National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for large-scale shale gas

  1. What is shale gas? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    What is shale gas? What is shale gas? What is shale gas? (694.01 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary How is shale gas produced?

  2. Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary ... Fossil Energy Research Benefits FE's early investments in shale research in the 1970s ...

  3. Shale gas - what happened? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shale gas - what happened? Shale gas - what happened? It seems like shale gas came out of nowhere - what happened? More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions...

  4. Shale Gas Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glossary Shale Gas Glossary Shale Gas Glossary (286.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer How is shale gas produced?

  5. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was ... September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil ...

  6. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May, 17, 2013 2-1 SHALE GAS AND SHALE OIL RESOURCE ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY INTRODUCTION This report sets forth Advanced Resources' methodology for assessing the in-place and recoverable shale gas and shale oil resources for the EIA/ARI "World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment." The methodology relies on geological information and reservoir properties assembled from the technical literature and data from publically

  7. How is shale gas produced? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How is shale gas produced? How is shale gas produced? How is shale gas produced? (3.81 MB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids

  8. Why is shale gas important? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Why is shale gas important? Why is shale gas important? Why is shale gas important? (1.27 MB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary How is shale gas produced?

  9. Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shale: Questions and Answers Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers (12.62 MB) More Documents & Publications Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids Shale Gas Glossary How is shale gas produced?

  10. Shale gas - what happened? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    gas - what happened? Shale gas - what happened? It seems like shale gas came out of nowhere - what happened? (571.05 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Natural Gas from Shale Challenges associated with shale gas production

  11. Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Surface Impacts Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts (657.75 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from ...

  12. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glossary Acquifer - A single underground geological formation, or group of formations, containing water. Antrim Shale - A shale deposit located in the northern Michigan basin that is a Devonian age rock formation lying at a relatively shallow depth of 1,000 feet. Gas has been produced from this formation for several decades primarily via vertical, rather than horizontal, wells. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates the technically recoverable Antrim shale resource at 20 trillion

  13. Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Air Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air (921.93 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Challenges associated with shale gas production How is shale gas produced?

  14. Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Earthquakes Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes Shale Gas Development Challenges: Induced Seismic Events (750.17 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Challenges associated with shale gas production Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids

  15. Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water (1003.99 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air

  16. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  17. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  18. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  19. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  20. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  1. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  2. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  3. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  4. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  5. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  6. ,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  7. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  8. ,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  9. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  10. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These deposits occur in shale "plays" - a set of discovered, undiscovered or possible natural gas accumulations that exhibit similar geological characteristics. Shale plays are ...

  11. Natural Gas from Shale | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shale Natural Gas from Shale Office of Fossil Energy research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, protective environmental practices and data development, making hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of gas technically recoverable where they once were not. Fossil Energy Research Benefits - Natural Gas from Shale (697.8 KB) More Documents & Publications Shale gas - what happened? Shale Gas Glossary Return on Investment

  12. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Source: Sachsenhofer et al., 2012 The Kovel-1 petroleum well is a key stratigraphic test ... have pursued shale gas leasing in Bulgaria but only one shale test well has been drilled. ...

  13. Challenges associated with shale gas production | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges associated with shale gas production Challenges associated with shale gas production What challenges are associated with shale gas production? (1012.02 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids

  14. Gas Shale Plays? The Global Transition

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    in TOC, thermally mature in the gas to oil windows, and among the most prospective in Europe for shale development. Figure VIII-5 exhibits organic-rich shales that are typically...

  15. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges are Associated with Shale Gas Production? Developing any energy resource - whether conventional or non-conventional like shale - carries with it the possibility and risk of environmental, public health, and safety issues. Some of the challenges related to shale gas production and hydraulic fracturing include: * Increased consumption of fresh water (volume and sources); * Induced seismicity (earthquakes) from shale flowback water disposal;Chemical disclosure of fracture fluid

  16. Shale Gas Spreads to the South | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Innovation » Oil & Gas » Shale » Shale Gas 101 Shale Gas 101 Shale Gas 101 This webpage has been developed to answer the many questions that people have about shale gas and hydraulic fracturing (or fracking). The information provided below explains the basics, including what shale gas is, where it's found, why it's important, how it's produced, and challenges associated with production. Natural gas production from "shale" formations (fine-grained sedimentary rocks

  17. Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 7,051 6,368 ...

  18. Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...

  19. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 1,239 1,119 1,239 ...

  20. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 11,582 10,461 ...

  1. Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 1,622 1,465 ...

  2. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 1,273 1,150 ...

  3. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 11,749 10,612 ...

  4. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  5. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 331 299 331 320 ...

  6. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 ...

  7. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 107,415 97,020 ...

  8. Shale Gas Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2009 2010 2011 2012...

  9. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Why is Shale Gas Important?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Why is Shale Gas Important? With the advance of extraction technology, shale gas production has led to a new abundance of natural gas supply in the United States over the past decade, and is expected to continue to do so for the foreseeable future. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the unproved technically recoverable U.S. shale gas resource is estimated at 482 trillion cubic feet. 1 Estimated proved and unproved shale gas resources amount to a combined 542 trillion cubic

  10. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers It Seems Like Shale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    It Seems Like Shale Gas Came Out of Nowhere - What Happened? Knowledge of gas shale resources and even production techniques has been around a long time (see "Technological ...

  11. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale ... 7:12:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale ...

  12. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale ... 1:29:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale ...

  13. ,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale ... 7:12:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale ...

  14. Gas Shale Plays? The Global Transition

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    wells, and install the extensive surface infrastructure needed to transport product to market. Industry is cautious regarding China's likely pace of shale gas development. Even...

  15. Gas Shale Plays? The Global Transition

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and transportation capacity in the Horn River Basin is being expanded to provide improved market access for its growing shale gas production. Pipeline infrastructure is being...

  16. Shale Gas 101 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Protection Agency U.S. Government Accountability Office Clean Coal Carbon Capture and Storage Oil & Gas Methane Hydrate LNG Offshore Drilling Enhanced Oil Recovery Shale

  17. Natural Gas from Shale | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas from Shale Office of Fossil Energy research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, protective environmental practices ...

  18. Shale Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 3,110 5,336 7,994 10,371 11,415 13,447 2007-2014 Alabama 0 0 2007-2010 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 Arkansas 527 794 940 1,027 1,026 1,038 2007-2014 California 101 90 89 3 2011-2014 Colorado 1 1 3 9 18 236 2007-2014 Kansas 1 3 1 2012-2014 Kentucky 5 4 4 4 4 2 2007-2014 Louisiana 293

  19. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Algeria Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of

  20. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Argentina Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of

  1. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Australia Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of

  2. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Canada Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  3. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Chad Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  4. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    China Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  5. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Eastern Europe Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or

  6. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Egypt Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  7. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    India and Pakistan Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or

  8. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indonesia Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of

  9. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jordan Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  10. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kazakhstan Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of

  11. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Libya Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  12. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  13. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Morocco Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of

  14. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Northern South America Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or

  15. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Western Europe Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or

  16. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oman Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  17. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South America Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee

  18. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Poland Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  19. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Russia Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  20. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Africa Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee

  1. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Spain Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  2. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thailand Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of

  3. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tunisia Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of

  4. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turkey Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  5. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kingdom Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of

  6. COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction and Hydraulic Fracturing" Professor Robert Jackson Duke University Presentation: PDF icon WC09JAN2013RBJackson.pdf Shale gas extraction is ...

  7. Shale Gas Application in Hydraulic Fracturing Market is likely...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on unconventional reservoirs such as coal bed methane, tight gas, tight oil, shale gas, and shale oil. Over the period of time, hydraulic fracturing technique has found...

  8. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. How is Shale Gas Produced? Shale gas formations are "unconventional" reservoirs - i.e., reservoirs of low "permeability." Permeability refers to the capacity of a porous, sediment, soil - or rock in this case - to transmit a fluid. This contrasts with a "conventional" gas reservoir produced from sands and carbonates (such as limestone). The bottom line is that in a conventional

  9. What is shale gas and why is it important?

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Shale gas refers to natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Over the past decade, the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has allowed access to large volumes of shale gas that were previously uneconomical to produce. The production of natural gas from shale formations has rejuvenated the natural gas industry in the United States.

  10. Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fracture Fluids Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids (904.72 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary Report of the Task Force on FracFocus 2.0

  11. ,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas...

  12. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North...

  13. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska...

  14. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi...

  15. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana...

  16. ,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California...

  17. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South...

  18. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas...

  19. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana...

  20. ,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah...

  1. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming...

  2. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West...

  3. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan...

  4. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma...

  5. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio...

  6. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon...

  7. ,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana...

  8. ,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida...

  9. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia...

  10. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada...

  11. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee...

  12. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland...

  13. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky...

  14. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado...

  15. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri...

  16. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

  17. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Key Points: * As with conventional oil and gas development, requirements from eight federal (including the Clean Water Act) and numerous state and local environmental and public health laws apply to shale gas and other unconventional oil and gas development. Consequently, the fracturing of wells is a process that is highly engineered, controlled and monitored. * Shale gas operations use water for drilling; water is also the primary component of fracturing fluid. * This water is likely to

  18. Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M.

    2012-01-27

    The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

  19. Where is shale gas found in the United States? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Where is shale gas found in the United States? Where is shale gas found in the United States? Where is shale gas found in the United States? (2.7 MB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts Shale Gas Glossary

  20. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico...

  1. ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York...

  2. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... of the Paran Basin, although Amerisur Energy has discussed the shale potential of the ... Showing Flat-lying but Moderately Faulted Devonian Shale (Green) at Depths of 2 to 3 km. ...

  3. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of...

  4. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2012 finalized New Source Performance Standards that set the first air pollution standards for natural gas hydraulic fracturing operations. ...

  5. Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

  6. Producing Natural Gas From Shale | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas From Shale Producing Natural Gas From Shale January 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Office of Fossil Energy sponsored early research that refined more cost-effective and innovative production technologies for U.S. shale gas production -- such as directional drilling. By 2035, EIA projects that shale gas production will rise to 13.6 trillion cubic feet, representing nearly half of all U.S. natural gas production. | Image courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. The Office of Fossil

  7. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  8. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  9. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  10. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee Releases Shale Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recommendations | Department of Energy Releases Shale Gas Recommendations Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee Releases Shale Gas Recommendations August 11, 2011 - 8:54am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - A diverse group of advisors to Energy Secretary Steven Chu today released a series of consensus-based recommendations calling for increased measurement, public disclosure and a commitment to continuous improvement in the development and environmental management of shale gas, which has

  11. DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today February 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A $92 million research investment in the 1970s by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is today being credited with technological contributions that have stimulated development of domestic natural gas from shales. The result: more U.S. jobs, increased energy security, and higher revenues

  12. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31

    Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make

  13. Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 66 58 134 2010's 121 75 52 25 123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Shale Gas

  14. ,"New Mexico Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2014,"0630...

  15. Analysis shows greenhouse gas emissions similar for shale, crude...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michael Wang, Argonne senior scientist and lead on the GREET model Analysis shows greenhouse gas emissions similar for shale, crude oil By Tona Kunz * October 15, 2015 Tweet ...

  16. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... the La Luna-1 stratigraphic test in the MMVB later that year (results not disclosed). ... ConocoPhillips expects to drill its first exploration well to test the La Luna Shale in ...

  17. Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2008-11-18

    This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However

  18. Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.

    2011-06-03

    Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

  19. APPLICATIONS OF CFD METHOD TO GAS MIXING ANALYSIS IN A LARGE-SCALED TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-03-19

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling technique was applied to the estimation of maximum benzene concentration for the vapor space inside a large-scaled and high-level radioactive waste tank at Savannah River site (SRS). The objective of the work was to perform the calculations for the benzene mixing behavior in the vapor space of Tank 48 and its impact on the local concentration of benzene. The calculations were used to evaluate the degree to which purge air mixes with benzene evolving from the liquid surface and its ability to prevent an unacceptable concentration of benzene from forming. The analysis was focused on changing the tank operating conditions to establish internal recirculation and changing the benzene evolution rate from the liquid surface. The model used a three-dimensional momentum coupled with multi-species transport. The calculations included potential operating conditions for air inlet and exhaust flows, recirculation flow rate, and benzene evolution rate with prototypic tank geometry. The flow conditions are assumed to be fully turbulent since Reynolds numbers for typical operating conditions are in the range of 20,000 to 70,000 based on the inlet conditions of the air purge system. A standard two-equation turbulence model was used. The modeling results for the typical gas mixing problems available in the literature were compared and verified through comparisons with the test results. The benchmarking results showed that the predictions are in good agreement with the analytical solutions and literature data. Additional sensitivity calculations included a reduced benzene evolution rate, reduced air inlet and exhaust flow, and forced internal recirculation. The modeling results showed that the vapor space was fairly well mixed and that benzene concentrations were relatively low when forced recirculation and 72 cfm ventilation air through the tank boundary were imposed. For the same 72 cfm air inlet flow but without forced recirculation

  20. North American Shale Gas | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and why is it important? (EIA) Review of Emerging Resources: U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays (EIA) Shale Gas: Applying Technology to Solve America's Energy Challenges (NETL ...

  1. New basins invigorate U.S. gas shales play

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, S.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hill, D.G.

    1996-01-22

    While actually the first and oldest of unconventional gas plays, gas shales have lagged the other main unconventional gas resources--tight gas and coalbed methane--in production and proved reserves. Recently, however, with active drilling of the Antrim shales in Michigan and promising results from the Barnett shales of North Texas, this gas play is growing in importance. While once thought of as only an Appalachian basin Devonian-age Ohio shales play and the exclusive domain of regional independents, development of gas shales has expanded to new basins and has began to attract larger E and P firms. Companies such as Amoco, Chevron, and Shell in the Michigan basin and Mitchell Energy and Development and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in the Fort Worth basin are aggressively pursuing this gas resource. This report, the third of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the gas shales industry following the 1992 expiration of the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. The main questions being addressed are first, to what extent are these gas sources viable without the tax credit, and second, what advances in understanding of these reservoirs and what progress in extraction technologies have changed the outlook for this large but complex gas resource?

  2. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Thursday, February 23, 2012 - 10:30am SSRL Third Floor Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger ...

  3. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Monday, May 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon ...

  4. Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-07-30

    Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

  5. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on ...

  6. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  7. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2:54:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSNUSMMCF" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas ...

  8. Eastern gas shales bibliography selected annotations: gas, oil, uranium, etc. Citations in bituminous shales worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, V.S.

    1980-06-01

    This bibliography contains 2702 citations, most of which are annotated. They are arranged by author in numerical order with a geographical index following the listing. The work is international in scope and covers the early geological literature, continuing through 1979 with a few 1980 citations in Addendum II. Addendum I contains a listing of the reports, well logs and symposiums of the Unconventional Gas Recovery Program (UGR) through August 1979. There is an author-subject index for these publications following the listing. The second part of Addendum I is a listing of the UGR maps which also has a subject-author index following the map listing. Addendum II includes several important new titles on the Devonian shale as well as a few older citations which were not found until after the bibliography had been numbered and essentially completed. A geographic index for these citations follows this listing.

  9. 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production- Secretary of Energy Advisory Board

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Shale Gas Subcommittee of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board is charged with identifying measures that can be taken to reduce the environmental impact and improve the safety of shale gas...

  10. Co-conversion of Biomass, Shale-natural gas, and process-derived...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Co-conversion of Biomass, Shale-natural gas, and process-derived CO2 into Fuels and Chemicals Co-conversion of Biomass, Shale-natural gas, and process-derived CO2 into Fuels and ...

  11. World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration sponsored Advanced Resources International, Inc., to assess 48 gas shale basins in 32 countries, containing almost 70 shale gas formations. This effort has culminated in the report: World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States.

  12. EIA responds to Nature article on shale gas projections

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    EIA has responded to a December 4, 2014 Nature article on projections of shale gas production made by EIA and by the Bureau of Economic Geology of the University of Texas at Austin (BEG/UT) with a letter to the editors of Nature. BEG/UT has also responded to the article in their own letter to the editor.

  13. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Thursday, February 23, 2012 - 10:30am SSRL Third Floor Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as

  14. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Monday, May 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as conventional reservoirs.

  15. DOE Gas Hydrate R&D: Shale Gas Déjà Vu?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    More than 30 years ago, DOE looked into the future and saw the potentially large benefit of developing promising but difficult-to-extract unconventional natural gas resources, particularly those from shale formations. As a result, it began sponsoring research and development (R&D), partnering with industry and academia, and, among other things, invested about $137 million in the Eastern Gas Shale Program between 1978 and 1992.

  16. Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-09-30

    This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

  17. Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer This Primer on Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States was commissioned through the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC). It is an effort to provide sound technical information on and additional insight into the relationship between today's fastest growing, and sometimes controversial, natural gas resource development activity, and environmental

  18. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Large Scale Jobs Running Large Scale Jobs Users face various challenges with running and scaling large scale jobs on peta-scale production systems. For example, certain applications may not have enough memory per core, the default environment variables may need to be adjusted, or I/O dominates run time. This page lists some available programming and run time tuning options and tips users can try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers

  19. Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay

  20. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fracture Fluids Key Points: * Shale fracture fluid, or "slickwater," is largely composed of water (99%); but a number of additives are mixed in with it to increase the effectiveness of the fracturing operation. These additives vary as a function of the well type and the preferences of the operator. * Hydraulic fracturing fluids can contain hazardous chemicals and, if mismanaged, spills could leak harmful substances into ground or surface water. However, good field practice, governed by

  1. ,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  2. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  3. ,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  4. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  5. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  6. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  7. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  8. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  9. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers and compiler options The available compilers on Hopper are PGI, Cray, Intel, GNU,...

  10. Virginia Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Virginia Shale Gas Proved Reserves, ...

  11. New Mexico Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) ... Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas Estimated Production New Mexico Shale Gas Proved ...

  12. US-China_Fact_Sheet_Shale_Gas.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shale_Gas.pdf US-China_Fact_Sheet_Shale_Gas.pdf (68.38 KB) More Documents & Publications FACT SHEET: U.S.-China Clean Energy Cooperation Announcements US-China Clean Energy Cooperation US-China_Fact_Sheet_Coal.pdf

  13. Evaluation of EL836 explosive stimulation of Devonian gas shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, T G

    1980-07-01

    This report presents an evaluation of EL836, an explosive developed at E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company Laboratories, in stimulating gas shale. EL836 is a water gel type explosive with a high aluminum content. The computational evaluation of EL836 involved four one-dimensional cyclindrical geometry calculations to assess the influence of two equation-of-state descriptios of EL836, the effect or rock yielding and the effect of internal crack pressurization. Results of a computational evaluation of the EL836 explosive in stimulating Devonian gas shale suggest the following: Extensive plastic yielding will occur in a region immediate to the borehole. Extensive tensile fracture will occur in a region that begins at the outer boundary of plastic deformation and terminates at more than 100 borehole radii. Without a mechanism of ;near-wellbore fracture, such as crushing or pre-cracking during drilling or intentional borehole grooving, the plastic flow that occurs adjacent to the wellbore causes stress redistributions which prohibit early-time (less than a millisecond) tensile fracture immediate to the wellbore and thus prohibits gas penetration from the wellbore into the crack system. The barrier that the near-wellbore plastic zone presents to gas flow from the wellbore is reduced in radial dimension as time increases. Natural fractures in the wellbore wall or cataclysmic deformation and fracture adjacent to the wellbore, as a result of the explosive detonation, will likely assist in breaking down the barrier to gas flow. Very significatn enhancement is achieved in the EL836 stimulation treatment when gases penetrate the stress-wave induced radial cracks. Only minor differences were observed in the EL836 stimulation effects when comparison is made between two different explosive equations-of-state. 33 figures, 2 tables.

  14. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ... 10:13:23 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ...

  15. ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ... 10:13:24 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ...

  16. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ... 9:55:03 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ...

  17. Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burton, III, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

  18. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protections Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL

  19. FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale Gas Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As many people know, over the past decade the United States has experienced a shale gas revolution that has beneficially transformed its energy landscape. In witnessing this transformation, other nations with significant shale resources are understandably interested in pursuing the responsible development of their domestic reserves, and achieving for their people accompanying economic, energy security and environmental benefits.

  20. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Hosts Conference Call on Shale Gas Draft Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington, DC - On Monday, November 14, 2011, the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) will convene a public meeting via conference call to discuss the SEAB Subcommittee on Shale Gas...

  1. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee (SEAB) on Shale Gas Production Posts Draft Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee (SEAB) on Shale Gas Production released its second and final ninety-day report reviewing the progress that has been made in...

  2. Interdisciplinary Investigation of CO2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoback, Mark D.; Kovscek, Anthony R.; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2013-09-30

    This project investigates the feasibility of geologic sequestration of CO2 in depleted shale gas reservoirs from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. It is anticipated that over the next two decades, tens of thousands of wells will be drilled in the 23 states in which organic-rich shale gas deposits are found. This research investigates the feasibility of using these formations for sequestration. If feasible, the number of sites where CO2 can be sequestered increases dramatically. The research embraces a broad array of length scales ranging from the ~10 nanometer scale of the pores in the shale formations to reservoir scale through a series of integrated laboratory and theoretical studies.

  3. COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydraulic Fracturing" | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab January 9, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction and Hydraulic Fracturing" Professor Robert Jackson Duke University Presentation: PDF icon WC09JAN2013_RBJackson.pdf Shale gas extraction is growing rapidly, developed in large part through horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Concerns over potential environmental impacts have accompanied the

  4. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  5. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 8280

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Arm, Stuart T.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-06-03

    The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Prior testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was up to 10 times that in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a -scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas gen geration rates. Results from the -scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, gas holdup in clay without AFA is comparable to that in the chemical waste simulant with AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions.

  6. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Arm, S.T.; Guzman-Leong, C.E.; Jagoda, L.K.; Stewart, C.W.; Wells, B.E.; Yokuda, S.T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Previous testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was as much as 10 times higher than in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a 1/4-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas generation rates. Results from the 1/4-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, holdup in the chemical waste simulant with AFA was not so greatly increased compared to gas holdup in clay without AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions. (authors)

  7. West Virginia Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Shale Proved Reserves (Billion ... Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 West Virginia Shale Gas Proved Reserves, ...

  8. North Dakota Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Shale Proved Reserves (Billion ... Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 North Dakota Shale Gas Proved Reserves, ...

  9. Louisiana--North Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana--North Shale Proved Reserves (Billion ... Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 North Louisiana Shale Gas Proved Reserves, ...

  10. Modelling the deployment of CO₂ storage in U.S. gas-bearing shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-12-31

    The proliferation of commercial development in U.S. gas-bearing shales helped to drive a twelve-fold increase in domestic gas production between 2000 and 2010, and the nation's gas production rates continue to grow. While shales have long been regarded as a desirable caprock for CCS operations because of their low permeability and porosity, there is increasing interest in the feasibility of injecting CO₂ into shales to enhance methane recovery and augment CO₂ storage. Laboratory work published in recent years observes that shales with adsorbed methane appear to exhibit a stronger affinity for CO₂ adsorption, offering the potential to drive additional CH₄ recovery beyond primary production and perhaps the potential to store a larger volume of CO₂ than the volume of methane displaced. Recent research by the authors on the revenues associated with CO₂-enhanced gas recovery (CO₂-EGR) in gas-bearing shales estimates that, based on a range of EGR response rates, the average revenue per ton of CO₂ for projects managed over both EGR and subsequent storage-only phases could range from $0.50 to $18/tCO₂. While perhaps not as profitable as EOR, for regions where lower-cost storage options may be limited, shales could represent another “early opportunity” storage option if proven feasible for reliable EGR and CO₂ storage. Significant storage potential exists in gas shales, with theoretical CO₂ storage resources estimated at approximately 30-50 GtCO₂. However, an analysis of the comprehensive cost competitiveness of these various options is necessary to understand the degree to which they might meaningfully impact U.S. CCS deployment or costs. This preliminary analysis shows that the degree to which EGR-based CO₂ storage could play a role in commercial-scale deployment is heavily dependent upon the offsetting revenues associated with incremental recovery; modeling the low revenue case resulted in only five shale-based projects, while under the high

  11. Modelling the deployment of CO2 storage in U.S. gas-bearing shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-10-23

    The proliferation of commercial development in U.S. gas-bearing shales helped to drive a twelve-fold increase in domestic gas production between 2000 and 2010, and the nation’s gas production rates continue to grow. While shales have long been regarded as a desirable caprock for CCS operations because of their low permeability and porosity, there is increasing interest in the feasibility of injecting CO2 into shales to enhance methane recovery and augment CO2 storage. Laboratory work published in recent years observes that shales with adsorbed methane appear to exhibit a stronger affinity for CO2 adsorption, offering the potential to drive additional CH4 recovery beyond primary production and perhaps the potential to store a larger volume of CO2 than the volume of methane displaced. Recent research by the authors on the revenues associated with CO2-enhanced gas recovery (CO2-EGR) in gas-bearing shales estimates that, based on a range of EGR response rates, the average revenue per ton of CO2 for projects managed over both EGR and subsequent storage-only phases could range from $0.50 to $18/tCO2. While perhaps not as profitable as EOR, for regions where lower-cost storage options may be limited, shales could represent another “early opportunity” storage option if proven feasible for reliable EGR and CO2 storage. Significant storage potential exists in gas shales, with theoretical CO2 storage resources estimated at approximately 30-50 GtCO2. However, an analysis of the comprehensive cost competitiveness of these various options is necessary to understand the degree to which they might meaningfully impact U.S. CCS deployment or costs. This preliminary analysis shows that the degree to which EGR-based CO2 storage could play a role in commercial-scale deployment is heavily dependent upon the offsetting revenues associated with incremental recovery; modeling the low revenue case resulted in only five shale-based projects, while under the high revenue case, shales

  12. Modelling the deployment of CO₂ storage in U.S. gas-bearing shales

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-12-31

    The proliferation of commercial development in U.S. gas-bearing shales helped to drive a twelve-fold increase in domestic gas production between 2000 and 2010, and the nation's gas production rates continue to grow. While shales have long been regarded as a desirable caprock for CCS operations because of their low permeability and porosity, there is increasing interest in the feasibility of injecting CO₂ into shales to enhance methane recovery and augment CO₂ storage. Laboratory work published in recent years observes that shales with adsorbed methane appear to exhibit a stronger affinity for CO₂ adsorption, offering the potential to drive additional CH₄more » recovery beyond primary production and perhaps the potential to store a larger volume of CO₂ than the volume of methane displaced. Recent research by the authors on the revenues associated with CO₂-enhanced gas recovery (CO₂-EGR) in gas-bearing shales estimates that, based on a range of EGR response rates, the average revenue per ton of CO₂ for projects managed over both EGR and subsequent storage-only phases could range from $0.50 to $18/tCO₂. While perhaps not as profitable as EOR, for regions where lower-cost storage options may be limited, shales could represent another “early opportunity” storage option if proven feasible for reliable EGR and CO₂ storage. Significant storage potential exists in gas shales, with theoretical CO₂ storage resources estimated at approximately 30-50 GtCO₂. However, an analysis of the comprehensive cost competitiveness of these various options is necessary to understand the degree to which they might meaningfully impact U.S. CCS deployment or costs. This preliminary analysis shows that the degree to which EGR-based CO₂ storage could play a role in commercial-scale deployment is heavily dependent upon the offsetting revenues associated with incremental recovery; modeling the low revenue case resulted in only five shale-based projects, while under

  13. INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

    2011-05-01

    This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

  14. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  15. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 13,204 11,926 13,204 12,778 13,204 12,778 13,204 13,204 12,778 13,204 12,778 13,204 2008 12,755 11,932 12,755 12,343 12,755 12,343 12,755 12,755 12,343 12,755 12,343 12,755 2009 12,222 11,039 12,222 11,827 12,222 11,827 12,222 12,222 11,827 12,222 11,827 12,222 2010 11,842 10,659 11,705 11,180 11,541 11,189 11,357 11,589

  16. Shale gas and non-aqueous fracturing fluids: Opportunities and challenges for supercritical CO?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, Richard S.; Carey, James William; Currier, Robert P.; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Kang, Qinjun; Karra, Satish; Jimnez-Martnez, Joaqun; Porter, Mark L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of shale formations in the United States has led to a domestic energy boom. Currently, water is the only fracturing fluid regularly used in commercial shale oil and gas production. Industry and researchers are interested in non-aqueous working fluids due to their potential to increase production, reduce water requirements, and to minimize environmental impacts. Using a combination of new experimental and modeling data at multiple scales, we analyze the benefits and drawbacks of using CO? as a working fluid for shale gas production. We theorize and outline potential advantages of CO? including enhanced fracturing and fracture propagation, reduction of flow-blocking mechanisms, increased desorption of methane adsorbed in organic-rich parts of the shale, and a reduction or elimination of the deep re-injection of flow-back water that has been linked to induced seismicity and other environmental concerns. We also examine likely disadvantages including costs and safety issues associated with handling large volumes of supercritical CO?. The advantages could have a significant impact over time leading to substantially increased gas production. In addition, if CO? proves to be an effective fracturing fluid, then shale gas formations could become a major utilization option for carbon sequestration.

  17. Shale gas and non-aqueous fracturing fluids: Opportunities and challenges for supercritical CO₂

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Middleton, Richard S.; Carey, James William; Currier, Robert P.; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Kang, Qinjun; Karra, Satish; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Porter, Mark L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of shale formations in the United States has led to a domestic energy boom. Currently, water is the only fracturing fluid regularly used in commercial shale oil and gas production. Industry and researchers are interested in non-aqueous working fluids due to their potential to increase production, reduce water requirements, and to minimize environmental impacts. Using a combination of new experimental and modeling data at multiple scales, we analyze the benefits and drawbacks of using CO₂ as a working fluid for shale gas production. We theorize and outline potential advantages of CO₂ including enhanced fracturing and fracture propagation, reductionmore » of flow-blocking mechanisms, increased desorption of methane adsorbed in organic-rich parts of the shale, and a reduction or elimination of the deep re-injection of flow-back water that has been linked to induced seismicity and other environmental concerns. We also examine likely disadvantages including costs and safety issues associated with handling large volumes of supercritical CO₂. The advantages could have a significant impact over time leading to substantially increased gas production. In addition, if CO₂ proves to be an effective fracturing fluid, then shale gas formations could become a major utilization option for carbon sequestration.« less

  18. Shale gas and non-aqueous fracturing fluids: Opportunities and challenges for supercritical CO₂

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, Richard S.; Carey, James William; Currier, Robert P.; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Kang, Qinjun; Karra, Satish; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Porter, Mark L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of shale formations in the United States has led to a domestic energy boom. Currently, water is the only fracturing fluid regularly used in commercial shale oil and gas production. Industry and researchers are interested in non-aqueous working fluids due to their potential to increase production, reduce water requirements, and to minimize environmental impacts. Using a combination of new experimental and modeling data at multiple scales, we analyze the benefits and drawbacks of using CO₂ as a working fluid for shale gas production. We theorize and outline potential advantages of CO₂ including enhanced fracturing and fracture propagation, reduction of flow-blocking mechanisms, increased desorption of methane adsorbed in organic-rich parts of the shale, and a reduction or elimination of the deep re-injection of flow-back water that has been linked to induced seismicity and other environmental concerns. We also examine likely disadvantages including costs and safety issues associated with handling large volumes of supercritical CO₂. The advantages could have a significant impact over time leading to substantially increased gas production. In addition, if CO₂ proves to be an effective fracturing fluid, then shale gas formations could become a major utilization option for carbon sequestration.

  19. ,"Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","11/19/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","12/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  20. Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

    1984-02-14

    An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

  1. Table 14. Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, w

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2014" "billion cubic feet" ,,"Changes in Reserves During 2014" ,"Published",,,,,,,,"New Reservoir" ,"Proved",,"Revision","Revision",,,,"New Field","Discoveries","Estimated","Proved"

  2. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-11

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  3. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-04-28

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  4. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-10

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  5. DOE's Shale Gas and Hydraulic Fracturing Research | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement of Guido DeHoratiis Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Gas ... performance of developing our Nation's unconventional oil and natural gas (UOG) resources. ...

  6. Porosity of coal and shale: Insights from gas adsorption and SANS/USANS techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastalerz, Maria; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Rupp, John A

    2012-01-01

    Two Pennsylvanian coal samples (Spr326 and Spr879-IN1) and two Upper Devonian-Mississippian shale samples (MM1 and MM3) from the Illinois Basin were studied with regard to their porosity and pore accessibility. Shale samples are early mature stage as indicated by vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) values of 0.55% for MM1 and 0.62% for MM3. The coal samples studied are of comparable maturity to the shale samples, having vitrinite reflectance of 0.52% (Spr326) and 0.62% (Spr879-IN1). Gas (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) adsorption and small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS/USANS) were used to understand differences in the porosity characteristics of the samples. The results demonstrate that there is a major difference in mesopore (2-50 nm) size distribution between the coal and shale samples, while there was a close similarity in micropore (<2 nm) size distribution. Micropore and mesopore volumes correlate with organic matter content in the samples. Accessibility of pores in coal is pore-size specific and can vary significantly between coal samples; also, higher accessibility corresponds to higher adsorption capacity. Accessibility of pores in shale samples is low.

  7. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-10-29

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of

  8. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-01-01

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of

  9. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-04-01

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf

  10. Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 5 well - Lorain County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-04-01

    The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. The program's objectives are as follows: (1) to evaluate recoverable reserves of gas contained in the shales; (2) to enhanced recovery technology for production from shale gas reservoirs; and (3) to stimulate interest among commercial gas suppliers in the concept of producing large quantities of gas from low-yield, shallow Devonian Shale wells. The EGSP-Ohio No. 5 well was cored under a cooperative cost-sharing agreement between the Department of Energy (METC) and Columbia Gas Transmission Corporation. Detailed characterization of the core was performed at the Eastern Gas Shale Project's Core Laboratory. At the well site, suites of wet and dry hole geophysical logs were run. Characterization work performed at the Laboratory included photographic logs, lithologic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition samples were tested for physical properties by Michigan Technological University. Physical properties data obtained were for: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength; strength in point load; and trends of microfractures.

  11. EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for a Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that...

  12. New Mexico Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) ... Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 New Mexico Shale Gas Proved Reserves, ...

  13. Assessment of Factors Influencing Effective CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godec, Michael

    2013-06-30

    Building upon advances in technology, production of natural gas from organic-rich shales is rapidly developing as a major hydrocarbon supply option in North America and around the world. The same technology advances that have facilitated this revolution - dense well spacing, horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing - may help to facilitate enhanced gas recovery (EGR) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in these formations. The potential storage of CO {sub 2} in shales is attracting increasing interest, especially in Appalachian Basin states that have extensive shale deposits, but limited CO{sub 2} storage capacity in conventional reservoirs. The goal of this cooperative research project was to build upon previous and on-going work to assess key factors that could influence effective EGR, CO{sub 2} storage capacity, and injectivity in selected Eastern gas shales, including the Devonian Marcellus Shale, the Devonian Ohio Shale, the Ordovician Utica and Point Pleasant shale and equivalent formations, and the late Devonian-age Antrim Shale. The project had the following objectives: (1) Analyze and synthesize geologic information and reservoir data through collaboration with selected State geological surveys, universities, and oil and gas operators; (2) improve reservoir models to perform reservoir simulations to better understand the shale characteristics that impact EGR, storage capacity and CO{sub 2} injectivity in the targeted shales; (3) Analyze results of a targeted, highly monitored, small-scale CO{sub 2} injection test and incorporate into ongoing characterization and simulation work; (4) Test and model a smart particle early warning concept that can potentially be used to inject water with uniquely labeled particles before the start of CO{sub 2} injection; (5) Identify and evaluate potential constraints to economic CO{sub 2} storage in gas shales, and propose development approaches that overcome these constraints; and (6) Complete new basin

  14. File:EIA-shale-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lower 48 States Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-03-10 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern...

  15. Stimulation rationale for shale gas wells: a state-of-the-art report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, C.; Barbour, T.; Blanton, T.L.

    1980-12-01

    Despite the large quantities of gas contained in the Devonian Shales, only a small percentage can be produced commercially by current production methods. This limited production derives both from the unique reservoir properties of the Devonian Shales and the lack of stimulation technologies specifically designed for a shale reservoir. Since October 1978 Science Applications, Inc. has been conducting a review and evaluation of various shale well stimulation techniques with the objective of defining a rationale for selecting certain treatments given certain reservoir conditions. Although this review and evaluation is ongoing and much more data will be required before a definitive rationale can be presented, the studies to date do allow for many preliminary observations and recommendations. For the hydraulic type treatments the use of low-residual-fluid treatments is highly recommended. The excellent shale well production which is frequently observed with only moderate wellbore enlargement treatments indicates that attempts to extend fractures to greater distances with massive hydraulic treatments are not warranted. Immediate research efforts should be concentrated upon limiting production damage by fracturing fluids retained in the formation, and upon improving proppant transport and placement so as to maximize fracture conductivity. Recent laboratory, numerical modeling and field studies all indicate that the gas fracturing effects of explosive/propellant type treatments are the predominate production enhancement mechanism and that these effects can be controlled and optimized with properly designed charges. Future research efforts should be focused upon the understanding, prediction and control of wellbore fracturing with tailored-pulse-loading charges. 36 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  16. CO2 utilization and storage in shale gas reservoirs: Experimental results and economic impacts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Owen, Antionette Toni; Miller, Quin R. S.; Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-12-31

    Natural gas is considered a cleaner and lower-emission fuel than coal, and its high abundance from advanced drilling techniques has positioned natural gas as a major alternative energy source for the U.S. However, each ton of CO2 emitted from any type of fossil fuel combustion will continue to increase global atmospheric concentrations. One unique approach to reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions involves coupling CO2 based enhanced gas recovery (EGR) operations in depleted shale gas reservoirs with long-term CO2 storage operations. In this paper, we report unique findings about the interactions between important shale minerals and sorbing gases (CH4 and CO2) andmore » associated economic consequences. Where enhanced condensation of CO2 followed by desorption on clay surface is observed under supercritical conditions, a linear sorption profile emerges for CH4. Volumetric changes to montmorillonites occur during exposure to CO2. Theory-based simulations identify interactions with interlayer cations as energetically favorable for CO2 intercalation. Thus, experimental evidence suggests CH4 does not occupy the interlayer and has only the propensity for surface adsorption. Mixed CH4:CO2 gas systems, where CH4 concentrations prevail, indicate preferential CO2 sorption as determined by in situ infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Collectively, these laboratory studies combined with a cost-based economic analysis provide a basis for identifying favorable CO2-EOR opportunities in previously fractured shale gas reservoirs approaching final stages of primary gas production. Moreover, utilization of site-specific laboratory measurements in reservoir simulators provides insight into optimum injection strategies for maximizing CH4/CO2 exchange rates to obtain peak natural gas production.« less

  17. Large-Scale Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large-Scale Computational Fluid Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management

  18. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-07-28

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the

  19. ,"U.S. Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2014,"06/30/2007" ,"Release Date:","11/19/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","12/31/2016"

  20. Interagency Collaboration to Address Environmental Impacts of Shale Gas Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A memorandum of understanding to perform collaborative research related to airborne emissions and air quality at natural gas drilling sites has been signed by the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

  1. DOE-Sponsored Project to Study Shale Gas Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A consortium led by the Energy Department's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will implement a process to monitor unconventional gas production at a test site near Morgantown, WV. The goal is to develop ways to increase efficiency and reduce environmental impacts.

  2. The Coal-Seq III Consortium. Advancing the Science of CO2 Sequestration in Coal Seam and Gas Shale Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koperna, George

    2014-03-14

    modeling software to enhance model robustness. Research was also conducted to improve algorithms and generalized adsorption models to facilitate realistic simulation of CO2 sequestration in coal seams and shale gas reservoirs. The interaction among water and the adsorbed gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrogen (N2) in coalbeds is examined using experimental in situ laboratory techniques to comprehensively model CBM production and CO2 sequestration in coals. An equation of state (EOS) module was developed which is capable of predicting the density of pure components and mixtures involving the wet CBM gases CH4, CO2, and N2 at typical reservoir condition, and is used to inform CO2 injection models. The final research objective examined the effects adsorbed CO2 has on coal strength and permeability. This research studied the weakening or failure of coal by the adsorption of CO2 from empirically derived gas production data to develop models for advanced modeling of permeability changes during CO2 sequestration. The results of this research effort have been used to construct a new and improved model for assessing changes in permeability of coal reservoirs due CO2 injection. The modules developed from these studies and knowledge learned are applied to field validation and basin assessment studies. These data were used to assess the flow and storage of CO2 in a shale reservoir, test newly developed code against large-scale projects, and conduct a basin-oriented review of coal storage potential in the San Juan Basin. The storage potential and flow of CO2 was modeled for shale sequestration of a proprietary Marcellus Shale horizontal gas production well using COMET3 simulation software. Simulation results from five model runs indicate that stored CO2 quantities are linked to the duration of primary production preceding injection. Matrix CO2 saturation is observed to increase in each shale zone after injection with an increase in primary production, and the size of

  3. Shale Research & Development | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Shale Research & Development Shale Research & Development UNCONVENTIONAL OIL AND NATURAL GAS America's abundant unconventional oil and gas (UOG) resources, which include natural ...

  4. Shale-Gas Experience as an Analog for Potential Wellbore Integrity Issues in CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, James W.; Simpson, Wendy S.; Ziock, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Shale-gas development in Pennsylvania since 2003 has resulted in about 19 documented cases of methane migration from the deep subsurface (7,0000) to drinking water aquifers, soils, domestic water wells, and buildings, including one explosion. In all documented cases, the methane leakage was due to inadequate wellbore integrity, possibly aggravated by hydrofracking. The leakage of methane is instructive on the potential for CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration operations. Although there are important differences between the two systems, both involve migrating, buoyant gas with wells being a primary leakage pathway. The shale-gas experience demonstrates that gas migration from faulty wells can be rapid and can have significant impacts on water quality and human health and safety. Approximately 1.4% of the 2,200 wells drilled into Pennsylvania's Marcellus Formation for shale gas have been implicated in methane leakage. These have resulted in damage to over 30 domestic water supplies and have required significant remediation via well repair and homeowner compensation. The majority of the wellbore integrity problems are a result of over-pressurization of the wells, meaning that high-pressure gas has migrated into an improperly protected wellbore annulus. The pressurized gas leaks from the wellbore into the shallow subsurface, contaminating drinking water or entering structures. The effects are localized to a few thousands of feet to perhaps two-three miles. The degree of mixing between the drinking water and methane is sufficient that significant chemical impacts are created in terms of elevated Fe and Mn and the formation of black precipitates (metal sulfides) as well as effervescing in tap water. Thus it appears likely that leaking CO{sub 2} could also result in deteriorated water quality by a similar mixing process. The problems in Pennsylvania highlight the critical importance of obtaining background data on water quality as well as on problems associated with

  5. Shale gas and non-aqueous fracturing fluids: Opportunities and challenges for supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, Richard Stephen; Carey, James William; Currier, Robert Patrick; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Kang, Qinjun; Karra, Satish; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Porter, Mark L.; Martinez, Joaquin Jimenez

    2015-03-23

    In this study, hydraulic fracturing of shale formations in the United States has led to a domestic energy boom. Currently, water is the only fracturing fluid regularly used in commercial shale oil and gas production. Industry and researchers are interested in non-aqueous working fluids due to their potential to increase production, reduce water requirements, and to minimize environmental impacts. Using a combination of new experimental and modeling data at multiple scales, we analyze the benefits and drawbacks of using CO2 as a working fluid for shale gas production. We theorize and outline potential advantages of CO2 including enhanced fracturing and fracture propagation, reduction of flow-blocking mechanisms, increased desorption of methane adsorbed in organic-rich parts of the shale, and a reduction or elimination of the deep re-injection of flow-back water that has been linked to induced seismicity and other environmental concerns. We also examine likely disadvantages including costs and safety issues associated with handling large volumes of supercritical CO2. The advantages could have a significant impact over time leading to substantially increased gas production. In addition, if CO2 proves to be an effective fracturing fluid, then shale gas formations could become a major utilization option for carbon sequestration.

  6. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-04-26

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  7. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-08-01

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  8. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-07-29

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  9. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-28

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  10. Fractured shale reservoirs: Towards a realistic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton-Smith, T.

    1996-09-01

    Fractured shale reservoirs are fundamentally unconventional, which is to say that their behavior is qualitatively different from reservoirs characterized by intergranular pore space. Attempts to analyze fractured shale reservoirs are essentially misleading. Reliance on such models can have only negative results for fractured shale oil and gas exploration and development. A realistic model of fractured shale reservoirs begins with the history of the shale as a hydrocarbon source rock. Minimum levels of both kerogen concentration and thermal maturity are required for effective hydrocarbon generation. Hydrocarbon generation results in overpressuring of the shale. At some critical level of repressuring, the shale fractures in the ambient stress field. This primary natural fracture system is fundamental to the future behavior of the fractured shale gas reservoir. The fractures facilitate primary migration of oil and gas out of the shale and into the basin. In this process, all connate water is expelled, leaving the fractured shale oil-wet and saturated with oil and gas. What fluids are eventually produced from the fractured shale depends on the consequent structural and geochemical history. As long as the shale remains hot, oil production may be obtained. (e.g. Bakken Shale, Green River Shale). If the shale is significantly cooled, mainly gas will be produced (e.g. Antrim Shale, Ohio Shale, New Albany Shale). Where secondary natural fracture systems are developed and connect the shale to aquifers or to surface recharge, the fractured shale will also produce water (e.g. Antrim Shale, Indiana New Albany Shale).

  11. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gas causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design production

  12. Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 6 series: Gallia County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. On September 28, 1978 the Department of Energy entered into a cooperative agreement with Mitchell Energy Corporation to explore Devonian shale gas potential in Gallia County, Ohio. Objectives of the cost-sharing contract were the following: (1) to select locations for a series of five wells to be drilled around the periphery of a possible gas reservoir in Gallia County, Ohio; (2) to drill, core, log, case, fracture, clean up, and test each well, and to monitor production from the wells for a five-year period. This report summarizes the procedures and results of core characterization work performed at the Eastern Gas Shales Project Core Laboratory on core retrieved from the Gallia County EGSP wells, designated OH No. 6/1, OH No. 6/2, OH No. 6/3, OH No. 6/4, and OH No. 6/5. Characterization work performed includes photographic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition the following tests were performed by Michigan Technological University to obtain the following data: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength, strength in point load; trends of microfractures; and hydraulic fracturing characteristics.

  13. Analysis of Devonian Black Shales in Kentucky for Potential Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and Enhanced Natural Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall; Cortland F. Eble; James A. Drahovzal; R. Marc Bustin

    2005-09-30

    Carbonaceous (black) Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In these shales, natural gas occurs in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO2 is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO2. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine both CO2 and CH4 adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO2 displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO2 adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton in the more organic-rich zones. There is a direct linear correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO2 adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial volumetric estimates based on these data indicate a CO2 sequestration capacity of as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. In the Big Sandy Gas Field area of eastern Kentucky, calculations using the net thickness of shale with 4 percent or greater total organic carbon, indicate that 6.8 billion tonnes of CO2 could be sequestered in the five county area. Discounting the uncertainties in reservoir volume and injection efficiency, these results indicate that the black shales of Kentucky are a potentially large geologic sink for CO2. Moreover, the extensive occurrence of gas shales in Paleozoic and Mesozoic

  14. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-01

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  15. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gasmore » causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design

  16. Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

  17. Process for oil shale retorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, John B.; Kunchal, S. Kumar

    1981-10-27

    Particulate oil shale is subjected to a pyrolysis with a hot, non-oxygenous gas in a pyrolysis vessel, with the products of the pyrolysis of the shale contained kerogen being withdrawn as an entrained mist of shale oil droplets in a gas for a separation of the liquid from the gas. Hot retorted shale withdrawn from the pyrolysis vessel is treated in a separate container with an oxygenous gas so as to provide combustion of residual carbon retained on the shale, producing a high temperature gas for the production of some steam and for heating the non-oxygenous gas used in the oil shale retorting process in the first vessel. The net energy recovery includes essentially complete recovery of the organic hydrocarbon material in the oil shale as a liquid shale oil, a high BTU gas, and high temperature steam.

  18. CO2 Storage by Sorption on Organic Matter and Clay in Gas Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Yonkofski, Catherine MR; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-10-10

    Simulations of methane production and supercritical carbon dioxide injection were developed that consider competitive adsorption of CH4 and CO2 on both organic matter and montmorillonite. The results were used to assess the potential for storage of CO2 in a hydraulically fractured shale gas reservoir and for enhanced recovery of CH4. Assuming equal volume fractions of organic matter and montmorillonite, amounts of CO2 adsorbed on both materials were comparable, while methane desorption was from clays was two times greater than desorption from organic material. The most successful strategy considered CO2 injection from a separate well and enhanced methane recovery by 73%, while storing 240 kmt of CO2.

  19. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  20. Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar introduces the “Large Scale Renewable Energy Guide." The webinar will provide an overview of this important FEMP guide, which describes FEMP's approach to large-scale renewable energy projects and provides guidance to Federal agencies and the private sector on how to develop a common process for large-scale renewable projects.

  1. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2012-03-20

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (ε{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ε{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  2. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§ Karl T. Schroeder,§ and Harry M. Edenborn

    2012-02-24

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ∼375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (εSr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where εSr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  3. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Michael Vanden; Anderson, Paul; Wallace, Janae; Morgan, Craig; Carney, Stephanie

    2012-04-30

    Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary

  4. Future directions in advanced exploratory research related to oil, gas, shale and tar sand resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Technical Coordination (OTC) is responsible for long-range, high-risk research that could provide major advances in technologies for the use of fossil fuels. In late 1986, OTC was given responsibility for an existing program of research in Advanced Process Technology (APT) for oil, gas, shale, and tar sands. To meet these challenges and opportunities, the OTC approached the National Research Council with a request to organize an advisory panel to examine future directions in fundamental research appropriate for sponsorship by the Advanced Process Technology program. An advisory group was formed with broad representation from the geosciences, physical sciences, and engineering disciplines to accomplish this task. The charge to the panel was to prepare a report for the director of the Office of Technical Coordination, identifying critical research areas. This report contains the findings and recommendations of the panel. It is written both to advise the research management of the Department of Energy on research opportunities and needs, and to stimulate interest and involvement in the research community in fundamental research related to fossil energy, and in particular, oil and gas resources. 1 tab.

  5. Alaska (with Total Offshore) Shale Production (Billion Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    company data. Release Date: 11192015 Next Release Date: 12312016 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas Estimated Production Alaska Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...

  6. History of western oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The history of oil shale in the United States since the early 1900's is detailed. Research on western oil shale probably began with the work of Robert Catlin in 1915. During the next 15 years there was considerable interest in the oil shales, and oil shale claims were located, and a few recovery plants were erected in Colorado, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, and Montana. Little shale soil was produced, however, and the major oil companies showed little interest in producing shale oil. The early boom in shale oil saw less than 15 plants produce a total of less than 15,000 barrels of shale oil, all but about 500 barrels of which was produced by the Catlin Operation in Nevada and by the US Bureau of Mines Rulison, Colorado operation. Between 1930 and 1944 plentiful petroleum supplies at reasonable prices prevent any significant interest in shale oil, but oil shortages during World War II caused a resurgence of interest in oil shale. Between 1940 and 1969, the first large-scale mining and retorting operations in soil shale, and the first attempts at true in situ recovery of shale oil began. Only 75,000 barrels of shale oil were produced, but major advancements were made in developing mine designs and technology, and in retort design and technology. The oil embargo of 1973 together with a new offering of oil shale leases by the Government in 1974 resulted in the most concentrated efforts for shale oil production to date. These efforts and the future prospects for shale oil as an energy source in the US are discussed.

  7. Validation Results for Core-Scale Oil Shale Pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staten, Josh; Tiwari, Pankaj

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes a study of oil shale pyrolysis at various scales and the subsequent development a model for in situ production of oil from oil shale. Oil shale from the Mahogany zone of the Green River formation was used in all experiments. Pyrolysis experiments were conducted at four scales, powdered samples (100 mesh) and core samples of 0.75”, 1” and 2.5” diameters. The batch, semibatch and continuous flow pyrolysis experiments were designed to study the effect of temperature (300°C to 500°C), heating rate (1°C/min to 10°C/min), pressure (ambient and 500 psig) and size of the sample on product formation. Comprehensive analyses were performed on reactants and products - liquid, gas and spent shale. These experimental studies were designed to understand the relevant coupled phenomena (reaction kinetics, heat transfer, mass transfer, thermodynamics) at multiple scales. A model for oil shale pyrolysis was developed in the COMSOL multiphysics platform. A general kinetic model was integrated with important physical and chemical phenomena that occur during pyrolysis. The secondary reactions of coking and cracking in the product phase were addressed. The multiscale experimental data generated and the models developed provide an understanding of the simultaneous effects of chemical kinetics, and heat and mass transfer on oil quality and yield. The comprehensive data collected in this study will help advance the move to large-scale in situ oil production from the pyrolysis of oil shale.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

    2013-10-02

    The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

  9. Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow in Shale?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The source of shale oil and gas is kerogen, an organic material in the shale, but until now kerogen hasn't been incorporated in mathematical models of shale gas reservoirs. Paulo ...

  10. Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.