocks, as well as a fast-pyrolysis oil, under 800 and 1,100{degrees}C batch combustion, is documented. Chlorine seems to play a large role in the facile mobilization of potassium. Included in the report is a discussion of relevant literature on the alkali problem in combustors and turbines. Highlighted are the phenomena identified in studies on coal and methods that have been applied to alkali speciation. The nature of binding of alkali in coal versus biomass is discussed, together with the implications for the ease of release. Herbaceous species and many agricultural residues appear to pose significant problems in release of alkali species to the vapor at typical combustor temperatures. These problems could be especially acute in direct combustion fired turbines, but may be ameliorated in integrated gasification combined cycles.

  20. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulfur species from combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Mwabe, P.O.

    1994-02-01

    Experimental work was carried out on a 17 kW, 600 cm long, gas laboratory combustor, to investigate the post flame reactive capture of alkali species by kaolinite. Emphasis was on alkali/sorbent interactions occurring in flue gas at temperatures above the alkali dewpoint and on the formation of water insoluble reaction products. Time-temperature studies were carried out by injecting kaolinite at different axial points along the combustor. The effect of chlorine and sulfur on alkali capture was investigated by doping the flame with SO{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} gases to simulate coal flame environments. Particle time and temperature history was kept as close as possible to that which would ordinarily be found in a practical boiler. Experiments designed to extract apparent initial reaction rates were carried using a narrow range, 1-2 {mu}m modal size sorbent, while, a coarse, multi size sorbent was used to investigate the governing transport mechanisms. The capture reaction has been proposed to be between alkali hydroxide and activated kaolinite, and remains so in the presence of sulfur and chlorine. The presence of sulfur reduces sodium capture by under 10% at 1300{degree}C. Larger reductions at lower temperatures are attributed to the elevated dewpoint of sodium ({approximately}850{degree}C) with subsequent reduction in sorbent residence time in the alkali gas phase domain. Chlorine reduces sodium capture by 30% across the temperature range covered by the present experiments. This result has been linked to thermodynamic equilibria between sodium hydroxide, sodium chloride and water.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of substituted garnet and perovskite-based lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu-Sepúlveda, Maria; Huq, Ashfia; Dhital, Chetan; Dominique E. Williams; Li, Yunchao; Paranthaman, M. Parans; Zaghib, Karim; Manivannan, A.

    2015-09-30

    In this study, titanium, tantalum-substituted Li7La3Zr2-xAxO12 (LLZO, A = Ta, Ti) garnets, and chromium-substituted La(2/3)-xLi3xTi1-yCryO3 (LLTO) perovskites were prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction and the Pechini processes. The desired crystal phases were obtained by varying the calcination temperature and time, as well as the substitution concentration. All samples indicated decomposition of the precursors when heated above 750 °C and formation of the desired phase after heat treatment at higher temperatures. Neutron diffraction data shows the formation of a predominant cubic phase in the case of Ta-LLZO, and monoclinic phase with minor impurity phases for Cr-LLTO. Ionic conductivity for Ti-LLZOmore » (Li7La3Zr1.4Ti0.6O12), Ta-LLZO (Li6.03La3Zr1.533Ta0.46O12), and Cr-LLTO (La(2/3)-xLi3xTi0.9Cr0.1O3) at room temperature were found to be 5.21 × 10–6, 1.01 ×10–6, and 1.2 × 10–4 S cm–1, respectively. The activation energies of the compounds were determined from the Arrhenius plot and were 0.44 eV (Ti0.6-LLZO), 0.54 eV (Ta0.5-LLZO), and 0.20 eV (Cr0.1-LLTO).« less

  2. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  3. Alkali slurry ozonation to produce a high capacity nickel battery material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1984-11-06

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  4. Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVan, Jackson H.; Selle, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

  5. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1996-09-24

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

  6. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1985-01-01

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

  7. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cassano, A.A.

    1985-07-02

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

  8. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    There are several ceramic materials which are currently being considered for use as structural elements in coal combustion and coal conversion systems because of their thermal and mechanical properties. These include alumina (refractories, membranes, heat engines); silicon carbide and silicon nitride (turbine engines, internal combustion engines, heat exchangers, particulate filters); zirconia (internal combustion engines, turbine engines, refractories); and mullite and cordierite (particulate filters, refractories, heat exchangers). High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, and zirconia. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products and determination of the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time. 145 refs., 29 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Dissolution of HTGR TRISO beads by the alkali fluoride fusion method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byster, S.E.

    1980-07-01

    The alkali fluoride fusion method for the dissolution of HTGR TRISO fuel beads offers significant time advantage over other commonly used fusion procedures when applied to samples weighing less than three grams. The method is straightforward, utilizes standard analytical laboratory equipment, and yields solutions which may be utilized by customary procedures.

  10. NOVEL REFRACTORY MATERIALS FOR HIGH ALKALI, HIGH TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Smith, Jeffrey D; O'Hara, Kelley; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela; Colavito,

    2012-08-01

    A project was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with a research team comprised of the academic institution Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T), and the industrial company MINTEQ International, Inc. (MINTEQ), along with representatives from the aluminum, chemical, glass, and forest products industries. The project was to address the need for new innovative refractory compositions by developing a family of novel MgO-Al 2O3, MgAl2O4, or other similar spinel structured or alumina-based unshaped refractory compositions (castables, gunnables, shotcretes, etc.) utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques (in-situ phase formation, altered conversion temperatures, accelerated reactions, etc). This family of refractory compositions would then be tailored for use in high-temperature, high-alkaline industrial environments like those found in the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries. Both practical refractory development experience and computer modeling techniques were used to aid in the design of this new family of materials. The newly developed materials were expected to offer alternative material choices for high-temperature, high-alkali environments that were capable of operating at higher temperatures (goal of increasing operating temperature by 100-200oC depending on process) or for longer periods of time (goal of twice the life span of current materials or next process determined service increment). This would lead to less process down time, greater energy efficiency for associated manufacturing processes (more heat kept in process), and materials that could be installed/repaired in a more efficient manner. The overall project goal was a 5% improvement in energy efficiency (brought about through a 20% improvement in thermal efficiency) resulting in a savings of 3.7 TBtu/yr (7.2 billion ft3 natural gas) by the year 2030. Additionally, new application techniques and systems were developed as part of this project to optimize the installation of this new family of refractory materials to maximize the properties of installed linings and to facilitate nuances such as hot installation and repair. Under this project, seven new shotcrete materials were developed for both primary and repair applications in aluminum, black liquor, coal gasification, and lime kiln environments. Developed materials were based on alumino-silicate, magnesia, and spinel forming systems. One of the developed materials was an insulating shotcrete to be used behind the high conductivity spinel linings developed under this project. Fundamental research work was carried out at MS&T throughout the life of the project to provide support for the development and production of the experimental refractory materials being developed. Work was also ongoing at ORNL and MS&T through the duration of the project on the measurement and characterization of key refractory properties as identified during year one of the project. Both materials currently being used in the industrial processes as identified and supplied by the industrial partners of this project and new materials being provided and developed by MINTEQ were evaluated as necessary. Additionally, energy savings estimates based on measured properties of the experimentally developed refractory systems from this project were made at MINTEQ to validate the energy savings estimates originally proposed for the project. As another part of the project, on-line inspection and hot repair techniques were considered. It was determined that although repair materials were successfully developed under this project for aluminum, black liquor, and coal gasification systems which enable hot repair, there was only minor interest from industry in implementing these materials. On-line inspection techniques were also identified under this project which are currently used in the steel industry, but implementation of these techniques in applications such as black liquor and coal gasification where higher temperatures and tighter access clearances exist proved difficult due to cost considerations. Therefore, on-line inspection was not further pursued under this project. Information from data collected during this and previous DOE projects was inputted into a refractory database housed at a public site (http://extwebapps.ornl.gov/crpd/Default.aspx). This database was initially populated with over twenty five refractory systems. Industrial trials of the insulating shotcrete (INSULSHOT FH) and the material for use in aluminum rotary furnaces (ROTOSHOT AL) developed under this project were performed validating the commercial potential of these materials. Additionally, the magnesia-rich spinel formulation (FAST FIRE MG-SP SHOT) for use in black liquor and lime kiln/cement applications was commercially released by MINTEQ. Industrial trials were monitored through the end of the project...

  11. Rapid Microwave Preparation of Highly Efficient Ce[superscript 3+]-Substituted Garnet Phosphors for Solid State White Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkel, Alexander; Denault, Kristin A.; George, Nathan C.; Doll, Courtney E.; Hry, Bathylle; Mikhailovsky, Alexander A.; Birkel, Christina S.; Hong, Byung-Chul; Seshadri, Ram (UCSB); (Mitsubishi)

    2012-04-30

    Ce{sup 3+}-substituted aluminum garnet compounds of yttrium (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) and lutetium (Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) - both important compounds in the generation of (In,Ga)N-based solid state white lighting - have been prepared using a simple microwave heating technique involving the use of a microwave susceptor to provide the initial heat source. Carbon used as the susceptor additionally creates a reducing atmosphere around the sample that helps stabilize the desired luminescent compound. High quality, phase-pure materials are prepared within a fraction of the time and using a fraction of the energy required in a conventional ceramic preparation; the microwave technique allows for a reduction of about 95% in preparation time, making it possible to obtain phase pure, Ce{sup 3+}-substituted garnet compounds in under 20 min of reaction time. It is estimated that the overall reduction in energy compared with ceramic routes as practiced in the lab is close to 99%. Conventionally prepared material is compared with material prepared using microwave heating in terms of structure, morphology, and optical properties, including quantum yield and thermal quenching of luminescence. Finally, the microwave-prepared compounds have been incorporated into light-emitting diode 'caps' to test their performance characteristics in a real device, in terms of their photon efficiency and color coordinates.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of substituted garnet and perovskite-based lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu-Sepúlveda, Maria; Huq, Ashfia; Dhital, Chetan; Dominique E. Williams; Li, Yunchao; Paranthaman, M. Parans; Zaghib, Karim; Manivannan, A.

    2015-09-30

    In this study, titanium, tantalum-substituted Li7La3Zr2-xAxO12 (LLZO, A = Ta, Ti) garnets, and chromium-substituted La(2/3)-xLi3xTi1-yCryO3 (LLTO) perovskites were prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction and the Pechini processes. The desired crystal phases were obtained by varying the calcination temperature and time, as well as the substitution concentration. All samples indicated decomposition of the precursors when heated above 750 °C and formation of the desired phase after heat treatment at higher temperatures. Neutron diffraction data shows the formation of a predominant cubic phase in the case of Ta-LLZO, and monoclinic phase with minor impurity phases for Cr-LLTO. Ionic conductivity for Ti-LLZO (Li7La3Zr1.4Ti0.6O12), Ta-LLZO (Li6.03La3Zr1.533Ta0.46O12), and Cr-LLTO (La(2/3)-xLi3xTi0.9Cr0.1O3) at room temperature were found to be 5.21 × 10–6, 1.01 ×10–6, and 1.2 × 10–4 S cm–1, respectively. The activation energies of the compounds were determined from the Arrhenius plot and were 0.44 eV (Ti0.6-LLZO), 0.54 eV (Ta0.5-LLZO), and 0.20 eV (Cr0.1-LLTO).

  13. Optimizing white light luminescence in Dy{sup 3+}-doped Lu{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} nano-garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haritha, P.; Linganna, K.; Venkatramu, V.; Martn, I. R.; Monteseguro, V.; Rodrguez-Mendoza, U. R.; Babu, P.; Len-Luis, S. F.; Jayasankar, C. K.; Lavn, V.

    2014-11-07

    Trivalent dysprosium-doped Lu{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} nano-garnets have been prepared by sol-gel method and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and laser excited spectroscopy. Under a cw 457?nm laser excitation, the white luminescence properties of Lu{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} nano-garnets have been studied as a function of the optically active Dy{sup 3+} ion concentration and at low temperature. Decay curves for the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level of Dy{sup 3+} ion exhibit non-exponential nature for all the Dy{sup 3+} concentrations, which have been well-fitted to a generalized energy transfer model for a quadrupole-quadrupole interaction between Dy{sup 3+} ions without diffusion. From these data, a simple rate-equations model can be applied to predict that intense white luminescence could be obtained from 1.8?mol% Dy{sup 3+} ions-doped nano-garnets, which is in good agreement with experimental results. Chromaticity color coordinates and correlated color temperatures have been determined as a function of temperature and are found to be within the white light region for all Dy{sup 3+} concentrations. These results indicate that 2.0?mol% Dy{sup 3+} ions doped nano-garnet could be useful for white light emitting device applications.

  14. An Aqueous Redox Flow Battery Based on Neutral Alkali Metal Ferri/ferrocyanide and Polysulfide Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xia, Gordon; Kirby, Brent W.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-13

    Aiming to explore low-cost redox flow battery systems, a novel iron-polysulfide (Fe/S) flow battery has been demonstrated in a laboratory cell. This system employs alkali metal ferri/ferrocyanide and alkali metal polysulfides as the redox electrolytes. When proper electrodes, such as pretreated graphite felts, are used, 78% energy efficiency and 99% columbic efficiency are achieved. The remarkable advantages of this system over current state-of-the-art redox flow batteries include: 1) less corrosive and relatively environmentally benign redox solutions used; 2) excellent energy and utilization efficiencies; 3) low cost for redox electrolytes and cell components. These attributes can lead to significantly reduced capital cost and make the Fe/S flow battery system a promising low-cost energy storage technology. The major drawbacks of the present cell design are relatively low power density and possible sulfur species crossover. Further work is underway to address these concerns.

  15. Petrography study of two siliceous limestones submitted to alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monnin, Y. . E-mail: monnin@ensm-douai.fr; Degrugilliers, P.; Bulteel, D.; Garcia-Diaz, E.

    2006-08-15

    This study presents the contribution of petrography to the comprehension of the alkali-silica reaction mechanism applied to two siliceous limestones. A petrography study was made on the two aggregates before reaction to define their relative proportions and types of reactive silica and to observe their distribution in the microstructure. Then a model reactor, constituted by the reactive siliceous limestone aggregate, portlandite and NaOH, was used to measure the swelling due to reaction of the silica with alkalis and the free expansion of the aggregates. The volume evolution between both aggregates was very different and could be explained by the preliminary petrographic study. It appears that the swelling of the aggregates is conditioned by the microstructure of the carbonated matrix, the quantity and the distribution of the reactive silica.

  16. Evaluation of the physi- and chemisorption of hydrogen in alkali (Na, Li) doped fullerenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Patrick; Teprovich, Jospeph A.; Compton, Robert; Affholter, Kathleen A; Schwartz, Viviane; Veith, Gabriel M; Zidan, Ragiay

    2015-01-01

    Alkali doped fullerenes synthesized by two different solvent assisted mixing techniques are compared for their hydrogen uptake activity. In this study we investigated the interaction of hydrogen with alkali doped fullerenes via physisorption. In addition, we present the first mass spectrometric evidence for the formation of C60H60 via chemisorption. Hydrogen physisorption isotherms up to 1 atm at temperatures ranging from 77-303 K were measured demonstrating an increase in hydrogen uptake versus pure C60 and increased isosteric heats of adsorption for the lithium doped fullerene Li12C60. However, despite these improvements the low amount of physisorbed hydrogen at 1 atm and 77 K in these materials suggests that fullerenes do not possess enough accessible surface area to effectively store hydrogen due to their close packed crystalline nature.

  17. Evaluation of the physi- and chemisorption of hydrogen in alkali (Na, Li) doped fullerenes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ward, Patrick; Teprovich, Jospeph A.; Compton, Robert; Affholter, Kathleen A; Schwartz, Viviane; Veith, Gabriel M; Zidan, Ragiay

    2015-01-01

    Alkali doped fullerenes synthesized by two different solvent assisted mixing techniques are compared for their hydrogen uptake activity. In this study we investigated the interaction of hydrogen with alkali doped fullerenes via physisorption. In addition, we present the first mass spectrometric evidence for the formation of C60H60 via chemisorption. Hydrogen physisorption isotherms up to 1 atm at temperatures ranging from 77-303 K were measured demonstrating an increase in hydrogen uptake versus pure C60 and increased isosteric heats of adsorption for the lithium doped fullerene Li12C60. However, despite these improvements the low amount of physisorbed hydrogen at 1 atm and 77more » K in these materials suggests that fullerenes do not possess enough accessible surface area to effectively store hydrogen due to their close packed crystalline nature.« less

  18. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  19. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-31

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  20. Gel nanostructure in alkali-activated binders based on slag and fly ash, and effects of accelerated carbonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.; Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel; Gehman, John D.; Brice, David G.; Kilcullen, Adam R.; Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 ; Duxson, Peter; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van

    2013-11-15

    Binders formed through alkali-activation of slags and fly ashes, including fly ash geopolymers, provide appealing properties as binders for low-emissions concrete production. However, the changes in pH and pore solution chemistry induced during accelerated carbonation testing provide unrealistically low predictions of in-service carbonation resistance. The aluminosilicate gel remaining in an alkali-activated slag system after accelerated carbonation is highly polymerised, consistent with a decalcification mechanism, while fly ash-based binders mainly carbonate through precipitation of alkali salts (bicarbonates at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, or carbonates under natural exposure) from the pore solution, with little change in the binder gel identifiable by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In activated fly ash/slag blends, two distinct gels (CASH and NASH) are formed; under accelerated carbonation, the NASH gel behaves comparably to fly ash-based systems, while the CASH gel is decalcified similarly to alkali-activated slag. This provides new scope for durability optimisation, and for developing appropriate testing methodologies. -- Highlights: C-A-S-H gel in alkali-activated slag decalcifies during accelerated carbonation. Alkali-activated fly ash gel changes much less under CO{sub 2} exposure. Blended slag-fly ash binder contains two coexisting gel types. These two gels respond differently to carbonation. Understanding of carbonation mechanisms is essential in developing test methods.

  1. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: The case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erba, A. Mahmoud, A.; Dovesi, R.; Belmonte, D.

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  2. Charge-coupled Substituted Garnets (Y3-xCa0.5xM0.5x)Fe5O12 (M = Ce, Th): Structure and Stability as Crystalline Nuclear Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Newville, Mathew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Sutton , Steven R.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-04-20

    The garnet structure has been proposed as a potential crystalline nuclear waste form for accommodation of actinide elements, especially uranium (U). In this study, yttrium iron garnet (YIG) as a model garnet host was studied for the incorporation of U analogs, cerium (Ce), and thorium (Th), incorporated by a charge-coupled substitution with calci-um (Ca) for yttrium (Y) in YIG, namely 2Y3+ = Ca2+ + M4+, where M4+ = Ce4+ or Th4+. Single phase garnets Y3-xCa0.5xM0.5xFe5O12, synthesized by the citrate-nitrate combustion method, were obtained up to x = 0.7. Ce was confirmed to be tetravalent by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated that the samples are single phase, M4+ and Ca2+ cations are restricted to the c-site, the nature of M4+ has only a minor effect on the structure, and the local environments of both the tetrahedral and octahedral Fe3+ are systematically affected by the extent of substitution, especially on the tetrahedral sublattice. The charge coupled substitution has advantages in incorporating Ce/Th and in stabilizing the substituted phases, compared to a single substitution strategy. Enthalpies of formation of garnets were obtained by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry, and the enthalpies of substitution of Ce and Th were determined. The thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the substituted garnets are entropically rather than energetically stabilized. This suggests that such garnets may form and persist in repositories at high temperature but might decompose near room temperature. These structural and thermodynamic findings shed light on possible incorporation of U in this garnet system.

  3. Effect of silicate modulus and metakaolin incorporation on the carbonation of alkali silicate-activated slags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernal, Susan A.; Mejia de Gutierrez, Ruby; Provis, John L.; Rose, Volker

    2010-06-15

    Accelerated carbonation is induced in pastes and mortars produced from alkali silicate-activated granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS)-metakaolin (MK) blends, by exposure to CO{sub 2}-rich gas atmospheres. Uncarbonated specimens show compressive strengths of up to 63 MPa after 28 days of curing when GBFS is used as the sole binder, and this decreases by 40-50% upon complete carbonation. The final strength of carbonated samples is largely independent of the extent of metakaolin incorporation up to 20%. Increasing the metakaolin content of the binder leads to a reduction in mechanical strength, more rapid carbonation, and an increase in capillary sorptivity. A higher susceptibility to carbonation is identified when activation is carried out with a lower solution modulus (SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O ratio) in metakaolin-free samples, but this trend is reversed when metakaolin is added due to the formation of secondary aluminosilicate phases. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffractometry of uncarbonated paste samples shows that the main reaction products in alkali-activated GBFS/MK blends are C-S-H gels, and aluminosilicates with a zeolitic (gismondine) structure. The main crystalline carbonation products are calcite in all samples and trona only in samples containing no metakaolin, with carbonation taking place in the C-S-H gels of all samples, and involving the free Na{sup +} present in the pore solution of the metakaolin-free samples. Samples containing metakaolin do not appear to have the same availability of Na{sup +} for carbonation, indicating that this is more effectively bound in the presence of a secondary aluminosilicate gel phase. It is clear that claims of exceptional carbonation resistance in alkali-activated binders are not universally true, but by developing a fuller mechanistic understanding of this process, it will certainly be possible to improve performance in this area.

  4. Accurate potential energy, dipole moment curves, and lifetimes of vibrational states of heteronuclear alkali dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Dmitry A.; Varganov, Sergey A.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-14

    We calculate the potential energy curves, the permanent dipole moment curves, and the lifetimes of the ground and excited vibrational states of the heteronuclear alkali dimers XY (X, Y = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) in the X{sup 1}?{sup +} electronic state using the coupled cluster with singles doubles and triples method. All-electron quadruple-? basis sets with additional core functions are used for Li and Na, and small-core relativistic effective core potentials with quadruple-? quality basis sets are used for K, Rb, and Cs. The inclusion of the coupled cluster non-perturbative triple excitations is shown to be crucial for obtaining the accurate potential energy curves. A large one-electron basis set with additional core functions is needed for the accurate prediction of permanent dipole moments. The dissociation energies are overestimated by only 14 cm{sup ?1} for LiNa and by no more than 114 cm{sup ?1} for the other molecules. The discrepancies between the experimental and calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are less than 1.7 cm{sup ?1}, and the discrepancies for the anharmonic correction are less than 0.1 cm{sup ?1}. We show that correlation between atomic electronegativity differences and permanent dipole moment of heteronuclear alkali dimers is not perfect. To obtain the vibrational energies and wave functions the vibrational Schrdinger equation is solved with the B-spline basis set method. The transition dipole moments between all vibrational states, the Einstein coefficients, and the lifetimes of the vibrational states are calculated. We analyze the decay rates of the vibrational states in terms of spontaneous emission, and stimulated emission and absorption induced by black body radiation. In all studied heteronuclear alkali dimers the ground vibrational states have much longer lifetimes than any excited states.

  5. Resolving the grain boundary and lattice impedance of hot-pressed Li7La3Zr2O12 garnet electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tenhaeff, Wyatt E.; Wang, Yangyang; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Wolfenstine, Jeff; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Dudney, Nancy J.; Rangasamy, Ezhiyl

    2013-07-24

    Here, the cubic-stabilized garnet solid electrolyte with a nominal composition of Li6.28Al0.24La3Zr2O12 is thoroughly characterized by impedance spectroscopy. By varying the frequency of the applied AC signal over 11 orders of magnitude for characterizations from –100 to +60 °C, the relative contributions of grain and grain boundary conduction are unambiguously resolved.

  6. DuraLith Alkali-Aluminosilicate Geopolymer Waste Form Testing for Hanford Secondary Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, W. L.; Lutz, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

    2011-07-21

    The primary objective of the work reported here was to develop additional information regarding the DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer as a waste form for liquid secondary waste to support selection of a final waste form for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary liquid wastes to be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility on the Hanford Site. Testing focused on optimizing waste loading, improving waste form performance, and evaluating the robustness of the waste form with respect to waste variability.

  7. Half metallic ferromagnetism in alkali metal nitrides MN (M = Rb, Cs): A first principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murugan, A. Rajeswarapalanichamy, R. Santhosh, M. Sudhapriyanga, G.; Kanagaprabha, S.

    2014-04-24

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of two alkali metal nitrides (MN: M= Rb, Cs) are investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package. At ambient pressure the two nitrides are stable in ferromagnetic state with CsCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that these materials are half metallic in nature. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from CsCl to ZB phase is observed in RbN and CsN.

  8. Structural and Crystal Chemical Properties of Alkali Rare-earth Double Phosphates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, James Matthew; Boatner, Lynn A.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Rawn, Claudia J.; Richardson, Jim

    2016-01-01

    When appropriately activated, alkali rare-earth double phosphates of the form: M3RE(PO4)2 (where M denotes an alkali metal and RE represents either a rare-earth element or Y or Sc) are of interest for use as inorganic scintillators for radiation detection at relatively long optical emission wavelengths. These compounds exhibit layered crystal structures whose symmetry properties depend on the relative sizes of the rare-earth and alkali-metal cations. Single-crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction methods were used here to refine the structures of the series of rare-earth double phosphate compounds: K3RE(PO4)2 with RE = Lu, Er, Ho, Dy, Gd, Nd, Ce, plus Y and Sc - as well as the compounds: A3Lu(PO4)2, with A = Rb, and Cs. The double phosphate K3Lu(PO4)2 was reported and structurally refined previously. This material had a hexagonal unit cell at room temperature with the Lu ion six-fold coordinated with oxygen atoms of the surrounding phosphate groups. Additionally two lower-temperature phases were observed for K3Lu(PO4)2. The first phase transition to a monoclinic P21/m phase occurred at ~230 K, and the Lu ion retained its six-fold coordination. The second K3Lu(PO4)2 phase transition occurred at ~130 K. The P21/m space group symmetry was retained, however, one of the phosphate groups rotated to increase the oxygen coordination number of Lu from six to seven. This structure then became isostructural with the room-temperature form of the compound K3Yb(PO4)2 reported here that also exhibits an additional high-temperature phase which occurs at T = 120 °C with a transformation to hexagonal P-3 space group symmetry and a Yb-ion coordination number reduction from seven to six. This latter result was confirmed using EXAFS. The single-crystal growth methods structural systematics, and thermal expansion properties of the present series of alkali rare-earth double phosphates, as determined by X-ray and neutron diffraction methods, are treated here.

  9. Oxygen-consuming chlor alkali cell configured to minimize peroxide formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy B.; Lipp, Ludwig; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-08-01

    Oxygen-consuming zero gap chlor-alkali cell was configured to minimize peroxide formation. The cell included an ion-exchange membrane that divided the cell into an anode chamber including an anode and a cathode chamber including an oxygen gas diffusion cathode. The cathode included a single-piece of electrically conducting graphitized carbon cloth. Catalyst and polytetrafluoroethylene were attached to only one side of the cloth. When the cathode was positioned against the cation exchange membrane with the catalyst side away from the membrane, electrolysis of sodium chloride to chlorine and caustic (sodium hydroxide) proceeded with minimal peroxide formation.

  10. Structural and Crystal Chemical Properties of Alkali Rare-earth Double Phosphates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Farmer, James Matthew; Boatner, Lynn A.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Rawn, Claudia J.; Richardson, Jim

    2016-01-01

    When appropriately activated, alkali rare-earth double phosphates of the form: M3RE(PO4)2 (where M denotes an alkali metal and RE represents either a rare-earth element or Y or Sc) are of interest for use as inorganic scintillators for radiation detection at relatively long optical emission wavelengths. These compounds exhibit layered crystal structures whose symmetry properties depend on the relative sizes of the rare-earth and alkali-metal cations. Single-crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction methods were used here to refine the structures of the series of rare-earth double phosphate compounds: K3RE(PO4)2 with RE = Lu, Er, Ho, Dy, Gd, Nd, Ce, plus Ymore » and Sc - as well as the compounds: A3Lu(PO4)2, with A = Rb, and Cs. The double phosphate K3Lu(PO4)2 was reported and structurally refined previously. This material had a hexagonal unit cell at room temperature with the Lu ion six-fold coordinated with oxygen atoms of the surrounding phosphate groups. Additionally two lower-temperature phases were observed for K3Lu(PO4)2. The first phase transition to a monoclinic P21/m phase occurred at ~230 K, and the Lu ion retained its six-fold coordination. The second K3Lu(PO4)2 phase transition occurred at ~130 K. The P21/m space group symmetry was retained, however, one of the phosphate groups rotated to increase the oxygen coordination number of Lu from six to seven. This structure then became isostructural with the room-temperature form of the compound K3Yb(PO4)2 reported here that also exhibits an additional high-temperature phase which occurs at T = 120 °C with a transformation to hexagonal P-3 space group symmetry and a Yb-ion coordination number reduction from seven to six. This latter result was confirmed using EXAFS. The single-crystal growth methods structural systematics, and thermal expansion properties of the present series of alkali rare-earth double phosphates, as determined by X-ray and neutron diffraction methods, are treated here.« less

  11. Optically pumped alkali laser and amplifier using helium-3 buffer gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J.; Page, Ralph; Soules, Thomas; Stappaerts, Eddy; Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2010-09-28

    In one embodiment, a laser oscillator is provided comprising an optical cavity, the optical cavity including a gain medium including an alkali vapor and a buffer gas, the buffer gas including .sup.3He gas, wherein if .sup.4He gas is also present in the buffer gas, the ratio of the concentration of the .sup.3He gas to the .sup.4He gas is greater than 1.37.times.10.sup.-6. Additionally, an optical excitation source is provided. Furthermore, the laser oscillator is capable of outputting radiation at a first frequency. In another embodiment, an apparatus is provided comprising a gain medium including an alkali vapor and a buffer gas including .sup.3He gas, wherein if .sup.4He gas is also present in the buffer gas, the ratio of the concentration of the .sup.3He gas to the .sup.4He gas is greater than 1.37.times.10.sup.-6. Other embodiments are also disclosed.

  12. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

  13. Charge-coupled substituted garnets (Y 3–x Ca 0.5x M 0.5x )Fe₅O₁₂ (M = Ce, Th): Structure and stability as crystalline nuclear waste forms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-04-20

    The garnet structure has been proposed as a potential crystalline nuclear waste form for accommodation of actinide elements, especially uranium (U). In this study, yttrium iron garnet (YIG) as a model garnet host was studied for the incorporation of U analogs, cerium (Ce) and thorium (Th), incorporated by a charge-coupled substitution with calcium (Ca) for yttrium (Y) in YIG, namely, 2Y³⁺ = Ca²⁺ + M⁴⁺, where M⁴⁺ = Ce⁴⁺ or Th⁴⁺. Single-phase garnets Y3–xCa0.5xM0.5xFe₅O₁₂ (x = 0.1–0.7) were synthesized by the citrate–nitrate combustion method. Ce was confirmed to be tetravalent by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffractionmore » and ⁵⁷Fe–Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated that M⁴⁺ and Ca²⁺ cations are restricted to the c site, and the local environments of both the tetrahedral and the octahedral Fe³⁺ are systematically affected by the extent of substitution. The charge-coupled substitution has advantages in incorporating Ce/Th and in stabilizing the substituted phases compared to a single substitution strategy. Enthalpies of formation of garnets were obtained by high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry, and the enthalpies of substitution of Ce and Th were determined. The thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the substituted garnets are entropically rather than energetically stabilized. This suggests that such garnets may form and persist in repositories at high temperature but might decompose near room temperature.« less

  14. Electric dipole polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies for hydrogen, the alkali-metal, alkaline-earth, and noble gas atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derevianko, Andrei Porsev, Sergey G. Babb, James F.

    2010-05-15

    The electric dipole polarizabilities evaluated at imaginary frequencies for hydrogen, the alkali-metal atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, and the noble gases are tabulated along with the resulting values of the atomic static polarizabilities, the atom-surface interaction constants, and the dispersion (or van der Waals) constants for the homonuclear and the heteronuclear diatomic combinations of the atoms.

  15. Ultralow-power local laser control of the dimer density in alkali-metal vapors through photodesorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Pankaj K.; Scully, Marlan O. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Dorfman, Konstantin E. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Yi Zhenhuan; Yuan Luqi; Welch, George R. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Sautenkov, Vladimir A. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Joint Institute of High Temperature, RAS, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Rostovtsev, Yuri V. [University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Zheltikov, Aleksei M. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-27

    Ultralow-power diode-laser radiation is employed to induce photodesorption of cesium from a partially transparent thin-film cesium adsorbate on a solid surface. Using resonant Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that this photodesorption process enables an accurate local optical control of the density of dimer molecules in alkali-metal vapors.

  16. Rheological properties of water-coal slurries based on brown coal in the presence of sodium lignosulfonates and alkali

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Savitskii; A.S. Makarov; V.A. Zavgorodnii

    2009-07-01

    The effect of the oxidized surface of brown coal on the structural and rheological properties of water-coal slurries was found. The kinetics of structure formation processes in water-coal slurries based on as-received and oxidized brown coal was studied. The effect of lignosulfonate and alkali additives on the samples of brown coal was considered.

  17. Energy conservation in the primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries together use nearly 13% of the electrical energy consumed by US industry. As part of its mission to promote energy conservation in basic US industries, the DOE surveys the present technological status of the major electrochemical industries and evaluates promising technological innovations that may lead to reduced energy requirements. This study provides technical and economic analyses in support of a government program of research and development in advanced electrolytic technology. This program is intended to supplement the development efforts directed toward energy savings by private industry. Sections II and III of this report cover aluminum and chlorine production processes only, since these two industries represent over 90% of the electrical energy requirements of all electrolytic industries in the United States. Section IV examines barriers to accelerated research and development by the electrolytic industries, and makes suggestions for government actions to overcome these barriers.

  18. The effects of lithium hydroxide solution on alkali silica reaction gels created with opal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Lyndon D.; Beaudoin, James J.; Grattan-Bellew, Patrick

    2004-04-01

    The reaction of Nevada opal with calcium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide solutions was investigated. In addition, opal was exposed to a combined solution of these three hydroxides. The progress of the three reactions was followed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results indicated the presence of a low-angle peak exclusive to the lithium-based reactions. The NMR results suggested a change in the silicate structure in the presence of lithium. These techniques indicated that the reaction of the alkali with the opal starting material is inhibited and perhaps stopped in the presence of lithium hydroxide. SEM revealed that the morphology of the reaction products on the surface of the reacted opal grains is markedly different invariably. It was concluded that evidence to support the theory of a protective layer exists and that the nature of the layer varies with ion type.

  19. Microstructural Changes Due to Alkali-Silica Reaction during Standard Mortar Test

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shin, Jun-Ho; Struble, Leslie; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructural development of mortar bars with silica glass aggregate undergoing alkali-silica reaction (ASR) under the conditions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test C1260 was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and qualitative X-ray microanalysis. Cracking in the aggregate, the hydrated paste, and the paste-aggregate interface was important in the development of the microstructure. Cracks were characterized according to their location, their relationship to other cracks, and whether they are filled with ASR gel. Expansion of the bars was approximately 1% at 12 days and 2% at 53 days. They fell apart by 63 days. The barsmore » contained two zones, an inner region that was undergoing ASR and an outer and much more highly damaged zone that extended further inward over time. Evidence of ASR was present even during the period when specimens were immersed in water, prior to immersion in NaOH solution.« less

  20. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-24

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  1. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  2. Ion Segregation and Deliquescence of Alkali Halide Nanocrystals on SiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Lin, Deng-Sung; Verdaguer, Albert; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-08-11

    The adsorption of water on alkali halide (KBr, KCl, KF, NaCl) nanocrystals on SiO{sub 2} and their deliquescence was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) from 8% to near saturation by scanning polarization force microscopy. At low humidity, water adsorption solvates ions at the surface of the crystals and increases their mobility. This results in a large increase in the dielectric constant, which is manifested in an increase in the electrostatic force and in an increase in the apparent height of the nanocrystals. Above 58% RH, the diffusion of ions leads to Ostwald ripening, where larger nanocrystals grow at the expense of the smaller ones. At the deliquescence point, droplets were formed. For KBr, KCl, and NaCl, the droplets exhibit a negative surface potential relative to the surrounding region, which is indicative of the preferential segregation of anions to the air/solution interface.

  3. Finite element analysis of three TVA dams with alkali-aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grenoble, B.A.; Meisenheimer, J.K.; Wagner, C.D.; Newell, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Three large Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) dams are currently experiencing problems caused by alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR). Since the fall of 1990, engineers in Stone & Webster`s Denver, Colorado office have been working with TVA to evaluate how AAR is affecting the dams and to identify measures for controlling the adverse effects of the concrete growth. This paper provides an overview of how finite element analysis is being used to understand the affects of AAR on these structures and to evaluate alternatives for minimizing the adverse effects of the concrete growth. Work on Hiwassee Dam is essentially complete, while that on the Chickamauga and Fontana Projects is still in progress. Consequently, this paper will focus primarily on Hiwassee Dam. The ongoing work on the other two projects will only be discussed briefly.

  4. The development of high-performance alkali-hybrid polarized He3 targets for electron scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Jaideep T.; Dolph, Peter A.M.; Tobias, William Al; Averett, Todd D.; Kelleher, Aiden; Mooney, K. E.; Nelyubin, Vladimir V.; Wang, Yunxiao; Zheng, Yuan; Cates, Gordon D.

    2015-05-01

    We present the development of high-performance polarized ³He targets for use in electron scattering experiments that utilize the technique of alkali-hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping. We include data obtained during the characterization of 24 separate target cells, each of which was constructed while preparing for one of four experiments at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. The results presented here document dramatic improvement in the performance of polarized ³He targets, as well as the target properties and operating parameters that made those improvements possible. Included in our measurements were determinations of the so-called X-factors that quantify a temperature-dependent and as-yet poorly understood spin-relaxation mechanism that limits the maximum achievable ³He polarization to well under 100%. The presence of this spin-relaxation mechanism was clearly evident in our data. We also present results from a simulation of the alkali-hydrid spin-exchange optical pumping process that was developed to provide guidance in the design of these targets. Good agreement with actual performance was obtained by including details such as off-resonant optical pumping. Now benchmarked against experimental data, the simulation is useful for the design of future targets. Included in our results is a measurement of the K- ³He spin-exchange rate coefficientmore » $$k^\\mathrm{K}_\\mathrm{se} = \\left ( 7.46 \\pm 0.62 \\right )\\!\\times\\!10^{-20}\\ \\mathrm{cm^3/s}$$ over the temperature range 503 K to 563 K.« less

  5. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General directions are available on the United Technologies Research Center website. WHERE: United Technologies Research Center 411 Silver Lane East Hartford, CT 06108 Media ...

  6. Methods of use of calcium hexa aluminate refractory linings and/or chemical barriers in high alkali or alkaline environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGowan, Kenneth A; Cullen, Robert M; Keiser, James R; Hemrick, James G; Meisner, Roberta A

    2013-10-22

    A method for improving the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of a liner in contact with at least one of an alkali and/or alkaline environments is provided. The method comprises lining a surface that is subject to wear by an alkali environment and/or an alkaline environment with a refractory composition comprising a refractory aggregate consisting essentially of a calcium hexa aluminate clinker having the formula CA.sub.6, wherein C is equal to calcium oxide, wherein A is equal to aluminum oxide, and wherein the hexa aluminate clinker has from zero to less than about fifty weight percent C.sub.12A.sub.7, and wherein greater than 98 weight percent of the calcium hexa aluminate clinker having a particle size ranging from -20 microns to +3 millimeters, for forming a liner of the surface. This method improves the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of the liner.

  7. Examination of the concrete from an old Portuguese dam: Texture and composition of alkali-silica gel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, Isabel Noronha, Fernando Teles, Madalena

    2007-11-15

    Exudations and pop-outs were identified in the interior galleries of a large dam built in the 1960s. The samples collected were examined by a Scanning Electron Microscope. A dense material with a smooth surface and drying shrinkage cracks or a spongy texture were observed in the samples. The semi-quantitative composition was obtained by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and it was concluded that this material corresponds to alkali-silica gel, composed of SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-K{sub 2}O-CaO. A viscous white product in contact with an aggregate particle in a cone sampled from a pop-out was observed through use of the scanning electron microscope and it has characteristics similar to the gel present in the exudations and cavities. Reference is made to the potential alkali reactivity of the aggregate present in the concrete. The texture and composition of the products probably resulting from an alkali-silica reaction are presented, set out in ternary diagrams, and discussed.

  8. X-ray microtomography shows pore structure and tortuosity in alkali-activated binders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provis, John L.; Myers, Rupert J.; White, Claire E.; Rose, Volker; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van

    2012-06-15

    Durability of alkali-activated binders is of vital importance in their commercial application, and depends strongly on microstructure and pore network characteristics. X-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) offers, for the first time, direct insight into microstructural and pore structure characteristics in three dimensions. Here, {mu}CT is performed on a set of sodium metasilicate-activated fly ash/slag blends, using a synchrotron beamline instrument. Segmentation of the samples into pore and solid regions is then conducted, and pore tortuosity is calculated by a random walker method. Segmented porosity and diffusion tortuosity are correlated, and vary as a function of slag content (slag addition reduces porosity and increases tortuosity), and sample age (extended curing gives lower porosity and higher tortuosity). This is particularly notable for samples with {>=} 50% slag content, where a space-filling calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate gel provides porosity reductions which are not observed for the sodium aluminosilicate ('geopolymer') gels which do not chemically bind water of hydration.

  9. Monitoring, Modeling, and Diagnosis of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Small Concrete Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Cai, Guowei; Gribok, Andrei V.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2015-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This report describes alkali-silica reaction (ASR) degradation mechanisms and factors influencing the ASR. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model developed by Saouma and Perotti by taking into consideration the effects of stress on the reaction kinetics and anisotropic volumetric expansion is presented in this report. This model is implemented in the GRIZZLY code based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment. The implemented model in the GRIZZLY code is randomly used to initiate ASR in a 2D and 3D lattice to study the percolation aspects of concrete. The percolation aspects help determine the transport properties of the material and therefore the durability and service life of concrete. This report summarizes the effort to develop small-size concrete samples with embedded glass to mimic ASR. The concrete samples were treated in water and sodium hydroxide solution at elevated temperature to study how ingress of sodium ions and hydroxide ions at elevated temperature impacts concrete samples embedded with glass. Thermal camera was used to monitor the changes in the concrete sample and results are summarized.

  10. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino; Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a meringue type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (?500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the meringue approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  11. Kimzeyite garnet phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph

    2013-05-14

    A phosphor of formula I is included in a phosphor composition in a lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light, Ca.sub.3-x-zSr.sub.xCe.sub.zM.sup.1.sub.2M.sup.2AlSiO.sub.12 (I) wherein M.sup.1 is Hf, Zr, or a combination thereof; M.sup.2 is Al, or a combination of Al and Ga; z<3-x; and 0.2>x.gtoreq.0. The lighting apparatus includes a semiconductor light source in addition to the phosphor composition.

  12. A comparative transport study of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Zilong; Tang, Chi; Shi, Jing; Katmis, Ferhat; Wei, Peng; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2014-06-02

    Bilayers of 20 quintuple layer Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} on 30 nm thick yttrium iron garnet (YIG) have been grown with molecular beam epitaxy in conjunction with pulsed laser deposition. The presence of the ferri-magnetic insulator YIG causes additional scattering to the surface states of the Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} topological insulator layer, as indicated by the temperature dependence of the resistivity. From the two-channel analysis of the Hall data, we find that the surface contribution in the bilayer samples is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the weak antilocalization effect from the surface states is clearly suppressed due to the presence of the YIG layer.

  13. Static SIMS Analysis of Carbonate on Basic Alkali-bearing Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Cortez, Marnie Michelle; Appelhans, Anthony David; Olsen, J.E.; Shaw, A. D.; Karahan, C.; Avci, R.

    2003-02-01

    Carbonate is a somewhat enigmatic anion in static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) because abundant ions containing intact CO32- are not detected when analyzing alkaline-earth carbonate minerals common to the geochemical environment. In contrast, carbonate can be observed as an adduct ion when it is bound with alkali cations. In this study, carbonate was detected as the adduct Na2CO3Na+ in the spectra of sodium carbonate, bicarbonate, hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite and to a lesser extent nitrate. The appearance of the adduct Na2CO3Na+ on hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite surfaces was interpreted in terms of these basic surfaces fixing CO2 from the ambient atmosphere. The low abundance of Na2CO3Na+ in the static SIMS spectrum of sodium nitrate, compared with a significantly higher abundance in salts having stronger conjugate bases, suggested that the basicity of the conjugate anions correlated with aggressive CO2 fixation; however, the appearance of Na2CO3Na+ could not be explained simply in terms of solution basicity constants. The oxide molecular ion Na2O+ and adducts NaOHNa+ and Na2ONa+ also constituted part of the carbonate spectral signature, and were observed in spectra from all the salts studied. In addition to the carbonate and oxide ions, a low-abundance oxalate ion series was observed that had the general formula Na2-xHxC2O4Na+, where 0 < x < 2. Oxalate adsorption from the laboratory atmosphere was demonstrated but the oxalate ion series also was likely to be formed from reductive coupling occurring during the static SIMS bombardment event. The remarkable spectral similarity observed when comparing the sodium salts indicated that their surfaces shared common chemical speciation and that the chemistry of the surfaces was very different from the bulk of the particle. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W. -P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous-flow natural seawater at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and elemental analysis were used to characterize the adsorbent at different stages of adsorbent preparation and treatment. The study can be divided into two parts: (A) investigation of optimal parameters for KOH adsorbent conditioning and (B) investigation of other possible agents for alkali conditioning, including cost analysis on the basis of uranium production. In the first part of the study, tests with simulated seawater containing 8 ppm uranium showed that the uranium adsorption capacity increased with an increase in the KOH concentration and conditioning time and temperature at each of the KOH concentrations used. FTIR and solid state NMR studies indicated that KOH conditioning converts the amidoxime functional groups into more hydrophilic carboxylate. The longer the KOH conditioning time, up to three hours, the higher was the loading capacity from the simulated seawater solution which is composed of only uranyl, sodium, chloride, and carbonate ions. Marine testing with natural seawater, on the other hand, showed that the uranium adsorption capacity of the adsorbent increased with KOH conditioning temperature, and gradually decreased with increasing KOH conditioning time from one hour to three hours at 80 C. This behavior is due to the conversion of amidoxime to carboxylate. The carboxylate groups are needed to increase the hydrophilicity of the adsorbent; however, conversion of a significant amount of amidoxime to carboxylate leads to loss in selectivity toward uranyl ions. Thus, there is an optimum KOH conditioning time for each temperature at which an optimum ratio between amidoxime and carboxylate is reached. For the case of base conditioning with 0.44 M KOH at 80 C, the optimal conditioning time is 1 hour, with respect to the highest uranium loading capacity from natural seawater. Uptake of other metal ions such as V, Fe, and Cu follows the same trend as that of uranium. Also, the uptake of Ca, Mg, and Zn ions increased with increasing KOH conditioning time, probably due to formation of more carboxylates, which leads to conversion of uranium-selective binding sites to less selective sites. In the second part of the study, inorganic based reagents such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), cesium hydroxide (CsOH), as well as organic based reagents such as ammonium hydroxide (AOH), tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH), tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAOH), triethylmethylammonium hydroxide (TEMAOH), tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAOH) and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), in addition to KOH, were used for alkaline conditioning. NaOH has emerged as a better reagent for alkaline conditioning of amidoxime-based adsorbent because of higher uranium uptake capacity, higher uranium uptake selectivity ...

  15. Fabrication and microstructure of cerium doped lutetium aluminum garnet (Ce:LuAG) transparent ceramics by solid-state reaction method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Junlang; Xu, Jian; Shi, Ying; Qi, Hongfang; Xie, Jianjun; Lei, Fang

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: We fabricate Ce doped lutetium aluminum garnet ceramics by solid-state method. The raw materials include Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders synthesized by co-precipitation method. The density of the transparent ceramics reach 99.7% of the theoretical value. The optical transmittance of the bulk ceramic at 550 nm was 57.48%. Some scattering centers decrease the optical characteristic of the ceramic. - Abstract: Polycrystalline Ce{sup 3+} doped lutetium aluminum garnet (Ce:LuAG) transparent ceramics fabricated by one step solid-state reaction method using synthetic nano-sized Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, commercial ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} powders were investigated in this paper. The green compacts shaped by the mixed powders were successfully densified into Ce:LuAG transparent ceramics after vacuum sintering at 1750 C for 10 h. The in-line optical transmittance of the Ce:LuAG ceramic made by home-made Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders could reach 57.48% at 550 nm, which was higher than that of the ceramic made by commercial Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders (22.96%). The microstructure observation showed that light scattering centers caused by micro-pores, aluminum segregation and refraction index inhomogeneities induced the decrease of optical transparency of the Ce:LuAG ceramics, which should be removed and optimized in the future work.

  16. The influence of the iron content on the reductive decomposition of A{sub 3?x}Fe{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 12} garnets (A = Mg, Mn; 0.47 ? x ? 2.85)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aparicio, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.aparicio@upol.cz; Filip, Jan, E-mail: claudia.aparicio@upol.cz; Mashlan, Miroslav, E-mail: claudia.aparicio@upol.cz; Zboril, Radek, E-mail: claudia.aparicio@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Departments of Experimental Physics and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2014-10-27

    Thermally-induced reductive decomposition of natural iron-bearing garnets of the almandine-pyrope and almandine-spessartine series were studied at temperatures up to 1200 C (heating rate of 10 C/min) under atmosphere of forming gas (10% of H{sub 2} in N{sub 2}). Crystallochemical formula of the studied garnet was calculated as {sup VIII}(A{sub 3?x}Fe{sub x}{sup 2+}){sup VI}(Al,Fe{sup 3+}){sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 12}, where the amount of Fe{sup 3+} in the octahedral sites is negligible with the exception of pyrope, A = Mg, Mn, and 0.47 ? x ? 2.85. The observed decomposition temperature, determined from differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry, is greater than 1000 C in all cases and showed almost linear dependence on the iron content in the dodecahedral sites of the studied garnets, with the exception of garnet with a near-pyrope composition (Prp{sub 80}Alm{sub 20}). The initial garnet samples and decomposition products were characterized in details by means of X-ray powder diffraction and {sup 57}Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy. We found that all studied garnets have common decomposition products such as metallic iron (in general, rounded particles below 4 ?m) and Fe-spinel; the other identified decomposition products depend on starting chemical composition of the garnet: Fe-cordierite, olivine (fayalite or tephroite), cristobalite, pyroxene (enstatite or pigeonite), and anorthite. Anorthite and pigeonite were only present in garnets with Ca in the dodecahedral site. All the identified phases were usually well crystallized.

  17. Theoretical simulations of protective thin film Fabry-Prot filters for integrated optical elements of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quarrie, L., E-mail: Lindsay.Quarrie@l-3com.com, E-mail: lindsay.o.quarrie@gmail.com [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Department of Materials Engineering, 801 LeRoy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RDLC Laser CoE, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The lifetime of Diode-Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) is limited by damage initiated by reaction of the glass envelope of its gain medium with rubidium vapor. Rubidium is absorbed into the glass and the rubidium cations diffuse through the glass structure, breaking bridging Si-O bonds. A damage-resistant thin film was developed enhancing high-optical transmission at natural rubidium resonance input and output laser beam wavelengths of 780 nm and 795 nm, while protecting the optical windows of the gain cell in a DPAL. The methodology developed here can be readily modified for simulation of expected transmission performance at input pump and output laser wavelengths using different combination of thin film materials in a DPAL. High coupling efficiency of the light through the gas cell was accomplished by matching the air-glass and glass-gas interfaces at the appropriate wavelengths using a dielectric stack of high and low index of refraction materials selected to work at the laser energies and protected from the alkali metal vapor in the gain cell. Thin films as oxides of aluminum, zirconium, tantalum, and silicon were selected allowing the creation of Fabry-Perot optical filters on the optical windows achieving close to 100% laser transmission in a solid optic combination of window and highly reflective mirror. This approach allows for the development of a new whole solid optic laser.

  18. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Bartsch, Richard A.

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable group are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.

  19. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, F.; Wang, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Organic sulfur is removed from coals by treatment with aqueous base, air, and vegetable oils with minimal loss of BTU. Such results were revealed during exploratory experiments on an ICCI funded project to remove organic sulfur from Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. In fact, prewashing IBC-108 coal with dilute alkali prior to treating with linseed oil and air results in 26% removal of sulfur. This new method will be investigated by treating coals with alkali, impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. During this first quarter the selection of base for pretreatment and extraction (Task 1) has been completed. NaOH is better than NH{sub 4}OH for the pretreatment and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is better than NaOH for the oil extraction. About 40% of sulfur is removed from IBC-108 coal using 5% NaOH for pretreatment followed by linseed oil oxidation in air and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} extraction.

  20. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: thermal cycle stability and chemical compatibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Williams, Riley T.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, E.

    2011-03-01

    An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel (SOFC) applications. The glass containing ~17 mole% alkalis (K2O and Na2O) remains vitreous and compliant during SOFC operation, unlike conventional SOFC sealing glasses, which experience substantial devitrification after the sealing process. The non-crystallizing compliant sealing glass has lower glass transition and softening temperatures since the microstructure remains glassy without significant crystallite formation, and hence can relieve or reduce residual stresses and also has the potential for crack healing. Sealing approaches based on compliant glass will also need to satisfy all the mechanical, thermal, chemical, physical, and electrical requirements for SOFC applications, not only in bulk properties but also at sealing interfaces. In this first of a series of papers we will report the thermal cycle stability of the glass when sealed between two SOFC components, i.e., a NiO/YSZ anode supported YSZ bilayer and a coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect material. High temperature leak rates were monitored versus thermal cycles between 700-850oC using back pressures ranging from 0.2 psi to 1.0 psi. Isothermal stability was also evaluated in a dual environment consisting of flowing dilute H2 fuel versus ambient air. In addition, chemical compatibility at the alumina and YSZ interfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results shed new light on the topic of SOFC glass seal development.

  1. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Bartsch, Richard A.

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable groupmore » are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.« less

  2. Improved Recovery Boiler Performance Through Control of Combustion, Sulfur, and Alkali Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Larry L.

    2008-06-09

    This project involved the following objectives: 1. Determine black liquor drying and devolatilization elemental and total mass release rates and yields. 2. Develop a public domain physical/chemical kinetic model of black liquor drop combustion, including new information on drying and devolatilization. 3. Determine mechanisms and rates of sulfur scavenging in recover boilers. 4. Develop non-ideal, public-domain thermochemistry models for alkali salts appropriate for recovery boilers 5. Develop data and a one-dimensional model of a char bed in a recovery boiler. 6. Implement all of the above in comprehensive combustion code and validate effects on boiler performance. 7. Perform gasification modeling in support of INEL and commercial customers. The major accomplishments of this project corresponding to these objectives are as follows: 1. Original data for black liquor and biomass data demonstrate dependencies of particle reactions on particle size, liquor type, gas temperature, and gas composition. A comprehensive particle submodel and corresponding data developed during this project predicts particle drying (including both free and chemisorbed moisture), devolatilization, heterogeneous char oxidation, char-smelt reactions, and smelt oxidation. Data and model predictions agree, without adjustment of parameters, within their respective errors. The work performed under these tasks substantially exceeded the original objectives. 2. A separate model for sulfur scavenging and fume formation in a recovery boiler demonstrated strong dependence on both in-boiler mixing and chemistry. In particular, accurate fume particle size predictions, as determined from both laboratory and field measurements, depend on gas mixing effects in the boilers that lead to substantial particle agglomeration. Sulfur scavenging was quantitatively predicted while particle size required one empirical mixing factor to match data. 3. Condensed-phase thermochemistry algorithms were developed for salt mixtures and compared with sodium-based binary and higher order systems. Predictions and measurements were demonstrated for both salt systems and for some more complex silicate-bearing systems, substantially exceeding the original scope of this work. 4. A multi-dimensional model of char bed reactivity developed under this project demonstrated that essentially all reactions in char beds occur on or near the surface, with the internal portions of the bed being essentially inert. The model predicted composition, temperature, and velocity profiles in the bed and showed that air jet penetration is limited to the immediate vicinity of the char bed, with minimal impact on most of the bed. The modeling efforts substantially exceeded the original scope of this project. 5. Near the completion of this project, DOE withdrew the BYU portion of a multiparty agreement to complete this and additional work with no advanced warning, which compromised the integration of all of this material into a commercial computer code. However, substantial computer simulations of much of this work were initiated, but not completed. 6. The gasification modeling is nearly completed but was aborted near its completion according to a DOE redirection of funds. This affected both this and the previous tasks.

  3. Charge-coupled substituted garnets (Y 3x Ca 0.5x M 0.5x )Fe?O?? (M = Ce, Th): Structure and stability as crystalline nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-04-20

    The garnet structure has been proposed as a potential crystalline nuclear waste form for accommodation of actinide elements, especially uranium (U). In this study, yttrium iron garnet (YIG) as a model garnet host was studied for the incorporation of U analogs, cerium (Ce) and thorium (Th), incorporated by a charge-coupled substitution with calcium (Ca) for yttrium (Y) in YIG, namely, 2Y? = Ca? + M??, where M?? = Ce?? or Th??. Single-phase garnets Y3xCa0.5xM0.5xFe?O?? (x = 0.10.7) were synthesized by the citratenitrate combustion method. Ce was confirmed to be tetravalent by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction and ??FeMssbauer spectroscopy indicated that M?? and Ca? cations are restricted to the c site, and the local environments of both the tetrahedral and the octahedral Fe? are systematically affected by the extent of substitution. The charge-coupled substitution has advantages in incorporating Ce/Th and in stabilizing the substituted phases compared to a single substitution strategy. Enthalpies of formation of garnets were obtained by high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry, and the enthalpies of substitution of Ce and Th were determined. The thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the substituted garnets are entropically rather than energetically stabilized. This suggests that such garnets may form and persist in repositories at high temperature but might decompose near room temperature.

  4. Charge-Coupled Substituted Garnets (Y3-xCa0.5xM0.5x)Fe5O12 (M = Ce, Th): Structure and Stability as Crystalline Nuclear Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-08

    The garnet structure has been proposed as a potential crystalline nuclear waste form for accommodation of actinide elements, especially uranium (U). In this study, yttrium iron garnet (YIG) as a model garnet host was studied for the incorporation of U analogs, cerium (Ce) and thorium (Th), incorporated by a charge-coupled substitution with calcium (Ca) for yttrium (Y) in YIG, namely, 2Y3+ = Ca2+ + M4+, where M4+ = Ce4+ or Th4+. Single-phase garnets Y3–xCa0.5xM0.5xFe5O12 (x = 0.1–0.7) were synthesized by the citrate–nitrate combustion method. Ce was confirmed to be tetravalent by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction and 57Fe–Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated that M4+ and Ca2+ cations are restricted to the c site, and the local environments of both the tetrahedral and the octahedral Fe3+ are systematically affected by the extent of substitution. The charge-coupled substitution has advantages in incorporating Ce/Th and in stabilizing the substituted phases compared to a single substitution strategy. Enthalpies of formation of garnets were obtained by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry, and the enthalpies of substitution of Ce and Th were determined. The thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the substituted garnets are entropically rather than energetically stabilized. This suggests that such garnets may form and persist in repositories at high temperature but might decompose near room temperature.

  5. Alkali injection system with controlled CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 ratios for combustion of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, Gregory F. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A high temperature combustion process for an organic fuel containing sulfur n which the nitrogen of air is replaced by carbon dioxide for combination with oxygen with the ratio of CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 being controlled to generate combustion temperatures above 2000 K. for a gas-gas reaction with SO.sub.2 and an alkali metal compound to produce a sulfate and in which a portion of the carbon-dioxide rich gas is recycled for mixing with oxygen and/or for injection as a cooling gas upstream from heating exchangers to limit fouling of the exchangers, with the remaining carbon-dioxide rich gas being available as a source of CO.sub.2 for oil recovery and other purposes.

  6. MgAl2O4 spinel refractory as containment liner for high-temperature alkali salt containing environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peascoe-Meisner, Roberta A [Knoxville, TN; Keiser, James R [Oak Ridge, TN; Hemric, James G [Knoxville, TN; Hubbard, Camden R [Oak Ridge, TN; Gorog, J Peter [Kent, WA; Gupta, Amul [Jamestown, NY

    2008-10-21

    A method includes containing a high-temperature alkali salt containing environment using a refractory containment liner containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel. A method, includes forming a refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel having an exterior chill zone defined by substantially columnar crystallization and an interior zone defined by substantially equiaxed crystallization; and removing at least a portion of the exterior chill zone from the refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel by scalping the refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel to define at least one outer surface having an area of substantially equiaxed crystallization. A product of manufacture includes a refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel including an interior zone defined by substantially equiaxed crystallization; and at least one outer surface having an area of substantially equiaxed crystallization.

  7. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  8. Comparative study of alkali-vapour cells with alkane-, alkeneand 1-nonadecylbenzene-based antirelaxation wall coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balabas, M V; Tretiak, O Yu

    2013-12-31

    The dependence of both longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of ground-state magnetic polarisation in alkali atoms on the coating temperature is experimentally studied for the first time in a rubidium-vapour cell with 1-nonadecylbenzene antirelaxation coating of inner walls. The comparison of these times with the relaxation times in a caesium-vapour cell with alkane wall coatings is presented. It is found that within the studied temperature range (294 340K) the transverse relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature of alkene and 1-nonadecylbenzene coatings. For the alkane coating such a dependence was not explicitly found. The longitudinal relaxation time begins to decrease in all cases when passing a certain critical temperature of the coating material. It is found that the unsaturated radical structure of the coating material molecules strongly affects its antirelaxation properties. (optical pumping)

  9. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali, Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, F.; Wang, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Organic sulfur is removed from coals by treatment with aqueous base, air, and vegetable oils with minimal loss of BTU. Such results were revealed during exploratory experiments on an ICCI funded project to remove organic sulfur from Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. In fact, prewashing IBC-108 coal with dilute alkali prior to treating with linseed oil and air results in 26% removal of sulfur. This new method is being investigated by treating coals with alkali, impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. During the first quarter the selection of base fro pretreatment and extraction was completed. NaOH is better than NH{sub 4}OH for the pretreatment and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is better than NaOH for the oil extraction. During the second quarter the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC-108 coal was further tested by pretreating the coal with two base concentrations at four different times followed by treatment with linseed oil at 125{degrees}C for three different times and finally washing with 5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and methanol. During this third quarter more experimental parameters were systematically varied in order to study the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC- 108 coal.

  10. Studies on the production of ultra-clean coal by alkali-acid leaching of low-grade coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabeel, A.; Khan, T.A.; Sharma, D.K.

    2009-07-01

    The use of low-grade coal in thermal power stations is leading to environmental pollution due to the generation of large amounts of fly ash, bottom ash, and CO{sub 2} besides other pollutants. It is therefore important to clean the coal before using it in thermal power stations, steel plants, or cement industries etc. Physical beneficiation of coal results in only limited cleaning of coal. The increasing environmental pollution problems from the use of coal have led to the development of clean coal technologies. In fact, the clean use of coal requires the cleaning of coal to ultra low ash contents, keeping environmental norms and problems in view and the ever-growing need to increase the efficiency of coal-based power generation. Therefore this requires the adaptation of chemical cleaning techniques for cleaning the coal to obtain ultra clean coal having ultra low ash contents. Presently the reaction conditions for chemical demineralization of low-grade coal using 20% aq NaOH treatment followed by 10% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching under reflux conditions have been optimized. In order to reduce the concentration of alkali and acid used in this process of chemical demineralization of low-grade coals, stepwise, i.e., three step process of chemical demineralization of coal using 1% or 5% aq NaOH treatment followed by 1% or 5% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching has been developed, which has shown good results in demineralization of low-grade coals. In order to conserve energy, the alkali-acid leaching of coal was also carried out at room temperature, which gave good results.

  11. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: the effect of protective alumina coating on electrical stability in dual environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-12-01

    An alkali-containing silicate glass was recently proposed as a potential sealant for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The glass contains appreciable amount of alkalis and retains its glassy microstructure at elevated temperatures over time. It is more compliant as compared to conventional glass-ceramics sealants and could potentially heal cracks during thermal cycling. In previous papers the thermal cycle stability, thermal stability and chemical compatibility were reported with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and YSZ-coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect. In this paper, we report the electrical stability of the compliant glass with aluminized AISI441 interconnect material under DC load in dual environment at 700-800oC. Apparent electrical resistivity was measured with a 4-point method for the glass sealed between two aluminized AISI441 metal coupons as well as plain AISI441 substrates. The results showed good electrical stability with the aluminized AISI441 substrate, while unstable behavior was observed for un-coated substrates. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and correlated with the measured resistivity results. Overall, the alumina coating demonstrated good chemical stability with the alkali-containing silicate sealing glass under DC loading.

  12. Effect of Acid, Alkali, and Steam Explosion Pretreatments on Characteristics of Bio-Oil Produced from Pinewood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hui; Srinivasan, Radhakrishnan; Yu, Fei; Steele, Philip; Li, Qi; Mitchell, Brian

    2011-06-21

    Bio-oil produced from pinewood by fast pyrolysis has the potential to be a valuable substitute for fossil fuels. Pretreatment prior to the fast pyrolysis process has been shown to alter the structure and chemical composition of biomass. To determine the influence of biomass pretreatments on bio-oil produced during fast pyrolysis, we tested three pretreatment methods: dilute acid, dilute alkali, and steam explosion. Bio-oils were produced from untreated and pretreated pinewood feedstocks in an auger reactor at 450 C. The bio-oils’ physical properties including pH, water content, acid value, density, viscosity, and heating value were measured. Chemical characteristics of the bio-oils were determined by gas chromatographymass spectrometry. Results showed that bio-oil yield and composition were influenced by biomass pretreatment. Of the three pretreatment methods, 1%H2SO4 pretreatment resulted in the highest bio-oil yield and best bio-oil quality.

  13. A review of the history of alkali-aggregate reaction at three of the Tennessee Valley Authority`s dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, C.D.; Newell, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Three of The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) major hydroelectric projects are experiencing alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR), These projects include Fontana Dam and Powerhouse, Hiwassee Dam and Powerhouse, and Chickamauga Lock, Dam and Powerhouse, All of these dams are considered {open_quotes}high hazard,{close_quotes} causing significant economic losses from loss of power, replacement of the dam and generation facilities, and loss of life should they fail. This paper presents an overview of the descriptions of each of these projects, including construction and original instrumentation installed in the structure during construction, All of these projects are now 50 to 60 years old and are experiencing problems in one or more locations due to AAR with no indication of any slowing of the concrete growth process, Concrete problems at these projects came as no surprise. Cracks were noted within 5 years of construction, and by 1980 some of these cracks were 1/2 inch in width. continuous monitoring of these projects has always been a priority. This paper will discuss how the growth from AAR has affected each structure, which structures have been affected most, and why. It will discuss how TVA has managed AAR at these projects in the past and how TVA is changing from a reactive to a pro-active approach in its response to AAR.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.; Billings, A.

    2009-06-24

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, James C.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

    2010-02-26

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  16. Alkali ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hrizo, John (Monroeville, PA); Bauerle, James E. (Plum Borough, PA); Witkowski, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  17. The evolution of strength and crystalline phases for alkali-activated ground blast furnace slag and fly ash-based geopolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Jae Eun; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Jun, Ssang Sun; Choi, Sejin; Clark, Simon M.

    2010-02-15

    The increase in strength and evolution of crystalline phases in inorganic polymer cement, made by the alkali activation of slag, Class C and Class F fly ashes, was followed using compressive strength test and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. In order to increase the crystallinity of the product the reactions were carried out at 80 deg. C. We found that hydrotalcite formed in both the alkali-activated slag cements and the fly ash-based geopolymers. Hydroxycancrinite, one member of the ABC-6 family of zeolites, was found only in the fly ash geopolymers. Assuming that the predominantly amorphous geopolymer formed under ambient conditions relates to the crystalline phases found when the mixture is cured at high temperature, we propose that the structure of this zeolitic precursor formed in Na-based high alkaline environment can be regarded as a disordered form of the basic building unit of the ABC-6 group of zeolites which includes poly-types such as hydroxycancrinite, hydroxysodalite and chabazite-Na.

  18. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: the effect of protective YSZ coating on electrical stability in dual environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-03-15

    Recently, compliant sealing glass has been proposed as a potential candidate sealant for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. In a previous paper, the thermal stability and chemical compatibility were reported for a compliant alkali-containing silicate glass sealed between anode supported YSZ bi-layer and YSZ-coated stainless steel interconnect. In this paper, we will report the electrical stability of the compliant glass under a DC load and dual environment at 700-800 degrees C. Apparent electrical resistivity was measured with a 4-point method for the glass sealed between two plain SS441 metal coupons or YSZ-coated aluminized substrates. The results showed instability with plain SS441 at 800 degrees C, but stable behavior of increasing resistivity with time was observed with the YSZ coated SS441. In addition, results of interfacial microstructure analysis with scanning electron microscopy will be correlated with the measured resistivity results. Overall, the YSZ coating demonstrated chemically stability with the alkali-containing compliant silicate sealing glass under electrical field and dual environments.

  19. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Combined stability in isothermal ageing and thermal cycling with YSZ coated ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-01-01

    An alkali-containing silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass contains about 17 mole% alkalis (K+Na) and has low glass transition and softening temperatures. It remains vitreous and compliant around 750-800oC after sealing without substantial crystallization, as contrary to conventional glass-ceramic sealants, which experience rapid crystallization after the sealing process. The glassy nature and low characteristic temperatures can reduce residual stresses and result in the potential for crack healing. In a previous study, the glass was found to have good thermal cycle stability and was chemically compatible with YSZ coating during short term testing. In the current study, the compliant glass was further evaluated in a more realistic way in that the sealed glass couples were first isothermally aged for 1000h followed by thermal cycling. High temperature leakage was measured. The chemical compatibility was also investigated with powder mixtures at 700 and 800oC to enhance potential interfacial reaction. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and evaluated with regard to the leakage and chemical compatibility results.

  20. Modifications to Hiwassee Dam and planned modification to Fontana and Chickamauga Dams by the Tennessee Valley Authority to manage alkali-aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, V.A.; Wagner, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    Large concrete members usually decrease in volume as their temperature drops from that achieved during hydration to that imposed during service. Small concrete members usually decrease in volume because of drying shrinkage. Most concrete structures are designed and detailed to provide for a volume decrease without excessive cracking, Occasionally concrete growth is exhibited in a concrete structure. Growth may result from a variety of reactions, such as the oxidation of minerals, the hydration of unstable oxides included in the concrete mix, or from an outside attack of sulphates. The most important reaction creating concrete growth is probably the reaction between minor alkali (Na{sub 2}O and K{sub 2}O) hydroxides from cement and the concrete aggregates.

  1. Solar assisted alkali pretreatment of garden biomass: Effects on lignocellulose degradation, enzymatic hydrolysis, crystallinity and ultra-structural changes in lignocellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabhane, Jagdish; William, S.P.M. Prince; Vaidya, Atul N.; Das, Sera; Wate, Satish R.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • SAAP is an efficient and economic means of pretreatment. • SAAP was found to be efficient in lignin and hemicellulose removal. • SAAP enhanced the enzymatic hydrolysis. • FTIR, XRD and SEM provided vivid understanding about the mode of action of SAAP. • Mass balance closer of 98% for pretreated GB confirmed the reliability of SAAP. - Abstract: A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the effectiveness of solar assisted alkali pretreatment (SAAP) on garden biomass (GB). The pretreatment efficiency was assessed based on lignocellulose degradation, conversion of cellulose into reducing sugars, changes in the ultra-structure and functional groups of lignocellulose and impact on the crystallinity of cellulose, etc. SAAP was found to be efficient for the removal of lignin and hemicellulose that facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. FTIR and XRD studies provided details on the effectiveness of SAAP on lignocellulosic moiety and crystallinity of cellulose. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed ultra-structural disturbances in the microfibrils of GB as a result of pretreatment. The mass balance closer of 97.87% after pretreatment confirmed the reliability of SAAP pretreatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that SAAP is not only an efficient means of pretreatment but also economical as it involved no energy expenditure for heat generation during pretreatment.

  2. Theoretical study on the ground state of the polar alkali-metal-barium molecules: Potential energy curve and permanent dipole moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gou, Dezhi; Kuang, Xiaoyu Gao, Yufeng; Huo, Dongming

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we systematically investigate the electronic structure for the {sup 2}Σ{sup +} ground state of the polar alkali-metal-alkaline-earth-metal molecules BaAlk (Alk = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs). Potential energy curves and permanent dipole moments (PDMs) are determined using power quantum chemistry complete active space self-consistent field and multi-reference configuration interaction methods. Basic spectroscopic constants are derived from ro-vibrational bound state calculation. From the calculations, it is shown that BaK, BaRb, and BaCs molecules have moderate values of PDM at the equilibrium bond distance (BaK:1.62 D, BaRb:3.32 D, and BaCs:4.02 D). Besides, the equilibrium bond length (4.93 Å and 5.19 Å) and dissociation energy (0.1825 eV and 0.1817 eV) for the BaRb and BaCs are also obtained.

  3. GRIZZLY Model of Multi-Reactive Species Diffusion, Moisture/Heat Transfer and Alkali-Silica Reaction for Simulating Concrete Aging and Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hai; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Cai, Guowei

    2015-09-01

    Concrete is widely used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. The use of concrete in nuclear power plants for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. As such, when life extension is considered for nuclear power plants, it is critical to have accurate and reliable predictive tools to address concerns related to various aging processes of concrete structures and the capacity of structures subjected to age-related degradation. The goal of this report is to document the progress of the development and implementation of a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model in GRIZZLY code with the ultimate goal to reliably simulate and predict long-term performance and response of aged NPP concrete structures subjected to a number of aging mechanisms including external chemical attacks and volume-changing chemical reactions within concrete structures induced by alkali-silica reactions and long-term exposure to irradiation. Based on a number of survey reports of concrete aging mechanisms relevant to nuclear power plants and recommendations from researchers in concrete community, we’ve implemented three modules during FY15 in GRIZZLY code, (1) multi-species reactive diffusion model within cement materials; (2) coupled moisture and heat transfer model in concrete; and (3) anisotropic, stress-dependent, alkali-silica reaction induced swelling model. The multi-species reactive diffusion model was implemented with the objective to model aging of concrete structures subjected to aggressive external chemical attacks (e.g., chloride attack, sulfate attack, etc.). It considers multiple processes relevant to external chemical attacks such as diffusion of ions in aqueous phase within pore spaces, equilibrium chemical speciation reactions and kinetic mineral dissolution/precipitation. The moisture/heat transfer module was implemented to simulate long-term spatial and temporal evolutions of the moisture and temperature fields within concrete structures at both room and elevated temperatures. The ASR swelling model implemented in GRIZZLY code can simulate anisotropic expansions of ASR gel under either uniaxial, biaxial and triaxial stress states, and can be run simultaneously with the moisture/heat transfer model and coupled with various elastic/inelastic solid mechanics models that were implemented in GRIZZLY code previously. This report provides detailed descriptions of the governing equations, constitutive equations and numerical algorithms of the three modules implemented in GRIZZLY during FY15, simulation results of example problems and model validation results by comparing simulations with available experimental data reported in the literature. The close match between the experiments and simulations clearly demonstrate the potential of GRIZZLY code for reliable evaluation and prediction of long-term performance and response of aged concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

  4. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.L.; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Jenkins, B.M.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.; Bryers, R.W.; Oden, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  5. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9}: The first osmium perovskites containing alkali cations at the 'A' site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mogare, Kailash M.; Klein, Wilhelm; Jansen, Martin

    2012-07-15

    K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} were obtained from solid-state reactions of potassium superoxide, sodium peroxide and osmium metal at elevated oxygen pressures. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} crystallizes as an oxygen-deficient cubic double perovskite in space group Fm3{sup Macron }m with a=8.4184(5) A and contains isolated OsO{sub 6} octahedra. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} crystallizes hexagonally in P6{sub 3}/mmc with a=5.9998(4) A and c=14.3053(14) A. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} consists of face sharing Os{sub 2}O{sub 9} pairs of octahedra. According to magnetic measurements K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} is diamagnetic, whereas K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays strong antiferromagnetic coupling (T{sub N}=140 K), indicating enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair. - Graphical abstract: High oxidation states of Os, obtained by high oxygen pressure synthesis, are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New osmates containing highly oxidized Os were obtained by high O{sub 2} pressure synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High oxidation states of Os are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds represent the first Os perovskites with an alkali metal at the A site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair.

  6. Real-time alkali monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goff, David R.; Romanosky, Robert R.; Hensel, Peter

    1990-01-01

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium emission line, may be detected in the presence of interfering background radiation. A combustion flame is fed by a diverted portion of a process stream and the common end of a bifurcated or quadfurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted to collect light from the flame. The light is guided through the branches of the fiber optic cable to bandpass filters, one of which is adapted to each of the branches of the fiber optic light guide. The bandpass filters are centered at wavelengths corresponding to the emission lines to be detected and two separate filters are required for each species being detected. The first filter has a bandwidth of about 3 nms and the second filter has a bandwidth of about 10 nms. Light detectors are located to view the light passing through the bandpass filters and amplifiers are connected to receive signals from the light detectors. The amplifier corresponding to the bandpass filter having the narrower bandwidth is preset to scale the signal by a factor equal to the ratio of the wide and narrow bandwidths of the bandpass filters. This scaling produces a scaled signal from which the difference between the scaled signal on the other signal can be calculated to produce a signal having an amplitude directly proportional to the concentration of the species of interest and independent of background radiation.

  7. Information Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group Leader Patrick M. Kelly Email Deputy Group Leader Amy Larson Email Contact Us ... Kelly, Group Leader Soumya Kundu Amy Larson, Deputy Group Leader Susan Mniszewski ...

  8. Efficiency Improvements - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Manager Doug Larson. Larson said more than half of the study's organizational, engineering, scheduling, and experimental configuration recommendations have been implemented. ...

  9. Revised Acquisition Guide Chapter 42.5, Contract Management Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    policyguidancepolicyflashes.htm. Questions concerning the revised Acquisition Guide chapter may be addressed to Mike Larson at (202) 287-1426 or Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov....

  10. Savings Project: Install Exterior Storm Windows With Low-E Coating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Larson Manufacturing Company. Installing storm windows will lower your energy bill while keeping your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer. | Photo courtesy of Larson ...

  11. Spin waves in micro-structured yttrium iron garnet nanometer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    B., E-mail: jungfleisch@anl.gov ; Zhang, Wei ; Jiang, Wanjun ; Wu, Stephen M. ; Pearson, John E. ; Bhattacharya, Anand ; Hoffmann, Axel 1 ; Chang, Houchen ; Wu, Mingzhong...

  12. New hypodiphosphates of the alkali metals: Synthesis, crystal structure and vibrational spectra of the hypodiphosphates(IV) M{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (M=Rb and Cs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Peng; Wiegand, Thomas; Eckert, Hellmut

    2012-10-15

    The new hypodiphosphates(IV) Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (1) and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (2) were synthesized by soft chemistry reactions from aqueous solutions of hypophosphoric acid and the corresponding heavy alkali-metal carbonates. Their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize isotypic in the triclinic space group P-1 with one formula unit in the unit cell. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units in staggered conformation for the P{sub 2}O{sub 6} skeleton and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. In the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} ion the hydrogen atoms are in a 'trans-trans' conformation. O{center_dot}H-O hydrogen bonds between the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups consolidate the structures into a three-dimensional network. The FT-Raman and {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H and MAS NMR spectra of the title compounds have been recorded and interpreted, especially with respect to their assignment to the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups. Thermogravimetric data of 2 have been interpreted in terms of a thermal decomposition model. - Graphical Abstract: The layered compounds Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] have been synthesized and investigated. Both crystallize isotypic. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and single-crystal structure of new alkali hypodiphosphates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures are characterized by [(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})]{sup 2-} units and M{sup +} cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units are linked by short hydrogen bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds are characterized by {sup 31}P MAS-NMR spectra.

  13. Alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} with large nonlinear optical properties in the deep-ultraviolet region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshak, A. H.; Huang, Hongwei; Kamarudin, H.; Auluck, S.

    2015-02-28

    The linear optical response and second harmonic generation (SHG) in alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} are investigated by means of density functional theory. Calculations are performed using four types of exchange correlations: Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof general gradient approximation, Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation, and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). The mBJ approach brings the calculated band gap (7.20 eV) in excellent agreement with the experimental one (7.28 eV). The calculated values of the uniaxial anisotropy δε=−0.076 and the birefringence Δn(0)=0.052 indicate considerable anisotropy in the linear optical properties, which makes it favorable for the second harmonic generation. The dominant component of the second harmonic generation is χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω). The value of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| is about 1.2 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm in agreement with previous calculations. To analyze the origin of the high SHG of NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} single crystals, we have correlated the features of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| spectra with the features of ε{sub 2}(ω) spectra as a function of ω/2 and ω. From the calculated dominant component |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)|, we find that the microscopic first hyperpolarizability, β{sub 111}, the vector components along the dipole moment direction is 0.5 × 10{sup −30} esu at static limit and 0.6 × 10{sup −30} esu at λ = 1064 nm.

  14. Polyanionic Polymers with High Alkali-Ion Conductivity and Wide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the search for suitable materials from which to construct high energy density solid state batteries, one of the principal obstacles has been the provision of a suitable ...

  15. Interference of atomic alkali species with laser-induced breakdown...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Proposed for publication in Applied Optics. Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country ...

  16. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed review of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.

  17. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of alkali metals in high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the concentration of atomic Na and K, resulting in neutral line signal absorption by these atoms, and to (2) a change of phase of the major Na- and K-containing species from an ...

  18. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the layer separation and thereby reduces the electronic band width perpendicular to the layers. Thus, the ratio UW can be driven through the critical value for the...

  19. Evaluation of Alkali Bromide Salts for Potential Pyrochemical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Steven D. Herrmann; Guy L. Fredrickson; Tedd E. Lister; Toni Y. Gutknecht

    2013-10-01

    Transient techniques were employed to study the electrochemical behavior, reduction mechanism and transport properties of REBr3 (RE - La, Nd and Gd) in pure LiBr, LiBr-KBr (eutectic) and LiBr-KBr-CsBr (eutectic) melts. Gd(III) showed a reversible single step soluble-insoluble exchange phenomenon in LiBr melt at 973K. Although La (III), Nd(III) and Gd(III) ions showed reversible behavior in eutectic LiBr-KBr melts, these ions showed a combination of temperature dependent reversible and pseudo-reversible behavior. While both La(III) and Gd(III) showed one step reduction, the reduction of Nd(III) was observed to be a two step process. La metal could be electrodeposited from the ternary electrolyte at a temperature of 673K. Various electrochemical measurements suggest that both binary and ternary bromide melts can potentially be used to electrodeposit high purity RE metals at comparatively lower operating temperatures.

  20. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Correlated Electron" Technology Illumination at the flick of a switch. Instant communication across vast distances. A universe of information accessible from your desktop. We...

  1. Conversion of alkali metal sulfate to the carbonate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheth, Atul C. (Woodridge, IL)

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting potassium sulfate to potassium carbonate in which a mixture of potassium sulfate and calcium oxide are reacted at a temperature in the range of between about 700.degree. C. and about 800.degree. C. with a gaseous mixture having a minor amount of hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide in a diluent with the calcium oxide being present in an amount not greater than about 20 percent by weight of the potassium sulfate to produce an aqueous mixture of potassium sulfide, potassium bisulfide, potassium hydroxide and calcium sulfide and a gaseous mixture of steam and hydrogen sulfide. The potassium and calcium salts are quenched to produce an aqueous slurry of soluble potassium salts and insoluble calcium salts and a gaseous mixture of steam and hydrogen sulfide. The insoluble calcium salts are then separated from the aqueous solution of soluble potassium salts. The calcium salts are dried to produce calcium sulfide, calcium bisulfide and steam, and then, the calcium sulfide and calcium bisulfide are converted to the oxide and recycled. The soluble potassium salts are carbonated to produce potassium carbonate which is concentrated and the precipitated crystals separated. The sulfur-containing compounds are further treated.

  2. Alkali-vapor magnetic resonance driven by fictitious radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhivun, Elena; Wickenbrock, Arne; Patton, Brian; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate an all-optical {sup 133}Cs scalar magnetometer, operating in nonzero magnetic field, in which the magnetic resonance is driven by an effective oscillating magnetic field provided by the AC Stark shift of an intensity-modulated laser beam. We achieve a projected shot-noise-limited sensitivity of 1.7fT/√(Hz) and measure a technical noise floor of 40fT/√(Hz). These results are essentially identical to a coil-driven scalar magnetometer using the same setup. This all-optical scheme offers advantages over traditional coil-driven magnetometers for use in arrays and in magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, e.g., searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  3. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

  4. Preparation of Zeolite A from alkali solutions containing potassium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goryachev, A.A.; Kuks, V.F.

    1983-03-20

    The most inexpensive general-purpose zeolite is Zeolite A. It is widely used as an adsorbent for drying hydrocarbon gases, for separation of normal paraffins, and recently as a component of synthetic detergents. The goal of this work was to study the effect of potassium, in crystallizing mixtures analogous to those used in industry, on the production of powdered Zeolite A and Zeolite A without binder on the basis of kaolin. It has been found that Zeolite A may be obtained upon crystallization of aluminosilica gel on the basis of aluminate and silicate solutions with a relative potassium content in the mixture to be crystallized that is not more than 0.8-0.14 mole fraction of the sum of the cations. In the case of crystallization of Zeolite A without binder on the basis of product, the amount of potassium should not be more than 5 rel. %. This is explained by the difference in the crystallization mechanism and the properties of the aluminate solutions containing potassium and silicon.

  5. NOvel Refractory Materials for High Alkali, High Temperature Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, J.G.; Griffin, R.

    2011-08-30

    Refractory materials can be limited in their application by many factors including chemical reactions between the service environment and the refractory material, mechanical degradation of the refractory material by the service environment, temperature limitations on the use of a particular refractory material, and the inability to install or repair the refractory material in a cost effective manner or while the vessel was in service. The objective of this project was to address the need for new innovative refractory compositions by developing a family of novel MgO-Al2O3 spinel or other similar magnesia/alumina containing unshaped refractory composition (castables, gunnables, shotcretes, etc) utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques (in-situ phase formation, altered conversion temperatures, accelerated reactions, etc). This family of refractory compositions would then be tailored for use in high-temperature, highalkaline industrial environments like those found in the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries. A research team was formed to carry out the proposed work led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and was comprised of the academic institution Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T), and the industrial company MINTEQ International, Inc. (MINTEQ), along with representatives from the aluminum, chemical, glass, and forest products industries. The two goals of this project were to produce novel refractory compositions which will allow for improved energy efficiency and to develop new refractory application techniques which would improve the speed of installation. Also methods of hot installation were sought which would allow for hot repairs and on-line maintenance leading to reduced process downtimes and eliminating the need to cool and reheat process vessels.

  6. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed reviewmore » of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.« less

  7. A Primitive Alkali Basaltic Stratovolcano And Associated Eruptive...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    define a very high geotherm consistent with their location near the Yermak hot spot, and provide a good datum point for the geothermal gradient adjacent to such a thermal...

  8. Evaluation of alkali concentration in conditions relevant to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A number of industrial combustion systems are adopting oxygen-enhanced firing to improve heat transfer characteristics and reduce emissions. The exhaust gas from these systems is ...

  9. Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  10. Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With...

  11. Geothermometry At Gabbs Alkali Flat Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Robin Penfield, Ben Delwiche (2008) A New Gold Pan For The West- Discovering Blind Geothermal Systems With Shallow Temperature Surveys...

  12. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x-rays, such as provided by the ALS. The team's measurements indicated carboxylate groups characteristic of proteins preferred sodium over potassium ions. These results lend...

  13. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  14. Policy Flash 2013-57 New Strategic Sourcing Acquisition Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov. ...

  15. DATE: TO: FROM:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...procurement-and-acquisitionpolicy-flashes Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson at 202-287-1426 or email at Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov.

  16. Policy Flash 2014-33 Revised Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson at 202-287-1426 or email at Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov. Attachment Acquisition Guide Chapter 7.2 Strategic ...

  17. Policy Flash 2013-65 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov PDF icon Policy ...

  18. MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thank you for your continued commitment to the PERT program. If you have questions, please feel free to contact Mike Larson at (202) 287-1426 or Michael.Larson@hg.doe.gov. @ ...

  19. Policy Flash 2013-65 Procurement Evaluation & Re-Engineering...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov. ...

  20. Policy Flash 2013-21 Change to Procurement Evaluation & Re-Engineering...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov. ...

  1. TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov.

  2. Policy Flash 2013-65 Procurement Evaluation & Re-Engineering Team (PERT) and Establishment of a 5-year Cycle with Corresponding Schedule

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq...

  3. Publications | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Langella, S. Lanzirotti, Antonio Lapenta, W. M. Laprise, R. Larsen, P. E. Larson, J. W. Larson, J. Larsson, E. Larsson, J. Latham, R. Lathrop, L. Lau, A. Y. Lau, K. C. Laughlin, ...

  4. CW-5, PW- 1,3,6 ROD concerns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    moving toward Groundwater. (Pam Larson) 4) The cost of re-mediating this dangerous material should not be a factor (limited budgets). (Pam Larson) 5) There were two explanations ...

  5. TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Director

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov.

  6. High Temperature Materials Overview Richard Wright Idaho National...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Significance of Creep Properties - Larson-Miller plot for rupture is used in analysis of creep-fatigue interaction - Creep curves and Larson-Miller plot are used in establishing ...

  7. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse April 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Your TA-53 WSST members WSST Chair: Eric Larson WSST Co-chair: Kristy Ortega WSST Secretary: Jean Trujillo E-mail: wsst53@lanl.gov LANSCE-LC: Eric Larson (primary), Mel Borrego ...

  8. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse September 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... TA-53 WSST members who participated included Eric Larson, Kristy Ortega, Jean Trujillo, ... Thomas Sisneros MST-8 665-6596 tsisneros@lanl.gov Eric Larson LANSCE-LC 667-9614 ...

  9. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse June 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sven C. Vogel (LANSCE-LC) spearheaded the development with design support from Eric Larson ... Howard Nekimken * LANSCE-LC: Eric Larson * MPA-CMMS: Michael Torrez * MPA-MC: Eve ...

  10. Policy Flash 2013-65 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at Michael.Larson@hq.doe.gov Policy Flash PERT Endorsement...

  11. Y-12 makes first radical changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    had help from others, of course, and not the least of which was the help of Clarence Larson and Eugene Wigner. Larson supported them from a management perspective in all they did...

  12. Re: 'BPA Upcoming Schedule'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Re: 'BPA Upcoming Schedule' Larson,Cheryl A - PS-6 From: Kari, Don (Perkins Coie) DKari@perkinscoie.com Sent: Monday, July 14, 2008 9:36 AM To: Larson,Cheryl A - PS-6 Cc:...

  13. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse February 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Ronald Barber, AOT-MDE ...... 35 years Eric Larson, LANSCE-LC ...... 30 years Nathan Okamoto, AOT-IC ...

  14. President Obama Announces New Plan to Create STEM Master Teaching Corps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    *Editor's Note: This blog was originally posted on WhiteHouse.gov's Office of Sience and Technology Policy by Phil Larson.

  15. Section 3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... J. Deluisi, 1997: Optimal measurement of surface shortwave in the model. irradiance using current instrumentation - The ARM Acknowledgments We thank Drs. N. Larson and N. ...

  16. Peter Nugent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Brown, Dey, Griffith, Harrison, Jannuzi, Larson, Madsen, Pilecki, Pojmaski, Skowron, ... G. Kim, R. A. Knop, M. Kowalski, E. Linder, J. Meyers, T. Morokuma, S. Nobili, J. Nordin, ...

  17. Tmu: J. A. Erl

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Facilities cc wiencls: Commissioner Larson Commissioner Doub Commissioner Kriegsman ... N.N. *Picari""y Arsenal Dover, N.J. ,' - liction Take" Unit III deconraminated ...

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.M. Di Nicola, Shamasundar Dixit, Gaylen Erbert, James Folta, John Heebner, Mark Henesian, Mark Hermann, Kenneth Jancaitis, Kai LaFortune, Lawrence Lagin, Douglas Larson, ...

  19. A new solid state extractor pulser for the FNAL magnetron ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This paper will discuss the pulser design and operational experience to date. Authors: Bollinger, D. S. 1 ; Lackey, J. 1 ; Larson, J. 1 ; Triplett, K. 1 + Show Author ...

  20. NEESConnect | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2015, Special Topic Guest Speaker Stephen J. Harris, Materials Science Division ... Materials Science, MSU Jul 2015, Jonathan Larson, Janice Reutt-Robey Group, Chem & ...

  1. Action 2b Revision of DOE G 226.1-2 with New Guidance for Acitvity...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Carl Sykes, NNSA * Dick Crowe, NNSA * Marcus Hayes, NNSA * Robert Boston, NE * Jay Larson, SC * David Weitzman, HSS * Tom Staker, HSS * James Coaxum, HSS * Scott Nicholson, ...

  2. Topic B Awardee: Western Governors' Association | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    For documents currently open to public review and comment, click here. SPSC member list, correspondence and chronology of actions CONTACT INFORMATION Doug Larson Executive ...

  3. hypermesh-and-hyperview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Erik Larson, Business Development Manager for Modeling and Visualization, Altair Engineering, presented the training course. Altair Engineering is the developer of the HyperWorks ...

  4. A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... email, html file, daily checking * Sophisticated Production Tools - LLNL's Shawn Larson has developed Tapestry (next slides) -MPI parallel application -Batch and interactive ...

  5. Microsoft Word - IceMountainFinal.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo courtesy of Moose Larson What the term "algific talus slope" also leaves undescribed are their unusual, seemingly misplaced ecosystems, which survive by a trick of nature. ...

  6. DRAFT MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD RIVER AND PLATEAU...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome and Introductions Pam Larson, City of Richland and River and Plateau Committee (RAP) chair, welcomed everyone to the meeting and led a round of introductions. Pam reviewed ...

  7. DRAFT MEETING SUMMARY (v

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome and introductions Pam Larson welcomed the committee and introductions were made. Pam said she still had some questions and needed some clarification on portions of the ...

  8. BERAC Meeting December 3-4, 2002 Washington, DC | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Steven Larson, Chief, Nuclear Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and DOE BERAC Member, "Molecular Imaging: Dawn of an Era in Cancer Research" David Reichle ...

  9. BERAC Meeting April 29-30, 2004 Washington DC | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Jill Banfield .ppt file (20.5MB), Structure, Reactivity, and Behavior of Nanoparticles in the Environment Steve Larson .ppt file (420KB), Radiopharmaceutical Subcommittee Report ...

  10. NIF & Photon Science Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Director, Laser S&T and Systems Engineering NIF Mark Herrmann Director, National Ignition Facility Doug Larson NIF Facility Manager and Chief Engineer, NIF & Photon Science ...

  11. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contributors David Mascarenas Logan Ott Aaron Curis Sara Brambilla Amy Larson Steve Brumby Charles Farrar Portions of this work were supported by the Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

  12. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract NA Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy,...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter Results Filter by Subject ammonia (1) battery separators (1) brines (1) cathodes ... Channel flow cathode assembly and electrolyzer Larson, E. H. ; Fitch, R. H. ; Kurtz, B. E. ...

  14. Savings Project: Install Exterior Storm Windows With Low-E Coating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    while keeping your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer. | Photo courtesy of Larson Manufacturing Company. Installing storm windows will lower your energy bill while...

  15. APS User News, Issue 88

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -- John Rogers to be Keynote at Users Meeting -- 2015 APS Compton Award goes to Ice, Larson, and Sparks BRIEFLY NOTED -- Congratulations to Daniel Haskel, Winner of the 2015...

  16. Finding Multiple Local Minima of Computationally Expensive Simulations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building 240Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Jeffery Larson Speaker(s) Title: Postdoctoral Appointee, MCS Event Website: http:www.mcs.anl.gov...

  17. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Bell, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to interpret the subsurface down to 20 km. References Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson, Russell W. Juncal (1980) Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin...

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Slice True-Up 101 pptx.pptx [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ted Barham, Janice Johnson and many others Content Organized and Presented by Craig Larson Slice History A Review of Subscription and RD(Regional Dialogue) Slice distinctions...

  19. An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    near-vertical fractures intersect the megabreccia units. Authors Peter B. Larson and Hugh P. Taylor Jr Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal...

  20. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FY 2014 to FY 2018. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at...

  1. Community Events | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Analysis, Third Edition (Chapman & HallCRC) Chapters: 6, 7 Moderators: J. Larson, K. Khan March 27, 2015 Northwestern University (Evanston Campus) Pancoe Auditorium...

  2. 2015 DOE SSL Technology Development Workshop Attendee List

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Light Technologies Kyle Landig Sunset Lighting Mike Landig Sunset Lighting Susan Larson Soraa Ben Latson Ecova Jefferay Lawton Microchip Technology Marc Ledbetter Pacific...

  3. A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera ring fault across the northern part of the Caldera. Authors Peter B. Larson, Allison Phillips, David John, Michael Cosca, Chad Pritchard, Allen Andersen and...

  4. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY FORUM ATTENDEES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    President 6 Joshua Larson MELE Associates, Inc. Sr. Program Analyst 7 Glenn Robinson Blue Ridge Information Systems President 8 Kirk Owens Leidos, Inc. Senior Program Manager 9...

  5. Building America Expert Meeting: Windows Options for New and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. ...

  6. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Hashino, Tempei ; Harrington, Jerry Y. ; Hoose, Corinna ; Khairoutdinov, Marat ; Larson, Vince ; Liu, Xiaohong ; Luo, Yali more ; McFarquhar, Greg ; Menon, Surabi ; ...

  7. June 16 & 17, 2014 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Doug Larson, WIEB Steve Beuning, Xcel Carrie Cullen Hitt, SEIA Tuesday, June 17, 2014 Panel - Distributed Energy Storage (DES) - Wanda Reder, S&C, moderator Willem Fadrhonc, STEM ...

  8. Energy Media Advisories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    initiative. February 3, 2011 U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow,...

  9. Evidence of superconductivity-induced phonon spectra renormalization in alkali-doped iron selenides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Opačić, M.; Lazarević, N.; Šćepanović, M.; Ryu, Hyejin; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.; Popović, Z. V.

    2015-11-16

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of superconducting KxFe2-ySe2 and nonsuperconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystals were measured in a temperature range from 10 K up to 300 K. Two Raman active modes from the I4/mmm phase and seven from the I4/m phase are observed in frequency range from 150 to 325 cm -1 in both compounds, suggesting that K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystal also has two-phase nature. Temperature dependence of Raman mode energy is analyzed in terms of lattice thermal expansion and phonon-phonon interaction. Temperature dependence of Raman mode linewidth is considered as temperature-induced anharmonic effects. It is shown that change of Raman mode energymore » with temperature is dominantly driven by thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. Abrupt change of the A1g mode energy near TC was observed in KxFe2-ySe2 , whereas it is absent in K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2. Phonon energy hardening at low temperatures in the superconducting sample is a consequence of superconductivity-induced redistribution of the electronic states below critical temperature.« less

  10. Evidence of superconductivity-induced phonon spectra renormalization in alkali-doped iron selenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opačić, M.; Lazarević, N.; Šćepanović, M.; Ryu, Hyejin; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.; Popović, Z. V.

    2015-11-16

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of superconducting KxFe2-ySe2 and nonsuperconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystals were measured in a temperature range from 10 K up to 300 K. Two Raman active modes from the I4/mmm phase and seven from the I4/m phase are observed in frequency range from 150 to 325 cm -1 in both compounds, suggesting that K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystal also has two-phase nature. Temperature dependence of Raman mode energy is analyzed in terms of lattice thermal expansion and phonon-phonon interaction. Temperature dependence of Raman mode linewidth is considered as temperature-induced anharmonic effects. It is shown that change of Raman mode energy with temperature is dominantly driven by thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. Abrupt change of the A1g mode energy near TC was observed in KxFe2-ySe2 , whereas it is absent in K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2. Phonon energy hardening at low temperatures in the superconducting sample is a consequence of superconductivity-induced redistribution of the electronic states below critical temperature.

  11. Monitoring and Control of Alkali Volatilization and Batch Carryover for Minimization of Particulates and Crown Corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-01-01

    New Technology will Allow Glass Manufacturers to Optimize Furnace Conditions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a continuous monitoring technique that glass manufacturers can use to reduce particulate matter emissions and extend furnace life.

  12. Alkali-vapor emission from PFBC of Illinois coals. (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    combusted in a laboratory-scale PFBCalkali sorber facility with a bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950oC and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. ...

  13. Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions by Selective Crystallization of Alkali Metal Coordination Capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajbanshi, Arbin; Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly of a tris(urea) anion receptor with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} yields crystalline capsules held together by coordinating Na{sup +} or K{sup +} cations and hydrogen-bonding water bridges, with the sulfate anions encapsulated inside urea-lined cavities. The sodium-based capsules can be selectively crystallized in excellent yield from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions ({approx}6 M Na{sup +}, pH 14), thereby providing for the first time a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  14. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2001-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

  15. Method and system for producing lower alcohols. [Heteropolyatomic lead salt coated with alkali metal formate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.; Heiberger, J.J.

    1983-09-26

    It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved catalyst for the reaction of carbon monoxide with water to produce methanol and other lower alcohols. It is a further object to provide a process for the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and water in which a relatively inexpensive catalyst permits the reaction at low pressures. It is also an object to provide a process for the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and water in which a relatively inexpensive catalyst permits the reaction at low pressures. It is also an object to provide a process for the production of methanol in which ethanol is also directly produced. It is another object to provide a process for the production of mixtures of methanol with ethanol and propanol from the reaction of carbon monoxide and water at moderate pressure with inexpensive catalysts. It is likewise an object to provide a system for the catalytic production of lower alcohols from the reaction of carbon monoxide and water at moderate pressure with inexpensive catalysts. In accordance with the present invention, a catalyst is provided for the reaction of carbon monoxide and water to produce lower alcohols. The catalyst includes a lead heteropolyatomic salt in mixture with a metal formate or a precursor to a metal formate.

  16. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Pyatina, T.

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  17. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Pyatina, T.

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  18. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, D.C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power. 1 fig.

  19. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power.

  20. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test ResultsCast Stone and Alkali Alumino-Silicate Geopolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Parker, Kent E.; Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2010-06-28

    PNNL is conducting screening tests on the candidate waste forms to provide a basis for comparison and to resolve the formulation and data needs identified in the literature review. This report documents the screening test results on the Cast Stone cementitious waste form and the Geopolymer waste form. Test results suggest that both the Cast Stone and Geopolymer appear to be viable waste forms for the solidification of the secondary liquid wastes to be treated in the ETF. The diffusivity for technetium from the Cast Stone monoliths was in the range of 1.2 10-11 to 2.3 10-13 cm2/s during the 63 days of testing. The diffusivity for technetium from the Geopolymer was in the range of 1.7 10-10 to 3.8 10-12 cm2/s through the 63 days of the test. These values compare with a target of 1 10-9 cm2/s or less. The Geopolymer continues to show some fabrication issues with the diffusivities ranging from 1.7 10-10 to 3.8 10-12 cm2/s for the better-performing batch to from 1.2 10-9 to 1.8 10-11 cm2/s for the poorer-performing batch. In the future more comprehensive and longer term performance testing will be conducted, to further evaluate whether or not these waste forms will meet the regulation and performance criteria needed to cost-effectively dispose of secondary wastes.

  1. 2-M Probe At Gabbs Alkali Flat Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Robin Penfield, Ben Delwiche (2008) A New Gold Pan For The West- Discovering Blind Geothermal Systems With Shallow Temperature Surveys...

  2. Vacuum polarization calculations for hydrogenlike and alkali-metal-like ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2003-10-01

    Complete vacuum polarization calculations incorporating finite nuclear size are presented for hydrogenic ions with principal quantum numbers n=1-5. Lithiumlike, sodiumlike, and copperlike ions are also treated starting with Kohn-Sham potentials, and including first-order screening corrections. In both cases dominant Uehling terms are calculated with high accuracy, and smaller Wichmann-Kroll terms are obtained using numerical electron Green's functions.

  3. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950{degree}C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800{degree} to 950{degree}C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na{sub 2}O, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820{degree}. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 {mu}m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  4. PS-6 From: Burbank,Nita M - DKC-7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Message Page 1 of 1 Larson,Cheryl A - PS-6 From: Burbank,Nita M - DKC-7 Sent: Wednesday, July 16, 2008 3:23 PM To: Larson,Cheryl A - PS-6; Miller,Robyn M - PS-6 SUbject: FW:...

  5. PS-6 From: Bas,JoAnn L -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Larson,Cheryl A - PS-6 From: Bas,JoAnn L - P-6 on behalf of Gendron,Mark 0 - PS-6 Sent: Tuesday, July 15,20081:13 PM To: Larson,Cheryl A - PS-6 Subject: FW: Contract templates...

  6. Comment on 'A planar refractive x-ray lens made of nanocrystalline diamond'[J. Appl. Phys. 108, 123107 (2010)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroon, R. E.

    2013-05-28

    The material LuAG (lutetium aluminium garnet) has been confused with LAG (lanthanum aluminium garnet). In general, aluminium garnet phases only occur for the smaller trivalent metal cations and LAG is not known to have been synthesized.

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... garnet structure has been proposed as a potential crystalline nuclear waste form for accommodation of actinide elements, especially uranium (U). In this study, yttrium iron garnet ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... injection from sputtered yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films into an adjacent platinum ... in thin film bilayers of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum at high microwave ...

  9. Search for: thorium | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... garnet structure has been proposed as a potential crystalline nuclear waste form for accommodation of actinide elements, especially uranium (U). In this study, yttrium iron garnet ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Temperature evolution of electromotive force from Pt on yttrium-iron-garnet under ... Pure spin current is injected from yttrium-iron-garnet by using spin pumping technique. ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Temperature evolution of electromotive force from Pt on yttrium-iron-garnet under ... Pure spin current is injected from yttrium-iron-garnet by using spin pumping technique. ...

  12. Biographical sketch - James Allen | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar...

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    bacterial reaction centers" Photosynthesis Research 107, 59-69. C. R. Larson, C. Seng, L. Lauman, H. J. Matthies, J. Wen, R. E. Blankenship, and J. P. Allen (2011) "The three ...

  13. Microsoft Word - DIBS Final Paper.docx

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    ... Vision, hype, and reality for delivering computing as the 5th utility FGCS 25, 2009. 5 R. Chaiken, B. Jenkins, P.-A. Larson, B. Ramsey, D. Shakib, S. Weaver, and J. Zhou. ...

  14. makinc | The Ames Laboratory

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    Publications 2014 Ray, P.K.; Akinc, M.; Kramer, M.J. Formation of multilayered scale ... Polymer 2013 54, 3994-4002. Abstract Thunga, M.; Larson, K.; Lio, W.; Weerasekera, T.; ...

  15. CASL-8-2015-0160-000 Ben Forget, C.Josey, P.Ducru, J.Walsh Massachuset...

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    ... S. Holloway, T. Johnson, T. Kawano, B. Kiedrowski, H. Kim, S. Kunieda, N. Larson, L. Leal, J. Lestone, R. Little, E. McCutchan, R. MacFarlane, M. MacInnes, C. Mattoon, R. ...

  16. Section 13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sci. 40, 116-138. planetary atmospheres, Space Sci. Rev., 16, 527-610. Hoppel, W. A., J. W. Fitzgerald, G. M. Frick, and R. E. Larson, 1990: Aerosol size distributions and optical ...

  17. NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier Research...

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    ... Journal of Materials Science, 2015, doi: 10.1007s10853-015-9318-0 23 Jonathan M. Larson, ... 25 Alexander C. Kozen, Alexander J. Pearse, Chuan-Fu Lin, Malachi Noked, Gary ...

  18. 110th Congress 2D Session H.R. 5746

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES APRIL 9, 2008 Mr. LARSON of Connecticut (for himself, Mr. DENT, Mr. WYNN, Mr. INGLIS of South Carolina, Ms. DELAURO, Mr. DOYLE, Mr. HOLDEN, Mr. ...

  19. Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... L. G., and J. L. Greenstein, 1941: Diffuse radiation in the galaxy. Journal Astrophysics, 93, 70-83. Kato, S., T. P. Ackerman, E. G. Dutton, N. S. Laulainen, and N. Larson, 1997: A ...

  20. Data Assimilation F. J. Barnes and W. Porch Los Alamos National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Barnes, F. J., W. Porch, S. Tarbox, K. E. Kunkel, R. Scott, W. A. Dugas, R. Hicks, P. Larson, and C. Riemann. 1993. Energy balance components of irrigated crops in North- Central ...

  1. NREL: Energy Analysis - Nicholas DiOrio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004-2008 Selected publications Pratt,J., Axelrad, P., Larson, K., Lesage,B., Gerren, R., DiOrio, N. Satellite Clock Bias Estimation for iGPS, GPS Solutions, No. 17:381-389 (2013). ...

  2. DRAFT: ACME-ARM-ASR Coordination Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... J. Geophys. Res., 117, D05204, doi:10.10292011JD016595. Golaz, J. C., V. E. Larson, and W. R. Cotton, 2002: A PDF-based model for boundary layer clouds. Part I: Method and model ...

  3. Susan Martindale

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... FAX: (317) 472-0106 rjohnson@utilitylaw.us J. D. Jojola Citizen Information Resource ... 586-3670 Gary.Lanthrum@rw.doe.gov Doug Larson Western Interstate Energy Board 1515 ...

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and Preliminary Results for Case 1 Kukla, G.J. Surface Solar Radiation in the United ... Larsen, N. Larson, N. A Comparison of Modeled and Measured Surface Shortwave Irradiance ...

  5. Section 55

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Hansen, J., and L. Travis, 1974: Light scattering in planetary atmospheres. Space Sci. Rev. 16, 527-610. Hoppel, W.A., J.W. Fitzgerald., G.M. Frick and R.E. Larson, 1990: Aerosol ...

  6. Report. Results of a Piezocone Investigation - Shiprock, New...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Structures, edited by D.J.A. van Zyl and Steven G. Vick, Geotechnical Special Publication No. 21, ASCE, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. Larson, N. and Mitchell, B. ...

  7. Studying Mixed-Phased Clouds Using Ground-Based Active and Passive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... J. Appl. Meteor., 40, 1967-1983. Fleishauer, R. P., V. E. Larson, and T. H. Vonder Haar, 2002: Observed microphysical structure of midlevel, mixed-phase clouds. J. Atmos. Sci., 59, ...

  8. Section 37

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... North Larsen for providing assist- ance with the MODTRAN code, and to Mr. Nels Larson and ... References Harrison, L., J. Michalsky, and J. Berndt, 1994: The auto- mated Multi-Filter ...

  9. Section 36

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The authors are grateful to Mr. Nels Larson and Mr. John Schmelzer of the PNNL for their help with the installation and maintenance of the instruments. References Harrison, L., J. ...

  10. Microsoft Word - PVSC 2013 Abstract-Capacitor_BK[1].docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sarjeant, J. Zirnheld, and F. MacDougall, "Capacitors," IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, vol. 26 (5), pp. 1368-1392, 1998. 14 W. Sarjeant, F. MacDougall, D. Larson, and I. ...

  11. Microsoft Word - Haeffelin-MP.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... J. Geophys. Res., 102, 25,881-25,898. Kato S., T. P. Ackerman, E. G. Dutton, N. Laulainen, and N. Larson, 1999: A comparison of modeled and measured surface shortwave irradiance ...

  12. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellul...

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    McAloon, A.J.; Yee, W.C.; Foglia, A.T. "A Process Model to Estimate Biodiesel Production Cost." Biores. Technol.; Vol. 97, 2006; pp. 671-678. 11. Laser, M.; Larson, E.; Dale, ...

  13. CCSM is currently a multi-executable system based on the Multi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of High Performance Computing Applications, Vol.19, No.3, 329-340, August 2005. 4 J. Larson, R. Jacob, and E. Ong, The Model Coupling Toolkit: A New Fortan90 Toolkit for ...

  14. ARM - 2014 AGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data

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    McFarquhar; Alice Grandin; Fabien Dezitter; J. Strapp; Alexei Korolev 2:25 PM, 3016 ... Ovchinnikov; Minghuai Wang; Vincent Larson 1:40 PM, Poster Hall (Moscone South) ...

  15. mph_hpca_revise.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Earth System Modeling Framework. http:www.esmf.ucar.edu http:sdcd.gsfc.nasa.govESSesmf tasc 23 J.W. Larson, R.L. Jacob, I.T. Foster, and J. Guo, Model Coupling Toolkit, ...

  16. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...qj.416. Morrison H, RB McCoy, SA Klein, S Xie, Y Luo, A Avramov, M Chen, JN Cole, M Falk, MJ Foster, AD Del Genio, JY Harrington, C Hoose, MF Khrairoutdinov, VE Larson, X ...

  17. Papers by CMI Researchers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Anisotropy Energies for (Fe1-xCox)2B, J. of Phy.: Conds. Matter, 2015, 27, 266002, doi:10.10880953-89842726266002 B. S. Pujari, P. Larson, V. P. Antropov, and K. D. ...

  18. LANSCE | Lujan Center | People | Scientists and Expertise

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    ... Some Motor Control and Allen-Bradley PLC Experience. Eric Larson Technical SME 505.667.9614 elarson@lanl.gov Mechanical Design support for Neutron Scattering, Vacuum, Cryogenics, ...

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hollars, S.(a), Comstock, J.M.(b), Fu, Q.(a), and Ackerman, T.P. (a), University of ... anvil clouds will remain constant during climate change (Hartmann and Larson 2002). ...

  20. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... of Ex-AX Owned cc wends: Comnissioner Larson Commissioner Doub Commissioner Kriegsman ... N.N. *Picatinny Arsenal Dover, N.J. i Action Taken Unit III decontaminated and ...

  1. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U. Bergmann, R. W. Morton, P. L. Manning, W. I. Sellers, S. Farrar, K. G. Huntley, R. A. Wogelius, and P. Larson (2010) "Archaeopteryx feathers and bone chemistry fully revealed ...

  2. Susan Martindale

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-9117 Gary.Lanthrum@rw.doe.gov Douglas Larson (Doug), Executive Director Western Interstate Energy Board 1515 Cleveland Place, Suite ...

  3. Women's Employee Resource Group

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    Women (Contact: Jenna Casias) Women in Computing (Contacts: Hai Ah Nam and Amy Larson) What binds us all together-and keeps us moving forward-is our shared vision to help ...

  4. BERAC Meeting April 20-21, 2005 Washington DC | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Mike Kuperberg .ppt file (1.8MB), Update on ERSD Restructuring Allison Campbell .ppt file (26.8MB), EMSL Update Steve Larson .ppt file (15.2MB), Comments Alan B. Packard .ppt file ...

  5. Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon acep01larson.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx ...

  6. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse February 2013

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    ... I encour- age you to meetknow and interact with your local WSST representative(s). Gary Sanchez (AOT-IC) is the new TA-53 WSST chair. The past chair, Eric Larson (LANSCE-LC), did ...

  7. Microsoft Word - Archaeopteryx

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    ... Scale bar 10 cm. (PNAS) Primary Citation U. Bergmann, R. W. Morton, P. L. Manning, W. I. Sellers, S. Farrar, K. G. Huntley, R. A. Wogelius, and P. Larson (2010) "Archaeopteryx ...

  8. Models on Distributed Memory Architectures

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    ... n NCAR: Tony Craig, Brian Kauffman, Vince Wayland, Tom Bettge n Argonne National Lab: Rob Jacobs, Jay Larson n Resources n DOE SciDAC Climate Project n NERSC Program

  9. 2015 Gasification Systems and Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids...

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    ... DesignCost Study for Synthetic Jet Fuel Production at a Mississippi Site from Lignite Woody Biomass with CO2 Capture and Storage via EOR Eric Larson, Princeton University ...

  10. Segment of Smithsonian Video history interview - December 1987

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    The interviewees were George M. Banic, Jr., John M. Googin, Chris P. Keim, Clarence Larson and Robert S. Livingston. Before looking at the specific interviews let's learn a bit...

  11. PTL-5 From: Malin,Debra J - PTL-5

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    M - PFP-6; Clark,Harry W - PTL-5; Wilson,Scott K - PS-6; Olive,J Courtney - LP- 7; Larson,Cheryl A - PS-6 Subject: FW: PPC comments on EPP framework Attachments: PPC Comments -...

  12. Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu

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    Commissioning Fritz - L806 David - L221 Lindenberg - L248 Glover - L233 Soft Start Surface Science Wurth - L188, L189, L191, L203, L204 In-House (AMO) Larson - L166 RSXS: Lee...

  13. BEAMLINE 6-2

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    Hard X-rays Probe Model Fuel-Cell Catalyst June 2010: Archaeopteryx Webinar with Pete Larson February 2010: Video of the week - Computation and tomography February 2010: Anders...

  14. Mark Nutt | Argonne National Laboratory

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    2013, Brussels Belgium. M. Nutt, P. Swift, J. Birkholzer, W. Boyle, T. Gunter, N. Larson, R. MacKinnon, K. McMahon, K. Sorenson, Overview of the United States Department of...

  15. PS-6 SUbject:

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    Larson.Cheryl A - PS-6 SUbject: annexed load treatment in RD ROD (p32-33) and Ex B oftemplates -----Original Message----- From: Randy Gregg mailto:GREGGR@bentonpud.org Sent:...

  16. Y-12's second era grows

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    with the comments made in your letter, and you will be glad to know that Dr. Clarence Larson has been placed in charge of the overall stable isotopes program at Y-12. Both he and...

  17. Policy Flash 2013-57 New Strategic Sourcing Acquisition Guide...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Mike Larson of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Strategic Programs Division at (202) 287-1426 or at...

  18. Microsoft Word - TrainingAgenda_2013_06_25.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Guest: Mary Hawken, Janice Johnson Content Organized and Presented by: Craig Larson Format: Net meeting with in-house room reservation for HQ AE's Note: Agenda subject to...

  19. Thermal techniques for characterizing magma body geometries ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    agreement with several independent geophysical measurements. Authors Hardee, H.C. ; Larson and D.W. Published Journal Geothermics, 111980 DOI http:dx.doi.org10.1016...

  20. Events | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2:00 PM Finding Multiple Local Minima of Computationally Expensive Simulations Jeffery Larson Postdoctoral Appointee, MCS Building 240Room 4301 Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... next...

  1. Electromagnetic separation of isotopes at Oak Ridge ? L.O. Love...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Love notes such individuals as W.A. Arnold, Roy N. Goslin, C.P. Keim, C.E. Larson and P.W. McDaniel as primary investigators who "should be remembered for their efforts...

  2. Union Carbides Last 20 Years in Oak Ridge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1965 (at the start of the last 20 year period we are describing) was Dr. Clarence E. Larson. He had come to Y-12 in 1943 from California (U. of C., Davis) where he was E. O....

  3. Analytical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5000 ft., depth 5000 ft., and steam-filled porosity of 5%. References Hardee, H.C. ; Larson, D.W. (1 January 1980) Thermal techniques for characterizing magma body geometries...

  4. An Analytical Study Of A 2-Layer Transient Thermal Conduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (e.g., where there is a shallow water table or a thin soil layer). Authors T. H. Larson and A. T. Hsui Published Journal Geophysics, 1992 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  5. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monday, April 6, 2009 11:00 am Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 "Atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of polymers and lipids" Ronald G. Larson Department of...

  6. High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements at Sandia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rep. Eric Swalwell; Michael Anderson, representing U.S. Rep. Jeff Denham; and Gayle Larson, representing Assemblymember Joan Buchanan. U.S. Rep. Barbara Lee and State Sen. Mark...

  7. Ligand-Thickness Effect Leads to Enhanced Preference for Large Anions in Alkali Metal Extraction by Crown Ethers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.

    1999-07-11

    Jean-Marie Lehn (Nobel laureate, 1987) suggested ligand thickness to be an important consideration in the design of host molecules for cation recognition. We have recently expanded the role of this simple ligand property by demonstrating a case in which ligand thickness contributes significantly to anion discrimination. It was found that in the extraction of sodium nitrate and perchlorate by a simple crown ether, bis(t-octylbenzo)-14-crown-4 (BOB 14C4), the normal preference for perchlorate is almost completely lost when the complex cation has the open-face sandwich vs. the sandwich structure.

  8. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi

    1997-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an inexpensive method to remove organic sulfur from pyrite-free and mineral-free coal using base, air, and readily available farm products. This is accomplished by treating coals with impregnating coals with polyunsaturated offs, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they produce no noxious products and improve burning qualities of the solid products. IBC-108 coal, (contains only 0.4% pyrite and 2.7% organic sulfur) was first treated with Na{sub 4}OH at two different concentrations and four different times, and with NH{sub 4}OH at two different concentrations and two different temperatures. Pretreating IBC-108 coal with bases removes 13% to 23% of the sulfur, and NaOH is a better treatment than NH{sub 4}OH in most of the experiments. Higher temperatures, higher base concentrations, and longer treatment times remove more sulfur. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is more effective than NaOH for oil extraction after the oil treatment. To test for effectiveness of sulfur removal, eight coal samples were treated with NaOH (two concentrations at four different times) were further treated with linseed oil at three temperatures, four different times, and two oil to coal ratios. The combination of NaOH pretreatment, then oil treatment, followed by Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} extraction, removes 23% to 50% of the sulfur. The best result is achieved by pretreating with 5% NaOH for 20 hr (23% sulfur removal) followed by oil treatment at 100{degrees}C for 5 hr with a 1:1 oil to coal ratio (50% sulfur removal in total). More sulfur is removed with a 1:1 oil to coal ratio than a 1:10 ratio under most conditions.

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Ptyttrium iron garnetPt(Ta) trilayers Li, ... A popular material for the latter is yttrium iron garnet, a magnetic insulator (MI). Here ...

  10. Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Ptyttrium iron garnetPt(Ta) trilayers Title: Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Ptyttrium iron garnetPt(Ta) trilayers ...

  11. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Ptyttrium iron garnetPt(Ta) trilayers Li, ... A popular material for the latter is yttrium iron garnet, a magnetic insulator (MI). Here ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Ptyttrium iron garnetPt(Ta) trilayers Li, ... A popular material for the latter is yttrium iron garnet, a magnetic insulator (MI). Here ...

  13. Revised calibration of the Sm:SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} pressure sensor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    garnet primary pressure scale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Revised calibration of the Sm:SrBsub 4Osub 7 pressure sensor using the Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet ...

  14. Elastic wave velocities in polycrystalline Mg[subscript 3]Al...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2Sisubscript 3Osubscript 12-pyrope garnet to 24 GPa and 1300 K Citation Details ... 2Sisubscript 3Osubscript 12-pyrope garnet to 24 GPa and 1300 K Authors: Chantel, ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... using the Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet primary pressure scale Rashchenko, Sergey ... using the recent Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet primary pressure scale as a reference. ...

  16. Electroactive materials for rechargeable batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Huiming; Amine, Khalil; Abouimrane, Ali

    2015-04-21

    An as-prepared cathode for a secondary battery, the cathode including an alkaline source material including an alkali metal oxide, an alkali metal sulfide, an alkali metal salt, or a combination of any two or more thereof.

  17. Quantitative assessment of alkali-reactive aggregate mineral content through XRD using polished sections as a supplementary tool to RILEM AAR-1 (petrographic method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, Nelia; Sorensen, Bjorn E.; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.

    2012-11-15

    The mineral content of 5 aggregate samples from 4 different countries, including reactive and non-reactive aggregate types, was assessed quantitatively by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using polished sections. Additionally, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to characterize the opal-CT identified in one of the aggregate samples. Critical review of results from polished sections against traditionally powdered specimen has demonstrated that for fine-grained rocks without preferred orientation the assessment of mineral content by XRD using polished sections may represent an advantage over traditional powder specimens. Comparison of data on mineral content and silica speciation with expansion data from PARTNER project confirmed that the presence of opal-CT plays an important role in the reactivity of one of the studied aggregates. Used as a complementary tool to RILEM AAR-1, the methodology suggested in this paper has the potential to improve the strength of the petrographic method.

  18. Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-03-31

    The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

  19. Effects of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Cocations on the Activity and Hydrothermal Stability of Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Washton, Nancy M.; Kollar, Marton; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-10-13

    Using a three-step aqueous solution ion-exchange method, cocation modified Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts were synthesized. These catalysts, in both fresh and hydrothermally aged forms, were characterized with several methods including temperature-programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption of NH3 (NH3-TPD), and 27Al solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and diffuse reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopies. Their catalytic performance was probed using steady-state standard NH3-SCR. Characterization results indicate that cocations weaken interactions between Cu-ions and the CHA framework making them more readily reducible. By removing a portion of Brønsted acid sites, cocations also help to mitigate hydrolysis of the zeolite catalysts during hydrothermal aging as evidenced from 27Al NMR. Reaction tests show that certain cocations, especially Li+ and Na+, promote low-temperature SCR rates while others show much less pronounced effects. In terms of applications, our results indicate that introducing cocations can be a viable strategy to improve both low- and high-temperature performance of Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts.

  20. Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Celluloses on Water-catalyzed Self-degradation of 200-degree C-heated Alkali-Activated Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the usefulness of sodium carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC) in promoting self-degradation of 200°C-heated sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash cementitious material after contact with water. CMC emitted two major volatile compounds, CO2 and acetic acid, creating a porous structure in cement. CMC also reacted with NaOH from sodium silicate to form three water-insensitive solid reaction products, disodium glycolate salt, sodium glucosidic salt, and sodium bicarbonate. Other water-sensitive solid reaction products, such as sodium polysilicate and sodium carbonate, were derived from hydrolysates of sodium silicate. Dissolution of these products upon contact with water generated heat that promoted cement’s self-degradation. Thus, CMC of high molecular weight rendered two important features to the water-catalyzed self-degradation of heated cement: One was the high heat energy generated in exothermic reactions in cement; the other was the introduction of extensive porosity into cement.

  1. Electrochemical cell (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Electrochemical cell An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali ...

  2. Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace035_larson_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data

  3. Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bismuth doped iron garnet thin films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth doped iron garnet thin films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth doped iron garnet thin films Controlling the magnetization dynamics on the femtosecond timescale is of fundamental importance for integrated opto-spintronic devices. For industrial

  4. Temperature evolution of electromotive force from Pt on yttrium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Temperature evolution of electromotive force from Pt on yttrium-iron-garnet under ferromagnetic resonance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Temperature evolution of ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Amarillo, TX (United States) Pertoleum Oil Reserves Office Philadelphia Regional ... Pure spin current is injected from yttrium-iron-garnet by using spin pumping technique. ...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Ma_2015_CNMSStaffScienceHighlight_AngewChemie...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structural stability of lithium lanthanum zirconium oxide (LLZO) garnet in aqueous media has been unveiled by using the state-of-the-art scanning transmission electron microscopy....

  7. Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bismuth doped iron garnet thin films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth doped iron ...

  8. New Leaf Biofuel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biofuel Jump to: navigation, search Name: New Leaf Biofuel Address: 1380 Garnet Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92109 Region: Southern CA Area Sector: Biofuels Product: Collects...

  9. A time-dependent formulation of multi-reference perturbation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: A time-dependent formulation of multi-reference perturbation theory Authors: Sokolov, Alexander Yu. 1 ; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic 1 + Show Author Affiliations Department of ...

  10. Breakthrough Could Improve Turbine Performance, Reduce Carbon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Connecticut successfully demonstrated that an oxide called yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) deposited by the relatively new process "solution precursor plasma spray" (SPPS) ...

  11. Erratum: "A transformed framework for dynamic correlation in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Erratum: "A transformed framework for dynamic correlation in multireference problems" J. Chem. Phys. 142, 124107 (2015) Authors: Sokolov, Alexander Yu. 1 ; Chan, Garnet ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The mineral occurs in a quartz-garnet-arsenopyrite matrix as white globules, tufted aggregates of fibrous crystals and radiating hemispheres of thin, colourless, bladed crystals. ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Elastic wave velocities in polycrystalline Mgsubscript 3Alsubscript 2Sisubscript 3Osubscript 12-pyrope garnet to 24 GPa and 1300 K Chantel, Julien ; Manthilake, Geeth M. ; ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Large ceramic neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) amplifier slabs are used in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL), ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elastic wave velocities in polycrystalline Mgsubscript 3Alsubscript 2Sisubscript 3Osubscript 12-pyrope garnet to 24 GPa and 1300 K Chantel, Julien ; Manthilake, Geeth M. ; ...

  16. The Use of Large Transparent Ceramics in a High Powered, Diode...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Large ceramic neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) amplifier slabs are used in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL), ...

  17. Regenerable sorbents for CO.sub.2 capture from moderate and high temperature gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    2008-01-01

    A process for making a granular sorbent to capture carbon dioxide from gas streams comprising homogeneously mixing an alkali metal oxide, alkali metal hydroxide, alkaline earth metal oxide, alkaline earth metal hydroxide, alkali titanate, alkali zirconate, alkali silicate and combinations thereof with a binder selected from the group consisting of sodium ortho silicate, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO.sub.4.2H.sub.2O), alkali silicates, calcium aluminate, bentonite, inorganic clays and organic clays and combinations thereof and water; drying the mixture and placing the sorbent in a container permeable to a gas stream.

  18. Internal-integral sodium return line for sodium heat engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Thomas K.

    1985-01-01

    A thermoelectric generator device which converts heat energy to electrical energy. An alkali metal is used with a solid electrolyte and a portion of the return line for the alkali metal is located within the generator vacuum space.

  19. Electrolytic systems and methods for making metal halides and refining metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, Justin M.; Cecala, David M.

    2015-05-26

    Disclosed are electrochemical cells and methods for producing a halide of a non-alkali metal and for electrorefining the halide. The systems typically involve an electrochemical cell having a cathode structure configured for dissolving a hydrogen halide that forms the halide into a molten salt of the halogen and an alkali metal. Typically a direct current voltage is applied across the cathode and an anode that is fabricated with the non-alkali metal such that the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed adjacent the anode. Electrorefining cells and methods involve applying a direct current voltage across the anode where the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed and the cathode where the non-alkali metal is electro-deposited. In a representative embodiment the halogen is chlorine, the alkali metal is lithium and the non-alkali metal is uranium.

  20. George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information * Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations

  1. Information Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Information Sciences Uncovering actionable knowledge and generating insight into exascale datasets from heterogeneous sources in real time Leadership Group Leader Patrick M. Kelly Email Deputy Group Leader Amy Larson Email Contact Us Administrator Yvonne McKelvey Email Conceptual illustration of futuristic data stream processing. Developing methods and tools for understanding complex interactions and extracting actionable information from massive data streams. Basic and applied research

  2. kato-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Comparison of Modeled and Measured Surface Shortwave Irradiance for a Molecular Atmosphere S. Kato* and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania *Now at Hampton University Hampton, Virginia E. G. Dutton NOAA-Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory Boulder, Colorado N. Laulainen and N. Larson Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction There is a growing body of evidence that models overestimate

  3. President Obama Announces Over $467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Announces New Plan to Create STEM Master Teaching Corps President Obama Announces New Plan to Create STEM Master Teaching Corps July 18, 2012 - 3:43pm Addthis *Editor's Note: This blog was originally posted on WhiteHouse.gov's Office of Sience and Technology Policy by Phil Larson. Today, the Obama Administration announced the President's plan to create a national Science, Math, Technology, and Engineering (STEM) Master Teacher Corps. The STEM Master Teacher Corps will

  4. George Crabtree - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information * Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations

  5. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, C.E.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  6. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  7. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Royer, L.T.

    1987-03-20

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  8. Crystal Chemistry and Luminescence of Ce3+ -Doped Lu2CaMg2(Si,Ge)3O12 and Its Use in LED Based Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlur,A.; Heward, W.; Gao, Y.; Srivastava, A.; Chandron, R.; Shankar, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the formation and luminescence of a new garnet phosphor for light emitting diode (LED) based lighting, Lu{sub 2}CaMg{sub 2}(Si,Ge){sub 3}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}.The regions for garnet phase formation are initially described with respect to larger rare earth substitution and show reasonable correlation to previous crystal chemistry studies for the garnet parent structure. While the pure silicate phosphor also has apatite second phases, a significant amount of Ce{sup 3+} enters the garnet phase, giving Ce{sup 3+} luminescence that is significantly redder when compared to typical Al{sup 3+} garnet phosphors with quantum efficiencies comparable to commercial Ce{sup 3+} garnet phosphors. Potential reasons for the emission red shift and the high quantum efficiency are discussed. Finally, the performance of these new phosphors is tested within LED based lamps. Lamps using these phosphors can reach color temperatures required for general illumination lighting and also have comparable phosphor conversion efficiencies when compared to lamps using typical garnet phosphors.

  9. Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO2 sequestration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G; Palmer, Donald A; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Beard, James S

    2014-03-18

    In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

  10. Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO.sub.2 sequestration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G.; Palmer, Donald A.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Beard, James S.

    2012-02-14

    In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

  11. Elastic wave velocities in polycrystalline Mg[subscript 3]Al[subscript

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2]Si[subscript 3]O[subscript 12]-pyrope garnet to 24 GPa and 1300 K (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Elastic wave velocities in polycrystalline Mg[subscript 3]Al[subscript 2]Si[subscript 3]O[subscript 12]-pyrope garnet to 24 GPa and 1300 K Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Elastic wave velocities in polycrystalline Mg[subscript 3]Al[subscript 2]Si[subscript 3]O[subscript 12]-pyrope garnet to 24 GPa and 1300 K Authors: Chantel,

  12. Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    garnet/Pt(Ta) trilayers (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron garnet/Pt(Ta) trilayers Title: Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron garnet/Pt(Ta) trilayers Pure spin current, a flow of spin angular momentum without flow of any accompanying net charge, is generated in two common ways. One makes use of the spin Hall effect in normal metals (NM) with strong spin-orbit coupling, such as Pt or Ta. The other utilizes

  13. Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    garnet/Pt(Ta) trilayers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron garnet/Pt(Ta) trilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron garnet/Pt(Ta) trilayers Pure spin current, a flow of spin angular momentum without flow of any accompanying net charge, is generated in two common ways. One makes use of the spin Hall effect in

  14. Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    garnet/Pt(Ta) trilayers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron garnet/Pt(Ta) trilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron garnet/Pt(Ta) trilayers × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public

  15. Revised calibration of the Sm:SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} pressure sensor using the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet primary pressure scale (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Revised calibration of the Sm:SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} pressure sensor using the Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet primary pressure scale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Revised calibration of the Sm:SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} pressure sensor using the Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet primary pressure scale The pressure-induced shift of Sm:SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7}

  16. Sub-Microsecond Decay Time Phosphors for Pressure Sensitive Paint Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, S.W.

    2001-03-22

    The results suggest that garnet phosphors can be engineered to function thermographically over desired temperature ranges by adjusting gallium content. Substituting gadolinium for the yttrium in the host matrix also has an effect but it is not as large. A silicate phosphor showed the greatest temperature dependence though it could not be excited to fluoresce by a blue LED. All the garnet phosphors could be excited with such a blue source. Two phosphors tested showed an increase in intensity with temperature. Other garnet and silicate materials as mentioned above will be tested in the future. In addition, some perovskite phosphors, such as GdAlO{sub 3}:Ce, will also be investigated.

  17. The effect of f[subscript O2] on the partitioning and valence of V and Cr

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in garnet/melt pairs and the relation to terrestrial mantle V and Cr content (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The effect of f[subscript O2] on the partitioning and valence of V and Cr in garnet/melt pairs and the relation to terrestrial mantle V and Cr content Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The effect of f[subscript O2] on the partitioning and valence of V and Cr in garnet/melt pairs and the relation to terrestrial mantle V and Cr content Chromium and vanadium

  18. Comparison of Three Ni-Hard I Alloys

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Microstructural characterization of the alloys was performed using optical and ... In this study 150 grit garnet (80-100 m abrasive particle size; Vickers hardness of 13.1 ...

  19. Epitaxial patterning of nanometer-thick Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Epitaxial patterning of nanometer-thick Ysub 3Fesub 5Osub 12 films with low magnetic damping. Magnetic insulators such as yttrium iron garnet, Y3Fe5O12, with extremely ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Interplay of disorder and geometrical frustration in doped gadolinium gallium garnet Woo, N. ; Silevitch, D.M. ; Ferri, C. ; Ghosh, S. ; Rosenbaum, T.F. ; UC) ; CIT) September 2015 ...

  1. Magneto-optic current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lanagan, Michael T.; Valsko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Fisher, Brandon L.; Welp, Ulrich

    2003-10-07

    An optical current transducer configured to sense current in the conductor is disclosed. The optical current transducer includes a light source and a polarizer that generates linearly polarized light received from a the light source. The light is communicated to a magneto-optic garnet that includes, among other elements, bismuth, iron and oxygen and is coupled to the conductor. The magneto-optic garnet is configured to rotate the polarization of the linearly polarized light received from the polarizer. The optical current transducer also includes an analyzer in optical communication with the magneto-optic garnet. The analyzer detects the rotation of the linearly polarized light caused by the magneto-optic garnet.

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The ideamore of combining single-molecule magnets with graphene provides a direction in designing a new class of molecular spintronic devices. less December 2015 Garnet-to-per...

  3. Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

    2013-01-11

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however.

  4. Thermochemical cyclic system for splitting water and/or carbon dioxide by means of cerium compounds and reactions useful therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen from water comprises reacting ceric oxide with monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate to yield a solid reaction product, oxygen and water. The solid reaction product, alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate, and water, are reacted to yield hydrogen, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Ceric oxide is recycled. Trialkali metal phosphate, carbon dioxide and water are reacted to yield monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate and alkali metal bicarbonate, which are recycled. The cylic process can be modified for producing carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide by reacting the alkali metal cerous phosphate and alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate in the absence of water to produce carbon monoxide, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Carbon monoxide can be converted to hydrogen by the water gas shift reaction.

  5. Thermochemical cyclic system for splitting water and/or carbon dioxide by means of cerium compounds and reactions useful therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, C.E.; Robinson, P.R.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen from water comprises reacting ceric oxide with monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate to yield a solid reaction product, oxygen and water. The solid reaction product, alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate, and water, are reacted to yield hydrogen, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Ceric oxide is recycled. Trialkali metal phosphate, carbon dioxide and water are reacted to yield monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate and alkali metal bicarbonate, which are recycled. The cyclic process can be modified for producing carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide by reacting the alkali metal cerous phosphate and alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate in the absence of water to produce carbon monoxide, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Carbon monoxide can be converted to hydrogen by the water gas shift reaction.

  6. CO.sub.2 removal sorbent composition with high chemical stability during multiple cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Rosencwaig, Shira

    2015-09-22

    Disclosed herein is a clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent composition prepared by integrating a clay substrate, basic alkali salt, and amine liquid. The basic alkali salt is present relative to the clay substrate in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 50 parts per 100 parts of the clay substrate. The amine liquid is present relative to a clay-alkali combination in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 10 parts per 10 parts of the clay-alkali combination. The clay-alkali-amine C02 sorbent is particularly advantageous for low temperature CO.sub.2 removal cycles in a gas stream having a C02 concentration less than around 2000 ppm and an oxygen concentration around 21%, such as air.

  7. Two-Photon Photoemission Study of the Coverage-Dependent Electronic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure of Chemisorbed Alkali Atoms on a Ag(111) Surface (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Two-Photon Photoemission Study of the Coverage-Dependent Electronic Structure of Chemisorbed Alkali Atoms on a Ag(111) Surface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-Photon Photoemission Study of the Coverage-Dependent Electronic Structure of Chemisorbed Alkali Atoms on a Ag(111) Surface We report a systematic investigation of the electronic

  8. Effect of temperature and CO2 concentration on laser-induced breakdown

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectroscopy measurements of alkali fume. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect temperature and CO2 concentration on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of alkali fume. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of temperature and CO2 concentration on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of alkali fume. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used in the evaluation of aerosol concentration in the exhaust of an oxygen/natural-gas glass furnace.

  9. ELECTROLYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alter, H.W.; Barney, D.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the treatment of radioactivc waste nitric acid solutions. The nitric acid solution is neutralized with an alkali metal hydroxide in an amount sufficient to precipitate insoluble hydroxides, and after separation of the precipitate the solution is electrolyzed to convert the alkali nitrate formed, to alkali hydroxide, gaseous ammonla and oxygen. The solution is then reusable after reducing the volume by evaporating the water and dissolved ammonia.

  10. Expert Meeting Report. Windows Options for New and Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyck, C.; Carmody, J.; Haglund, K.

    2013-05-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011, at the Nolte Building on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Featured speakers included John Carmody and Pat Huelman of the University of Minnesota, Charlie Curcija of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover need and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals.

  11. Expert Meeting Report: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.; Carmody, J.; Haglund, K.

    2013-05-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011 at the Nolte Building on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Featured speakers included John Carmody and Pat Huelman of the University of Minnesota, Charlie Curcija of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover need and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals.

  12. Non-aqueous electrolyte for lithium-ion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Amine, Khalil

    2015-12-22

    An electrolyte including an alkali metal salt; a polar aprotic solvent; and a triazinane trione; wherein the electrolyte is substantially non-aqueous.

  13. Ling Tao, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (MESP) of the Novel Deacetylation and Disk ... alkali deacetylation and mechanical (disc) refining process ... via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic ...

  14. Lithium | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium Subscribe to RSS - Lithium Nearly everybody knows about lithium - a light, silvery alkali metal - used in rechargeable batteries powering everything from laptops to hybrid ...

  15. Liquid phase thermal swing chemical air separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, D.C.

    1988-05-24

    A temperature swing absorption separation of oxygen from air is performed with an oxygen acceptor of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite. 2 figs.

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Lithium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lithium Nearly everybody knows about lithium - a light, silvery alkali metal - used in rechargeable batteries powering everything from laptops to hybrid cars. What may not be so...

  17. Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LLC - Dan Hoglund, Lead * Olin Chemical Chlor-Alkali Division - Don Loftis 3 ... and cargo monitoring - Pressure gauges & chemical detection sensors - Fiber-opticphotonic ...

  18. Sodium heat engine electrical feedthrough

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, Neill (Dearborn, MI)

    1985-01-01

    A thermoelectric generator device which converts heat energy to electrical energy. An alkali metal is used with a solid electrolyte and a hermetically sealed feedthrough structure.

  19. Studies of the regeneration of activated bauxite used as granular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BED FILTERS; HOT GAS CLEANUP; POTASSIUM CHLORIDES; SORPTION; SODIUM CHLORIDES; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; COAL; FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTORS; ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS; ALUMINIUM ORES; ...

  20. Sorbent Assisted Catalyst for the One-Pot Sequestration and Conversion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crude oil. However, the use of strong alkali catalysts and elimination of glycerol waste component from the lipid conversion reduces the yields obtained from the renewable stock. ...

  1. Double perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, K.D.

    1991-01-01

    Alkali metal doped double perovskites containing manganese and at least one of cobalt, iron and nickel are useful in the oxidative coupling of alkane to higher hydrocarbons.

  2. Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing ... an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. ...

  3. Electrochemical cell (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Electrochemical cell An electrochemical cell having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated ...

  4. Method of preparation of a CO.sub.2 removal sorbent with high chemical stability during multiple cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Rosencwaig, Shira

    2015-07-14

    Method for the production of a clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent prepared by integrating a clay substrate, basic alkali salt, and amine liquid. The basic alkali salt is present relative to the clay substrate in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 50 parts per 100 parts of the clay substrate. The amine liquid is present relative to a clay-alkali combination in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 10 parts per 10 parts of the clay-alkali combination. The clay substrate and basic alkali salt may be combined in a solid-solid heterogeneous mixture and followed by introduction of the amine liquid. Alternatively, an alkaline solution may be blended with the amine solution prior to contacting the clay substrate. The clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent is particularly advantageous for low temperature CO.sub.2 removal cycles in a gas stream having a CO.sub.2 concentration less than around 2000 ppm and an oxygen concentration around 21%, such as air. Results are presented illustrating the performance of the clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent compared to a clay-amine sorbent lacking the alkali inclusion.

  5. Jiangxi Ganzhong Chlorine Caustic Company aka China Jiangxi Chlor...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ganzhong Chlorine Caustic Company aka China Jiangxi Chlor Alkali Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jiangxi Ganzhong Chlorine & Caustic Company (aka China Jiangxi...

  6. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    The Quebec plant produces hydrogen using renewable methods-through electrolysis of water and using a chlor alkali waste recuperation process. Power for these processes comes...

  7. Liquid phase thermal swing chemical air separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature swing absorption separation of oxygen from air is performed with an oxygen acceptor of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite.

  8. Bulk and Surface Molecular Orientation Distribution in Injection-molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers: Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.; Burghardt, W; Bubeck, R; Burgard, S; Fischer, D

    2010-01-01

    Bulk and surface distributions of molecular orientation in injection-molded plaques of thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) have been studied using a combination of techniques, coordinated with process simulations using the Larson-Doi 'polydomain' model. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to map out the bulk orientation distribution. Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) were utilized to probe the molecular orientation states to within about {approx}5 {micro}m and {approx}2 nm, respectively, of the sample surface. These noninvasive, surface-sensitive techniques yield reasonable self-consistency, providing complementary validation of the robustness of these methods. An analogy between Larson-Doi and fiber orientation models has allowed the first simulations of TLCP injection molding. The simulations capture many fine details in the bulk orientation distribution across the sample plaque. Direct simulation of surface orientation at the level probed by FTIR-ATR and NEXAFS was not possible due to the limited spatial resolution of the simulations. However, simulation results extracted from the shear-dominant skin region are found to provide a qualitatively accurate indicator of surface orientation. Finally, simulations capture the relation between bulk and surface orientation states across the different regions of the sample plaque.

  9. SURVIVAL OF INTERSTELLAR MOLECULES TO PRESTELLAR DENSE CORE COLLAPSE AND EARLY PHASES OF DISK FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hincelin, U.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S.; Commerçon, B.

    2013-09-20

    An outstanding question of astrobiology is the link between the chemical composition of planets, comets, and other solar system bodies and the molecules formed in the interstellar medium. Understanding the chemical and physical evolution of the matter leading to the formation of protoplanetary disks is an important step for this. We provide some new clues to this long-standing problem using three-dimensional chemical simulations of the early phases of disk formation: we interfaced the full gas-grain chemical model Nautilus with the radiation-magnetohydrodynamic model RAMSES, for different configurations and intensities of the magnetic field. Our results show that the chemical content (gas and ices) is globally conserved during the collapsing process, from the parent molecular cloud to the young disk surrounding the first Larson core. A qualitative comparison with cometary composition suggests that comets are constituted of different phases, some molecules being direct tracers of interstellar chemistry, while others, including complex molecules, seem to have been formed in disks, where higher densities and temperatures allow for an active grain surface chemistry. The latter phase, and its connection with the formation of the first Larson core, remains to be modeled.

  10. Molecular orientation distributions during injection molding of liquid crystalline polymers: Ex situ investigation of partially filled moldings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Jun; Burghardt, Wesley R.; Bubeck, Robert A.

    2013-01-10

    The development of molecular orientation in thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) during injection molding has been investigated using two-dimensional wide-angle X-ray scattering coordinated with numerical computations employing the Larson-Doi polydomain model. Orientation distributions were measured in 'short shot' moldings to characterize structural evolution prior to completion of mold filling, in both thin and thick rectangular plaques. Distinct orientation patterns are observed near the filling front. In particular, strong extension at the melt front results in nearly transverse molecular alignment. Far away from the flow front shear competes with extension to produce complex spatial distributions of orientation. The relative influence of shear is stronger in the thin plaque, producing orientation along the filling direction. Exploiting an analogy between the Larson-Doi model and a fiber orientation model, we test the ability of process simulation tools to predict TLCP orientation distributions during molding. Substantial discrepancies between model predictions and experimental measurements are found near the flow front in partially filled short shots, attributed to the limits of the Hele-Shaw approximation used in the computations. Much of the flow front effect is however 'washed out' by subsequent shear flow as mold filling progresses, leading to improved agreement between experiment and corresponding numerical predictions.

  11. Preparation of catalysts via ion-exchangeable coatings on supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.

    1986-04-09

    Disclosed are: new catalytic compositions which comprise an inert support coated with a hydrous alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, or quaternary ammonium titanate, niobate, zirconate, or tantalate, in which the alkali or alkaline earth metal or quaternary ammonium cations have been exchanged for a catalytically effective quantity of a catalytically effective metal.

  12. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kucera, Gene H. (Downers Grove, IL); Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL); Sim, James W. (Evergreen Park, IL)

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  13. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  14. Sodium to sodium carbonate conversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herrmann, S.D.

    1997-10-14

    A method is described for converting radioactive alkali metal into a low level disposable solid waste material. The radioactive alkali metal is atomized and introduced into an aqueous caustic solution having caustic present in the range of from about 20 wt % to about 70 wt % to convert the radioactive alkali metal to a radioactive alkali metal hydroxide. The aqueous caustic containing radioactive alkali metal hydroxide and CO{sub 2} are introduced into a thin film evaporator with the CO{sub 2} present in an amount greater than required to convert the alkali metal hydroxide to a radioactive alkali metal carbonate, and thereafter the radioactive alkali metal carbonate is separated from the thin film evaporator as a dry powder. Hydroxide solutions containing toxic metal hydroxide including one or more metal ions of Sb, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag and Tl can be converted into a low level non-hazardous waste using the thin film evaporator of the invention. 3 figs.

  15. Sodium to sodium carbonate conversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A method of converting radioactive alkali metal into a low level disposable solid waste material. The radioactive alkali metal is atomized and introduced into an aqueous caustic solution having caustic present in the range of from about 20 wt % to about 70 wt % to convert the radioactive alkali metal to a radioactive alkali metal hydroxide. The aqueous caustic containing radioactive alkali metal hydroxide and CO.sub.2 are introduced into a thin film evaporator with the CO.sub.2 present in an amount greater than required to convert the alkali metal hydroxide to a radioactive alkali metal carbonate, and thereafter the radioactive alkali metal carbonate is separated from the thin film evaporator as a dry powder. Hydroxide solutions containing toxic metal hydroxide including one or more metal ions of Sb, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag and T1 can be converted into a low level non-hazardous waste using the thin film evaporator of the invention.

  16. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2010-12-07

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  17. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2011-11-22

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  18. Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, and Membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2008-10-21

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  19. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2009-09-01

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  20. Method of bonding metals to ceramics and other materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; DeWald, A.P.; Chienping Ju; Rigsbee, J.M.

    1993-01-05

    A composite and method of forming same wherein the composite has a non-metallic portion and an alloy portion wherein the alloy comprises an alkali metal and a metal which is an electrical conductor such as Cu, Ag, Al, Sn or Au and forms an alloy with the alkali metal. A cable of superconductors and composite is also disclosed.

  1. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  2. Methods for tritium labeling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andres, Hendrik; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.

    1993-01-01

    Reagents and processes for reductively introducing deuterium or tritium into organic molecules are described. The reagents are deuterium or tritium analogs of trialkyl boranes, borane or alkali metal aluminum hydrides. The process involves forming these reagents in situ from alkali metal tritides or deuterides.

  3. Method of bonding metals to ceramics and other materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; DeWald, A. Bruce; Ju, Chien-Ping; Rigsbee, James M.

    1993-01-01

    A composite and method of forming same wherein the composite has a non-metallic portion and an alloy portion wherein the alloy comprises an alkali metal and a metal which is an electrical conductor such as Cu, Ag, Al, Sn or Au and forms an alloy with the alkali metal. A cable of superconductors and composite is also disclosed.

  4. Reuse of waste cutting sand at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, S., LLNL

    1998-02-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses for the spent garnet sand: backfill in utility trenches; and as a concrete constituent. In both applications, garnet waste would replace the sand formerly purchases by LLNL for these purposes. Findings supported the reuse of waste garnet sand in concrete, but disqualified its proposed application as trench backfill. Waste sand stabilized in ac concrete matrix appeared to present no metals-leaching hazard; however, unconsolidated sand in trenches could potentially leach metals in concentrations high enough to threaten ground water quality. A technical report submitted to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board was reviewed and accepted by that body. Reuse of waste garnet cutting sand as a constituent in concrete poured to form walkways and patios at LLNL was approved.

  5. Carbon dioxide adsorbents containing magnesium oxide suitable for use at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Weigel, Scott Jeffrey; Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption of carbon dioxide from gas streams at temperatures in the range of 300 to 500.degree. C. is carried out with a solid adsorbent containing magnesium oxide, preferably promoted with an alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate so that the atomic ratio of alkali metal to magnesium is in the range of 0.006 to 2.60. Preferred adsorbents are made from the precipitate formed on addition of alkali metal and carbonate ions to an aqueous solution of a magnesium salt. Atomic ratios of alkali metal to magnesium can be adjusted by washing the precipitate with water. Low surface area adsorbents can be made by dehydration and CO.sub.2 removal of magnesium hydroxycarbonate, with or without alkali metal promotion. The process is especially valuable in pressure swing adsorption operations.

  6. Method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yavorsky, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    A method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile comprises soaking the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution and distributing an oxygen-containing gas throughout the coal refuse pile for a time period sufficient to effect oxidation of coal contained in the coal refuse pile. The method further comprises leaching the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution to solubilize and extract the oxidized coal as alkali salts of humic acids and collecting the resulting solution containing the alkali salts of humic acids. Calcium hydroxide may be added to the solution of alkali salts of humic acid to form precipitated humates useable as a low-ash, low-sulfur solid fuel.

  7. Ion dynamics and mixed mobile ion effect in fluoride glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, S.; Ghosh, A.

    2005-06-15

    We report the ionic relaxation and mixed mobile ion effect in 50ZrF{sub 4}-10BaF{sub 2}-10YF{sub 3}-(30-x)LiF-xNaF fluoride glass series, where fluorine anions participate in the diffusion process in addition to alkali cations, unlike mixed alkali oxide glasses and crystals. By analyzing the ion dynamics in the framework of a power-law model as well as modulus formalism we have observed mixed mobile ion effect in the dc conductivity and its activation energy, the crossover frequency and its activation energy, the conductivity relaxation frequency and its activation energy, and also in the decoupling index. We have correlated these phenomena with the fractal dimension of the conduction pathways in the mixed alkali fluoride glasses compared to the single alkali glasses. We have shown that the relaxation dynamics in mixed alkali fluoride glasses is independent of temperature but dependent on glass composition.

  8. Scintillator assembly for alpha radiation detection and an associated method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Bates, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator assembly for use in conjunction with a photomultiplier or the like in the detection of alpha radiation utilizes a substrate or transparent yttrium aluminum garnet and a relatively thin film of cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet coated upon the substrate. The film material is applied to the substrate in a sputtering process, and the applied film and substrate are annealed to effect crystallization of the film upon the substrate. The resultant assembly provides relatively high energy resolution during use in a detection instrument and is sufficiently rugged for use in field environments.

  9. Scintillator assembly for alpha radiation detection and an associated method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; McElhaney, S.A.; Bates, J.B.

    1994-07-26

    A scintillator assembly for use in conjunction with a photomultiplier or the like in the detection of alpha radiation utilizes a substrate or transparent yttrium aluminum garnet and a relatively thin film of cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet coated upon the substrate. The film material is applied to the substrate in a sputtering process, and the applied film and substrate are annealed to effect crystallization of the film upon the substrate. The resultant assembly provides relatively high energy resolution during use in a detection instrument and is sufficiently rugged for use in field environments. 4 figs.

  10. Titania-Activated Silica System for Emission Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Titania-Activated Silica System for Emission Control Titania-Activated Silica System for Emission Control Silica-Titania Composite (STC) Technology Safely and Cost-Effectively Removes Mercury from End-Box Exhaust in Chlor-Alkali Facilities The chlor-alkali industry produces valuable chemicals such as chlorine, hydrogen, and caustic soda. In 2001, between 150 and 200 chlor-alkali facilities throughout the world used the mercury-cell process. Although this process uses the mercury in a closed-loop

  11. Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| under AEC Contract A T (30-1)-3780 " ■ ' Annual Report (1970) Principal In-vestigator: Martin Karpins Institution: Harvard University The research performed under this contract can best be sunmarized under several headings. (a) Alkali-Halideg Alkali-Halide (MX^ M*X*) Exchange Reactions. This project is being continued. A careful study of certain parameters obtained from alkali-halide crystals and used in the first surface for the KCl, NaBr were not

  12. Deetherification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1985-11-05

    Ethers such as isobutyl tertiary butyl ether are dissociated into their component alcohols and isoolefins by heat stabilized catalyst compositions prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  13. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1986-12-16

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  14. Deetherification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1985-01-01

    Ethers such as isobutyl tertiary butyl ether are dissociated into their component alcohols and isolefins by heat stabilized catalyst compositions prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  15. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1986-01-01

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  16. Sodium purification apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gould, M.I.

    1980-03-04

    An apparatus for and method of collecting and storing oxide impurities contained in high-temperature liquid alkali metal are disclosed. A method and apparatus are provided for nucleating and precipitating oxide impurities by cooling, wherein the nucleation and precipitation are enhanced by causing a substantial increase in pressure drop and corresponding change in the velocity head of the alkali metal. Thereafter the liquid alkali metal is introduced into a quiescent zone wherein the liquid velocity is maintained below a specific maximum whereby it is possible to obtain high oxide removal efficiencies without the necessity of a mesh or filter. 1 fig.

  17. .sup.123m Te-Labeled biochemicals and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1980-01-01

    A novel class of .sup.123m Te-labeled steroids and amino acids is provided by the method of reacting a .sup.123m Te symmetric diorgano ditelluride with a hydride reducing agent and a source of alkali metal ions to form an alkali metal organo telluride. The alkali metal organo telluride is reacted with a primary halogenated steroidal side chain, amino acid, or amino acid precursor such as hydantoin. The novel compounds are useful as biological tracers and as organal imaging agents.

  18. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  19. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition and process for electrolysis thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vandegrift, George F. (Bolingbrook, Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Hinsdale, IL)

    1983-01-01

    A process for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  20. Process for hydroliquefying coal or like carbonaceous solid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malek, John Michael

    1977-01-01

    In this process the products of the dissolution-hydrogenation of coal or the like material in a hydrocarbon rich solvent are subjected in their slurryform fraction to an asphaltenes decomposing action of an alkali, like caustic soda or, being admixed after the gasiform fraction of the hydrogenation products has been taken off the slurryform fraction of the hydrogenation products now including the admixed alkali is subjected to a rehydrogenation by a hydrogen rich gas which after its rehydrogenating use is preferably applied, as source of hydrogen, to said dissolution-hydrogenation of coal. Optionally the admixed alkali includes minor amounts of a carboxylic acid salt of calcium.

  1. Sodium purification apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gould, Marc I. [Van Nuys, CA

    1980-03-04

    An apparatus for and method of collecting and storing oxide impurities contained in high-temperature liquid alkali metal. A method and apparatus are provided for nucleating and precipitating oxide impurities by cooling, wherein the nucleation and precipitation are enhanced by causing a substantial increase in pressure drop and corresponding change in the velocity head of the alkali metal. Thereafter the liquid alkali metal is introduced into a quiescent zone wherein the liquid velocity is maintained below a specific maximum whereby it is possible to obtain high oxide removal efficiencies without the necessity of a mesh or filter.

  2. Studies of nonlinear and chaotic phenomena in solid state systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, P.H.

    1987-09-01

    This thesis contains three sections discussing different areas. Spin wave interactions in iron garnets are described in section one. Mathematical analysis of a magnetic oscillator is presented in section two. In the final section, the source of noise in Josephson Junctions is investigated. The three sections are indexed separately. (JDH)

  3. Investigation on growth and laser properties of GGG:(Nd,Cr) single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang; Lin; Liu; Liu; Zhu

    1986-04-04

    Investigation on the growth and laser properties of gadolinium gallium garnet crystal doped with neodymium and chromium is reported. As the segregation coefficient of Nd in GGG is less than 1 and that of Cr is greater than 1, a modified Czochralski method for growth is adopted in order to keep the dopants being uniform in the grown crystal.

  4. Tantalum-containing catalyst useful for producing alcohols from synthesis gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kinkade, Nancy E.

    1992-01-01

    A catalyst useful for selectively converting a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen to a mixture of lower alkanols consisting essentially of a mixture of molybdenum sulfide, an alkali metal compound and a tantalum compound.

  5. Tantalum-containing catalyst useful for producing alcohols from synthesis gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kinkade, Nancy E.

    1991-01-01

    A catalyst useful for selectively converting a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen to a mixture of lower alkanols consisting essentially of a mixture of molybdenum sulfide, an alkali metal compound and a tantalum compound.

  6. Method for producing catalysis from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Derbyshire, Frank; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Jagtoyen, Marit

    1998-01-01

    A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

  7. Method for producing catalysts from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

    1998-02-24

    A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

  8. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  9. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Susman, Sherman; Volin, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  10. N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    early everybody knows about lithium - a light, silvery alkali metal - used in rechargeable ... reactions also have used lithium to coat the walls of donut-shaped toka- mak reactors. ...

  11. Comparison of CsBr and KBr coated Cu photocathodes: Effects of laser irradiation and work function changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Weidong; VilayurGanapathy, Subramanian; Joly, Alan G.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Chambers, Scott A.; Maldonado, Juan R.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-20

    Thin films (7 nm layers) of CsBr and KBr were deposited on Cu(100) to investigate photoemission properties of these potential photocathode materials. After thin film deposition and prolonged laser ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (266 nm picosecond laser) photoemission quantum efficiency increases by factors of 26 and 77 for KBr/Cu(100) and CsBr/Cu(100) photocathodes, respectively. Immediately following thin film deposition, a decrease in work function is observed, compared to bare Cu, in both cases. Quantum efficiency enhancements are attributed to the decrease in photocathode work function, due to the deposition of alkali halide thin films, and photo-induced processes, that introduce defect states into the alkali halide bandgap, induced by UV laser irradiation. It is possible that alkali metal formation occurs during UV irradiation and that this further contributes to photoemission enhancement. Our results suggest that KBr, a relatively stable alkali-halide, has potential for photocathode applications.

  12. Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKee, Douglas W.; Spiro, Clifford L.; Kosky, Philip G.

    1985-01-01

    Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

  13. Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reggel, Leslie; Raymond, Raphael; Blaustein, Bernard D.

    1976-11-23

    Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

  14. Sodium heat engine electrical feedthrough

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, N.

    1985-03-19

    A thermoelectric generator device which converts heat energy to electrical energy is disclosed. An alkali metal is used with a solid electrolyte and a hermetically sealed feedthrough structure. 4 figs.

  15. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the ...

  16. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  17. Method of preparing electrolyte for use in fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kinoshita, Kimio; Ackerman, John P.

    1978-01-01

    An electrolyte compact for fuel cells includes a particulate support material of lithium aluminate that contains a mixture of alkali metal compounds, such as carbonates or hydroxides, as the active electrolyte material. The porous lithium aluminate support structure is formed by mixing alumina particles with a solution of lithium hydroxide and another alkali metal hydroxide, evaporating the solvent from the solution and heating to a temperature sufficient to react the lithium hydroxide with alumina to form lithium aluminate. Carbonates are formed by reacting the alkali metal hydroxides with carbon dioxide gas in an exothermic reaction which may proceed simultaneously with the formation with the lithium aluminate. The mixture of lithium aluminate and alkali metal in an electrolyte active material is pressed or otherwise processed to form the electrolyte structure for assembly into a fuel cell.

  18. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Ingersoll, David

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  19. Two-Photon Photoemission Study of the Coverage-Dependent Electronic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Two-Photon Photoemission Study of the Coverage-Dependent Electronic Structure of Chemisorbed Alkali Atoms on a Ag(111) Surface ...

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.