Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response storage potential of all the geological CO2 storage options and are widely distributed throughout the globe in all sedimentary basins.ForCO2 storage tohaveasignificantimpact on atmospheric levels

Zhou, Quanlin

2

Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

3

On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 , excluding enhanced oil recovery operations 2 . Whenfor water flooding, enhanced oil recovery, and disposal, the

Zhou, Q.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressureannual volume of world oil production and the pore volumem 3 . In 2006, the world oil production was 4.3 km 3 (73.46

Zhou, Q.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result in an accelerated rate of utilization of the nation’s CO2 storage resource, leaving less high-quality storage capacity for other carbon-producing industries including electric power generation.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

Large-Scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to meet atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm by the end of the century. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. A key aspect of the research presented here is that the costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are explicitly incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced globally by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the majority source, along with growing utilization of waste-to-energy. The ability to draw on a diverse set of biomass based feedstocks helps to reduce the pressure for drastic large-scale changes in land use and the attendant environmental, ecological, and economic consequences those changes would unleash. In terms of the conversion of bioenergy feedstocks into value added energy, this paper demonstrates that biomass is and will continue to be used to generate electricity as well as liquid transportation fuels. A particular focus of this paper is to show how climate policies and technology assumptions - especially the availability of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies - affect the decisions made about where the biomass is used in the energy system. The potential for net-negative electric sector emissions through the use of CCS with biomass feedstocks provides an attractive part of the solution for meeting stringent emissions constraints; we find that at carbon prices above 150$/tCO2, over 90% of biomass in the energy system is used in combination with CCS. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, it is a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. CCS is also used heavily with other fuels such as coal and natural gas, and by 2095 a total of 1530 GtCO2 has been stored in deep geologic reservoirs. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels as two representative conversion processes and shows that both technologies may be important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics.

Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

8

Regional Opportunities for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in China: A Comprehensive CO2 Storage Cost Curve and Analysis of the Potential for Large Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the People’s Republic of China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents data and analysis on the potential for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies to deploy within China, including a survey of the CO2 source fleet and potential geologic storage capacity. The results presented here indicate that there is significant potential for CCS technologies to deploy in China at a level sufficient to deliver deep, sustained and cost-effective emissions reductions for China over the course of this century.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Li, Xiaochun; Davidson, Casie L.; Wei, Ning; Dooley, James J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aquifer near the ground surface to the storage formation.below the ground surface. The storage formation is boundedstorage formation, and Aquifer 8 the uppermost aquifer nearest to the ground

Birkholzer, J.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews Requirements for Science: Target 2014 Nuclear Physics (NP) Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics:...

11

Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

12

Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems Wednesday October 26, 2011, Babbio energy storage devices. Specifically, this talk discusses 1) the challenges for grid scale of emergent technologies with ultralow costs on new energy storage materials and mechanisms. Dr. Jun Liu

Fisher, Frank

13

Predicting PVT data for CO2brine mixtures for black-oil simulation of CO2 geological storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting PVT data for CO2­brine mixtures for black-oil simulation of CO2 geological storage efficiency of the black-oil approach promote application of black-oil simulation for large-scale geological into geological formations has been considered as a potential method to mitigate climate change. Accurate

Santos, Juan

14

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon...

15

Membraneless hydrogen bromine laminar flow battery for large-scale energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical energy storage systems have been considered for a range of potential large-scale energy storage applications. These applications vary widely, both in the order of magnitude of energy storage that is required ...

Braff, William Allan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

An Energy-Efficient Framework for Large-Scale Parallel Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Energy-Efficient Framework for Large-Scale Parallel Storage Systems Ziliang Zong, Matt Briggs-scale and energy-efficient parallel storage systems. To validate the efficiency of the proposed framework, a buffer that this new framework can significantly improves the energy efficiency of large-scale parallel storage systems

Qin, Xiao

17

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Geologic Storage of CO2, in Carbon Dioxide Capture forFormations - Results from the CO2 Capture Project: GeologicBenson, Process Modeling of CO2 Injection into Natural Gas

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and utility applications, such as pump hydro, compressed air, y-wheel and electrochemicalRoom-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage Huilin Pan attention particularly in large- scale electric energy storage applications for renewable energy and smart

Wang, Wei Hua

19

Large Scale Distribution of Stochastic Control Algorithms for Gas Storage Constantinos Makassikis, Stephane Vialle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large Scale Distribution of Stochastic Control Algorithms for Gas Storage Valuation Constantinos algorithm which is applied to gas storage valuation, and presents its experimental performances on two PC achieved in the field of gas storage valuation (see [2, 3] for example). As a result, many different price

Vialle, Stéphane

20

Influence of capillary pressure on CO2 storage and monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solutions to mitigate the greenhouse effect. We are interested in analyzing the influence of capillary pressure on CO2 in- jection, storage and monitoring in saline ...

gabriela

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC’s continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called “case studies,” of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, “multi-core” environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage Yuan Yang,a Guangyuan Zhengb and Yi Cui*ac Large-scale energy storage represents a key challenge for renewable energy develop a new lithium/ polysulfide (Li/PS) semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage

Cui, Yi

23

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes a section that describes efforts already underway or planned at NERSC that address requirements collected at the workshop. NERSC has many initiatives in progress that address key workshop findings and are aligned with NERSC's strategic plans.

Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modeling of CO2 storage in aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 6, 2011 ... atmosphere, increasing its temperature (greenhouse effect). To minimize climate change impacts, geological sequestration of CO2 is an ...

santos,,,

25

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

Pennycook, Steve

26

FS2You: Peer-Assisted Semi-Persistent Online Storage at a Large Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inc. Abstract--It has been widely acknowledged that online storage systems within the "cloud a group. Such online storage services are typically provided by dedicated servers, either in content as an extensive measurement study at a large scale to demonstrate the effectiveness of our design, using real

Wu, Dekai

27

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEASIBILITY: TEAPOT DOME EOR PILOT L. Chiaramonte, M.TO IDENTIFY OPTIMAL CO 2 EOR STORAGE SITES V. Núñez Lopez,from a carbon dioxide EOR/sequestration project. Energy

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

29

Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale electrical energy storage has become more important than ever for reducing fossil energy consumption in transportation and for the widespread deployment of intermittent renewable energy in electric grid. However, significant challenges exist for its applications. Here, the status and challenges are reviewed from the perspective of materials science and materials chemistry in electrochemical energy storage technologies, such as Li-ion batteries, sodium (sulfur and metal halide) batteries, Pb-acid battery, redox flow batteries, and supercapacitors. Perspectives and approaches are introduced for emerging battery designs and new chemistry combinations to reduce the cost of energy storage devices.

Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Lemmon, John P.; Imhoff, Carl H.; Graff, Gordon L.; Li, Liyu; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Chong M.; Xiao, Jie; Xia, Guanguang; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Baskaran, Suresh; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Schwenzer, Birgit

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from a Geologic Storage Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 - 16, 1987. Skinner, L. CO2 Blowouts: An Emerging Problem,Assessment for Underground CO2 Storage, paper 234, presentedReservoir Performance Risk in CO2 Storage Projects, paper

Pruess, Karsten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoirs, with large capacity for CO 2 storage (Bradshaw and Dance, 2004; Bachu, 2008). Improperly abandoned

Pruess, Karsten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Survey and analysis of selected jointly owned large-scale electric utility storage projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to examine and document the issues surrounding the curtailment in commercialization of large-scale electric storage projects. It was sensed that if these issues could be uncovered, then efforts might be directed toward clearing away these barriers and allowing these technologies to penetrate the market to their maximum potential. Joint-ownership of these projects was seen as a possible solution to overcoming the major barriers, particularly economic barriers, of commercializaton. Therefore, discussions with partners involved in four pumped storage projects took place to identify the difficulties and advantages of joint-ownership agreements. The four plants surveyed included Yards Creek (Public Service Electric and Gas and Jersey Central Power and Light); Seneca (Pennsylvania Electric and Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company); Ludington (Consumers Power and Detroit Edison, and Bath County (Virginia Electric Power Company and Allegheny Power System, Inc.). Also investigated were several pumped storage projects which were never completed. These included Blue Ridge (American Electric Power); Cornwall (Consolidated Edison); Davis (Allegheny Power System, Inc.) and Kttatiny Mountain (General Public Utilities). Institutional, regulatory, technical, environmental, economic, and special issues at each project were investgated, and the conclusions relative to each issue are presented. The major barriers preventing the growth of energy storage are the high cost of these systems in times of extremely high cost of capital, diminishing load growth and regulatory influences which will not allow the building of large-scale storage systems due to environmental objections or other reasons. However, the future for energy storage looks viable despite difficult economic times for the utility industry. Joint-ownership can ease some of the economic hardships for utilites which demonstrate a need for energy storage.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The contribution of CO2 capture and storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contribution of CO2 capture and storage to a sustainable energy system Policy brief of Energy Models for INtegrated Technology Systems' is partially funded by the EU under the Scientific.html. The following partners are involved in Part 2 of the CASCADE MINTS project: · Energy research Centre

34

SUBTASK 2.19 – OPERATIONAL FLEXIBILITY OF CO2 TRANSPORT AND STORAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is produced in large quantities during electricity generation and by industrial processes. These CO2 streams vary in terms of both composition and mass flow rate, sometimes substantially. The impact of a varying CO2 stream on pipeline and storage operation is not fully understood in terms of either operability or infrastructure robustness. This study was performed to summarize basic background from the literature on the topic of operational flexibility of CO2 transport and storage, but the primary focus was on compiling real-world lessons learned about flexible operation of CO2 pipelines and storage from both large-scale field demonstrations and commercial operating experience. Modeling and pilot-scale results of research in this area were included to illustrate some of the questions that exist relative to operation of carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects with variable CO2 streams. It is hoped that this report’s real-world findings provide readers with useful information on the topic of transport and storage of variable CO2 streams. The real-world results were obtained from two sources. The first source consisted of five full-scale, commercial transport–storage projects: Sleipner, Snøhvit, In Salah, Weyburn, and Illinois Basin–Decatur. These scenarios were reviewed to determine the information that is available about CO2 stream variability/intermittency on these demonstration-scale projects. The five projects all experienced mass flow variability or an interruption in flow. In each case, pipeline and/or injection engineers were able to accommodate any issues that arose. Significant variability in composition has not been an issue at these five sites. The second source of real- world results was telephone interviews conducted with experts in CO2 pipeline transport, injection, and storage during which commercial anecdotal information was acquired to augment that found during the literature search of the five full-scale projects. The experts represented a range of disciplines and hailed from North America and Europe. Major findings of the study are that compression and transport of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) purposes in the United States has shown that impurities are not likely to cause transport problems if CO2 stream composition standards are maintained and pressures are kept at 10.3 MPa or higher. Cyclic, or otherwise intermittent, CO2 supplies historically have not impacted in-field distribution pipeline networks, wellbore integrity, or reservoir conditions. The U.S. EOR industry has demonstrated that it is possible to adapt to variability and intermittency in CO2 supply through flexible operation of the pipeline and geologic storage facility. This CO2 transport and injection experience represents knowledge that can be applied in future CCS projects. A number of gaps in knowledge were identified that may benefit from future research and development, further enhancing the possibility for widespread application of CCS. This project was funded through the Energy & Environmental Research Center–U.S. Department of Energy Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme.

Jensen, Melanie; Schlasner, Steven; Sorensen, James; Hamling, John

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Selection of coals of different maturities for CO2 Storage by modelling of CH4 and CO2 adsorption isotherms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this study is to compare and model pure gas sorption isotherms (CO2 and CH4) for well-characterised coals of different maturities to determine the most suitable coal for CO2 storage. Carbon dioxide and methane; Coals; Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption; Modelling isotherms 1. Introduction CO2 is a greenhouse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

Modeling long-term CO2 storage, sequestration and cycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of numerical and analytical models to the problem of storage, sequestration and migration of carbon dioxide in geologic formations is discussed. A review of numerical and analytical models that have been applied to CO2 sequestration are presented, as well as a description of frameworks for risk analysis. Application of models to various issues related to carbon sequestration are discussed, including trapping mechanisms, density convection mixing, impurities in the CO2 stream, changes in formation porosity and permeability, the risk of vertical leakage, and the impacts on groundwater resources if leakage does occur. A discussion of the development and application of site-specific models first addresses the estimation of model parameters and the use of natural analogues to inform the development of CO2 sequestration models, and then surveys modeling that has been done at two commercial-scale CO2 sequestration sites, Sleipner and In Salah, along with a pilot-scale injection sites used to study CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers (Frio) and an experimental site designed to test monitoring of CO2 leakage in the vadose zone (ZERT Release Facility).

Bacon, Diana H.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ris Energy Report 6 CO2 capture and storage 2 6.1 What is CO2 capture and storage?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be burned in an engine or fuel cell, and a CO2 stream for storage (see chapters 7.3 and 7.6 for further2 Gas, oil Air O2 H2 Raw material Gas, ammonia, steel Air/O2 Steam Figure 15: the three main

38

Predicting CO2-water interfacial tension under pressure and temperature conditions of geologic CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E EPM2- TIP4P2005 PPL- TIP4P2005 Predicted (f) a P ? CO2 2SE? CO2 2SE? CO2 2SE ? CO2 2SE ? CO2 2SE ? CO2 2SE a Surface excess CO

Nielsen, L.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However, additional analyses plus detailed regional and site characterization is needed, along with a closer examination of competing storage demands.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

40

First U.S. Large-Scale CO2 Storage Project Advances | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecordFederal Registry CommentsOverview »FINDINGDepartment ofPlant |First

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondary accumulation at shallow depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large Releases from CO2 Storage Reservoirs: Analogs,S.T. Nelson. Natural Leaking CO2-charged Systems as AnalogsY. Sano, and H.U. Schmincke. CO2-rich Gases from Lakes Nyos

Pruess, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Regulation for Underground Storage of CO2 Passed by U.S. States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation. Its use, therefore, is necessary in order to achieve the CO2 emission reduction targetRegulation for Underground Storage of CO2 Passed by U.S. States Holly Javedan Massachusetts................................................................................................... 8 2.4 CO2 Ownership

43

Reliability sensitivity analysis based on probability distribution perturbation with application to CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to CO2 storage Ekaterina Sergienkoa,b , Paul Lema^itrec,d , Aur´elie Arnaudc , Daniel Busbyb , Fabrice a computationally expensive simulation code for evaluating the failure probability such as the CO2 storage risk analysis. An application of the method to a synthetic CO2 storage case study is provided together with some

Boyer, Edmond

44

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Could Sequestration of CO2 be Combined with the DevelopmentTOUGH2 Code for Studies of CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers,and J. Ennis- King. CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Sustainable Carbon Sequestration: Increasing CO2-Storage Efficiency through a CO2-Brine Displacement Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed methods for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore mitigating global climate change. Few studies on storing CO2 in an aquifer have been conducted on a regional scale. This study...

Akinnikawe, Oyewande

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRAIN CO2 INJECTION FEASIBILITY: TEAPOT DOME EOR PILOTEOR, and coupled process modeling will investigate the total system including preliminary estimates of CO2

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

ARRA-Multi-Level Energy Storage and Controls for Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Project Objective is to design innovative energy storage architecture and associated controls for high wind penetration to increase reliability and market acceptance of wind power. The project goals are to facilitate wind energy integration at different levels by design and control of suitable energy storage systems. The three levels of wind power system are: Balancing Control Center level, Wind Power Plant level, and Wind Power Generator level. Our scopes are to smooth the wind power fluctuation and also ensure adequate battery life. In the new hybrid energy storage system (HESS) design for wind power generation application, the boundary levels of the state of charge of the battery and that of the supercapacitor are used in the control strategy. In the controller, some logic gates are also used to control the operating time durations of the battery. The sizing method is based on the average fluctuation of wind profiles of a specific wind station. The calculated battery size is dependent on the size of the supercapacitor, state of charge of the supercapacitor and battery wear. To accommodate the wind power fluctuation, a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) consisting of battery energy system (BESS) and super-capacitor is adopted in this project. A probability-based power capacity specification approach for the BESS and super-capacitors is proposed. Through this method the capacities of BESS and super-capacitor are properly designed to combine the characteristics of high energy density of BESS and the characteristics of high power density of super-capacitor. It turns out that the super-capacitor within HESS deals with the high power fluctuations, which contributes to the extension of BESS lifetime, and the super-capacitor can handle the peaks in wind power fluctuations without the severe penalty of round trip losses associated with a BESS. The proposed approach has been verified based on the real wind data from an existing wind power plant in Iowa. An intelligent controller that increases battery life within hybrid energy storage systems for wind application was developed. Comprehensive studies have been conducted and simulation results are analyzed. A permanent magnet synchronous generator, coupled with a variable speed wind turbine, is connected to a power grid (14-bus system). A rectifier, a DC-DC converter and an inverter are used to provide a complete model of the wind system. An Energy Storage System (ESS) is connected to a DC-link through a DC-DC converter. An intelligent controller is applied to the DC-DC converter to help the Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) to regulate output power and also to control the operation of the battery and supercapacitor. This ensures a longer life time for the batteries. The detailed model is simulated in PSCAD/EMTP. Additionally, economic analysis has been done for different methods that can reduce the wind power output fluctuation. These methods are, wind power curtailment, dumping loads, battery energy storage system and hybrid energy storage system. From the results, application of single advanced HESS can save more money for wind turbines owners. Generally the income would be the same for most of methods because the wind does not change and maximum power point tracking can be applied to most systems. On the other hand, the cost is the key point. For short term and small wind turbine, the BESS is the cheapest and applicable method while for large scale wind turbines and wind farms the application of advanced HESS would be the best method to reduce the power fluctuation. The key outcomes of this project include a new intelligent controller that can reduce energy exchanged between the battery and DC-link, reduce charging/discharging cycles, reduce depth of discharge and increase time interval between charge/discharge, and lower battery temperature. This improves the overall lifetime of battery energy storages. Additionally, a new design method based on probability help optimize the power capacity specification for BESS and super-capacitors. Recommendations include experimental imp

David Wenzhong Gao

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Well Technologies for CO2 Geological Storage: CO2-Resistant Cement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Résumé — Technologies de puits pour le stockage géologique du CO2: ciment résistant au CO2 — Le stockage souterrain du CO2 est actuellement considéré comme la voie la plus efficace pour une séquestration sure et à faible coût. Cette nouvelle application exige une étanchéité du puits à très long terme. La rupture de la gaine de ciment dans l’intervalle entre le cuvelage et la formation géologique peut créer des chemins préférentiels favorisant la fuite du CO2 vers la surface avec des vitesses probablement supérieures à celles pouvant être provoquées par les fuites au travers des formations géologiques. Il en résultera une perte économique, une réduction de l’efficacité du stockage de CO2 et la remise en cause du champ pour le stockage de CO2. Ce risque potentiel de fuites soulève des questions quant à la bonne iso-lation du puits à long terme et à la durabilité du ciment hydraté utilisé pour isoler l’annulaire entre les intervalles de production et d’injection dans les puits de CO2. Nous proposons une nouvelle procédure expérimentale et une méthodologie pour étudier la réactivité des systèmes CO2-Eau-Ciment en simulant les interactions du ciment pris avec le CO2 injecté à l’état supercritique dans des conditions de fond de puits. Les conditions utilisées pour ces expériences sont de 90ºC et 280 bars. L’évolution des propriétés mécaniques et physico-chimiques du ciment Portland est mesurée dans le temps sur une période maxi-male de six mois. Les résultats sont comparés à ceux obtenus par une étude similaire sur un nouveau

V. Barlet-gouédard; G. Rimmelé; B. Goffé; O. Porcherie

50

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

157 WELL INTEGRITY IN CO 2 ENVIRONMENTS: PERFORMANCE, RISK,of CO 2 injection, wells integrity and long term behavior ofcan compromise the well integrity and thus its functional

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marchetti, C. , On geoengineering and the CO2 prob- lem.to the location of geoengineering activities seems to be

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Large releases from CO2 storage reservoirs: Analogs, scenarios, and modeling needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells is a major concern for storage of CO 2 in depleted or near-depleted oil and gas reservoirs [

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Large releases from CO2 storage reservoirs: analogs, scenarios, and modeling needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells is a major concern for storage of CO 2 in depleted or near-depleted oil and gas reservoirs [

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Large Releases from CO2 Storage Reservoirs: A Discussion of Natural Analogs, FEPS, and Modeling Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells is a major concern for geological storage of CO 2 in depleted or near-depleted oil and gas reservoirs [

Birkholzer, J.; Pruess, K.; Lewicki, J.L.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.; Karimjee, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

CO2 leakage up from a geological storage site to shallow fresh groundwater: CO2-water-rock interaction assessment and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 leakage up from a geological storage site to shallow fresh groundwater: CO2-water repository requires the investigation of the potential CO2 leakage back into fresh groundwater, particularly sensitive monitoring techniques in order to detect potential CO2 leaks and their magnitude as well

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

56

Report TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.entek.chalmers.se/~anly/symp/symp2001.html) "CO2 sequestration by magnesium silicate mineral carbonation in Finland" Ron Zevenhoven of magnesium oxide-based mineral carbonation for CO2 sequestration" Ron Zevenhoven, Jens Kohlmann. underReport TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2 from flue gases Jens Kohlmann 1

Zevenhoven, Ron

57

A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale energy storage represents a key challenge for renewable energy and new systems with low cost, high energy density and long cycle life are desired. In this article, we develop a new lithium/polysulfide (Li/PS) semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage, with lithium polysulfide (Li{sub 2}S{sub 8}) in ether solvent as a catholyte and metallic lithium as an anode. Unlike previous work on Li/S batteries with discharge products such as solid state Li{sub 2}S{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}S, the catholyte is designed to cycle only in the range between sulfur and Li{sub 2}S{sub 4}. Consequently all detrimental effects due to the formation and volume expansion of solid Li{sub 2}S{sub 2}/Li{sub 2}S are avoided. This novel strategy results in excellent cycle life and compatibility with flow battery design. The proof-of-concept Li/PS battery could reach a high energy density of 170 W h kg{sup -1} and 190 W h L{sup -1} for large scale storage at the solubility limit, while keeping the advantages of hybrid flow batteries. We demonstrated that, with a 5 M Li{sub 2}S{sub 8} catholyte, energy densities of 97 W h kg{sup -1} and 108 W h L{sup -1} can be achieved. As the lithium surface is well passivated by LiNO{sub 3} additive in ether solvent, internal shuttle effect is largely eliminated and thus excellent performance over 2000 cycles is achieved with a constant capacity of 200 mA h g{sup -1}. This new system can operate without the expensive ion-selective membrane, and it is attractive for large-scale energy storage.

Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Techno-economic Modeling of the Integration of 20% Wind and Large-scale Energy Storage in ERCOT by 2030  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study�¢����s objective is to examine interrelated technical and economic avenues for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) grid to incorporate up to and over 20% wind generation by 2030. Our specific interests are to look at the factors that will affect the implementation of both high level of wind power penetration (> 20% generation) and installation of large scale storage.

Ross Baldick; Michael Webber; Carey King; Jared Garrison; Stuart Cohen; Duehee Lee

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

Physical and chemical effects of CO2 storage in saline aquifers of the southern North Sea   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most promising mitigation strategies for greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere is carbon capture and storage (CCS). Deep saline aquifers are seen as the most efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites, ...

Heinemann, Niklas

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strain and microseismicity, well integrity, caprock sealingstrain and microseismicity, well integrity, caprock sealingactions. 7 WELLBORE INTEGRITY The well design of a deep CO 2

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EOR) and enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBMR) becauseand potential for coalbed methane. The Mannville coals areCO 2 injectivity and coalbed methane producibility. Thus,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Predicting CO2-water interfacial tension under pressure and temperature conditions of geologic CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

within ± 15% of nominal P. EPM2-SPC/E DZ- SPC/E PPL-SPC/EEPM2- TIP4P2005 PPL- TIP4P2005 Predicted (f) a P ? CO2 2SE ?to C and O atoms (Table 1). The PPL model (In Het Panhuis et

Nielsen, L.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

How secure is CO2 storage? Leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology available to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from large point sources such as power plants and the burial of organic rich rocks such as coal seams.2 We have compiled the first global dataset on natural CO ­ but not necessarily leaking. Figure 4: Diagram showing the state of CO2 in the studied reservoirs. Supercritical

64

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 Jason J. Heinrich, Howard J. Herzog, David M. Reiner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analogs: acid gas injection (AGI), enhanced oil recovery (EOR), natural gas storage, and CO2 transportENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 * Jason J. Heinrich, Howard J. Herzog, David M of reducing CO2 emissions. The storage of CO2 in underground geologic reservoirs is one such idea that employs

65

Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Deep Saline Aquifer Storage Based on Reservoir and Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and of the Council of 23 April 2009 on the geological storage of carbon dioxide IEA-GHG, 2007. Remediation of Leakage from CO2 Storage Reservoirs. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme, 2007/11, September 2007. Le Guenan T : review and modelling., in CO2NET 2009 Annual Seminar Agenda - Trondheim - Norway - 18-19 June 2009. Xu T

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report serves as the final technical report and users manual for the 'Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II SBIR project. Advanced Resources International has developed a screening tool by which users can technically screen, assess the storage capacity and quantify the costs of CO2 storage in four types of CO2 storage reservoirs. These include CO2-enhanced oil recovery reservoirs, depleted oil and gas fields (non-enhanced oil recovery candidates), deep coal seems that are amenable to CO2-enhanced methane recovery, and saline reservoirs. The screening function assessed whether the reservoir could likely serve as a safe, long-term CO2 storage reservoir. The storage capacity assessment uses rigorous reservoir simulation models to determine the timing, ultimate storage capacity, and potential for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Finally, the economic assessment function determines both the field-level and pipeline (transportation) costs for CO2 sequestration in a given reservoir. The screening tool has been peer reviewed at an Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical meeting in March 2009. A number of useful observations and recommendations emerged from the Workshop on the costs of CO2 transport and storage that could be readily incorporated into a commercial version of the Screening Tool in a Phase III SBIR.

George J. Koperna Jr.; Vello A. Kuuskraa; David E. Riestenberg; Aiysha Sultana; Tyler Van Leeuwen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1 *, P.D.C. Défossez1 storage of CO2 in unmineable coal seams could be a very interesting option in the sustainable management of coal basins. However, the various chemical and physical parameters that determine the success

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

68

European and Global Perspectives for CO2 Capture and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants. Therefore, it is recommended to employ mixes of the different CO2 emission reduction options are compared in order to address the question how to achieve significant CO2 emission reductions through2 emission reductions through the application of CCS technologies. The analysis shows that CCS can

69

CO2 Capture and Storage Project, Education and Training Center...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) Project is one of the nation's largest carbon capture and storage endeavors. Part of the project includes the National...

70

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 escapes the reservoir through the abandoned well. Theof the abandoned well and the gas reservoir is calculated by4 reservoir 1.e-12 1.e-14 8.4e-4 Fracture or abandoned well

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in depleted or abandoned oil and gas reservoirs; how- ever,abandoned wells represent a potentially direct route from reservoirabandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO 2 reservoir

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in depleted or abandoned oil and gas reservoirs; how- ever,oil well abandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO 2 reservoir

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unminable coaltakes place in depleted oil or gas reservoirs (IAE, 2003).of CO 2 in depleted oil and gas reservoirs. J Can Pet

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN DEPLETED AND NEAR- DEPLETED OIL RESERVOIRS V. A. KuuskraaDEPLETED AND NEAR-DEPLETED OIL RESERVOIRS Vello A. Kuuskraaof CO 2 in a depleted oil reservoir: an overview,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery project as a prototypeCO 2 injection for enhanced oil recovery. Indeed, most near-as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery projects. REFERENCES

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photovoltaics; hydrogen storage; ultrathin epitaxial filmsstorage to obtain an accurate power spectrum, especially if the relatively rapid vibrational behavior of hydrogen

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Scenario Development and Analysis of Hydrogen as a Large-Scale Energy Storage Medium (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conclusions from this report are: (1) hydrogen has several important advantages over competing technologies, including - very high storage energy density (170 kWh/m{sup 3} vs. 2.4 for CAES and 0.7 for pumped hydro) which allows for potential economic viability of above-ground storage and relatively low environmental impact in comparison with other technologies; and (2) the major disadvantage of hydrogen energy storage is cost but research and deployment of electrolyzers and fuel cells may reduce cost significantly.

Steward, D. M.

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir-A Numerical Simulation Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

injection into saline aquifer, CO2-EOR, CO2-ECBM, and so forth, have been studied to minimize the CO22-EOR, CO2-ECBM, and so forth, have been studied to minimize the CO2 release into the atmosphere1 CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir- A Numerical Simulation

Mohaghegh, Shahab

79

Hydro-mechanical modelling of geological CO2 storage and the study of possible caprock fracture mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydro-mechanical modelling of geological CO2 storage and the study of possible caprock fracture element modelling of a hypothetical underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage operation. The hydro

80

Seismic modeling to monitor CO2 geological storage: The Atzbach ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 8, 2012 ... greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide in depleted hydrocarbon ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Economic analysis of large-scale hydrogen storage for renewable utility applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported here supports the efforts of the Market Transformation element of the DOE Fuel Cell Technology Program. The portfolio includes hydrogen technologies, as well as fuel cell technologies. The objective of this work is to model the use of bulk hydrogen storage, integrated with intermittent renewable energy production of hydrogen via electrolysis, used to generate grid-quality electricity. In addition the work determines cost-effective scale and design characteristics and explores potential attractive business models.

Schoenung, Susan M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,500 users working on some 650 projects that involve nearly 600 codes in a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In March 2013, NERSC, DOE?s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE?s Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) held a review to characterize High Performance Computing (HPC) and storage requirements for FES research through 2017. This report is the result.

Gerber, Richard

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BER-funded research over the subsequent three to five years. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. Chief among them: scientific progress in BER-funded research is limited by current allocations of computational resources. Additionally, growth in mission-critical computing -- combined with new requirements for collaborative data manipulation and analysis -- will demand ever increasing computing, storage, network, visualization, reliability and service richness from NERSC. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. It also presents a number of"case studies" as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BER. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this"case study" format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and 3-5 year computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel,"multi-core" environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years.

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office (BER),

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Using Big Data and Smart Field Technology for Detecting Leakage in a CO2 Storage Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Storage), captures the CO2 from production sources like the power plants (coal or gas fired) and transfers leaking from the reservoir using the real-time data streams demonstrates the power of pattern recognition it to sink or storage site (geologic unit). Hydrocarbon reservoirs, deep saline reservoirs and coal bed

Mohaghegh, Shahab

87

ABSTRACT--Due to the sun's intermittent nature, there must be energy storage on a large scale in order for solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT--Due to the sun's intermittent nature, there must be energy storage on a large scale electrode). Since this produces no carbon dioxide this is a very clean process. With the growing demand future. Hydrogen is a potential candidate to act as an energy storage medium in a sustainable energy

Honsberg, Christiana

88

On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced water from production of crude oil, natural gas,combined U.S. production rate of crude oil (0.3 km 3 ) and

Zhou, Q.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-002-2012_Modeling the Performance of Large Scale CO2 Storage_20121024.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWERFebruarySavebased on an analysis DOEUse

90

Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of CO 2 Storage for Full-Scale Deployment, Ground Water, 48(connect the storage formation with the ground surface. ToStorage Systems—Application of a New Analytical Solution, submitted to Ground

Birkholzer, J.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

co2-saline-storage | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage CleanDiscovery of θ1cmarquardt2013 NETLSaline

92

CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding. As part of the MGSC�������¢����������������s Validation Phase (Phase II) studies, the small injection pilot test was conducted at the Bald Unit site within the Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, which was chosen for the project on the basis of site infrastructure and reservoir conditions. Geologic data on the target formation were extensive. Core analyses, porosity and permeability data, and geophysical logs from 40 wells were used to construct cross sections and structure contour and isopach maps in order to characterize and define the reservoir architecture of the target formation. A geocellular model of the reservoir was constructed to improve understanding of CO2 behavior in the subsurface. At the time of site selection, the Field was under secondary recovery through edge-water injection, but the wells selected for the pilot in the Bald Unit had been temporarily shut-in for several years. The most recently shut-in production well, which was surrounded by four nearby shut-in production wells in a five-spot pattern, was converted to CO2 injection for this pilot. Two additional wells outside the immediate five-spot pattern, one of which was an active producer, were instrumented to measure surface temperature and pressure. The CO2 injection period lasted from September 3, 2009, through December 14, 2010, with one three-month interruption caused by cessation of CO2 deliveries due to winter weather. Water was injected into the CO2 injection well during this period. A total of 6,300 tonnes (6,950 tons) of CO2 were injected into the reservoir at rates that generally ranged from 18 to 32 tonnes (20 to 35 tons) per day. The CO2 injection bottomhole pressure generally remained at 8.3 to 9.0 MPag (1,200 to 1,300 psig). The CO2 injection was followed by continued monitoring for nine months during post-CO2 water injection. A monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) program was designed to determine the fate of injected CO2. Extensive periodic sampling and analysis of brine, groundwater, and produced gases began before CO2 injection and continued through the monitored waterflood periods. Samples were gathered from production wells and three newly installed groundwater monitoring wells. Samples underwent geochemical and isotopic analyses to reveal any CO2-related changes. Groundwater and kinetic modeling and mineralogical analysis were also employed to better understand the long-term dynamics of CO2 in the reservoir. No CO2 leakage into groundwater was detected, and analysis of brine and gas chemistry made it possible to track the path of plume migration and infer geochemical reactions and trapping of CO2. Cased-hole logging did not detect any CO2 in the near-wellbore region. An increase in CO2 concentration was first detected in February 2010 from the gas present in the carboy during brine sampling; however, there was no appreciable gas volume associated with the detection of CO2. The first indication of elevated gas rates from the commingled gas of the pilot�������¢����������������s production wells occurred in July 2010 and reached a maximum of 0.36 tonnes/day (0.41 tons/day) in September 2010. An estimated 27 tonnes (30 tons) of CO2 were produced at the surface from the gas separator at the tank battery from September 3, 2009, through September 11, 2011, representing 0.5% of the injected CO2. Consequently, 99.5%

Frailey, Scott M.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Damico, James R.; Okwen, Roland T.; McKaskle, Ray W.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Directed Technical Change and the Adoption of CO2 Abatement Technology: The Case of CO2 Capture and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies the cost effectiveness of combining traditional environmental policy, such as CO2 trading schemes, and technology policy that has aims of reducing the cost and speeding the adoption of CO2 abatement ...

Otto, Vincent M.

94

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

95

Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, “Incorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species,” we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task “Study of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes,” We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Large releases from CO2 storage reservoirs: analogs, scenarios,and modeling needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the purpose of geologic storage in deep salineformations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential existsfor CO2 to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward alongpermeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. In this paper, weevaluate the potential for such CO2 discharges based on the analysis ofnatural analogs, where large releases of gas have been observed. We areparticularly interested in circumstances that could generate sudden,possibly self-enhancing release events. The probability for such eventsmay be low, but the circumstances under which they occur and thepotential consequences need to be evaluated in order to designappropriate site-selection and risk-management strategies. Numericalmodeling of hypothetical test cases is suggested to determine criticalconditions for large CO2 releases, to evaluate whether such conditionsmaybe possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, toevaluate the potential impacts of such events as well as designappropriate mitigation strategies.

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Rutqvist,Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs Sean T Description Date 0 Original document 1/29/2008 1 Estimate for carbon content of crude oil was incorrect (see p an invaluable summer at the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin working with Sue

98

Basin-scale hydrogeologic impacts of CO2 storage: Capacity and regulatory implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94720, United States 1. Introduction Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) in deep formations (e regulation of CO2 storage projects. Our assessment arises from a hypothetical future carbon sequestration valuable groundwater resources overlying the deep sequestration aquifers. In this paper, we discuss how

Zhou, Quanlin

99

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind.

100

Long-timescale interaction of CO2 storage with reservoir and seal: Miller and Brae natural analogue fields North Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power generation by shift of natural methane gas to hydrogen and pre-combustion separation of CO2 Background Depleted oil or gas fields, naturally rich in CO2, provide an immediate opportunity for long1 Long-timescale interaction of CO2 storage with reservoir and seal: Miller and Brae natural

Haszeldine, Stuart

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Frameworkfor Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a screening and ranking framework(SRF) developed to evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites on the basis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk arising from possible CO2 leakage. The approach is based on the assumption that HSE risk due to CO2 leakage is dependent on three basic characteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site: (1) the potential for primary containment by the target formation; (2) the potential for secondary containment if the primary formation leaks; and (3) the potential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 if the primary formation leaks and secondary containment fails. The framework is implemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numerical scores representing expert opinions or general information available from published materials along with estimates of uncertainty to evaluate the three basic characteristics in order to screen and rank candidate sites. Application of the framework to the Rio Visa Gas Field, Ventura Oil Field, and Mammoth Mountain demonstrates the approach. Refinements and extensions are possible through the use of more detailed data or model results in place of property proxies. Revisions and extensions to improve the approach are anticipated in the near future as it is used and tested by colleagues and collaborators.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

102

Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Frameworkfor Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a screening and ranking framework(SRF) developed to evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2)storage sites on the basis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE)risk arising from possible CO2 leakage. The approach is based on theassumption that HSE risk due to CO2 leakage is dependent on three basiccharacteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site: (1) the potential forprimary containment by the target formation, (2) the potential forsecondary containment if the primary formation leaks, and (3) thepotential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 if the primaryformation leaks and secondary containment fails. The framework isimplemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numerical scoresrepresenting expert opinions or general information available frompublished materials along with estimates of uncertainty to evaluate thethree basic characteristics in order to screen and rank candidate sites.Application of the framework to the Rio Vista Gas Field, Ventura OilField, and Mammoth Mountain demonstrates the approach. Refinements andextensions are possible through the use of more detailed data or modelresults in place of property proxies. Revisions and extensions to improvethe approach are anticipated in the near future as it is used and testedby colleagues and collaborators.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Developing a Comprehensive Risk Assessment Framework for Geological Storage CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operational risks for CCS projects include: risks of capturing, compressing, transporting and injecting CO?; risks of well blowouts; risk that CO? will leak into shallow aquifers and contaminate potable water; and risk that sequestered CO? will leak into the atmosphere. This report examines these risks by using information on the risks associated with analogue activities such as CO2 based enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), natural gas storage and acid gas disposal. We have developed a new analysis of pipeline risk based on Bayesian statistical analysis. Bayesian theory probabilities may describe states of partial knowledge, even perhaps those related to non-repeatable events. The Bayesian approach enables both utilizing existing data and at the same time having the capability to adsorb new information thus to lower uncertainty in our understanding of complex systems. Incident rates for both natural gas and CO2 pipelines have been widely used in papers and reports on risk of CO2 pipelines as proxies for the individual risk created by such pipelines. Published risk studies of CO2 pipelines suggest that the individual risk associated with CO2 pipelines is between 10-3 and 10-4, which reflects risk levels approaching those of mountain climbing, which many would find unacceptably high. This report concludes, based on a careful analysis of natural gas pipeline failures, suggests that the individual risk of CO2 pipelines is likely in the range of 10-6 to 10-7, a risk range considered in the acceptable to negligible range in most countries. If, as is commonly thought, pipelines represent the highest risk component of CCS outside of the capture plant, then this conclusion suggests that most (if not all) previous quantitative- risk assessments of components of CCS may be orders of magnitude to high. The potential lethality of unexpected CO2 releases from pipelines or wells are arguably the highest risk aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), carbon capture, and storage (CCS). Assertions in the CCS literature, that CO2 levels of 10% for ten minutes, or 20 to 30% for a few minutes are lethal to humans, are not supported by the available evidence. The results of published experiments with animals exposed to CO2, from mice to monkeys, at both normal and depleted oxygen levels, suggest that lethal levels of CO2 toxicity are in the range 50 to 60%. These experiments demonstrate that CO2 does not kill by asphyxia, but rather is toxic at high concentrations. It is concluded that quantitative risk assessments of CCS have overestimated the risk of fatalities by using values of lethality a factor two to six lower than the values estimated in this paper. In many dispersion models of CO2 releases from pipelines, no fatalities would be predicted if appropriate levels of lethality for CO2 had been used in the analysis.

Duncan, Ian

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

105

Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal–CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations: An Approach to Improve Energy Recovery and Mitigate Risk : FY1 Final Report The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

109

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

110

Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storage reservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO 2 to the surface, particularly in depleted oil or gas reservoir

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A method for quick assessment of CO2 storage capacity in closed and semi-closed saline formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, USA 1. Introduction Geological carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep forma- tions (e.g., saline of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Carbon Sequestration Regio 2008 Published on line 21 March 2008 Keywords: Geological CO2 sequestration Storage capacity Saline

Zhou, Quanlin

112

Intercomparison of simulation models for CO2 disposal in underground storage reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil recovery (EOR) using CO2 requires an understanding ofexperience with using CO2 for EOR projects (SPE, 1999), and

Pruess, Karsten; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Law, David; Oldenburg, Curt

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Copyright 2013 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission from: CERTS Microgrid Demonstration with Large-Scale Energy Storage and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Scale Energy Storage and Renewable Generation Eduardo Alegria, Member, IEEE; Tim Brown, Member, IEEE; Erin Minear, Member, IEEE; Robert H. Lasseter, Fellow, IEEE Submitted to "Energy Storage Applications--Distributed Generation, Distributed Resource, Islanding, Microgrid, Smart Grid, Renewable Energy, Advanced Energy Storage

114

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulation has been used, as common practice, to estimate the CO2 storage capacity of depleted reservoirs. However, this method is time consuming, expensive and requires detailed input data. This investigation proposes an analytical method...

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Carbon storage: the economic efficiency of storing CO2 in leaky reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industry routinely injects CO2 underground to enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR). A bit more than two thousand kilometers of CO2 pipelines have been laid in Texas to provide for CO2- EOR. In these operations the goal must pay for the CO2. Yet at the end of an EOR operation a major fraction of CO2 purchased remains

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

116

Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection ProcessDuring CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For purposes of geologic storage, CO2 would be injected into saline formations at supercritical temperature and pressure conditions, and would form a separate phase that is immiscible with the aqueous phase (brine). At typical subsurface temperature and pressure conditions, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) has lower density than the aqueous phase and would experience an upward buoyancy force. Accordingly, the CO2 is expected to accumulate beneath the caprock at the top of the permeable interval, and could escape from the storage formation wherever (sub-)vertical pathways are available, such as fractures or faults through the caprock, or improperly abandoned wells. Over time, an increasing fraction of CO2 may dissolve in the aqueous phase, and eventually some of the aqueous CO2 may react with rock minerals to form poorly soluble carbonates. Dissolution into the aqueous phase and eventual sequestration as carbonates are highly desirable processes as they would increase permanence and security of storage. Dissolution of CO2 will establish phase equilibrium locally between the overlying CO2 plume and the aqueous phase beneath. If the aqueous phase were immobile, CO2 dissolution would be limited by the rate at which molecular diffusion can remove dissolved CO2 from the interface between CO2-rich and aqueous phases. This is a slow process. However, dissolution of CO2 is accompanied by a small increase in the density of the aqueous phase, creating a negative buoyancy force that can give rise to downward convection of CO2-rich brine, which in turn can greatly accelerate CO2 dissolution. This study explores the process of dissolution-diffusion-convection (DDC), using high-resolution numerical simulation. We find that geometric features of convection patterns are very sensitive to small changes in problem specifications, reflecting self-enhancing feedbacks and the chaotic nature of the process. Total CO2 dissolution rates on the other hand are found to be quite robust against modest changes in problem parameters, and are essentially constant as long as no dissolved CO2 reaches the lower boundary of the system.

Pruess, Karsten; Zhang, Keni

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemi...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale...

118

No geologic evidence that seismicity causes fault leakage that would render large-scale carbon capture and storage unsuccessful  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a recent Perspective (1), Zoback and Gorelick argued that carbon capture and storage (CCS) is likely not a viable strategy for reducing CO[subscript 2] emissions to the atmosphere. They argued that maps of earthquake ...

Juanes, Ruben

119

MANAGING THE RISKS IN THE VADOSE ZONE ASSOCIATED WITH THE LEAKAGE OF CO2 FROM A DEEP GEOLOGICAL STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term storage (depleted natural gas and oil fields, deep aquifers and unmineable coal seams). CO2 is injected correspond to a storage reservoir depth of about 800 m (Law et al., 1996). Since the 1990's, the CCS" in case of "abnormal behaviour" of the reservoir has been outlined by the European directive on geological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

120

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB Geologic Pilot Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using injected CO 2 to driveof enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using injected CO 2 to swell

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondary accumulation at shallow depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adiabatic (= no external heat supply) expansion of CO 2 toCO 2 without external heat supply will cause temperatures toenables more sustained heat supply from the surroundings,

Pruess, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in Response to CO2 Leakage from Deep Geologicalstudy mineral trapping for CO2 disposal in deep arenaceousconstituents as function of P(CO2)? function of P(CO2)? – –

Birkholzer, Jens

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Large-scale Demonstration and Deployment Project for D&D of Fuel Storage Canals and Associated Facilities at INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA), sponsored a Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) under management of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The INEEL LSDDP is one of several LSDDPs sponsored by DOE. The LSDDP process integrates field demonstrations into actual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations by comparing new or improved technologies against existing baseline technologies using a side-by-side comparison. The goals are (a) to identify technologies that are cheaper, safer, faster, and cleaner (produce less waste), and (b) to incorporate those technologies into D&D baseline operations. The INEEL LSDDP reviewed more than 300 technologies, screened 141, and demonstrated 17. These 17 technologies have been deployed a total of 70 times at facilities other than those where the technology was demonstrated, and 10 have become baseline at the INEEL. Fifteen INEEL D&D needs have been modified or removed from the Needs Management System as a direct result of using these new technologies. Conservatively, the ten-year projected cost savings at the INEEL resulting from use of the technologies demonstrated in this INEEL LSDDP exceeds $39 million dollars.

Whitmill, Larry Joseph

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

CO2 Saline Storage Demonstration in Colorado Sedimentary Basins: Applied Studies in Reservoir Assessment and Dynamic Processes Affecting Industrial Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multitask research project was conducted in anticipation of a possible future increase in industrial efforts at CO2 storage in Colorado sedimentary basins. Colorado is already the home to the oldest Rocky Mountain CO2 storage site, the Rangely Oil Field, where CO2-EOR has been underway since the 1980s. The Colorado Geological Survey has evaluated storage options statewide, and as part of the SW Carbon Sequestration Partnership the Survey, is deeply engaged in and committed to suitable underground CO2 storage. As a more sustainable energy industry is becoming a global priority, it is imperative to explore the range of technical options available to reduce emissions from fossil fuels. One such option is to store at least some emitted CO2 underground. In this NETL-sponsored CO2 sequestration project, the Colorado School of Mines and our partners at the University of Colorado have focused on a set of the major fundamental science and engineering issues surrounding geomechanics, mineralogy, geochemistry and reservoir architecture of possible CO2 storage sites (not limited to Colorado). Those are the central themes of this final report and reported below in Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 6. Closely related to these reservoir geoscience issues are also legal, environmental and public acceptance concerns about pore space accessibility—as a precondition for CO2 storage. These are addressed in Tasks 1, 5 and 7. Some debates about the future course of the energy industry can become acrimonius. It is true that the physics of combustion of hydrocarbons makes it impossible for fossil energy to attain a carbon footprint anywhere nearly as low as that of renewables. However, there are many offsetting benefits, not the least that fossil energy is still plentiful, it has a global and highly advanced distribution system in place, and the footprint that the fossil energy infrastructure occupies is orders of magnitude smaller than renewable energy facilities with equivalent energy capacity. Finally, inexpensive natural gas here in North America is pushing coal for electricity generation off the market, thus reducing US CO2 emissions faster than any other large industrialized nation. These two big factors argue for renewed efforts to find technology solutions to reduce the carbon footprint (carbon dioxide as well as methane and trace gases) of conventional and unconventional oil and gas. One major such technology component is likely to be carbon capture, utilization and storage.

Nummedal, Dag; Sitchler, Alexis; McCray, John; Mouzakis, Katherine; Glossner, Andy; Mandernack, Kevin; Gutierrez, Marte; Doran, Kevin; Pranter, Matthew; Rybowiak, Chris

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storage reservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells at storage sites, particularly at sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirsabandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO 2 to the surface, particularly in depleted oil or gas reservoirabandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO 2 to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirs

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Why we need the and in CO2 utilization and storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2(1): 9–19 (2012). 3. US DOE, EOR fact sheet. [Online]. DOE,programs/reserves/npr/CO 2 _EOR_ Fact_Sheet.pdf [Decemberoil recovery ( CO 2 - EOR). While much of the current

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Estimating the supply and demand for deep geologic CO2 storage capacity over the course of the 21st Century: A meta-analysis of the literature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whether there is sufficient geologic CO2 storage capacity to allow CCS to play a significant role in mitigating climate change has been the subject of debate since the 1990s. This paper presents a meta- analysis of a large body of recently published literature to derive updated estimates of the global deep geologic storage resource as well as the potential demand for this geologic CO2 storage resource over the course of this century. This analysis reveals that, for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation scenarios that have end-of-century atmospheric CO2 concentrations of between 350 ppmv and 725 ppmv, the average demand for deep geologic CO2 storage over the course of this century is between 410 GtCO2 and 1,670 GtCO2. The literature summarized here suggests that -- depending on the stringency of criteria applied to calculate storage capacity – global geologic CO2 storage capacity could be: 35,300 GtCO2 of “theoretical” capacity; 13,500 GtCO2 of “effective” capacity; 3,900 GtCO2, of “practical” capacity; and 290 GtCO2 of “matched” capacity for the few regions where this narrow definition of capacity has been calculated. The cumulative demand for geologic CO2 storage is likely quite small compared to global estimates of the deep geologic CO2 storage capacity, and therefore, a “lack” of deep geologic CO2 storage capacity is unlikely to be an impediment for the commercial adoption of CCS technologies in this century.

Dooley, James J.

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), serving to sequester CO 2allocation methods for EOR LCA, finding that the allocation

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increased electricity generation from other power plants inplants require the capture of more CO 2 per unit of electricity generation.

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

where CO 2 used for enhanced oil recovery has broken throughformations for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) has been

Pruess, Karsten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Area of Interest 1, CO2 at the Interface: Nature and Dynamics of the Reservoir/Caprock Contact and Implications for Carbon Storage Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined the influence of geologic features present at the reservoir/caprock interface on the transmission of supercritical CO2 into and through caprock. We focused on the case of deformation-band faults in reservoir lithologies that intersect the interface and transition to opening-mode fractures in caprock lithologies. Deformation-band faults are exceeding common in potential CO2 injection units and our fieldwork in Utah indicates that this sort of transition is common. To quantify the impact of these interface features on flow and transport we first described the sedimentology and permeability characteristics of selected sites along the Navajo Sandstone (reservoir lithology) and Carmel Formation (caprock lithology) interface, and along the Slickrock Member (reservoir lithology) and Earthy Member (caprock lithology) of the Entrada Sandstone interface, and used this information to construct conceptual permeability models for numerical analysis. We then examined the impact of these structures on flow using single-phase and multiphase numerical flow models for these study sites. Key findings include: (1) Deformation-band faults strongly compartmentalize the reservoir and largely block cross-fault flow of supercritical CO2. (2) Significant flow of CO2 through the fractures is possible, however, the magnitude is dependent on the small-scale geometry of the contact between the opening-mode fracture and the deformation band fault. (3) Due to the presence of permeable units in the caprock, caprock units are capable of storing significant volumes of CO2, particularly when the fracture network does not extend all the way through the caprock. The large-scale distribution of these deformation-bandfault- to-opening-mode-fractures is related to the curvature of the beds, with greater densities of fractures in high curvature regions. We also examined core and outcrops from the Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire Formation reservoir/caprock interface in order to extend our work to a reservoir/caprock pair this is currently being assessed for long-term carbon storage. These analyses indicate that interface features similar to those observed at the Utah sites 3 were not observed. Although not directly related to our main study topic, one byproduct of our investigation is documentation of exceptionally high degrees of heterogeneity in the pore-size distribution of the Mount Simon Sandstone. This suggests that the unit has a greater-than-normal potential for residual trapping of supercritical CO2.

Mozley, Peter; Evans, James; Dewers, Thomas

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

2 Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent 3 storage in energy end-uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent 3 storage in energy end-uses 4 by matching the winds of the 14 Middle-Atlantic Bight (MAB) to energy demand in the 15 adjacent states] We develop methods for assessing offshore wind 9 resources, using a model of the vertical structure

Firestone, Jeremy

133

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aaron DS, Williams KA. Is carbon capture and storage reallyal. Comparison of carbon capture and storage with renewablefuel power plants with carbon capture and storage. Energy

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoirs, un-mineable coal seams, and possibly organic-2 , and in un-mineable coal seams is at least 3 GtCO 2 [25].

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondary accumulation at shallow depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling effects from adiabatic expansion of CO 2 to atmospheric pressure (1.013 bar), starting from ambient hydrostatic-geothermal

Pruess, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Physics and Seismic Modeling for Monitoring CO2 Storage JOSE M. CARCIONE,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, methane-bearing coal beds and saline aquifers. An example of the latter is the Sleipner field in the North-elastical equations model the seismic properties of reservoir rocks saturated with CO2, methane, oil and brine-simulation methodology to compute synthetic seismograms for reservoirs subject to CO2 sequestration. The petro

Santos, Juan

137

EFFECTS OF CO2 LEAKAGES FROM STORAGE SITES ON THE QUALITY OF POTABLE GROUNDWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was packed into two fixed-bed PVC columns. In the one column, gas CO2 and water were co-injected while only gas effect due mainly to the combustion of fossil fuels and CO2 emissions in the atmosphere

138

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capture of CO 2 from gasifier process producing electricalPlaquemine, Louisiana. The gasifier is a proprietary designGasifier .

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Utilization of CO2 as cushion gas for porous media compressed air energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design of compressed air energy storage electric powerS and Williams RH, Compressed Air Energy Storage: Theory,Porous media compressed air energy storage (PM-CAES): theory

Oldenburg, C.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Aquifers in The Netherlands, EnergyStorage of Carbon Dioxide: Comparison of Non-hysteretic and Hysteretic Characteristic Curves, Energy

Pruess, Karsten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

RESPONSES OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND TOTAL CARBON STORAGE TO CHANGES IN CLIMATE AND ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONCENTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model (TEM, version 4.0) to estimate global responses of annual net primary production (NPP) and total. For contemporary climate with 315 ppmv CO2, TEM estimated that global NPP is 47.9 PgC/yr and global total carbon-q climate and +20.6% (9.9 PgC/yr) for the GISS climate. The responses of global total carbon storage are +17

142

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of CO 2 in an enhanced oil recovery system. Environ Scia process known as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), serving tois in support of enhanced oil recovery efforts [43]. To

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

New Strategies for Finding Abandoned Wells at Proposed Geologic Storage Sites for CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to the injection of CO2 into geological formations, either for enhanced oil recovery or for CO2 sequestration, it is necessary to locate wells that perforate the target formation and are within the radius of influence for planned injection wells. Locating and plugging wells is necessary because improperly plugged well bores provide the most rapid route for CO2 escape to the surface. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of helicopter and ground-based well detection strategies at a 100+ year old oilfield in Wyoming where a CO2 flood is planned. This project was jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and Fugro Airborne Surveys.

Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy today announced 11 projects valued at $75.5 million aimed at increasing scientific understanding about the potential of promising geologic formations to safely and permanently store carbon dioxide (CO2).

145

Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage of Carbon Dioxide: Comparison of Non- Hysteretic and Hysteretic Characteristic Curves, Energy

Houseworth, J.E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

7, 1553315563, 2007 Large-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Pacific, correlations with CO, CO2, CH4, and C2Cl4 were dif- fuse overall, but recognizable on flights out Chemistry and Physics Discussions Factors influencing the large-scale distribution of Hg in the Mexico City the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) cam- paign in spring 2006. Flights were conducted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

147

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO 2Fluid, Proceedings, World Geothermal Congress 2010, Bali,Remain? Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 17,

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The H-Cube Project: Hydrodynamics, Heterogeneity and Homogenization in CO2 storage modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Audigane, BRGM, E. Mouche, CEA, S. Viseur, CEREGE, D. Guérillot, TERRA 3E And the H-CUBE team Key words-scaling processes We propose to assess the buoyant forces on the CO2 and brine vertical migration of heterogeneity field distribution on the same 3D static earth model appropriate ranking measures of the static

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

Hypothesized Link Between Glacial/Interglacial Atmospheric CO2 Cycles and Storage/Release of CO2-Rich Fluids From Deep-Sea Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volcanic vents. Hydrothermal systems in the Pacific act as both a source and sink for carbon by changes in 14 C production alone and therefore appears to require a flux of 14 C- depleted carbon of CO2 regulation. Here we explore the possibility that hydrothermal sources of CO2 contributed

Stott, Lowell

150

Tagging CO2 to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the wake of concerns about the long term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with carbon isotope 14C immediately prior to sequestration to a level that is normal on the surface (one part per trillion). Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon from anthropogenic injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we have developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This system consists of a gas-exchange apparatus to make disposable cartridges ready for controlled injection into a fast flowing stream of pressurized CO2. We built a high-pressure injection and tagging system, and a 14C detection system. The disposable cartridge and injection system have been successfully demonstrated in the lab with a high-pressure flow reactor, as well as in the field at the CarbFix CO2 sequestration site in Iceland. The laser-based 14C detection system originally conceived has been shown to possess inadequate sensitivity for ambient levels. Alternative methods for detecting 14C, such as saturated cavity absorption ringdown spectroscopy and scintillation counting, may still be suitable. KEYWORDS

Lackner, Klaus; Matter, Juerg; Park, Ah-Hyung; Stute, Martin; Carson, Cantwell; Ji, Yinghuang

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Evaluation of the Nordland Group overburden as an effective seal for the Sleipner CO2 storage site (offshore Norway) using analytical and stochastic modelling techniques   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saline aquifers and depleted hydrocarbon fields situated beneath the North Sea are currently being proposed as storage repositories for anthropogenic CO2 captured from point source emitters in the UK and mainland Europe. ...

Nicoll, Grant Douglas

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

152

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 31 in Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in DeepChapter 14 in Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in DeepSummary. Chapter 25 in Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capturefrom Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 GeologicStorage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional coal-burning power plants are major contributors of excess CO2 to the atmospheric inventory. Because such plants are stationary, they are particularly amenable to CO2 capture and disposal by deep injection into confined geologic formations. However, the energy penalty for CO2 separation and compression is steep, and could lead to a 30-40 percent reduction in useable power output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are thermodynamically more efficient, i.e.,produce less CO2 for a given power output, and are more suitable for CO2 capture. Therefore, if CO2 capture and deep subsurface disposal were to be considered seriously, the preferred approach would be to build replacement IGCC plants with integrated CO2 capture, rather than retrofit existing conventional plants. Coal contains minor quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which are of concern, as their release into the atmosphere leads to the formation of urban ozone and acid rain, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, and global warming. Coal also contains many trace elements that are potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. During CO2 separation and capture, these constituents could inadvertently contaminate the separated CO2 and be co-injected. The concentrations and speciation of the co-injected contaminants would differ markedly, depending on whether CO2 is captured during the operation of a conventional or an IGCC plant, and the specific nature of the plant design and CO2 separation technology. However, regardless of plant design or separation procedures, most of the hazardous constituents effectively partition into the solid waste residue. This would lead to an approximately two order of magnitude reduction in contaminant concentration compared with that present in the coal. Potential exceptions are Hg in conventional plants, and Hg and possibly Cd, Mo and Pb in IGCC plants. CO2 capture and injection disposal could afford an opportunity to deliberately capture environmental pollutants in the gaseous state and co-inject them with the CO2, in order to mitigate problems associated with solid waste disposal in surface impoundments. Under such conditions, the injected pollutant concentrations could be roughly equivalent to their concentrations in the coal feed. The fate of the injected contaminants can only be determined through further testing and geochemical modeling. However, the concentrations of inadvertent contaminants in the injected CO2 would probably be comparable to their ambient concentrations in confining shales of the injection zone. In general, the aqueous concentrations of hazardous constituents in distal parts of the injection zone, regardless of source, are likely to be limited by equilibrium with respect to coexisting solid phases under the acid conditions induced by the dissolved high pressure CO2, rather than by the initial concentrations of injected contaminants. Therefore, even if a deliberate policy of contaminant recovery and injection were to be pursued, water quality in USDWs would more likely depend on thermodynamic controls governing aqueous contaminant concentrations in the presence of high pressure CO2 rather than in the injected CO2. The conclusions reached in this report are preliminary, and should be confirmed through more comprehensive data evaluation and supporting geochemical modeling.

Apps, J.A.

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage of Carbon Dioxide: Comparison of Non-hysteretic and Hysteretic Characteristic Curves, Energy

Pruess, K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approach for Generating Renewable Energy with SimultaneousCombining Recovery of Renewable Energy with Geologic Storage

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Impact of Fractures on CO2 Storage Monitoring: Keys for an Integrated Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage in fractured reservoirs (depleted hydrocarbon fields or brine aquifers) requires the study fluids, connected and/or non-connected fractures, the presence of Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev

Boyer, Edmond

157

Assessing Reservoir Depositional Environments to Develop and Quantify Improvements in CO2 Storage Efficiency: A Reservoir Simulation Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storage potential and fluid movement within formations are dependent on the unique hydraulic characteristics of their respective depositional environments. Storage efficiency (E) quantifies the potential for storage in a geologic depositional environment and is used to assess basinal or regional CO2 storage resources. Current estimates of storage resources are calculated using common E ranges by lithology and not by depositional environment. The objectives of this project are to quantify E ranges and identify E enhancement strategies for different depositional environments via reservoir simulation studies. The depositional environments considered include deltaic, shelf clastic, shelf carbonate, fluvial deltaic, strandplain, reef, fluvial and alluvial, and turbidite. Strategies considered for enhancing E include CO2 injection via vertical, horizontal, and deviated wells, selective completions, water production, and multi-well injection. Conceptual geologic and geocellular models of the depositional environments were developed based on data from Illinois Basin oil fields and gas storage sites. The geologic and geocellular models were generalized for use in other US sedimentary basins. An important aspect of this work is the development of conceptual geologic and geocellular models that reflect the uniqueness of each depositional environment. Different injection well completions methods were simulated to investigate methods of enhancing E in the presence of geologic heterogeneity specific to a depositional environment. Modeling scenarios included horizontal wells (length, orientation, and inclination), selective and dynamic completions, water production, and multiwell injection. A Geologic Storage Efficiency Calculator (GSECalc) was developed to calculate E from reservoir simulation output. Estimated E values were normalized to diminish their dependency on fluid relative permeability. Classifying depositional environments according to normalized baseline E ranges ranks fluvial deltaic and turbidite highest and shelf carbonate lowest. The estimated average normalized baseline E of turbidite, and shelf carbonate depositional environments are 42.5% and 13.1%, with corresponding standard deviations of 11.3%, and 3.10%, respectively. Simulations of different plume management techniques suggest that the horizontal well, multi-well injection with brine production from blanket vertical producers are the most efficient E enhancement strategies in seven of eight depositional environments; for the fluvial deltaic depositional environment, vertical well with blanket completions is the most efficient. This study estimates normalized baseline E ranges for eight depositional environments, which can be used to assess the CO2 storage resource of candidate formations. This study also improves the general understanding of depositional environment’s influence on E. The lessons learned and results obtained from this study can be extrapolated to formations in other US basins with formations of similar depositional environments, which should be used to further refine regional and national storage resource estimates in future editions of the Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas of the United States. Further study could consider the economic feasibility of the E enhancement strategies identified here.

Okwen, Roland; Frailey, Scott; Leetaru, Hannes; Moulton, Sandy

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

High Resolution Simulation and Characterization of Density-Driven Flow in CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are routinely used to study the process of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in saline aquifers. In this paper TOUGH2-MP. 1. Introduction Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration involves injecting CO2

159

Carbon storage: the economic efficiency of storing CO2 in leaky reservoirs Minh Ha-Duong, David W. Keith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The upstream oil and gas industry routinely injects CO2 underground to enhance oil recovery (CO2- EOR). A bit more than 2,000 km of CO2 pipelines have been laid in Texas to provide for CO2-EOR. In these operations-used, since operators must pay for the CO2. Yet at the end of an EOR operation a major fraction of CO2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

160

New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In another step forward toward improved scientific understanding of potential geologic carbon dioxide storage impacts, a new U.S. Department of Energy sponsored study has confirmed earlier research showing that proper site selection and monitoring is essential for helping anticipate and mitigate possible risks.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SPE -124703 Process for tracking the evolving perception of risk during CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil and gas reservoirs, and coal seams. While the technology for CCS already exists (e.g. Moritis for presentation at the 2009 SPE Offshore Europe Oil & Gas Conference & Exhibition held in Aberdeen, UK, 8's subsurface and stored in the pore spaces of rock. Potential storage sites include saline reservoirs, depleted

162

Geomechanical Simulations of CO2 Storage Integrity using the Livermore Distinct Element Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects involving annual injections of millions of tons of CO{sub 2} are a key infrastructural element needed to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The large rate and volume of injection will induce pressure and stress gradients within the formation that could activate existing fractures and faults, or drive new fractures through the caprock. We will present results of an ongoing investigation to identify conditions that will activate existing fractures/faults or make new fractures within the caprock using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC). LDEC is a multiphysics code, developed at LLNL, capable of simulating dynamic fracture of rock masses under a range of conditions. As part of a recent project, LDEC has been extended to consider fault activation and dynamic fracture of rock masses due to pressurization of the pore-space. We will present several demonstrations of LDEC functionality and applications of LDEC to CO{sub 2} injection scenarios including injection into an extensively fractured rockmass. These examples highlight the advantages of explicitly including the geomechanical response of each interface within the rockmass. We present results from our investigations of Teapot Dome using LDEC to study the potential for fault activation during injection. Using this approach, we built finite element models of the rock masses surrounding bounding faults and explicitly simulated the compression and shear on the fault interface. A CO{sub 2} injection source was introduced and the area of fault activation was predicted as a function of injection rate. This work presents an approach where the interactions of all locations on the fault are considered in response to specific injection scenarios. For example, with LDEC, as regions of the fault fail, the shear load is taken up elsewhere on the fault. The results of this study are consistent with previous studies of Teapot Dome and indicate significantly elevated pore pressures are required to activate the bounding faults, given the assumed in situ stress state on the faults.

Morris, J P; Johnson, S M; Friedmann, S J

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

Doughty, Christine

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Ohio River Valley CO2 Storage Project AEP Mountaineer Plan, West Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes an evaluation of deep rock formations with the objective of providing practical maps, data, and some of the issues considered for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage projects in the Ohio River Valley. Injection and storage of CO{sub 2} into deep rock formations represents a feasible option for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from coal-burning power plants concentrated along the Ohio River Valley area. This study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), American Electric Power (AEP), BP, Ohio Coal Development Office, Schlumberger, and Battelle along with its Pacific Northwest Division. An extensive program of drilling, sampling, and testing of a deep well combined with a seismic survey was used to characterize the local and regional geologic features at AEP's 1300-megawatt (MW) Mountaineer Power Plant. Site characterization information has been used as part of a systematic design feasibility assessment for a first-of-a-kind integrated capture and storage facility at an existing coal-fired power plant in the Ohio River Valley region--an area with a large concentration of power plants and other emission sources. Subsurface characterization data have been used for reservoir simulations and to support the review of the issues relating to injection, monitoring, strategy, risk assessment, and regulatory permitting. The high-sulfur coal samples from the region have been tested in a capture test facility to evaluate and optimize basic design for a small-scale capture system and eventually to prepare a detailed design for a capture, local transport, and injection facility. The Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project was conducted in phases with the ultimate objectives of demonstrating both the technical aspects of CO{sub 2} storage and the testing, logistical, regulatory, and outreach issues related to conducting such a project at a large point source under realistic constraints. The site characterization phase was completed, laying the groundwork for moving the project towards a potential injection phase. Feasibility and design assessment activities included an assessment of the CO{sub 2} source options (a slip-stream capture system or transported CO{sub 2}); development of the injection and monitoring system design; preparation of regulatory permits; and continued stakeholder outreach.

Neeraj Gupta

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possible means of reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions include injecting CO{sub 2} in petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery or storing CO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into subsurface reservoirs would induce a complex interplay of multiphase flow, capillary trapping, dissolution, diffusion, convection, and chemical reactions that may have significant impacts on both short-term injection performance and long-term fate of CO{sub 2} storage. Reactive Transport Modeling is a promising approach that can be used to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of injected CO{sub 2} and associated gas-fluid-rock interactions. This presentation will summarize recent advances in reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and review key technical issues on (1) the short- and long-term behavior of injected CO{sub 2} in geological formations; (2) the role of reservoir mineral heterogeneity on injection performance and storage security; (3) the effect of gas mixtures (e.g., H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on CO{sub 2} storage; and (4) the physical and chemical processes during potential leakage of CO{sub 2} from the primary storage reservoir. Simulation results suggest that CO{sub 2} trapping capacity, rate, and impact on reservoir rocks depend on primary mineral composition and injecting gas mixtures. For example, models predict that the injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with H{sub 2}S in both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs lead to acidified zones and mineral dissolution adjacent to the injection well, and carbonate precipitation and mineral trapping away from the well. Co-injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and in particular with SO{sub 2} causes greater formation alteration and complex sulfur mineral (alunite, anhydrite, and pyrite) trapping, sometimes at a much faster rate than previously thought. The results from Reactive Transport Modeling provide valuable insights for analyzing and assessing the dynamic behaviors of injected CO{sub 2}, identifying and characterizing potential storage sites, and managing injection performance and reducing costs.

Xiao, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Feasibility of Large-Scale Ocean CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO{sub 2}. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves. In this report we detail research carried out in the period October 1, 2007 through September 30, 2008. The primary body of work is contained in a formal publication attached as Appendix 1 to this report. In brief we have surveyed the recent literature with respect to the natural occurrence of clathrate hydrates (with a special emphasis on methane hydrates), the tools used to investigate them and their potential as a new source of natural gas for energy production.

Peter Brewer

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo FengBoulder,Research JumpEnergyEnergyOpenStorage

168

Evaluating Potential for Large Releases from CO2 StorageReservoirs: Analogs, Scenarios, and Modeling Needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the purpose of geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential exists for CO{sub 2} to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward along permeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. Such discharge is not necessarily a serious concern, as CO{sub 2} is a naturally abundant and relatively benign gas in low concentrations. However, there is a potential risk to health, safety and environment (HSE) in the event that large localized fluxes of CO{sub 2} were to occur at the land surface, especially where CO{sub 2} could accumulate. In this paper, we develop possible scenarios for large CO{sub 2} fluxes based on the analysis of natural analogues, where large releases of gas have been observed. We are particularly interested in scenarios which could generate sudden, possibly self-enhancing, or even eruptive release events. The probability for such events may be low, but the circumstances under which they might occur and potential consequences need to be evaluated in order to design appropriate site selection and risk management strategies. Numerical modeling of hypothetical test cases is needed to determine critical conditions for such events, to evaluate whether such conditions may be possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, to evaluate the potential HSE impacts of such events and design appropriate mitigation strategies.

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Tsang,Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

169

NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January-March 2006 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main accomplishments were analysis of Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' reservoir test results from the AEP No.1 well and design and feasibility support tasks. Reservoir test results indicate injection potential in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' may be significantly higher than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. In addition, organizational and scheduling issues were addressed to move the project toward an integrated carbon capture and storage system at the Mountaineer site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

Neeraj Gupta

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A CO{sub 2} sequestration project is being considered to (1) capture CO{sub 2} emissions from the Consumers Cooperative Refineries Limited at Regina, Saskatchewan and (2) geologically sequester the captured CO{sub 2} locally in a deep saline aquifer. This project is a collaboration of several industrial and governmental organizations, including the Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC), Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), SaskEnvironment Go Green Fund, SaskPower, CCRL, Schlumberger Carbon Services, and Enbridge. The project objective is to sequester 600 tonnes CO{sub 2}/day. Injection is planned to start in 2012 or 2013 for a period of 25 years for a total storage of approximately 5.5 million tonnes CO{sub 2}. This report presents an assessment of the leakage risk of the proposed project using a methodology known as the Certification Framework (CF). The CF is used for evaluating CO{sub 2} leakage risk associated with geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), as well as brine leakage risk owing to displacement and pressurization of brine by the injected CO{sub 2}. We follow the CF methodology by defining the entities (so-called Compartments) that could be impacted by CO{sub 2} leakage, the CO{sub 2} storage region, the potential for leakage along well and fault pathways, and the consequences of such leakage. An understanding of the likelihood and consequences of leakage forms the basis for understanding CO{sub 2} leakage risk, and forms the basis for recommendations of additional data collection and analysis to increase confidence in the risk assessment.

Houseworth, J.E.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Using the Choquet integral for screening geological CO2 storage sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For geological CO{sub 2} storage site selection, it is desirable to reduce the number of candidate sites through a screening process before detailed site characterization is performed. Screening generally involves defining a number of criteria which then need to be evaluated for each site. The importance of each criterion to the final evaluation will generally be different. Weights reflecting the relative importance of these criteria can be provided by experts. To evaluate a site, each criterion must be evaluated and scored, and then aggregated, taking into account the importance of the criteria. We propose the use of the Choquet integral for aggregating the scores. The Choquet integral considers the interactions among criteria, i.e. whether they are independent, complementary to each other, or partially repetitive. We also evaluate the Shapley index, which demonstrates how the importance of a given piece of information may change if it is considered by itself or together with other available information. An illustrative example demonstrates how the Choquet integral properly accounts for the presence of redundancy in two site-evaluation criteria, making the screening process more defensible than the standard weighted-average approach.

Zhang, Y.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the October through December 2005 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main field activity was reservoir testing in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' in the AEP No.1 well. In addition reservoir simulations were completed to assess feasibility of CO{sub 2} injection for the Mountaineer site. These reservoir testing and computer simulation results suggest that injection potential may be substantially more than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work also continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

Neeraj Gupta

2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

174

Large scale tracking algorithms.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Well injectivity during CO2 storage operations in deep saline aquifers6 1: Experimental investigation of drying effects, salt precipitation and7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technique than can potentially limit the accumulation29-17Jan2014 #12;3 1. Introduction51 52 Geological sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers studied54 much less than mature oil & gas reservoirs. Injection of carbon dioxide into saline aquifers55

Boyer, Edmond

176

sRecovery Act: Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on evaluating the feasibility and suitability of using the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sediments of the South Georgia Rift basin (SGR) for CO2 storage in southern South Carolina and southern Georgia The SGR basin in South Carolina (SC), prior to this project, was one of the least understood rift basin along the east coast of the U.S. In the SC part of the basin there was only one well (Norris Lightsey #1) the penetrated into J/TR. Because of the scarcity of data, a scaled approach used to evaluate the feasibility of storing CO2 in the SGR basin. In the SGR basin, 240 km (~149 mi) of 2-D seismic and 2.6 km2 3-D (1 mi2) seismic data was collected, process, and interpreted in SC. In southern Georgia 81.3 km (~50.5 mi) consisting of two 2-D seismic lines were acquired, process, and interpreted. Seismic analysis revealed that the SGR basin in SC has had a very complex structural history resulting the J/TR section being highly faulted. The seismic data is southern Georgia suggest SGR basin has not gone through a complex structural history as the study area in SC. The project drilled one characterization borehole (Rizer # 1) in SC. The Rizer #1 was drilled but due to geologic problems, the project team was only able to drill to 1890 meters (6200 feet) instead of the proposed final depth 2744 meters (9002 feet). The drilling goals outlined in the original scope of work were not met. The project was only able to obtain 18 meters (59 feet) of conventional core and 106 rotary sidewall cores. All the conventional core and sidewall cores were in sandstone. We were unable to core any potential igneous caprock. Petrographic analysis of the conventional core and sidewall cores determined that the average porosity of the sedimentary material was 3.4% and the average permeability was 0.065 millidarcy. Compaction and diagenetic studies of the samples determined there would not be any porosity or permeability at depth in SC. In Georgia there appears to be porosity in the J/TR section based on neutron log porosity values. The only zones in Rizer #1 that appear to be porous were fractured diabase units where saline formation water was flowing into the borehole. Two geocellular models were created for the SC and GA study area. Flow simulation modeling was performed on the SC data set. The injection simulation used the newly acquired basin data as well as the Petrel 3-D geologic model that included geologic structure. Due to the new basin findings as a result of the newly acquired data, during phase two of the modeling the diabase unit was used as reservoir and the sandstone units were used as caprock. Conclusion are: 1) the SGR basin is composed of numerous sub-basins, 2) this study only looked at portions of two sub-basins, 3) in SC, 30 million tonnes of CO2 can be injected into the diabase units if the fracture network is continuous through the units, 4) due to the severity of the faulting there is no way of assuring the injected CO2 will not migrate upward into the overlying Coastal Plain aquifers, 5) in Georgia there appears to porous zones in the J/TR sandstones, 6) as in SC there is faulting in the sub-basin and the seismic suggest the faulting extends upward into the Coastal Plain making that area not suitable for CO2 sequestration, 7) the complex faulting observed at both study areas appear to be associated with transfer fault zones (Heffner 2013), if sub-basins in the Georgia portion of the SGR basin can be located that are far away from the transfer fault zones there is a strong possibility of sequestering CO2 in these areas, and 9) the SGR basin covers area in three states and this project only studied two small areas so there is enormous potential for CO2 sequestration in other portions the basin and further research needs to be done to find these areas.

Waddell, Michael

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal-fired power plants will require multiple injection wells Pipeline as liquid CO 2 , injection through wells Liquid or supercritical

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

Pruess, K.

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. , and Jammes, L. , Well integrity in CO 2 environments:nine areas: Injection well integrity Abandoned well problemswastes. A number of well-integrity failures in the 1960s and

Tsang, C.-F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon dioxide in enhanced oil recovery, Energy Conversionin the U.S. for enhanced oil recovery for approximately 35gained from CO 2 -enhanced oil recovery has provided a solid

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Can Radiative Forcing Be Limited to 2.6 Wm?2 Without Negative Emissions From Bioenergy AND CO2 Capture and Storage?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining bioenergy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) technologies (BECCS) has the potential to remove CO2 from the atmosphere while producing useful energy. BECCS has played a central role in scenarios that reduce climate forcing to low levels such as 2.6Wm-2. In this paper we consider whether BECCS is essential to limiting radiative forcing (RF) to 2.6Wm-2 by 2100 using the Global Change Assessment Model, a closely coupled model of biogeophysical and human Earth systems. We show that BECCS can potentially reduce the cost of limiting RF to 2.6Wm-2 by 2100 but that a variety of technology combinations that do not include BECCS can also achieve this goal, under appropriate emissions mitigation policies. We note that with appropriate supporting land-use policies terrestrial sequestration could deliver carbon storage ranging from 200 to 700 PgCO2-equiavalent over the 21st century. We explore substantial delays in participation by some geopolitical regions. We find that the value of BECCS is substantially higher under delay and that delay results in higher transient RF and climate change. However, when major regions postponed mitigation indefinitely, it was impossible to return RF to 2.6Wm-2 by 2100. Neither finite land resources nor finite potential geologic storage capacity represented a meaningful technical limit on the ability of BECCS to contribute to emissions mitigation in the numerical experiments reported in this paper.

Edmonds, James A.; Luckow, Patrick W.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Kim, Son H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO2 storage project: Applying the Certification Framework in a dynamic context.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil and gas district 4 from 1991 to 2005: implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide, Environmental Geology. [

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Impact of Sorption Isotherms on the Simulation of CO2-Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage Process in Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and kerogen surfaces, very similar to the way methane is stored within coal beds. It has been demonstrated in gassy coals that on average; CO2 is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two for one or more. Black shale reservoirs may react similarly and desorb methane in the presence

Mohaghegh, Shahab

186

Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sedimentary basins. 1. Introduction #12;In recent years emissions of carbon dioxide from the UK electricity of these measures for deployment in 2020 depends entirely on final UK carbon emission targets and the abilityScope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment

Haszeldine, Stuart

187

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and liability for carbon capture and sequestration, Environ.Wilson and Gerard, editors, Carbon Capture and SequestrationSpecial Report on carbon dioxide capture and storage, ISBN

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Visualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are now considered the "lenses" for examining large-scale data. THE LARGE-SCALE DATA VISUALIZATIONVisualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data Jason Leigh1 , Andrew Johnson1 , Luc Renambot1 representation of data and the interactive manipulation and querying of the visualization. Large-scale data

Johnson, Andrew

189

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents a comparison of hydrologic issues and technical approaches used in deep-well injection and disposal of liquid wastes, and those issues and approaches associated with injection and storage of CO{sub 2} in deep brine formations. These comparisons have been discussed in nine areas: (1) Injection well integrity; (2) Abandoned well problems; (3) Buoyancy effects; (4) Multiphase flow effects; (5) Heterogeneity and flow channeling; (6) Multilayer isolation effects; (7) Caprock effectiveness and hydrogeomechanics; (8) Site characterization and monitoring; and (9) Effects of CO{sub 2} storage on groundwater resources There are considerable similarities, as well as significant differences. Scientifically and technically, these two fields can learn much from each other. The discussions presented in this paper should help to focus on the key scientific issues facing deep injection of fluids. A substantial but by no means exhaustive reference list has been provided for further studies into the subject.

Tsang, C.-F.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Simulation of CO2 Sequestration at Rock Spring Uplift, Wyoming: Heterogeneity and Uncertainties in Storage Capacity, Injectivity and Leakage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many geological, geochemical, geomechanical and hydrogeological factors control CO{sub 2} storage in subsurface. Among them heterogeneity in saline aquifer can seriously influence design of injection wells, CO{sub 2} injection rate, CO{sub 2} plume migration, storage capacity, and potential leakage and risk assessment. This study applies indicator geostatistics, transition probability and Markov chain model at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming generating facies-based heterogeneous fields for porosity and permeability in target saline aquifer (Pennsylvanian Weber sandstone) and surrounding rocks (Phosphoria, Madison and cap-rock Chugwater). A multiphase flow simulator FEHM is then used to model injection of CO{sub 2} into the target saline aquifer involving field-scale heterogeneity. The results reveal that (1) CO{sub 2} injection rates in different injection wells significantly change with local permeability distributions; (2) brine production rates in different pumping wells are also significantly impacted by the spatial heterogeneity in permeability; (3) liquid pressure evolution during and after CO{sub 2} injection in saline aquifer varies greatly for different realizations of random permeability fields, and this has potential important effects on hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock, reactivation of pre-existing faults and the integrity of the cap-rock; (4) CO{sub 2} storage capacity estimate for Rock Springs Uplift is 6614 {+-} 256 Mt at 95% confidence interval, which is about 36% of previous estimate based on homogeneous and isotropic storage formation; (5) density profiles show that the density of injected CO{sub 2} below 3 km is close to that of the ambient brine with given geothermal gradient and brine concentration, which indicates CO{sub 2} plume can sink to the deep before reaching thermal equilibrium with brine. Finally, we present uncertainty analysis of CO{sub 2} leakage into overlying formations due to heterogeneity in both the target saline aquifer and surrounding formations. This uncertainty in leakage will be used to feed into risk assessment modeling.

Deng, Hailin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jiao, Zunsheng [Wyoming State Geological Survey; Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Surdam, Ronald C. [Wyoming State Geological Survey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Ohio River Valley CO2 Storage Project AEP Mountaineer Plant, West Virginia Numerical Simulation and Risk Assessment Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection were conducted as part of a program to assess the potential for geologic sequestration in deep geologic reservoirs (the Rose Run and Copper Ridge formations), at the American Electric Power (AEP) Mountaineer Power Plant outside of New Haven, West Virginia. The simulations were executed using the H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl operational mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator (White and Oostrom, 2006). The objective of the Rose Run formation modeling was to predict CO{sub 2} injection rates using data from the core analysis conducted on the samples. A systematic screening procedure was applied to the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage site utilizing the Features, Elements, and Processes (FEP) database for geological storage of CO{sub 2} (Savage et al., 2004). The objective of the screening was to identify potential risk categories for the long-term geological storage of CO{sub 2} at the Mountaineer Power Plant in New Haven, West Virginia. Over 130 FEPs in seven main classes were assessed for the project based on site characterization information gathered in a geological background study, testing in a deep well drilled on the site, and general site conditions. In evaluating the database, it was apparent that many of the items were not applicable to the Mountaineer site based its geologic framework and environmental setting. Nine FEPs were identified for further consideration for the site. These FEPs generally fell into categories related to variations in subsurface geology, well completion materials, and the behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. Results from the screening were used to provide guidance on injection system design, developing a monitoring program, performing reservoir simulations, and other risk assessment efforts. Initial work indicates that the significant FEPs may be accounted for by focusing the storage program on these potential issues. The screening method was also useful in identifying unnecessary items that were not significant given the site-specific geology and proposed scale of the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project. Overall, the FEP database approach provides a comprehensive methodology for assessing potential risk for a practical CO{sub 2} storage application. An integrated numerical fate and transport model was developed to enable risk and consequence assessment at field scale. Results show that such an integrated modeling effort would be helpful in meeting the project objectives (such as site characterization, engineering, permitting, monitoring and closure) during different stages. A reservoir-scale numerical model was extended further to develop an integrated assessment framework which can address the risk and consequence assessment, monitoring network design and permitting guidance needs. The method was used to simulate sequestration of CO{sub 2} in moderate quantities at the Mountaineer Power Plant. Results indicate that at the relatively low injection volumes planned for pilot scale demonstration at this site, the risks involved are minor to negligible, owing to a thick, low permeability caprock and overburden zones. Such integrated modeling approaches coupled with risk and consequence assessment modeling are valuable to project implementation, permitting, monitoring as well as site closure.

Neeraj Gupta

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Large Releases from CO2 Storage Reservoirs: A Discussion ofNatural Analogs, FEPS, and Modeling Needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the purpose of geologic storage in deep saline formations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential exists for CO{sub 2} to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward along permeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. In this paper, we evaluate the potential for such CO{sub 2} discharges based on the analysis of natural analogs, where large releases of gas have been observed. We are particularly interested in circumstances that could generate sudden, possibly self-enhancing release events. The probability for such events may be low, but the circumstances under which they occur and the potential consequences need to be evaluated in order to design appropriate site-selection and risk-management strategies. Numerical modeling of hypothetical test cases is suggested to determine critical conditions for large CO{sub 2} releases, to evaluate whether such conditions may be possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, to evaluate the potential impacts of such events as well as design appropriate mitigation strategies.

Birkholzer, J.; Pruess, K.; Lewicki, J.L.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang,C-F.; Karimjee, A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Materialized community ground models for large-scale earthquake simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materialized community ground models for large-scale earthquake simulation Steven W. Schlosser to ground motion sim- ulations, in which ground model datasets are fully materi- alized into octress stored as a service techniques in which scientific computation and storage services become more tightly intertwined. 1

Shewchuk, Jonathan

194

THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Webinar introduces the “Large Scale Renewable Energy Guide." The webinar will provide an overview of this important FEMP guide, which describes FEMP's approach to large-scale renewable energy projects and provides guidance to Federal agencies and the private sector on how to develop a common process for large-scale renewable projects.

196

Conundrum of the Large Scale Streaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The etiology of the large scale peculiar velocity (large scale streaming motion) of clusters would increasingly seem more tenuous, within the context of the gravitational instability hypothesis. Are there any alternative testable models possibly accounting for such large scale streaming of clusters?

T. M. Malm

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

197

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

Neeraj Gupta

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

CO2 Sequestration short course  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Cole, David R [The Ohio State University; Navrotsky, Alexandra [University of California-Davis; Bourg, Ian C [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Next-Generation Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Code PFLOTRAN: Application to CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers P. Lichtner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to investigate sequestration of CO2 in vari- ous geologic media including depleted oil reservoirs and saline

Mills, Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 Geological Storage and Ground Water Resources U.S.and Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) State and Federal Statutes Storage,

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (? 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and shale cores, which were pressurized with high pressure CO2, determine the fate of sequestered CO2 in these cores. Our results suggested that Illinois bituminous coal in its unperturbed state, i.e., when not pressurized with CO2, showed large variations in the mechanical properties. Modulus varied from 0.7 GPa to 3.4 GPa even though samples were extracted from a single large chunk of coal. We did not observe any glass transition for Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, however, when the coal was pressurized with CO2 at ambient ? P ? 20.7 MPa, the viscosity of the coal decreased and inversely scaled with the CO2 pressure. The decrease in viscosity as a function of pressure could pose CO2 injection problems for coal as lower viscosity would allow the solid coal to flow to plug the fractures, fissures, and cleats. Our experiments also showed a very small fraction of CO2 was absorbed in coal; and when CO2 pressurized coals were exposed to atmospheric conditions, the loss of CO2 from coals was massive. Half of the sequestered gas from the coal cores was lost in less than 20 minutes. Our shockwave experiments on Illinois bituminous coal, New Albany shale (Illinois), Devonian shale (Ohio), and Utica shale (Ohio) presented clear evidence that the significant emission of the sequestered CO2 from these formations cannot be discounted during seismic activity, especially if caprock is compromised. It is argued that additional shockwave studies, both compressive and transverse, would be required for successfully mapping the risks associated with sequestering high pressure CO2 in coal and shale formations.

Malhotra, Vivak

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on "CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 saturation at the Weyburn CO 2 EOR injection project inMonitoring CO 2 storage during EOR at the Weyburn-Midalean excellent example of a CO 2 EOR (enhanced oil recovery)

Lumley, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution of Design Rules for Biological Automation, polydimethylsiloxane Abstract Microfluidic large-scale integration (mLSI) refers to the develop- ment of microfluidic, are discussed. Several microfluidic components used as building blocks to create effective, complex, and highly

Quake, Stephen R.

205

Large-Scale in the United  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States ASSESSMENT OF OPPORTUNITIES AND BARRIERS, including 10% post consumer waste. #12;Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States ASSESSMENT Energy, Office of Wind and Water Power Technologies for their financial and technical support

206

DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications Large scale Python and other dynamic applications may spend huge...

207

CO2 sequestration | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 sequestration CO2 sequestration Leads No leads are available at this time. Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on...

208

CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forest Colleen2 Ecological Society of America, 2008 #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;+ [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] + C and N storage in biomass #12;+ Net primary production

209

Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

Oehmen, Josef

210

A workflow for handling heterogeneous 3D models with the TOUGH2 family of codes: Applications to numerical modeling of CO2 geological storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is straightforward. Three examples are shown for validation: i) leakage of CO2 up through an abandoned well, ii) 3D of pilot sites for CCS. Extrapolation of laboratory results from core to reservoir scale can be done

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

211

Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce...

Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed 1984-

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

"Applications and future trends in polymer materials for green energy systems: from energy generation and storage, to CO2 capture and transportaion"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation describes United Technologies Research Center's recent work in green energy systems, including APRA-E project content to create a synthetic analogue of the carbonic anhydrase enzyme and incorporate it into a membrane for CO2 separation from the flue gas of a coal power plant.

George Zafiris

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Assessing health impacts of CO2 leakage from a geological storage site into buildings: role of attenuation in the unsaturated zone and building foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-use tool for decision support, which enables to assess the impacts on human health of CO2 leakage from that considers the effects of leakage on environment and human health must be carried out. A risk analysis should in the case of unexpected leakage from the reservoir. These potential impacts should be considered in a risk

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

215

Large-scale Screening of Zeolite Structures for CO2 Membrane Separations |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMission StatementCenter for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean

216

Large scale structure of the Universe: Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The changes of main paradigms on the structure and evolution of the Universe are reviewed. Two puzzles of the modern cosmology, the mean density of matter and the regularity of the Universe on large scales, as well as the possibility to solve these puzzles by the introduction of more complicated form of inflation, are discussed.

J. Einasto

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Dark Matter and Large Scale Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review of the study of dark matter and large scale structure of the Universe at Tartu Observatory is given. Tartu astronomers have participated in this development, starting from Ernst "Opik and Grigori Kuzmin, and continuing with the present generation of astronomers. Our goal was to understand better the structure, origin and evolution of the Universe.

J. Einasto

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Page Digest for Large-Scale Web Services Daniel Rocco, David Buttler, Ling Liu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page Digest for Large-Scale Web Services Daniel Rocco, David Buttler, Ling Liu Georgia Institute this storage and processing efficiently. In this paper, we introduce Page Digest, a mechanism for efficient storage and processing of Web documents. The Page Digest design encourages a clean separation

Rocco, Daniel

219

Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of the potential for tensile and shear failure associated with CO2 injection in multilayered reservoir-caprock systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a geological CO 2 storage system and to study methods forof the multilayered CO 2 storage system. Figure 2. Simulatedof the multilayered CO 2 storage system. GROUND SURFACE Pre-

Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Tsang, C.-F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage of carbon dioxide is being actively considered for the reduction of green house gases. To make an impact on the environment CO2 should be put away on the scale of gigatonnes per annum. The storage capacity of deep saline aquifers...

Anchliya, Abhishek

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering at Large Scale at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Volume Rendering at Large Scale Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering at Large Scale volrend-swes.png We studied the performance and scalability characteristics of hybrid''...

222

EMSL - CO2 sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

co2-sequestration en Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on Alumina. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

223

A Climatology of Tropical Anvil and Its Relationship to the Large-Scale Circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research was sponsored by the ARM-DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64174. viii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT??????.???????????????????..??? iii DEDICATION... the climate feedback obtained from doubled CO 2 experiments with different parameterizations of large-scale clouds and moist convection by using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. They showed that the presence of optically thick anvil...

Li, Wei

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Large-Scale PV Integration Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

1 National Roadmap Committee for Large-Scale Research Facilities the netherlands' roadmap for large-scale research facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;1 National Roadmap Committee for Large-Scale Research Facilities the netherlands' roadmap for large-scale research facilities #12;2 National Roadmap Committee for Large-Scale Research Facilities1 by Roselinde Supheert) #12;3 National Roadmap Committee for Large-Scale Research Facilities The Netherlands

Horn, David

226

Large-scale Intelligent Transporation Systems simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype computer system has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) capable of running on massively parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems. The prototype includes the modelling of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of our design is that vehicles will be represented by autonomus computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

Ewing, T.; Canfield, T.; Hannebutte, U.; Levine, D.; Tentner, A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

number modeling of type ia supernovae. I. Hydrodynamics.number modeling of type ia supernovae. II. Energy evolution.Mach number modeling of type ia supernovae. III. Reactions.

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the process of thermonuclear incineration of theircore-collapse and thermonuclear events to test predictionsprocesses. In contrast to thermonuclear supernova modeling,

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

second resulting from a thermonuclear explosion of materialresult from the thermonuclear burning of a carbon-oxygensensitive to how the thermonuclear runaway is ignited (

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Automatic Reconfiguration for Large-Scale Reliable Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Byzantine-fault-tolerant replication enhances the availability and reliability of Internet services that store critical state and preserve it despite attacks or software errors. However, existing Byzantine-fault-tolerant ...

Rodrigues, Rodrigo

231

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological and Environmental Science (BER) Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) High Energy Physics (HEP) Nuclear Physics (NP) Overview Published Reports Case Study FAQs Home Science at...

232

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proceedings of High Performance Computing – 2011 (HPC-2011)In recent years, high performance computing has becomeNERSC is the primary high-performance computing facility for

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Ia supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, X-ray bursts and corerelativistic jet, making a gamma-ray burst, the luminositythose that lead to gamma-ray bursts. The current frontier is

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutrino matrix. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments,process called neutrinoless double beta decay in nuclei,

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Promise Of Data Grouping In Large Scale Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

primary and mirror copy [118]. PDC attempts to concen- tratewe could follow the lead of PDC [80] and use a multi-queueare interested in comes from the PDC work [80] and involves

Wildani, Avani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-Energy Nuclear Physics National Joseph Carlson / HPC Initiative: Building a Universal Joseph Carlson Jonathan Engel Nuclear Energy Density Functional Structure and Reactions

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERN 73-11Large areaLargefor High Energy

238

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared Temanson -

239

Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

research. Final Report PDF version Date and Location April 29-30, 2014 Hyatt Regency Bethesda One Bethesda Metro Center (7400 Wisconsin Ave) Bethesda, Maryland, USA 20814...

240

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space CombinedValues shown

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space CombinedValues shownBiological and

242

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space CombinedValues shownBiological

243

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space CombinedValues shownBiologicalEnvironmental

244

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space CombinedValues

245

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space CombinedValues Participants Organizing

246

Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space CombinedValues Participants

247

Developing a monitoring and verification plan with reference to the Australian Otway CO2 pilot project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently injecting 100,000 tons of CO{sub 2} in a large-scale test of storage technology in a pilot project in southeastern Australia called the CO2CRC Otway Project. The Otway Basin, with its natural CO{sub 2} accumulations and many depleted gas fields, offers an appropriate site for such a pilot project. An 80% CO{sub 2} stream is produced from a well (Buttress) near the depleted gas reservoir (Naylor) used for storage (Figure 1). The goal of this project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} can be safely transported, stored underground, and its behavior tracked and monitored. The monitoring and verification framework has been developed to monitor for the presence and behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface reservoir, near surface, and atmosphere. This monitoring framework addresses areas, identified by a rigorous risk assessment, to verify conformance to clearly identifiable performance criteria. These criteria have been agreed with the regulatory authorities to manage the project through all phases addressing responsibilities, liabilities, and to assure the public of safe storage.

Dodds, K.; Daley, T.; Freifeld, B.; Urosevic, M.; Kepic, A.; Sharma, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of CO 2 Storage for Full-Scale Deployment, Ground Water,storage sites leading to the most serious impacts at the ground

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Department of Energy Announces 15 Projects Aimed at Secure CO2...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

experimental studies, numerical pore- and reservoir-scale modeling, and high-performance computing to investigate various large-scale storage schemes with the goal of...

250

Reversible Hydrogen Storage using CO2 and a Proton-Switchable Iridium Catalyst in Aqueous Media under Mild Temperatures and Pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Green plants convert CO{sub 2} to sugar for energy storage via photosynthesis. We report a novel catalyst that uses CO{sub 2} and hydrogen to store energy in formic acid. Using a homogeneous iridium catalyst with a proton-responsive ligand, we show the first reversible and recyclable hydrogen storage system that operates under mild conditions using CO{sub 2}, formate and formic acid. This system is energy-efficient and green because it operates near ambient conditions, uses water as a solvent, produces high-pressure CO-free hydrogen, and uses pH to control hydrogen production or consumption. The extraordinary and switchable catalytic activity is attributed to the multifunctional ligand, which acts as a proton-relay and strong {pi}-donor, and is rationalized by theoretical and experimental studies.

Hull J. F.; Himeda, Y.; Wang, W.-H.; Hashiguchi, B.; Szalda, D.J.; Muckerman, J.T.; Fujita, E.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Atypical Behavior Identification in Large Scale Network Traffic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyber analysts are faced with the daunting challenge of identifying exploits and threats within potentially billions of daily records of network traffic. Enterprise-wide cyber traffic involves hundreds of millions of distinct IP addresses and results in data sets ranging from terabytes to petabytes of raw data. Creating behavioral models and identifying trends based on those models requires data intensive architectures and techniques that can scale as data volume increases. Analysts need scalable visualization methods that foster interactive exploration of data and enable identification of behavioral anomalies. Developers must carefully consider application design, storage, processing, and display to provide usability and interactivity with large-scale data. We present an application that highlights atypical behavior in enterprise network flow records. This is accomplished by utilizing data intensive architectures to store the data, aggregation techniques to optimize data access, statistical techniques to characterize behavior, and a visual analytic environment to render the behavioral trends, highlight atypical activity, and allow for exploration.

Best, Daniel M.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Olsen, Bryan K.; Pike, William A.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

252

Large-scale simulations of reionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

Kohler, Katharina; /JILA, Boulder /Fermilab; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; /Fermilab; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects August 21, 2013 - 12:00am...

254

Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

Li, Fangfei, E-mail: li-fangfei@163.com [Department of Mathematics, East China University of Science and Technology, No. 130, Meilong Road, Shanghai, Shanghai 200237 (China)] [Department of Mathematics, East China University of Science and Technology, No. 130, Meilong Road, Shanghai, Shanghai 200237 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Theoretical Tools for Large Scale Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the main theoretical aspects of the structure formation paradigm which impinge upon wide angle surveys: the early universe generation of gravitational metric fluctuations from quantum noise in scalar inflaton fields; the well understood and computed linear regime of CMB anisotropy and large scale structure (LSS) generation; the weakly nonlinear regime, where higher order perturbation theory works well, and where the cosmic web picture operates, describing an interconnected LSS of clusters bridged by filaments, with membranes as the intrafilament webbing. Current CMB+LSS data favour the simplest inflation-based $\\Lambda$CDM models, with a primordial spectral index within about 5% of scale invariant and $\\Omega_\\Lambda \\approx 2/3$, similar to that inferred from SNIa observations, and with open CDM models strongly disfavoured. The attack on the nonlinear regime with a variety of N-body and gas codes is described, as are the excursion set and peak-patch semianalytic approaches to object collapse. The ingredients are mixed together in an illustrative gasdynamical simulation of dense supercluster formation.

J. R. Bond; L. Kofman; D. Pogosyan; J. Wadsley

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

256

Inducinga CO2 leak into ashallow aquifer (CO2FieldLab EUROGIA+ project): Monitoring the CO2 plume in groundwaters.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(saline aquifer, depleted oil/gas reservoir), aquifers are ubiquitousin the overlying sedimentary pile in case of unwanted CO2leakages from a storage site. Independently from the nature of the reservoir

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

257

Uncertainty quantification for CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study develops a statistical method to perform uncertainty quantification for understanding CO2 storage potential within an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) environment at the Farnsworth Unit of the Anadarko Basin in northern Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil-water flow and reactive transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major uncertainty metrics: net CO2 injection, cumulative oil production, cumulative gas (CH4) production, and net water injection. A global sensitivity and response surface analysis indicates that reservoir permeability, porosity, and thickness are the major intrinsic reservoir parameters that control net CO2 injection/storage and oil/gas recovery rates. The well spacing and the initial water saturation also have large impact on the oil/gas recovery rates. Further, this study has revealed key insights into the potential behavior and the operational parameters of CO2 sequestration at CO2-EOR s...

Dai, Zhenxue; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Jia, Wei; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Ampomah, William; Grigg, Reid

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

amine methanol, ether . Amine amine CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, . promoter . 1.2 CO2 HBGS process CO2 , CO2 . CO2 , IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) (fuel gas) CO2 . IGCC CO2 H2 . (gasification) CO H2 (water gas shift reaction) H2 CO CO2 . CO2 H2 turbine H2 . H2 , CO2 #12;. fuel gas CO2 40%, 60% H2 . fuel gas (gasification) HBGS process . CO2 CO2 . venture

Hong, Deog Ki

259

Ferroelectric opening switches for large-scale pulsed power drivers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast electrical energy storage or Voltage-Driven Technology (VDT) has dominated fast, high-voltage pulsed power systems for the past six decades. Fast magnetic energy storage or Current-Driven Technology (CDT) is characterized by 10,000 X higher energy density than VDT and has a great number of other substantial advantages, but it has all but been neglected for all of these decades. The uniform explanation for neglect of CDT technology is invariably that the industry has never been able to make an effective opening switch, which is essential for the use of CDT. Most approaches to opening switches have involved plasma of one sort or another. On a large scale, gaseous plasmas have been used as a conductor to bridge the switch electrodes that provides an opening function when the current wave front propagates through to the output end of the plasma and fully magnetizes the plasma - this is called a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Opening can be triggered in a POS using a magnetic field to push the plasma out of the A-K gap - this is called a Magnetically Controlled Plasma Opening Switch (MCPOS). On a small scale, depletion of electron plasmas in semiconductor devices is used to affect opening switch behavior, but these devices are relatively low voltage and low current compared to the hundreds of kilo-volts and tens of kilo-amperes of interest to pulsed power. This work is an investigation into an entirely new approach to opening switch technology that utilizes new materials in new ways. The new materials are Ferroelectrics and using them as an opening switch is a stark contrast to their traditional applications in optics and transducer applications. Emphasis is on use of high performance ferroelectrics with the objective of developing an opening switch that would be suitable for large scale pulsed power applications. Over the course of exploring this new ground, we have discovered new behaviors and properties of these materials that were here to fore unknown. Some of these unexpected discoveries have lead to new research directions to address challenges.

Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Glover, Steven Frank

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

HYDROMECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION FOR SITE SELECTION IN CO2 PERMANENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-BarcelonaTech), Barcelona, Spain 3 Energy City Foundation (CIUDEN), Spanish Government CO2 Geological Storage Programme (Vilarrasa et al., 2011, Energy Procedia) Trees killed by CO2 leakage in Mammoth Mountains (Farrar et al EQUATIONS Mass conservation equation Darcy's law Momentum balance Effective stress Hooke's law (linear

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 recovery and storage (CCS) Emissions after cuts (Technology Advance scenario (substantial C 0 emission reduction)) '

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale SustainableHydrogen Batteries Nuclear By Lee Lynd, Dartmouth Ethanol •Ethanol, ethyl alcohol, fermentation ethanol, or just “

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Solving large scale polynomial convex problems on \\ell_1/nuclear ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 24, 2012 ... Solving large scale polynomial convex problems on \\ell_1/nuclear norm balls by randomized first-order algorithms. Aharon Ben-Tal (abental ...

Aharon Ben-Tal

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Shawn Yunsheng Xu University of Missouri May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential,...

265

Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Large Scale GSHP as Alternative...

266

Optimization Online - Large-Scale Linear Programming Techniques ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 12, 2002 ... Large-Scale Linear Programming Techniques for the Design of Protein Folding Potentials. Michael Wagner (mwagner ***at*** odu.edu)

Michael Wagner

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

CO2 interaction with aquifer and seal on geological timescales: the Miller oilfield, UK North Sea   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) has been identified as a feasible technology to reduce CO2 emissions whilst permitting the continued use of fossil fuels. Injected CO2 must remain efficiently isolated from the atmosphere ...

Lu, Jiemin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

role in naturally removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the ocean is considered an essential dioxide in addition to the vast quantities already stored naturally. A few recent research to contradict each other regarding the use of the ocean as a "sink" or disposal area for carbon dioxide. On one

269

Underground CO2 Storage | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version)

270

NETL CO2 Storage Frequently Asked Questions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifA Comparison NERSC: RunningNERSC---8J NESEACO2

271

Large-Scale Eucalyptus Energy Farms and Power Cogeneration1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-Scale Eucalyptus Energy Farms and Power Cogeneration1 Robert C. Noronla2 The initiation of a large-scale cogeneration project, especially one that combines construction of the power generation supplemental fuel source must be sought if the cogeneration facility will consume more fuel than

Standiford, Richard B.

272

Large Scale Parameter Sweep Studies Using Distributed Matlab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Large Scale Parameter Sweep Studies Using Distributed Matlab Vikas Argod Graduate Assistant 225. The implementation is done in Matlab. The discussion extends to large scale problems of similar type using distributed matlab. Use of distributed matlab reduced computation time significantly

Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

273

Attack Containment Framework for Large-Scale Critical Infrastructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attack Containment Framework for Large-Scale Critical Infrastructures Hoang Nguyen Department-- We present an attack containment framework against value-changing attacks in large-scale critical structure, called attack container, which captures the trust behavior of a group of nodes and assists

Nahrstedt, Klara

274

POWER SYSTEMS STABILITY WITH LARGE-SCALE WIND POWER PENETRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of offshore wind farms, wind power fluctuations may introduce several challenges to reliable power system behaviour due to natural wind fluctuations. The rapid power fluctuations from the large scale wind farms Generation Control (AGC) system which includes large- scale wind farms for long-term stability simulation

Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

275

Northern California CO2 Reduction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

C6 Resources LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Shell Oil Company, worked with the US Department of Energy (DOE) under a Cooperative Agreement to develop the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project. The objective of the Project is to demonstrate the viability of using Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) to reduce existing greenhouse gas emissions from industrial sources on a large-scale. The Project will capture more than 700,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, which is currently being vented to the atmosphere from the Shell Martinez Refinery in Contra Costa County. The CO2 will be compressed and dehydrated at the refinery and then transported via pipeline to a sequestration site in a rural area in neighboring Solano County. The CO2 will be sequestered into a deep saline formation (more than two miles underground) and will be monitored to assure secure, long-term containment. The pipeline will be designed to carry as much as 1,400,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, so additional capacity will be available to accommodate CO2 captured from other industrial sources. The Project is expected to begin operation in 2015. The Project has two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive design basis for the Project. The Cooperative Agreement with the DOE provided cost sharing for Phase 1 and the opportunity to apply for additional DOE cost sharing for Phase 2, comprising the design, construction and operation of the Project. Phase 1 has been completed. DOE co-funding is provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. As prescribed by ARRA, the Project will stimulate the local economy by creating manufacturing, transportation, construction, operations, and management jobs while addressing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at an accelerated pace. The Project, which will also assist in meeting the CO2 reduction requirements set forth in California?s Climate Change law, presents a major opportunity for both the environment as well as the region. C6 Resources is conducting the Project in collaboration with federally-funded research centers, such as Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and Lawrence Livermore National Lab. C6 Resources and Shell have identified CCS as one of the critical pathways toward a worldwide goal of providing cleaner energy. C6 Resources, in conjunction with the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), has conducted an extensive and ongoing public outreach and CCS education program for local, regional and state-wide stakeholders. As part of a long term relationship, C6 Resources will continue to engage directly with community leaders and residents to ensure public input and transparency. This topical report summarizes the technical work from Phase 1 of the Project in the following areas: ? Surface Facility Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the preliminary engineering work performed for CO2 capture, CO2 compression and dehydration at the refinery, and surface facilities at the sequestration site ? Pipeline Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the pipeline routing study and preliminary engineering design ? Geologic Sequestration: summarizes the work to characterize, model and evaluate the sequestration site ? Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA): summarizes the MVA plan to assure long-term containment of the sequestered CO2

Hymes, Edward

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

Stabilization of Large Scale Structure by Adhesive Gravitational Clustering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interplay between gravitational and dispersive forces in a multi-streamed medium leads to an effect which is exposed in the present note as the genuine driving force of stabilization of large-scale structure. The conception of `adhesive gravitational clustering' is advanced to interlock the fairly well-understood epoch of formation of large-scale structure and the onset of virialization into objects that are dynamically in equilibrium with their large-scale structure environment. The classical `adhesion model' is opposed to a class of more general models traced from the physical origin of adhesion in kinetic theory.

Thomas Buchert

1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

277

Large-Scale Data Challenges in Future Power Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes technical challenges in supporting large-scale real-time data analysis for future power grid systems and discusses various design options to address these challenges. Even though the existing U.S. power grid has served the nation remarkably well over the last 120 years, big changes are in the horizon. The widespread deployment of renewable generation, smart grid controls, energy storage, plug-in hybrids, and new conducting materials will require fundamental changes in the operational concepts and principal components. The whole system becomes highly dynamic and needs constant adjustments based on real time data. Even though millions of sensors such as phase measurement units (PMUs) and smart meters are being widely deployed, a data layer that can support this amount of data in real time is needed. Unlike the data fabric in cloud services, the data layer for smart grids must address some unique challenges. This layer must be scalable to support millions of sensors and a large number of diverse applications and still provide real time guarantees. Moreover, the system needs to be highly reliable and highly secure because the power grid is a critical piece of infrastructure. No existing systems can satisfy all the requirements at the same time. We examine various design options. In particular, we explore the special characteristics of power grid data to meet both scalability and quality of service requirements. Our initial prototype can improve performance by orders of magnitude over existing general-purpose systems. The prototype was demonstrated with several use cases from PNNL’s FPGI and was shown to be able to integrate huge amount of data from a large number of sensors and a diverse set of applications.

Yin, Jian; Sharma, Poorva; Gorton, Ian; Akyol, Bora A.

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Techno-economic modelling of CO2 capture systems for Australian industrial sources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Australia is recognising that carbon capture and storage (CCS) may be a feasible pathway for addressing increasing levels of CO2 emissions. This thesis presents a… (more)

Ho, Minh Trang Thi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and/or used in enhanced oil recovery. This technology can beCO 2 for underground storage, enhanced oil recovery or other

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Platforms and real options in large-scale engineering systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis introduces a framework and two methodologies that enable engineering management teams to assess the value of real options in programs of large-scale, partially standardized systems implemented a few times over ...

Kalligeros, Konstantinos C., 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Retroreflective shadowgraph technique for large-scale flow visualization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for large-scale flow visualization, the simple shadow- graph can often provide the most robust solution photographed the shadowgram of a blasting-cap ex- plosion outdoors in daylight (see Fig. 6.14a of [1]). One

Settles, Gary S.

283

Surrogate modeling for large-scale black-box systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research introduces a systematic method to reduce the complexity of large-scale blackbox systems for which the governing equations are unavailable. For such systems, surrogate models are critical for many applications, ...

Liem, Rhea Patricia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Biochemical, Environmental, Petroleum Engineering and Nantoechnology. CHEMICAL&MATERIALSSCIENCE CHE OVERVIEW of Science 131 units · Chemical Engineering (Petroleum) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Chemical Engineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical

Rohs, Remo

285

Exploration of large scale manufacturing of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussion of the current manufacturing process of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) parts and the emergence of PDMS use in biomedical microfluidic devices addresses the need to develop large scale manufacturing processes for ...

Hum, Philip W. (Philip Wing-Jung)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Infrastructure for large-scale tests in marine autonomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the development of infrastructure for research with large-scale autonomous marine vehicle fleets and the design of sampling trajectories for compressive sensing (CS). The newly developed infrastructure ...

Hummel, Robert A. (Robert Andrew)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Data mining techniques for large-scale gene expression analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern computational biology is awash in large-scale data mining problems. Several high-throughput technologies have been developed that enable us, with relative ease and little expense, to evaluate the coordinated expression ...

Palmer, Nathan Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Streamflow forecasting for large-scale hydrologic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STREAMFLOW FORECASTING FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROLOGIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by HAITHAM MUNIR AWWAD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering STREAMFLOW FORECASTING FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROLOGIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by HAITHAM MUNIR AWWAD Approved as to style and content by: uan B. Valdes (Chair of Committee) alph A. Wurbs (Member) Marshall J. Mc...

Awwad, Haitham Munir

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Holographic principle and large scale structure in the universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A reasonable representation of large scale structure, in a closed universe so large it's nearly flat, can be developed by extending the holographic principle and assuming the bits of information describing the distribution of matter density in the universe remain in thermal equilibrium with the cosmic microwave background radiation. The analysis identifies three levels of self-similar large scale structure, corresponding to superclusters, galaxies, and star clusters, between today's observable universe and stellar systems. The self-similarity arises because, according to the virial theorem, the average gravitational potential energy per unit volume in each structural level is the same and depends only on the gravitational constant. The analysis indicates stellar systems first formed at z\\approx62, consistent with the findings of Naoz et al, and self-similar large scale structures began to appear at redshift z\\approx4. It outlines general features of development of self-similar large scale structures at redshift z<4. The analysis is consistent with observations for angular momentum of large scale structures as a function of mass, and average speed of substructures within large scale structures. The analysis also indicates relaxation times for star clusters are generally less than the age of the universe and relaxation times for more massive structures are greater than the age of the universe.

T. R. Mongan

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

Interaction between CO2-rich solutions and reservoir-seal rocks. Experimentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal systems 5.Use of CO2 in enhanced coal bed methane recovery 6.Other suggested options (basalts, oilInteraction between CO2-rich solutions and reservoir-seal rocks. Experimentation María García formations (after Cook, 1999). Geological Storage Options for CO2 1.Depleted oil and gas reservoirs 2.Use

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

291

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2 seepage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2; accepted 17 June 2008; published 31 July 2008. [1] Claystone caprocks are often the ultimate seal for CO2 underground storage when residual CO2 gas reaches the reservoir top due to buoyancy. Permeability changes

Luquot, Linda

292

Oldenburg and Pan CO2 as Cushion Gas for CAES 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oldenburg and Pan CO2 as Cushion Gas for CAES 1 CO2 as Cushion Gas for Compressed Air Energy Compressed Air Oldenburg, C.M., Energy&Fuels, 17(1), 240­246, 2003. #12;Oldenburg and Pan CO2 as Cushion Gas as Cushion Gas for CAES 3 Renewables Need Energy Storage Source: Samir Succar, IAC Workshop, October 2005

Eisen, Michael

293

emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2 Nordic Plus) and Use carbonation processes. One aspect was to verify the possible use of mineral carbon- ation for the separation, utilisation and long-term storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the pulp and paper industry. The Geological

Zevenhoven, Ron

294

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Sourcekey","N5030CO2","N5010CO2","N5020CO2","N5070CO2","N5050CO2","N5060CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","Colorado Natural Gas in Underground...

295

Co2 geological sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Xu, Tianfu

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

296

Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

CO2 Capture with Liquid-to-Solid Absorbents: CO2 Capture Process Using Phase-Changing Absorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: GE and the University of Pittsburgh are developing a unique CO2 capture process in which a liquid absorbent, upon contact with CO2, changes into a solid phase. Once in solid form, the material can be separated and the CO2 can be released for storage by heating. Upon heating, the absorbent returns to its liquid form, where it can be reused to capture more CO2. The approach is more efficient than other solventbased processes because it avoids the heating of extraneous solvents such as water. This ultimately leads to a lower cost of CO2 capture and will lower the additional cost to produce electricity for coal-fired power plants that retrofit their facilities to include this technology.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Large-scale simulations of complex physical systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific computing has become a tool as vital as experimentation and theory for dealing with scientific challenges of the twenty-first century. Large scale simulations and modelling serve as heuristic tools in a broad problem-solving process. High-performance computing facilities make possible the first step in this process - a view of new and previously inaccessible domains in science and the building up of intuition regarding the new phenomenology. The final goal of this process is to translate this newly found intuition into better algorithms and new analytical results.In this presentation we give an outline of the research themes pursued at the Scientific Computing Laboratory of the Institute of Physics in Belgrade regarding large-scale simulations of complex classical and quantum physical systems, and present recent results obtained in the large-scale simulations of granular materials and path integrals.

Belic, A. [Scientific Computing Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

299

On Local and Global Centrality in Large Scale Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating influential nodes in large scale networks including but not limited to social networks, biological networks, communication networks, emerging smart grids etc. is a topic of fundamental interest. To understand influences of nodes in a network, a classical metric is centrality within which there are multiple specific instances including degree centrality, closeness centrality, betweenness centrality and more. As of today, existing algorithms to identify nodes with high centrality measures operate upon the entire (or rather global) network, resulting in high computational complexity. In this paper, we design efficient algorithms for determining the betweenness centrality in large scale networks by taking advantage of the modular topology exhibited by most of these large scale networks. Very briefly, modular topologies are those wherein the entire network appears partitioned into distinct modules (or clusters or communities), wherein nodes within the module (that likely share highly similar profiles) h...

Das, Sima

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Toward Improved Support for Loosely Coupled Large Scale Simulation Workflows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance computing (HPC) workloads are increasingly leveraging loosely coupled large scale simula- tions. Unfortunately, most large-scale HPC platforms, including Cray/ALPS environments, are designed for the execution of long-running jobs based on coarse-grained launch capabilities (e.g., one MPI rank per core on all allocated compute nodes). This assumption limits capability-class workload campaigns that require large numbers of discrete or loosely coupled simulations, and where time-to-solution is an untenable pacing issue. This paper describes the challenges related to the support of fine-grained launch capabilities that are necessary for the execution of loosely coupled large scale simulations on Cray/ALPS platforms. More precisely, we present the details of an enhanced runtime system to support this use case, and report on initial results from early testing on systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Boehm, Swen [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Vallee, Geoffroy R [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/ flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less than Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized.

Roberts, J.J.; Wood, R.A.; Haszeldine, R.S. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage, School of GeoSciences, Grant Institute, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland (United Kingdom)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evolving Large Scale UAV Communication System Adrian Agogino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolving Large Scale UAV Communication System Adrian Agogino UCSC at NASA Ames Mail Stop 269 Corvallis, OR 97331 Kagan.Tumer@ oregonstate.edu ABSTRACT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have traditionally powered unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to fly long term missions at high altitudes. This will revo

Tumer, Kagan

303

Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealingModeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields S. Worman , A.B. Murray , R for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements

Claudin, Philippe

304

Spatial Energy Balancing in Large-scale Wireless Multihop Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Energy Balancing in Large-scale Wireless Multihop Networks Seung Jun Baek and Gustavo de is on optimizing trade-offs between the energy cost of spreading traffic and the improved spatial balance of energy. We propose a parameterized family of energy balancing strategies for grids and approximate

de Veciana, Gustavo

305

Parallel Stochastic Gradient Algorithms for Large-Scale Matrix ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On large-scale matrix completion tasks, Jellyfish is orders of magnitude more efficient than ...... NNLS was written in Matlab, and some of the functions are available .... Figure 6: Low-Rank Factorization Graph on (A) Movielens1M and (B)

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In general, large-scale integration studies in Europe and the United States find that high penetrations of renewable generation are technically feasible with operational changes and increased access to transmission. This paper describes other key findings such as the need for fast markets, large balancing areas, system flexibility, and the use of advanced forecasting.

Bird, L.; Milligan, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Large Scale Mining of Molecular Fragments with Wildcards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large Scale Mining of Molecular Fragments with Wildcards Heiko Hofer1 , Christian Borgelt2 a novel molecule will be active or inactive, so that future chemical tests can be focused on the most molecular fragments to discriminate between active and inactive molecules. In this paper we present two

Borgelt, Christian

308

Computer Science Colloquium Designing a Large-Scale Quantum Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Science Colloquium Designing a Large-Scale Quantum Architecture Speaker: Tzvetan Metodi of traditional architectures, to develop a model for a computationally relevant quantum system that provides on the development of balanced architectural models of organization and specialization for emerging quantum computing

309

ORNL 2013-G00021/tcc Large Scale Graphene Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL 2013-G00021/tcc 02.2013 Large Scale Graphene Production UT-B ID 201102606 Technology Summary Graphene is an emerging one-atom-thick carbon material which has the potential for a wide range research, graphene has quickly attained the status of a wonder nanomaterial and continued to draw

310

Developing A Grid Portal For Large-scale Reservoir Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing A Grid Portal For Large-scale Reservoir Studies 1 Center for Computation & Technology 2 uncertainty. · Advantages of grid technology · Proposed Solution of the UCoMS Team · What is a Portal? · UCo of reservoir uncertainty... Petroleum drilling consist of many uncertainties. Main objective is to optimize

Allen, Gabrielle

311

Large Scale Simulation of Tor: Modelling a Global Passive Adversary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Implementing global passive adversary attacks on currently deployed low latency anonymous networks designs have been developed which attempt to apply mixes to low latency traffic. The most widelyLarge Scale Simulation of Tor: Modelling a Global Passive Adversary Gavin O' Gorman and Stephen

Blott, Stephen

312

Seamlessly Integrating Software & Hardware Modelling for Large-Scale Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering, with the math- ematical modelling approach, Modelica, to address the software/hardware integration problem. The environment and hardware components are modelled in Modelica and integrated software-hardware codesign, large-scale sys- tems, Behavior Engineering, Modelica. 1. Introduction

Zhao, Yuxiao

313

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emphasis in Nanotechnology · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Petroleum Engineering · ChemicalEngineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, materials, energy

Rohs, Remo

314

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· ChemicalEngineering (Nanotechnology) Bachelor of Science 131 units · ChemicalEngineering(Petroleum38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, pharmaceutical

Rohs, Remo

315

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Nanotechnology · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Petroleum Engineering · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Polymers38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, pharmaceutical

Rohs, Remo

316

Re-evaluation of the 1995 Hanford Large Scale Drum Fire Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large-scale drum performance test was conducted at the Hanford Site in June 1995, in which over one hundred (100) 55-gal drums in each of two storage configurations were subjected to severe fuel pool fires. The two storage configurations in the test were pallet storage and rack storage. The description and results of the large-scale drum test at the Hanford Site were reported in WHC-SD-WM-TRP-246, ''Solid Waste Drum Array Fire Performance,'' Rev. 0, 1995. This was one of the main references used to develop the analytical methodology to predict drum failures in WHC-SD-SQA-ANAL-501, 'Fire Protection Guide for Waste Drum Storage Array,'' September 1996. Three drum failure modes were observed from the test reported in WHC-SD-WM-TRP-246. They consisted of seal failure, lid warping, and catastrophic lid ejection. There was no discernible failure criterion that distinguished one failure mode from another. Hence, all three failure modes were treated equally for the purpose of determining the number of failed drums. General observations from the results of the test are as follows: {lg_bullet} Trash expulsion was negligible. {lg_bullet} Flame impingement was identified as the main cause for failure. {lg_bullet} The range of drum temperatures at failure was 600 C to 800 C. This is above the yield strength temperature for steel, approximately 540 C (1,000 F). {lg_bullet} The critical heat flux required for failure is above 45 kW/m{sup 2}. {lg_bullet} Fire propagation from one drum to the next was not observed. The statistical evaluation of the test results using, for example, the student's t-distribution, will demonstrate that the failure criteria for TRU waste drums currently employed at nuclear facilities are very conservative relative to the large-scale test results. Hence, the safety analysis utilizing the general criteria described in the five bullets above will lead to a technically robust and defensible product that bounds the potential consequences from postulated fires in TRU waste facilities, the means of storage in which are the Type A, 55-gal drums.

Yang, J M

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

317

Capturing CO2 from Air Anca Timofte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capturing CO2 from Air Anca Timofte Climeworks AG Birchstrasse 155, 8050 Zürich www.climeworks.com, contact@climeworks.com Carbon Mitigation Lecture, 27 October 2014 #12;Air Climeworks CO2 capture plant CO2-free air Pure CO2 #12;3 Climeworks Products Demonstrator · 1 ton CO2 per year · Online since 12

Fischlin, Andreas

318

Quantum noise in large-scale coherent nonlinear photonic circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A semiclassical simulation approach is presented for studying quantum noise in large-scale photonic circuits incorporating an ideal Kerr nonlinearity. A circuit solver is used to generate matrices defining a set of stochastic differential equations, in which the resonator field variables represent random samplings of the Wigner quasi-probability distributions. Although the semiclassical approach involves making a large-photon-number approximation, tests on one- and two-resonator circuits indicate satisfactory agreement between the semiclassical and full-quantum simulation results in the parameter regime of interest. The semiclassical model is used to simulate random errors in a large-scale circuit that contains 88 resonators and hundreds of components in total, and functions as a 4-bit ripple counter. The error rate as a function of on-state photon number is examined, and it is observed that the quantum fluctuation amplitudes do not increase as signals propagate through the circuit, an important property for scalability.

Charles Santori; Jason S. Pelc; Raymond G. Beausoleil; Nikolas Tezak; Ryan Hamerly; Hideo Mabuchi

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Performance Health Monitoring of Large-Scale Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the progress made on the ASCR funded project Performance Health Monitoring for Large Scale Systems. A large-­?scale application may not achieve its full performance potential due to degraded performance of even a single subsystem. Detecting performance faults, isolating them, and taking remedial action is critical for the scale of systems on the horizon. PHM aims to develop techniques and tools that can be used to identify and mitigate such performance problems. We accomplish this through two main aspects. The PHM framework encompasses diagnostics, system monitoring, fault isolation, and performance evaluation capabilities that indicates when a performance fault has been detected, either due to an anomaly present in the system itself or due to contention for shared resources between concurrently executing jobs. Software components called the PHM Control system then build upon the capabilities provided by the PHM framework to mitigate degradation caused by performance problems.

Rajamony, Ram

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

320

Prototype Vector Machine for Large Scale Semi-Supervised Learning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Practicaldataminingrarelyfalls exactlyinto the supervisedlearning scenario. Rather, the growing amount of unlabeled data poses a big challenge to large-scale semi-supervised learning (SSL). We note that the computationalintensivenessofgraph-based SSLarises largely from the manifold or graph regularization, which in turn lead to large models that are dificult to handle. To alleviate this, we proposed the prototype vector machine (PVM), a highlyscalable,graph-based algorithm for large-scale SSL. Our key innovation is the use of"prototypes vectors" for effcient approximation on both the graph-based regularizer and model representation. The choice of prototypes are grounded upon two important criteria: they not only perform effective low-rank approximation of the kernel matrix, but also span a model suffering the minimum information loss compared with the complete model. We demonstrate encouraging performance and appealing scaling properties of the PVM on a number of machine learning benchmark data sets.

Zhang, Kai; Kwok, James T.; Parvin, Bahram

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission from Large Scale Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For more than a decade now the complete origin of the diffuse gamma-ray emission background (EGRB) has been unknown. Major components like unresolved star-forming galaxies (making 10GeV. Moreover, we show that, even though the gamma-ray emission arising from structure formation shocks at galaxy clusters is below previous estimates, these large scale shocks can still give an important, and even dominant at high energies, contribution to the EGRB. Future detections of cluster gamma-ray emission would make our upper limit of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission from structure-formation process, a firm prediction, and give us deeper insight in evolution of these large scale shock.

Dobardzic, Aleksandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Suppression of large-scale perturbations by stiff solid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of large-scale scalar perturbations in the presence of stiff solid (solid with pressure to energy density ratio > 1/3) is studied. If the solid dominated the dynamics of the universe long enough, the perturbations could end up suppressed by as much as several orders of magnitude. To avoid too steep large-angle power spectrum of CMB, radiation must have prevailed over the solid long enough before recombination.

Vladimír Balek; Matej Škovran

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Suppression of large-scale perturbations by stiff solid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of large-scale scalar perturbations in the presence of stiff solid (solid with pressure to energy density ratio > 1/3) is studied. If the solid dominated the dynamics of the universe long enough, the perturbations could end up suppressed by as much as several orders of magnitude. To avoid too steep large-angle power spectrum of CMB, radiation must have prevailed over the solid long enough before recombination.

Balek, Vladimír

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SAGUARO (Scalable Algorithms for Groundwater Uncertainty Analysis and Robust Optimization) Project focused on the development of scalable numerical algorithms for large-scale Bayesian inversion in complex systems that capitalize on advances in large-scale simulation-based optimization and inversion methods. The project was a collaborative effort among MIT, the University of Texas at Austin, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Sandia National Laboratories. The research was directed in three complementary areas: efficient approximations of the Hessian operator, reductions in complexity of forward simulations via stochastic spectral approximations and model reduction, and employing large-scale optimization concepts to accelerate sampling. The MIT--Sandia component of the SAGUARO Project addressed the intractability of conventional sampling methods for large-scale statistical inverse problems by devising reduced-order models that are faithful to the full-order model over a wide range of parameter values; sampling then employs the reduced model rather than the full model, resulting in very large computational savings. Results indicate little effect on the computed posterior distribution. On the other hand, in the Texas--Georgia Tech component of the project, we retain the full-order model, but exploit inverse problem structure (adjoint-based gradients and partial Hessian information of the parameter-to-observation map) to implicitly extract lower dimensional information on the posterior distribution; this greatly speeds up sampling methods, so that fewer sampling points are needed. We can think of these two approaches as ``reduce then sample'' and ``sample then reduce.'' In fact, these two approaches are complementary, and can be used in conjunction with each other. Moreover, they both exploit deterministic inverse problem structure, in the form of adjoint-based gradient and Hessian information of the underlying parameter-to-observation map, to achieve their speedups.

Willcox, Karen [MIT] [MIT; Marzouk, Youssef [MIT] [MIT

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Large Scale Deployment of Renewables for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

).38 The small scale of renewable energy projects multiplies the relative costs incurred through multiple administrative processes. For example, biogas plants in Germany require several parallel permit processes designed to address issues such as EU... -cellulose material. Anaerobic digestion or gasification of biomass produces gas that can be used in similar applications to natural gas. Small-scale biogas production is now a well-established technology and large-scale application is in the advanced stages...

Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2 release experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

numbered 0-6. Plots of F CO2 measured along the surface wellin Figure 2. Figure 2. Log F CO2 maps for measurements madeof soil CO 2 flux (F CO2 ). The surface leakage onset,

Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Primordial quantum nonequilibrium and large-scale cosmic anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study incomplete relaxation to quantum equilibrium at long wavelengths, during a pre-inflationary phase, as a possible explanation for the reported large-scale anomalies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Our scenario makes use of the de Broglie-Bohm pilot-wave formulation of quantum theory, in which the Born probability rule has a dynamical origin. The large-scale power deficit could arise from incomplete relaxation for the amplitudes of the primordial perturbations. We show, by numerical simulations for a spectator scalar field, that if the pre-inflationary era is radiation dominated then the deficit in the emerging power spectrum will have a characteristic shape (an inverse-tangent dependence on wavenumber k, with oscillations). It is found that our scenario is able to produce a power deficit in the observed region and of the observed (approximate) magnitude for an appropriate choice of cosmological parameters. We also discuss the large-scale anisotropy, which could arise from incomplete relaxation for the phases of the primordial perturbations. We present numerical simulations for phase relaxation, and we show how to define characteristic scales for amplitude and phase nonequilibrium. The extent to which the data might support our scenario is left as a question for future work. Our results suggest that we have a potentially viable model that might explain two apparently independent cosmic anomalies by means of a single mechanism.

Samuel Colin; Antony Valentini

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Microwave backgropund anisotropies, large-scale structure and cosmological parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review how the various large-scale data constrain cosmological parameters and, consequently, theories for the origin of large-scale structure in the Universe. We discuss the form of the power spectrum implied by the correlation data of galaxies and argue by comparing the velocity field implied by the distribution of light with the observed velocity flows that the bias parameter, $b$, is likely to be constant in the linear regime. This then allows one to estimate the density parameter, $\\Omega$, and $b$ directly from the \\underline{data} on $\\xi(r)$ and the velocity fields. We show that it is consistent with low values of $\\Omega^{0.6}/b$. We discuss the ways to normalise the optical data at $z\\sim0$ directly to the COBE (or other microwave background) data. The data on high-$z$ \\underline{galaxies} allows one to further constrain the shape of the \\underline{primordial} power spectrum at scales which are non-linear today ($< 8h^{-1}$Mpc) and we discuss the consistency of the data with inflationary models normalised to the large-scale structure observations.

A. Kashlinsky

1993-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

331

8, 73737389, 2008 Scientists' CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 7373­7389, 2008 Scientists' CO2 emissions A. Stohl Title Page Abstract Introduction substantial emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). In this pa- per, the CO2 emissions of the employees working, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

6, 1092910958, 2006 Regional scale CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using radon A. I. Hirsch Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes A. I (Adam.Hirsch@noaa.gov) 10929 #12;ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

333

MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH restricted to: (i) supercritical CO2 injection and storage within the Dogger reservoir aquifer, (ii) CO2 the cement-rock formation interface in the abandoned well (iii) impacts on the Albian aquifer water quality

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

334

Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column that the CO2 is in a dense phase (either liquid or supercritical). Accurate assessment of the storage capacity also requires an estimation of the amount of CO2 that can be safely stored beneath the reservoir seal

335

CO2 percolation experiment through chlorite/zeolite-rich sandstone (Pretty Hill Formation Otway BasinAustralia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 percolation experiment through chlorite/zeolite-rich sandstone (Pretty Hill Formation ­ Otway November 2011 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: CO2 storage Clay precipitation Carbon Permeability Reactive transport Underground CO2 sequestration is highly recommended as an effective means of significantly

Demouchy, Sylvie

336

Feasibility of a Perfluorocarbon tracer based network to support Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of Sequestered CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Accounting of Sequestered CO2 Thomas B. Watson* and Terrence Sullivan Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton% of total sequestered CO2 over the lifetime of the reservoir. This is 0.001% per year for a 1000 year lifetime of a storage reservoir. Effective detection of CO2 leaks at the surface may require incorporation

Johnson, Peter D.

337

Carbon Utilization and Storage | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Assess Carbon Utilization and Storage Technologies PDF Improving Domestic Energy Security and Lowering CO2 Emissions with "Next Generation" CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery...

338

Solar cycle variations of large scale flows in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we study the large-scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone using the ring diagram technique. We use observations from four different times to study possible temporal variations in flow velocity. We find definite changes in both the zonal and meridional components of the flows. The amplitude of the zonal flow appears to increase with solar activity and the flow pattern also shifts towards lower latitude with time.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

339

Large scale EPR correlations and cosmic gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how quantum correlations survive at large scales in spite of their exposition to stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves. We consider Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) correlations built up on the polarizations of photon pairs and evaluate how they are affected by the cosmic gravitational wave background (CGWB). We evaluate the quantum decoherence of the EPR correlations in terms of a reduction of the violation of the Bell inequality as written by Clauser, Horne, Shimony and Holt (CHSH). We show that this decoherence remains small and that EPR correlations can in principle survive up to the largest cosmic scales.

B. Lamine; R. Hervé; M. -T. Jaekel; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

340

Generation of large-scale winds in horizontally anisotropic convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection between free-slip horizontal plates, rotating about a horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind.

von Hardenberg, J; Provenzale, A; Spiegel, E A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Large-Scale Anisotropy of EGRET Gamma Ray Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the course of its operation, the EGRET experiment detected high-energy gamma ray sources at energies above 100 MeV over the whole sky. In this communication, we search for large-scale anisotropy patterns among the catalogued EGRET sources using an expansion in spherical harmonics, accounting for EGRET's highly non-uniform exposure. We find significant excess in the quadrupole and octopole moments. This is consistent with the hypothesis that, in addition to the galactic plane, a second mid-latitude (5^{\\circ} < |b| < 30^{\\circ}) population, perhaps associated with the Gould belt, contributes to the gamma ray flux above 100 MeV.

Luis Anchordoqui; Thomas McCauley; Thomas Paul; Olaf Reimer; Diego F. Torres

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

Robust Morphological Measures for Large-Scale Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complete family of statistical descriptors for the morphology of large--scale structure based on Minkowski--Functionals is presented. These robust and significant measures can be used to characterize the local and global morphology of spatial patterns formed by a coverage of point sets which represent galaxy samples. Basic properties of these measures are highlighted and their relation to the `genus statistics' is discussed. Test models like a Poissonian point process and samples generated from a Voronoi--model are put into perspective.

T. Buchert

1994-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

343

Statistical analysis of large-scale structure in the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methods for the statistical characterization of the large-scale structure in the Universe will be the main topic of the present text. The focus is on geometrical methods, mainly Minkowski functionals and the J-function. Their relations to standard methods used in cosmology and spatial statistics and their application to cosmological datasets will be discussed. This work is not only meant as a short review for comologist, but also attempts to illustrate these morphological methods and to make them accessible to scientists from other fields. Consequently, a short introduction to the standard picture of cosmology is given.

Martin Kerscher

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXX OfficeLandLarge-Scale Manufacturing

345

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXX OfficeLandLarge-Scale

346

Sun Also Rises: Planning for Large-Scale Solar Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind, solar, and other renewable energy are an important part of any present-day energy. The portion of energy they supply will certainly be increasing over the next few years. Arguably, large-scale wind power has reached technological maturity, and with more than 100 GW of capacity, ample experience exists on integrating wind systems. Solar technologies, on the other hand, are emerging, and substantial R&D investments are being made to achieve parity with retail electricity costs in the near future. As this happens, annual capacity additions of solar power will become significant.

Bebic, J.; Walling, R.; O'Brien, K.; Kroposki, B.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermal Energy Storage Potential in Supermarkets.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The objective of this research is to evaluate the potential of thermal energy storage in supermarkets with CO2 refrigeration systems. Suitable energy storage techniques… (more)

Ohannessian, Roupen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

349

Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the location of all projects created with funding from the Smart Grid Demonstration and Energy Storage Project, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act....

350

Energy Storage for the Power Grid  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The iron vanadium redox flow battery was developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a solution to large-scale energy storage for the power grid.

Wang, Wei; Imhoff, Carl; Vaishnav, Dave

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

Energy Storage for the Power Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The iron vanadium redox flow battery was developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a solution to large-scale energy storage for the power grid.

Wang, Wei; Imhoff, Carl; Vaishnav, Dave

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up to $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $\\approx 1000$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.

Marino, Dr. Raffaele [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Mininni, Dr. Pablo D. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina; Rosenberg, Duane L [ORNL; Pouquet, Dr. Annick [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Skewness and Kurtosis in Large-Scale Cosmic Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, I present the calculation of the third and fourth moments of both the distribution function of the large--scale density and the large--scale divergence of the velocity field, $\\theta$. These calculations are made by the mean of perturbative calculations assuming Gaussian initial conditions and are expected to be valid in the linear or quasi linear regime. The moments are derived for a top--hat window function and for any cosmological parameters $\\Omega$ and $\\Lambda$. It turns out that the dependence with $\\Lambda$ is always very weak whereas the moments of the distribution function of the divergence are strongly dependent on $\\Omega$. A method to measure $\\Omega$ using the skewness of this field has already been presented by Bernardeau et al. (1993). I show here that the simultaneous measurement of the skewness and the kurtosis allows to test the validity of the gravitational instability scenario hypothesis. Indeed there is a combination of the first three moments of $\\theta$ that is almost independent of the cosmological parameters $\\Omega$ and $\\Lambda$, $${(-3^2) \\over ^2}\\approx 1.5,$$ (the value quoted is valid when the index of the power spectrum at the filtering scale is close to -1) so that any cosmic velocity field created by gravitational instabilities should verify such a property.

F. Bernardeau

1993-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

Large Scale Structure in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary observational goals of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are to obtain CCD imaging of 10,000 deg^2 of the north Galactic cap in five passbands, with a limiting magnitude in the r-band of 22.5, to obtain spectroscopic redshifts of 10^6 galaxies and 10^5 quasars, and to obtain similar data for three ~ 200 deg^2 stripes in the south Galactic cap, with repeated imaging to allow co-addition and variability studies in at least one of these stripes. The resulting photometric and spectroscopic galaxy datasets allow one to map the large scale structure traced by optical galaxies over a wide range of scales to unprecedented precision. Results relevant to the large scale structure of our Universe include: a flat model with a cosmological constant Omega_Lambda=0.7 provides a good description of the data; the galaxy-galaxy correlation function shows departures from a power law which are statistically significant; and galaxy clustering is a strong function of galaxy type.

M. Bernardi

2003-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

ORIGINAL PAPER Potential volume for CO2 deep ocean sequestration: an assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-year storage and 61 m for one decade. Keywords Carbon dioxide Á Ocean sequestration Á RegressionORIGINAL PAPER Potential volume for CO2 deep ocean sequestration: an assessment of the area located in an average amount of 6.957 Gt within this duration. If deep sea sequestration for CO2 can be the possible

Wu, Yih-Min

356

MODELING AND CONTROL OF A O2/CO2 GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING AND CONTROL OF A O2/CO2 GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Lars Imsland Dagfinn Snarheim and control of a semi-closed O2/CO2 gas turbine cycle for CO2 capture. In the first part the process predictive control, Gas turbines, CO2 capture 1. INTRODUCTION Gas turbines are widely used for power

Foss, Bjarne A.

357

Brucite [Mg(OH2)] Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

storage risks. Most attention so far has been focused on reactions occurring between silicate minerals and rocks in the aqueous dominated CO2-bearing fluid. However, water-bearing...

358

Transition from Large-Scale to Small-Scale Dynamo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamo equations are solved numerically with a helical forcing corresponding to the Roberts flow. In the fully turbulent regime the flow behaves as a Roberts flow on long time scales, plus turbulent fluctuations at short time scales. The dynamo onset is controlled by the long time scales of the flow, in agreement with the former Karlsruhe experimental results. The is governed by a generalized {alpha} effect, which includes both the usual {alpha} effect and turbulent diffusion, plus all higher order effects. Beyond the onset we find that this generalized {alpha} effect scales as O(Rm{sup -1}), suggesting the takeover of small-scale dynamo action. This is confirmed by simulations in which dynamo occurs even if the large-scale field is artificially suppressed.

Ponty, Y. [Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, Nice cedex 04 (France); Plunian, F. [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Large scale anisotropic bias from primordial non-Gaussianity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we study the large scale structure bias in models of anisotropic inflation. We use the Peak Background Splitting method in Excursion Set Theory to find the scale-dependent bias. We show that the amplitude of the bias is modified by a direction-dependent factor. In the specific anisotropic inflation model which we study, the scale-dependent bias vanishes at leading order when the long wavelength mode in squeezed limit is aligned with the anisotropic direction in the sky. We also extend the scale-dependent bias formulation to the general situations with primordial anisotropy. We find some selection rules indicating that some specific parts of a generic anisotropic bispectrum is picked up by the bias parameter. We argue that the anisotropic bias is mainly sourced by the angle between the anisotropic direction and the long wavelength mode in the squeezed limit.

Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: baghram@ipm.ir, E-mail: mh.namjoo@ipm.ir, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The XMM/Megacam-VST/VIRMOS Large Scale Structure Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of the XMM-LSS Survey is to map the large scale structure of the universe, as highlighted by clusters and groups of galaxies, out to a redshift of about 1, over a single 8x8 sq.deg. area. For the first time, this will reveal the topology of the distribution of the deep potential wells and provide statistical measurements at truly cosmological distances. In addition, clusters identified via their X-ray properties will form the basis for the first uniformly-selected, multi-wavelength survey of the evolution of clusters and individual cluster galaxies as a function of redshift. The survey will also address the very important question of the QSO distribution within the cosmic web.

M. Pierre

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High Metallicity, Photoionised Gas in Intergalactic Large-Scale Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present high-resolution UV spectra of absorption-line systems toward the low-z QSO HS0624+6907 (z=0.3700). Coupled with spectroscopic galaxy redshifts, we find that many of these absorbers are integalactic gas clouds distributed within large-scale structures. The gas is cool (T0.9). STIS data reveal a cluster of 13 HI Lyman alpha lines within a 1000 km/s interval at z=0.0635. We find 10 galaxies at this redshift with impact parameters ranging from 135 h^-1 kpc to 1.37 h^-1 Mpc. We attribute the HI Lya absorptions to intragroup medium gas, possibly from a large-scale filament viewed along its long axis. Remarkably, the metallicity is near-solar, [M/H] = -0.05 +/- 0.4 (2 sigma uncertainty), yet the nearest galaxy which might pollute the IGM is at least 135 h_70^-1 kpc away. Tidal stripping from nearby galaxies appears to be the most likely origin of this highly enriched, cool gas. More than six Abell galaxy clusters are found within 4 degree of the sight line suggesting that the QSO line of sight passes near a node in the cosmic web. At z~0.077, we find absorption systems as well as galaxies at the redshift of the nearby clusters Abell 564 and Abell 559. We conclude that the sight line pierces a filament of gas and galaxies feeding into these clusters. The absorber at z_abs = 0.07573 associated with Abell 564/559 also has a high metallicity with [C/H] > -0.6, but again the closest galaxy is relatively far from the sight line (293 h^-1 kpc).

Bastien Aracil; Todd M. Tripp; David V. Bowen; Jason X. Proschaska; Hsiao-Wen Chen; Brenda L. Frye

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Training a Large Scale Classifier with the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a previous publication we proposed discrete global optimization as a method to train a strong binary classifier constructed as a thresholded sum over weak classifiers. Our motivation was to cast the training of a classifier into a format amenable to solution by the quantum adiabatic algorithm. Applying adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) promises to yield solutions that are superior to those which can be achieved with classical heuristic solvers. Interestingly we found that by using heuristic solvers to obtain approximate solutions we could already gain an advantage over the standard method AdaBoost. In this communication we generalize the baseline method to large scale classifier training. By large scale we mean that either the cardinality of the dictionary of candidate weak classifiers or the number of weak learners used in the strong classifier exceed the number of variables that can be handled effectively in a single global optimization. For such situations we propose an iterative and piecewise approach in which a subset of weak classifiers is selected in each iteration via global optimization. The strong classifier is then constructed by concatenating the subsets of weak classifiers. We show in numerical studies that the generalized method again successfully competes with AdaBoost. We also provide theoretical arguments as to why the proposed optimization method, which does not only minimize the empirical loss but also adds L0-norm regularization, is superior to versions of boosting that only minimize the empirical loss. By conducting a Quantum Monte Carlo simulation we gather evidence that the quantum adiabatic algorithm is able to handle a generic training problem efficiently.

Hartmut Neven; Vasil S. Denchev; Geordie Rose; William G. Macready

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

363

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg, Curtis M. (LBNL Earth Sciences Division) [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

July 21, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

CO2 http://andrew.ucsd.edu/co2qc/ University of California, San Diego  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooled by liquid nitrogen. The water and CO2 are separated from one another by sublimation and the CO2 for oceanic CO2 analysis: A method for the certification of total alkalinity. Marine Chemistry 80, 185

367

Numerical simulation of leakage from a geologic disposal reservoirfor CO2, with transitions between super- and sub-criticalconditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The critical point of CO2 is at temperature and pressureconditions of Tcrit = 31.04oC, Pcrit = 73.82 bar. At lower (subcritical)temperatures and/or pressures, CO2 can exist in two different phases, aliquid and a gaseous state, as well as in two-phase mixtures of thesestates. Disposal of CO2 into brine formations would be made atsupercritical pressures. However, CO2 escaping from the storage reservoirmay migrate upwards towards regions with lower temperatures andpressures, where CO2 would be in subcritical conditions. An assessment ofthe fate of leaking CO2 requires a capability to model not onlysupercritical but also subcritical CO2, as well as phase changes betweenliquid and gaseous CO2 in sub-critical conditions. We have developed amethodology for numerically simulating the behavior of water-CO2 mixturesin permeable media under conditions that may include liquid, gaseous, andsupercritical CO2. This has been applied to simulations of leakage from adeep storage reservoir in which a rising CO2 plume undergoes transitionsfrom supercritical to subcritical conditions. We find strong coolingeffects when liquid CO2 rises to elevations where it begins to boil andevolve a gaseous CO2 phase. A three-phase zone forms (aqueous - liquid -gas), which over time becomes several hundred meters thick as decreasingtemperatures permit liquid CO2 to advance to shallower elevations. Fluidmobilities are reduced in the three-phase region from phase interferenceeffects. This impedes CO2 upflow, causes the plume to spread outlaterally, and gives rise to dispersed CO2 discharge at the land surface.Our simulations suggest that temperatures along a CO2 leakage path maydecline to levels low enough so that solid water ice and CO2 hydratephases may be formed.

Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

QGESS: CO2 Impurity Design Parameters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10. Shah, Minish. Capturing CO2 from Oxy-Fuel Combustion Flue Gas. Cottbus, Germany : Praxair Inc., 2005. 11. Spitznogle, Gary O. CO2 Impurity Specification at AEP Mountaineer....

369

Large-scale fabrication and assembly of carbon nanotubes via nanopelleting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Widespread use of carbon nanotubes is predicated on the development of robust large-scale manufacturing techniques. There remain, however, few feasible methods for the large-scale handling of aligned and geometrically ...

El Aguizy, Tarek A., 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Architectural Design and Complexity Analysis of Large-Scale Cortical Simulation on a Hybrid Computing Platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- performance computing platform for large-scale mathematical models. Traditional computing architecture cannot hybrid computing architecture for the simulation and evaluation of large-scale associative neural memory models. The proposed architecture achieves very high computing and communication performances

Qiu, Qinru

371

Workshop on Scalable Cyber-Security Challenges in Large-Scale Networks: Deployment Obstacles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workshop on Scalable Cyber-Security Challenges in Large-Scale Networks: Deployment Obstacles Large, and Definitions of Cybersecurity.... 8 Conventional Wisdom is Inadequate....................................... 9 Directions in Scalable Cyber-Security in Large-Scale Networks: Deployment Obstacles." The workshop

Feigenbaum, Joan

372

Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Energy Department Awards 66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project December 18, 2007 - 4:58pm Addthis...

373

DOE Awards $126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon Sequestratio...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects DOE Awards 126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects May 6, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis...

374

ATMOSPHERIC CO2 A GLOBAL LIMITING RESOURCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbondioxideatmosphericburden,PgC Land use Fossil CO2 from land use emissions ­ not fossil fuel combustion ­ was the dominant CO2 Comparison of CO2 mixing ratio from fossil fuel combustion and land use changes 400 380 360 340 cores 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 Forcing,Wm -2 #12;ATMOSPHERIC CO2 EMISSIONS Time series 1700

Schwartz, Stephen E.

375

5, 33133340, 2005 SCIAMACHY CO2 and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 5, 3313­3340, 2005 SCIAMACHY CO2 and aerosols S. Houweling et al. Title Page Abstract Evidence of systematic errors in SCIAMACHY-observed CO2 due to aerosols S. Houweling 1,2 , W. Hartmann 1 Commons License. 3313 #12;ACPD 5, 3313­3340, 2005 SCIAMACHY CO2 and aerosols S. Houweling et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

2, 711743, 2006 Glacial CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CPD 2, 711­743, 2006 Glacial CO2 sequestration L. C. Skinner Title Page Abstract Introduction CO2 change: a simple "hypsometric effect" on deep-ocean carbon sequestration? L. C. Skinner Godwin Scientist Award win- ners 2006 711 #12;CPD 2, 711­743, 2006 Glacial CO2 sequestration L. C. Skinner Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

Supporting Large-scale Continuous Stream Datacenters via Pub/Sub Middleware and Adaptive Transport Protocols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting Large-scale Continuous Stream Datacenters via Pub/Sub Middleware and Adaptive Transport {mahesh, ken}@cs.cornell.edu Abstract Large-scale datacenters that handle continuous data streams require constitutes a promising area of research to address the challenges of these types of large-scale datacenters

Schmidt, Douglas C.

378

Influence of Western North Pacific Tropical Cyclones on Their Large-Scale Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water vapor, and sea surface tem- perature (SST)] on an index of TC activity [accumulated cyclone energyInfluence of Western North Pacific Tropical Cyclones on Their Large-Scale Environment ADAM H. SOBEL) tropical cyclones (TCs) on their large-scale environment by lag regressing various large-scale climate

Sobel, Adam

379

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Phase-Changing Ionic Liquids: CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids Involving Phase Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: Notre Dame is developing a new CO2 capture process that uses special ionic liquids (ILs) to remove CO2 from the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. ILs are salts that are normally liquid at room temperature, but Notre Dame has discovered a new class of ILs that are solid at room temperature and change to liquid when they bind to CO2. Upon heating, the CO2 is released for storage, and the ILs re-solidify and donate some of the heat generated in the process to facilitate further CO2 release. These new ILs can reduce the energy required to capture CO2 from the exhaust stream of a coal-fired power plant when compared to state-ofthe- art technology.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Giant radio galaxies - II. Tracers of large-scale structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out optical spectroscopy with the Anglo-Australian Telescope for 24,726 objects surrounding a sample of 19 Giant Radio Galaxies (GRGs) selected to have redshifts in the range 0.05 to 0.15 and projected linear sizes from 0.8 to 3.2 Mpc. Such radio galaxies are ideal candidates to study the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) because their radio lobes extend beyond the ISM and halos of their host galaxies, and into the tenuous IGM. We were able to measure redshifts for 9,076 galaxies. Radio imaging of each GRG, including high-sensitivity, wideband radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array for 12 GRGs and host optical spectra (presented in a previous paper, Malarecki et al. 2013), is used in conjunction with the surrounding galaxy redshifts to trace large-scale structure. We find that the mean galaxy number overdensity in volumes of ~700 Mpc$^3$ near the GRG host galaxies is ~70 indicating an overdense but non-virialized environment. A Fourier component analysis is used to qu...

Malarecki, J M; Saripalli, L; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Parallel Index and Query for Large Scale Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern scientific datasets present numerous data management and analysis challenges. State-of-the-art index and query technologies are critical for facilitating interactive exploration of large datasets, but numerous challenges remain in terms of designing a system for process- ing general scientific datasets. The system needs to be able to run on distributed multi-core platforms, efficiently utilize underlying I/O infrastructure, and scale to massive datasets. We present FastQuery, a novel software framework that address these challenges. FastQuery utilizes a state-of-the-art index and query technology (FastBit) and is designed to process mas- sive datasets on modern supercomputing platforms. We apply FastQuery to processing of a massive 50TB dataset generated by a large scale accelerator modeling code. We demonstrate the scalability of the tool to 11,520 cores. Motivated by the scientific need to search for inter- esting particles in this dataset, we use our framework to reduce search time from hours to tens of seconds.

Chou, Jerry; Wu, Kesheng; Ruebel, Oliver; Howison, Mark; Qiang, Ji; Prabhat,; Austin, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes; Ryne, Rob D.; Shoshani, Arie

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

383

Classical Control of Large-Scale Quantum Computers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The accelerated development of quantum technology has reached a pivotal point. Early in 2014, several results were published demonstrating that several experimental technologies are now accurate enough to satisfy the requirements of fault-tolerant, error corrected quantum computation. While there are many technological and experimental issues that still need to be solved, the ability of experimental systems to now have error rates low enough to satisfy the fault-tolerant threshold for several error correction models is a tremendous milestone. Consequently, it is now a good time for the computer science and classical engineering community to examine the {\\em classical} problems associated with compiling quantum algorithms and implementing them on future quantum hardware. In this paper, we will review the basic operational rules of a topological quantum computing architecture and outline one of the most important classical problems that need to be solved; the decoding of error correction data for a large-scale quantum computer. We will endeavour to present these problems independently from the underlying physics as much of this work can be effectively solved by non-experts in quantum information or quantum mechanics.

Simon J. Devitt

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure: Connecting Hopes with Reality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large scale structure is however from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm loc}$ ($f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm eq}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are $\\Delta f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm loc, eq.} \\simeq 1$. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.

Marcelo Alvarez; Tobias Baldauf; J. Richard Bond; Neal Dalal; Roland de Putter; Olivier Doré; Daniel Green; Chris Hirata; Zhiqi Huang; Dragan Huterer; Donghui Jeong; Matthew C. Johnson; Elisabeth Krause; Marilena Loverde; Joel Meyers; P. Daniel Meerburg; Leonardo Senatore; Sarah Shandera; Eva Silverstein; Anže Slosar; Kendrick Smith; Matias Zaldarriaga; Valentin Assassi; Jonathan Braden; Amir Hajian; Takeshi Kobayashi; George Stein; Alexander van Engelen

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fractal Approach to Large-Scale Galaxy Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a review of the history and the present state of the fractal approach to the large-scale distribution of galaxies. Angular correlation function was used as a general instrument for the structure analysis. It was realized later that a normalization condition for the reduced correlation function estimator results in distorted values for both R_{hom} and fractal dimension D. Moreover, according to a theorem on projections of fractals, galaxy angular catalogues can not be used for detecting a structure with the fractal dimension D>2. For this 3-d maps are required, and indeed modern extensive redshift-based 3-d maps have revealed the ``hidden'' fractal dimension of about 2, and have confirmed superclustering at scales even up to 500 Mpc (e.g. the Sloan Great Wall). On scales, where the fractal analysis is possible in completely embedded spheres, a power--law density field has been found. The fractal dimension D =2.2 +- 0.2 was directly obtained from 3-d maps and R_{hom} has expanded from 10 Mpc to scales approaching 100 Mpc. In concordance with the 3-d map results, modern all sky galaxy counts in the interval 10^m - 15^m give a 0.44m-law which corresponds to D=2.2 within a radius of 100h^{-1}_{100} Mpc. We emphasize that the fractal mass--radius law of galaxy clustering has become a key phenomenon in observational cosmology.

Yurij Baryshev; Pekka Teerikorpi

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Gulf of Mexico Miocene CO2 Site Characterization Mega Transect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO2-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the offshore Miocene interval is a storage resource of National interest for providing CO2 storage as an atmospheric emissions abatement strategy. The natural petroleum system was used as an analog to infer seal quality and predict possible migration pathways of fluids in an engineered system of anthropogenic CO2 injection and storage. The regional structural features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone) that exert primary control on the trapping and distribution of Miocene hydrocarbons are expected to perform similarly for CCS. Industrial?scale CCS will require storage capacity utilizing well?documented Miocene hydrocarbon (dominantly depleted gas) fields and their larger structural closures, as well as barren (unproductive, brine?filled) closures. No assessment was made of potential for CO2 utilization for enhanced oil and gas recovery. The use of 3D numerical fluid flow simulations have been used in the study to greatly assist in characterizing the potential storage capacity of a specific reservoir. Due to the complexity of geologic systems (stratigraphic heterogeneity) and inherent limitations on producing a 3D geologic model, these simulations are typically simplified scenarios that explore the influence of model property variability (sensitivity study). A specific site offshore San Luis Pass (southern Galveston Island) was undertaken successfully, indicating stacked storage potential. Downscaling regional capacity estimates to the local scale (and the inverse) has proven challenging, and remains an outstanding gap in capacity assessments. In order to characterize regional seal performance and identify potential brine and CO2 leakage pathways, results from three high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic datasets acquired by the study using novel HR3D (P-Cable) acquisition system showed steady and significant improvements in data quality because of improved acquisition and processing technique. Finely detailed faults and stratigraphy in the shallowest 1000 milliseconds (~800 m) of data allowed for the identification and mapping of unconformable surfaces including what is probably

Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key to Large-Scale Cogeneration?" Public Power, v, 35, no.Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems,"Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems, tion from

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Samenvatting CO2 is het meest belangrijke broeikasgas. The concentratie van CO2 in de atmosfeer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Samenvatting CO2 is het meest belangrijke broeikasgas. The concentratie van CO2 in de atmosfeer brandstoffen en veranderingen in landgebruik. Toenemende concentraties van CO2 in de atmosfeer zullen naar toename van CO2 in de atmosfeer op de dynamiek van de microbiële gemeenschap in de directe omgeving van de

van den Brink, Jeroen

389

MAC-Kaust Project P1 CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAC-Kaust Project P1 ­ CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter identification and numerical simulation M. Brokate, O. A. PykhteevHysteresis aspects of CO2 sequestration modeling K-H. Hoffmann, N. D. Botkin Objectives and methods of CO2 sequestration There is a popular belief

Turova, Varvara

390

Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storagereservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deepgeologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO2emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologiccarbon storage is to trap CO2 underground, CO2 could migrate away fromthe storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeablepathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitudereleases of CO2 have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs innumerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbondioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO2reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due toinfluences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. Thesesystems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potentialrelease of CO2 from geologic storage reservoirs and provide importantinformation about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that areassociated with releases, as well as the health, safety, andenvironmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can beapplied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO2 and industrialreleases of CO2 and natural gas in the context of these characteristics.Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessonscan be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO2 can bothaccumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondaryreservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Bothprimary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO2 should therefore bewell characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO2have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release,such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential forprocesses that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks andtrigger the release of CO2 from a storage reservoir should be evaluated.Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and directconduits for CO2 flow from depth to the surface. Risk assessment shouldtherefore emphasize determining the potential for and nature of CO2migration along these structures. Fourth, wells that are structurallyunsound have the potential to rapidly release large quantities of CO2 tothe atmosphere. Risk assessment should therefore be focused on thepotential for both active and abandoned wells at storage sites totransport CO2 to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil orgas reservoirs where wellsare abundant. Fifth, the style of CO2 releaseat the surface varies widely between and within different leakage sites.In rare circumstances, the release of CO2 can be a self-enhancing and/oreruptive process; this possibility should be assessed in the case of CO2leakage from storage reservoirs. Sixth, the hazard to human health hasbeen small in most cases of large surface releases of CO2. This could bedue to implementation of public education and CO2 monitoring programs;these programs should therefore be employed to minimize potential health,safety, and environmental effects associated with CO2 leakage. Finally,while changes in groundwater chemistry were related to CO2 leakage due toacidification and interaction with host rocks along flow paths, watersremained potable in most cases. Groundwaters should be monitored forchanges that may be associated with storage reservoirleakage.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison of non-hysteretic and hysteretic characteristic curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 from the storage formation to the ground surface, whileCO 2 from the storage formation to the ground surface, whilebetween the storage formation and the ground surface (

Doughty, Christine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison of non-hysteretic chracteristic curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 from the storage formation to the ground surface, whilebetween the storage formation and the ground surface for theCO 2 from the storage formation to the ground surface, while

Doughty, Christine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cosmological Implications of the CMB Large-scale Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WMAP and Planck may have uncovered several anomalies in the full CMB sky that could indicate possible new physics driving the growth of density fluctuations in the early Universe. These include an unusually low power at the largest scales and an apparent alignment of the quadrupole and octopole moments. In LCDM, the quadrupole and octopole moments should be statistically independent. These low probability features may simply be due to posterior selections from many such possible effects. If this is not the case, however, their combined statistical significance would be equal to the product of their individual significances. Ignoring the biasing due to posterior selection, the missing large-angle correlations would have a probability as low as ~0.1% and the low-l multipole alignment would be unlikely at the ~4.9% level; under the least favourable conditions, their simultaneous observation in the context of the standard model could then be likely at only the ~0.005% level. In this paper, we explore the possibility that these features are indeed anomalous, and show that the corresponding probability of CMB multipole alignment in the R_h=ct Universe would then be ~7-10%, depending on the number of large-scale Sachs-Wolfe induced fluctuations. Since the low power at the largest spatial scales is reproduced in this cosmology without the need to invoke cosmic variance, the overall likelihood of observing both of these features in the CMB is > 7%, much more likely than in LCDM. The key physical ingredient responsible for this difference is the existence in the former of a maximum fluctuation size at the time of recombination, which is absent in the latter because of inflation.

Fulvio Melia

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

Inflationary tensor fossils in large-scale structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inflation models make specific predictions for a tensor-scalar-scalar three-point correlation, or bispectrum, between one gravitational-wave (tensor) mode and two density-perturbation (scalar) modes. This tensor-scalar-scalar correlation leads to a local power quadrupole, an apparent departure from statistical isotropy in our Universe, as well as characteristic four-point correlations in the current mass distribution in the Universe. So far, the predictions for these observables have been worked out only for single-clock models in which certain consistency conditions between the tensor-scalar-scalar correlation and tensor and scalar power spectra are satisfied. Here we review the requirements on inflation models for these consistency conditions to be satisfied. We then consider several examples of inflation models, such as non-attractor and solid inflation models, in which these conditions are put to the test. In solid inflation the simplest consistency conditions are already violated whilst in the non-attractor model we find that, contrary to the standard scenario, the tensor-scalar-scalar correlator probes directly relevant model-dependent information. We work out the predictions for observables in these models. For non-attractor inflation we find an apparent local quadrupolar departure from statistical isotropy in large-scale structure but that this power quadrupole decreases very rapidly at smaller scales. The consistency of the CMB quadrupole with statistical isotropy then constrains the distance scale that corresponds to the transition from the non-attractor to attractor phase of inflation to be larger than the currently observable horizon. Solid inflation predicts clustering fossils signatures in the current galaxy distribution that may be large enough to be detectable with forthcoming, and possibly even current, galaxy surveys.

Emanuela Dimastrogiovanni; Matteo Fasiello; Donghui Jeong; Marc Kamionkowski

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Lateral solids dispersion coefficient in large-scale fluidized beds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of fuel feed ports in a large-scale fluidized bed combustor depends on the fuel characteristics and lateral solids mixing. However, the reported values of the effective lateral solids dispersion coefficient (D{sub sr}) are scattered in the broad range of 0.0001-0.1 m{sup 2}/s. With the aim of predicting D{sub sr} in wider fluidized beds which is difficult to measure directly or deduce from experimental results in lab-scale facilities, a computational method is proposed. It combines the Eulerian-Granular simulation and fictitious particle tracing technique. The value of D{sub sr} is calculated based on the movement of the tracers. The effect on D{sub sr} of bed width (W) ranging from 0.4 m up to 12.8 m at different levels of superficial gas velocity (U{sub 0}) is investigated. It is found that increasing W whilst maintaining U{sub 0}, D{sub sr} initially increases markedly, then its increase rate declines, and finally it stays around a constant value. The computed values of D{sub sr} are examined quantitatively and compared with a thorough list of the measured D{sub sr} in the literature since 1980s. Agreed with the measurements performed in the pilot-scale fluidized beds, the value of D{sub sr} in wider facilities at higher fluidizing velocities is predicted to be around the order of magnitude of 0.1 m{sup 2}/s, much higher than that in lab-scale beds. Finally, the effect of D{sub sr} on the distribution of fuel particles over the cross section in fluidized beds with the specified layout of feed ports is discussed. (author)

Liu, Daoyin; Chen, Xiaoping [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon...

Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Predicting CO2-water interfacial tension under pressure and temperature conditions of geologic CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquid/vapor interface of SPC/E water. J. Phys. Chem. 100,dioxide mixtures described by the SPC/E and EPM2 models. (and water oxygen is denoted by O SPC/E and O TIP for SPC/E (

Nielsen, L.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A first large-scale flood inundation forecasting model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present continental to global scale flood forecasting focusses on predicting at a point discharge, with little attention to the detail and accuracy of local scale inundation predictions. Yet, inundation is actually the variable of interest and all flood impacts are inherently local in nature. This paper proposes a first large scale flood inundation ensemble forecasting model that uses best available data and modeling approaches in data scarce areas and at continental scales. The model was built for the Lower Zambezi River in southeast Africa to demonstrate current flood inundation forecasting capabilities in large data-scarce regions. The inundation model domain has a surface area of approximately 170k km2. ECMWF meteorological data were used to force the VIC (Variable Infiltration Capacity) macro-scale hydrological model which simulated and routed daily flows to the input boundary locations of the 2-D hydrodynamic model. Efficient hydrodynamic modeling over large areas still requires model grid resolutions that are typically larger than the width of many river channels that play a key a role in flood wave propagation. We therefore employed a novel sub-grid channel scheme to describe the river network in detail whilst at the same time representing the floodplain at an appropriate and efficient scale. The modeling system was first calibrated using water levels on the main channel from the ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) laser altimeter and then applied to predict the February 2007 Mozambique floods. Model evaluation showed that simulated flood edge cells were within a distance of about 1 km (one model resolution) compared to an observed flood edge of the event. Our study highlights that physically plausible parameter values and satisfactory performance can be achieved at spatial scales ranging from tens to several hundreds of thousands of km2 and at model grid resolutions up to several km2. However, initial model test runs in forecast mode revealed that it is crucial to account for basin-wide hydrological response time when assessing lead time performances notwithstanding structural limitations in the hydrological model and possibly large inaccuracies in precipitation data.

Schumann, Guy J-P; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Voisin, Nathalie; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Pappenberger, Florian; Phanthuwongpakdee, Kay; Hall, Amanda C.; Bates, Paul D.

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

The supply chain of CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top), production (F Pr )Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO 2 Emissions (Carbonfrom the burning of fossil fuels are conventionally

Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Project Profile: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

feasibility of using phase change materials (PCM) at elevated temperatures and to acquire engineering results that will lead to the demonstration of large-scale thermal storage...

402

Potential method for measurement of CO2 leakage from underground sequestration fields using radioactive tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) release to the environment is a pressing challenge that should be addressed to avert the potential devastating effects of global warming. Within the United States, the most abundant sources of CO2 emissions are those generate from coal- or gas-fired power plants; one method to control CO2 emissions is to sequester it in deep underground geological formations. From integrated assessment models the overall leakage rates from these storage locations must be less than 0.1% of stored volume per year for long-term control. The ability to detect and characterize nascent leaks, in conjunction with subsequent remediation efforts, will significantly decrease the amount of CO2 released back into the environment. Because potential leakage pathways are not necessarily known a priori, onsite monitoring must be performed; the monitoring region in the vicinity of a CO2 injection well may be as large as 100 km2, which represents the estimated size of a supercritical CO2 bubble that would form under typical injection scenarios. By spiking the injected CO2 with a radiological or stable isotope tracer, it will be possible to detect ground leaks from the sequestered CO2 using fewer sampling stations, with greater accuracy than would be possible using simple CO2 sensors. The relative merits of various sorbent materials, radiological and stable isotope tracers, detection methods and potential interferences will be discussed.

Bachelor, Paula P.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Amonette, James E.; Hayes, James C.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Saripalli, Prasad

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Modeling of Near-Surface Leakage and Seepage of CO2 for Risk Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into deep geologic carbon sequestration sites entails risk that CO2 will leak away from the primary storage formation and migrate upwards to the unsaturated zone from which it can seep out of the ground. We have developed a coupled modeling framework called T2CA for simulating CO2 leakage and seepage in the subsurface and in the atmospheric surface layer. The results of model simulations can be used to calculate the two key health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk drivers, namely CO2 seepage flux and nearsurface CO2 concentrations. Sensitivity studies for a subsurface system with a thick unsaturated zone show limited leakage attenuation resulting in correspondingly large CO2 concentrations in the shallow subsurface. Large CO2 concentrations in the shallow subsurface present a risk to plant and tree roots, and to humans and other animals in subsurface structures such as basements or utility vaults. Whereas CO2 concentrations in the subsurface can be high, surfacelayer winds reduce CO2 concentrations to low levels for the fluxes investigated. We recommend more verification and case studies be carried out with T2CA, along with the development of extensions to handle additional scenarios such as calm conditions, topographic effects, and catastrophic surface-layer discharge events.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre A.J.

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Status of COThe Status of CO22 CaptureCapture and Storage Technologyand Storage Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and hydrogen from fossil fuels · Energy models show that without CCS, the cost of mitigating climate change (Electricity, Fuels, Chemicals, Hydrogen) CO2 CO2 Capture & Compress CO2 Transport CO2 Storage (Sequestration) - Post-combustion - Pre-combustion - Oxyfuel combustion - Pipeline - Tanker - Depleted oil/gas fields

405

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in   the   Swarthmore   Spheromak   Experiment   showing  of  the  Swarthmore  Spheromak   Experiment  (SSX)  the   Swarthmore   Spheromak   Experiment   is   shown  

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Ignition Facility (NIF) coming online, this is theof SRS/2wp instabilities in NIF relevant regimes. However,parameters relevant to NIF. There are important questions

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of focus include magnetohydrodynamics, plasma turbulence andsystems, with a focus on the physics of plasmas in magneticas well as space plasmas. The focus of his work is on

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fuels generated from renewable energy: a possible solution for large scale energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CSP)Concentrating solar power (CSP) Light electricity Photovoltaic conversion (PV) #12;4/22/2012 4 Energy System Gas (or fossil) Plant Sun or Wind Energy Plant Sun Fossil Wind Water Liquid fuels or raw #12;4/22/2012 9 Electricity grid Indirect Towards the Renewable Energy System Gas (or fossil) Plant

Franssen, Michael

409

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate and earth system models, based on theoreticalemerging class of Earth System Models that include detailedof integrated earth system model predictions requires

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office BER,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Panel 1, Towards Sustainable Energy Systems: The Role of Large-Scale Hydrogen Storage in Germany  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652 Srivastava,Pacific1of PageHYDROGEN ENERGYHanno

411

Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't Happen toLeveragingLindsey GeislerEnergy EfficiencyAward

412

Harvey Wasserman! Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9Harvey Brooks, 1960 The ErnestHarveyHarvey

413

Sandia National Laboratories: Large-scale storage of low-pressure gaseous  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS ExhibitIowa State UniversityFacilityLIMITS Liquidflamehydrogen

414

Role of large scale storage in a UK low carbon energy future Philipp Grunewalda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and enable demand side management (DSM) of electric appliances, including ground source heat pumps, air, 311 Mechanical Engineering Building, London SW7 2AZ, UK bLow Carbon Research Institute, Cardiff University, Welsh School of Architecture, Bute Building, King Edward VII Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3NB Abstract

415

PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i.e., Newtonian or non-Newtonian). The most important properties for testing with Newtonian slurries are the Archimedes number distribution and the particle concentration. For some test objectives, the shear strength is important. In the testing to collect data for CFD V and V and CFD comparison, the liquid density and liquid viscosity are important. In the high temperature testing, the liquid density and liquid viscosity are important. The Archimedes number distribution combines effects of particle size distribution, solid-liquid density difference, and kinematic viscosity. The most important properties for testing with non-Newtonian slurries are the slurry yield stress, the slurry consistency, and the shear strength. The solid-liquid density difference and the particle size are also important. It is also important to match multiple properties within the same simulant to achieve behavior representative of the waste. Other properties such as particle shape, concentration, surface charge, and size distribution breadth, as well as slurry cohesiveness and adhesiveness, liquid pH and ionic strength also influence the simulant properties either directly or through other physical properties such as yield stress.

Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

Advanced I/O for large-scale scientific applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As scientific simulations scale to use petascale machines and beyond, the data volumes generated pose a dual problem. First, with increasing machine sizes, the careful tuning of IO routines becomes more and more important to keep the time spent in IO acceptable. It is not uncommon, for instance, to have 20% of an application's runtime spent performing IO in a 'tuned' system. Careful management of the IO routines can move that to 5% or even less in some cases. Second, the data volumes are so large, on the order of 10s to 100s of TB, that trying to discover the scientifically valid contributions requires assistance at runtime to both organize and annotate the data. Waiting for offline processing is not feasible due both to the impact on the IO system and the time required. To reduce this load and improve the ability of scientists to use the large amounts of data being produced, new techniques for data management are required. First, there is a need for techniques for efficient movement of data from the compute space to storage. These techniques should understand the underlying system infrastructure and adapt to changing system conditions. Technologies include aggregation networks, data staging nodes for a closer parity to the IO subsystem, and autonomic IO routines that can detect system bottlenecks and choose different approaches, such as splitting the output into multiple targets, staggering output processes. Such methods must be end-to-end, meaning that even with properly managed asynchronous techniques, it is still essential to properly manage the later synchronous interaction with the storage system to maintain acceptable performance. Second, for the data being generated, annotations and other metadata must be incorporated to help the scientist understand output data for the simulation run as a whole, to select data and data features without concern for what files or other storage technologies were employed. All of these features should be attained while maintaining a simple deployment for the science code and eliminating the need for allocation of additional computational resources.

Klasky, Scott (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schwan, Karsten (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald F., II (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Parallel I/O Software Infrastructure for Large-Scale Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Parallel IO Software Infrastructure for Large-Scale Systems | Tags: Math & Computer Science Choudhary.png An illustration of how MPI---IO file domain alignment works to...

418

A Topological Framework for the Interactive Exploration of Large Scale Turbulent Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison of terascale combustion simulation data. Mathe-premixed hydrogen ?ames. Combustion and Flame, [7] J. L.of Large Scale Turbulent Combustion Peer-Timo Bremer 1 ,

Bremer, Peer-Timo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Performance Engineering: Understanding and Improving the Performance of Large-Scale Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An API for Runtime Code Patching,” Journal of Highof the Conference on Code Generation and Optimization,Performance of Large-Scale Codes David H. Bailey 1 , Robert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

High-Surface-Area CO2 Sponge: High Performance CO2 Scrubbing Based on Hollow Fiber-Supported Designer Ionic Liquid Sponges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: The team from ORNL and Georgia Tech is developing a new technology that will act like a sponge, integrating a new, alcohol-based ionic liquid into hollow fibers (magnified image, right) to capture CO2 from the exhaust produced by coal-fired power plants. Ionic liquids, or salts that exist in liquid form, are promising materials for carbon capture and storage, but their tendency to thicken when combined with CO2 limits their efficiency and poses a challenge for their development as a cost-effective alternative to current-generation solutions. Adding alcohol to the mix limits this tendency to thicken in the presence of CO2 but can also make the liquid more likely to evaporate, which would add significantly to the cost of CO2 capture. To solve this problem, ORNL is developing new classes of ionic liquids with high capacity for absorbing CO2. ORNL’s sponge would reduce the cost associated with the energy that would need to be diverted from power plants to capture CO2 and release it for storage.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

4, 23852405, 2007 CO2 and climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 4, 2385­2405, 2007 CO2 and climate affect European carbon ballance R. Harrison and C. Jones Competing roles of rising CO2 and climate change in the contemporary European carbon balance R. Harrison and C. Jones Met Office, Hadley Centre for Climate Change, Exeter, EX1 3PB, UK Received: 13 April 2007

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

422

Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team member's expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z [University of Cincinnati; Dong, J. H. [University of Cincinnati

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

Harry Cordatos

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Study of CO2 Mobility Control in Heterogeneous Media Using CO2 Thickening Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 injection is an effective method for performing enhanced oil recovery (EOR). There are several factors that make CO2 useful for EOR, including promoting swelling, reducing oil viscosity, decreasing oil density, and vaporizing and extracting...

Al Yousef, Zuhair

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

Integrating Online Compression to Accelerate Large-Scale Data Analytics Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract—With growing dataset sizes, and as computing cycles are increasing faster than storage and wide-area bandwidths, compression appears like a promising approach for improving the performance of large-scale data analytics applications. In this context, this paper makes the following contributions. First, we develop a new compression methodology, which exploits the similarities between spatial and/or temporal neighbors in a simulation dataset, and enables high compression ratios and low decompression costs. Second, we have developed a framework that can be used to incorporate a variety of compression and decompression algorithms. This framework also supports a simple API to allow integration with an existing application or data processing middleware. Once a compression algorithm is implemented, this framework can allow multi-threaded retrieval, multi-threaded data decompression, and use of informed prefetching and caching. By integrating this framework with a data-intensive middleware, we have applied our compression methodology and framework to three applications over two datasets, including a GCRM climate model dataset. We obtained an average compression ratio of 51.68%, and up to 53.27% improvement in execution time of data analysis applications.

Bicer, T.; Yin, Jian; Chiu, David; Agrawal, Gagan; Schuchardt, Karen L.

2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

426

Building a Large Scale Climate Data System in Support of HPC Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth System Grid Federation (ESG) is a large scale, multi-institutional, interdisciplinary project that aims to provide climate scientists and impact policy makers worldwide a web-based and client-based platform to publish, disseminate, compare and analyze ever increasing climate related data. This paper describes our practical experiences on the design, development and operation of such a system. In particular, we focus on the support of the data lifecycle from a high performance computing (HPC) perspective that is critical to the end-to-end scientific discovery process. We discuss three subjects that interconnect the consumer and producer of scientific datasets: (1) the motivations, complexities and solutions of deep storage access and sharing in a tightly controlled environment; (2) the importance of scalable and flexible data publication/population; and (3) high performance indexing and search of data with geospatial properties. These perceived corner issues collectively contributed to the overall user experience and proved to be as important as any other architectural design considerations. Although the requirements and challenges are rooted and discussed from a climate science domain context, we believe the architectural problems, ideas and solutions discussed in this paper are generally useful and applicable in a larger scope.

Wang, Feiyi [ORNL] [ORNL; Harney, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

meters in CO2 euthanasia chambers. All CO2 euthanasia chambers in both  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

meters in CO2 euthanasia chambers. All CO2 euthanasia chambers in both the facilities and laboratories will need flow meters. ULAR is currently in the process of identifying a cost-effective, accurate, and durable flow meter to install in all of the CO2 chambers in all of the vivaria. When a specific model

Bushman, Frederic

428

TWO-DIMENSIONAL REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING OF CO2 INJECTION IN A SALINE AQUIFER AT THE SLEIPNER SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems are under consideration for CO2 storage in the subsurface (Holloway, 1997), (i) depleted oil or gas reservoirs, (ii) unmineable coal beds and (iii) saline aquifers. Deep saline aquifers offer) dissolution trapping, which represents CO2 dissolved in the liquid phase (oil or brine), and (iii) mineral

Boyer, Edmond

429

Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

co2 capture meeting | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage CleanDiscovery of θ1cmarquardt2013 NETL CO2

431

Large-Scale Malaria Treatment in the Private Sector: A Case Study of the Cambodian Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1993 to address child survival (safe water and diarrhea treatment), HIV/AIDS, ma- lariaLarge-Scale Malaria Treatment in the Private Sector: A Case Study of the Cambodian Experience #12;#12;Large-Scale Malaria Treatment in the Private Sector: A Case Study of the Cambodian Experience #12

Klein, Ophir

432

Impacts of Large-Scale Wind Generators Penetration on the Voltage Stability of Power Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development of wind energy tech- nology and the current world-wide status of grid-connected as well as standImpacts of Large-Scale Wind Generators Penetration on the Voltage Stability of Power Systems M. J systems and their dynamic behaviours to identify critical issues that limit the large-scale integration

Pota, Himanshu Roy

433

ORNL/TM-2011/455 Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL/TM-2011/455 Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) Project: Tractive Energy Analysis Methodology and Results from Long-Haul Truck Drive Cycle Evaluations May 2011 Prepared by Tim LaClair #12;#12;ORNL/TM-2011/455 Energy and Transportation Science Division LARGE SCALE DUTY CYCLE (LSDC) PROJECT: TRACTIVE ENERGY

434

Optimal Selection of AC Cables for Large Scale Offshore Wind Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Selection of AC Cables for Large Scale Offshore Wind Farms Peng Hou, Weihao Hu, Zhe Chen@et.aau.dk, whu@iet.aau.dk, zch@iet.aau.dk Abstract--The investment of large scale offshore wind farms is high the operational requirements of the offshore wind farms and the connected power systems. In this paper, a new cost

Hu, Weihao

435

Autonomous and Energy-Aware Management of Large-Scale Cloud Infrastructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous and Energy-Aware Management of Large-Scale Cloud Infrastructures Eugen Feller Advisor.e. self-organization and healing); (3) energy-awareness. However, existing open-source cloud management, and energy-aware resource management frameworks for large-scale cloud infrastructures. Particularly, a novel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

436

LARGE-SCALE MOVEMENT PATTERNS OF MALE LOGGERHEAD SEA TURTLES (CARETTA CARETTA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LARGE-SCALE MOVEMENT PATTERNS OF MALE LOGGERHEAD SEA TURTLES (CARETTA CARETTA) IN SHARK BAY Management Title of Thesis: Large-Scale Movement Patterns of Male Loggerhead Sea Turtles (Caretta caretta) in Shark Bay, Australia Report No. 524 Examining Committee: Chair: Christine Gruman Master of Resource

437

SEQUENCING TECHNOLOGIES Microdroplet-based PCR enrichment for large-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEQUENCING TECHNOLOGIES Microdroplet-based PCR enrichment for large-scale targeted sequencing.1126/science.1181498) Genome sequencing for large-scale population-based studies requires technologies generated in this study is expected to be a useful resource for examining the molecular characteristics

Rosenberg, Noah

438

Harvesting Clean Energy How California Can Deploy Large-Scale Renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting Clean Energy How California Can Deploy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects Harvesting Clean Energy: How California Can Deploy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects on Appropriate acres of impaired lands in the Westlands Water District in the Central Valley may soon have

Kammen, Daniel M.

439

Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Report NJ Department of Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Report NJ Department of Environmental Protection September 8 Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's (NJDEP) "Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Management rules to address the development and permitting of wind turbines in the coastal zone

Holberton, Rebecca L.

440

Evaluating the Potential for Large-Scale Biodiesel Deployments in a Global Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the Potential for Large-Scale Biodiesel Deployments in a Global Context by Matthew Johnston. All rights reserved. #12;#12;Evaluating the Potential for Large-Scale Biodiesel Deployments on the subject of biodiesel, but I can only hope she takes comfort knowing now much I appreciate everything she

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Large-Scale Integrated Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Large-Scale Integrated Smart Grid Solutions with High: LargeScale Integrated Smart Grid Solutions with High Penetration of Renewable Resources, Dispersed- ing electricity grid. Much attention is being given to smart grid development in the U.S. and around

442

A Study of the Coverage of Large-scale Sensor Benyuan Liu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

networks. I. INTRODUCTION Advances in micro-sensor and communication technologies have made it possibleA Study of the Coverage of Large-scale Sensor Networks Benyuan Liu Department of Computer Science study the coverage properties of large-scale sensor networks. Three coverage measures are defined

Liu, Benyuan

443

A Topological Framework for the Interactive Exploration of Large Scale Turbulent Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Topological Framework for the Interactive Exploration of Large Scale Turbulent Combustion Peer a new topological framework for the analysis of large scale, time-varying, turbulent combustion consumption thresh- olds for an entire time-dependent combustion simulation. By computing augmented merge

Knowles, David William

444

Evaluation of Segmentation Techniques for Inventory Management in Large Scale Multi-Item Inventory Systems1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Evaluation of Segmentation Techniques for Inventory Management in Large Scale Multi-Item Inventory Systems1 Manuel D. Rossetti2 , Ph. D., P. E. Department of Industrial Engineering University of their inventory policies in a large-scale multi-item inventory system. Conventional inventory segmentation

Rossetti, Manuel D.

445

Towards Automatic Incorporation of Search engines into a Large-Scale Metasearch Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Automatic Incorporation of Search engines into a Large-Scale Metasearch Engine Zonghuan Wu. of Computer Science Univ. of Illinois at Chicago yu@cs.uic.edu Abstract A metasearch engine supports unified access to multiple component search engines. To build a very large-scale metasearch engine that can

Meng, Weiyi

446

Large-Scale Integration of Deferrable Demand and Renewable Energy Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Large-Scale Integration of Deferrable Demand and Renewable Energy Sources Anthony Papavasiliou. In order to accurately assess the impacts of renewable energy integration and demand response integration model for assessing the impacts of the large-scale integration of renewable energy sources

Oren, Shmuel S.

447

Introduction Large-scale circulation Clouds Conclusions European temperature extremes in CMIP5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Large-scale circulation Clouds Conclusions European temperature extremes in CMIP5 extremes in CMIP5 EUCLIPSE ­ May 2012 ­ Paris #12;Introduction Large-scale circulation Clouds Conclusions Introduction Objectives European temperature extremes: understand model biases & uncertainties under future

Ribes, Aurélien

448

QA-Pagelet: Data Preparation Techniques for Large-Scale Data Analysis of the Deep Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QA-Pagelet: Data Preparation Techniques for Large-Scale Data Analysis of the Deep Web James the QA-Pagelet as a fundamental data preparation technique for large-scale data analysis of the Deep Web-Pagelets from the Deep Web. Two unique features of the Thor framework are 1) the novel page clustering

Caverlee, James

449

QA-Pagelet: Data Preparation Techniques for Large Scale Data Analysis of the Deep Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 QA-Pagelet: Data Preparation Techniques for Large Scale Data Analysis of the Deep Web James data preparation technique for large scale data analysis of the Deep Web. To support QA the Deep Web. Two unique features of the Thor framework are (1) the novel page clustering for grouping

Liu, Ling

450

Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission Dingyong Zhong, Shuang Liu, Guangyu Zhang, and E. G. Wanga) State Key Laboratory for Surface Received 2 January 2001; accepted for publication 13 March 2001 Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride

Zhang, Guangyu

451

Author's personal copy CO2/CH4, CH4/H2 and CO2/CH4/H2 separations at high pressures using Mg2(dobdc)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

improvements will lead to global energy savings [1]. Additionally, carbon capture and storage is an exciting possibility for preventing the release of anthropogenic carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and hinges on gas be a step in one method for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. In pre- combustion CO2 cap

452

Non-Stationary Random Process for Large-Scale Failure and Recovery of Power Distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A key objective of the smart grid is to improve reliability of utility services to end users. This requires strengthening resilience of distribution networks that lie at the edge of the grid. However, distribution networks are exposed to external disturbances such as hurricanes and snow storms where electricity service to customers is disrupted repeatedly. External disturbances cause large-scale power failures that are neither well-understood, nor formulated rigorously, nor studied systematically. This work studies resilience of power distribution networks to large-scale disturbances in three aspects. First, a non-stationary random process is derived to characterize an entire life cycle of large-scale failure and recovery. Second, resilience is defined based on the non-stationary random process. Close form analytical expressions are derived under specific large-scale failure scenarios. Third, the non-stationary model and the resilience metric are applied to a real life example of large-scale disruptions due t...

Wei, Yun; Galvan, Floyd; Couvillon, Stephen; Orellana, George; Momoh, James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and A.M. Jessop, Hydraulic fracturing experiment at theor pressures at which hydraulic fracturing of the cap rocka high potential for hydraulic fracturing occurs in the case

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formations or depleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research hasas brine formations or depleted oil or gas reservoirs. The

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal bed methane recovery (ECBM). Data from reservoirs incoal bed methane (ECBM) recovery. Also, since oil and gas reservoirs

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the plant as follows: Levelized RR = Levelized Carrying Charge (LCC) + Expenses = Levelized annual cost of electricity (1) where LCC = Total Plant Cost (or TPC) x Levelized Carrying Charge Factor (or LCCF Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, USA 3 Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, Massachusetts Institute

457

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weimann MI (2009) Live hydraulic fracturing monitoring andof conduits by hydraulic- extension fracturing is important

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the rock volume. Oil-production data indicate that theal. , 2006). Historical oil production at depths around 2400logs in regionally dis- oil production tributed wells Well

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin. The successful drill stem test re- covered 84.1 m (and fluid data from drill stem tests (as shown in Figure 3

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be necessary to extract coal seam methane or groundwater inCalifornia, March 20-22, 2006 Unmineable coal seams Finally,unmineable coal seams pose substantial chal- lenges in all

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). At the North-Sea-basedon a commercial scale by past EOR operations, natural gasand Aneth are related to EOR in carbonate reservoirs. At

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatise of Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields,A-A’). phy, geology, stratigraphic contacts, oil and gas andgeology, initial information available from hydrogeology, oil

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). At the North-SPE 10685- MS, SPE Enhanced Oil Recovery Symp, 4-7 April

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watrous Formation, Williston Basin, Canada: a preliminaryaccumulation in the northern Williston Basin. The Watrous

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

CO2 geological storage safety assessment: methodological developments , G. Bellenfanta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an early phase or for reviewing a risk assessment. Though not a complete risk assessment workflow, it thus Agency (IEA) recently evaluated the contribution of CCS to emissions reductions by 2050 to one fifth this result, the IEA concludes that the implementation of the technology should reach 100 projects in 2020

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

466

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geo- logic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: An Analysis of86 MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP,MONITORING OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION B. R. Strazisar,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zonethe feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of Energy U.S. DepartmentCommitment for aIn thisA description of projects

469

Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIIIDrive Ltd Jump to: navigation,Energy

470

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formations, including oil and gas reservoirs and deep salineGCS consist mainly of oil and gas reservoirs and deep salinebelow the caprock in oil and gas reservoirs and deep saline

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

host hydrocarbon reservoirs and oil and gas produc- tionthroat radius mm Radius (m) Reservoirs Oil Gas um GeologicalIn each of these reservoirs, oil fields have been dis-

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Economic Assessment of CO2 Capture and Disposal Richard S. Eckaus, Henry D. Jacoby, A. Denny Ellerman, Wing-Chi Leung and Zili Yang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electric generation into three categories: conventional plants, non-carbon "backstop" technologies of capture technology is large-scale electric power generation, and with a set of simulation experiments we, and fossil-fired generation with CO2 capture and disposal. Today, the largest fraction of electricity supply

473

Prospects for Subsurface CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be around 28 Gigatons. For the last few centuries prior to the industrial revolution, the average atmospheric CO2 concentra- tion was about 280 ppm.2 Since the onset of the industrial rev- olution, there has

Firoozabadi, Abbas

474

Large-scale Nanostructure Simulations from X-ray Scattering Data On Graphics Processor Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photovoltaic, energy storage, battery, fuel, and car- bonphotovoltaic, energy storage, battery, fuel, and carbon

Sarje, Abhinav

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Version 3.0 SOP 4 --p(CO2) October 12, 2007 (p(CO2))  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Version 3.0 SOP 4 -- p(CO2) October 12, 2007 91 SOP 4 (p(CO2)) - 1. . microatmospheres . (20°C 250-2000 µatm) (mole fraction) . 2. CO2 (mole fraction) . 2 2(CO ) (CO( ) . . Frit . #12;October 12, 2007 SOP 4 -- p(CO2) Version 3.0 92 CO2 CO2 2 . p(CO2) (1) . 4. 3

476

Screening and ranking framework (SRF) for geologic CO2 storagesite selection on the basis of HSE risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A screening and ranking framework (SRF) has been developedto evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites on thebasis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk arising from CO2leakage. The approach is based on the assumption that CO2 leakage risk isdependent on three basic characteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site:(1) the potential for primary containment by the target formation; (2)the potential for secondary containment if the primary formation leaks;and (3) the potential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 ifthe primary formation leaks and secondary containment fails. Theframework is implemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numericalscores representing expert opinions or published information along withestimates of uncertainty. Applications to three sites in Californiademonstrate the approach. Refinements and extensions are possible throughthe use of more detailed data or model results in place of propertyproxies.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

477

Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar to those predicted atmospheric CO2 concentrations (½CO2atm) during Earth's ancient greenhouse episodes is essential for accurately predicting the response of future climate to elevated CO2 levels. Empirical estimates of ½CO2atm

Ahmad, Sajjad

478

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of syn-gas production from CO2 and water, with no consumption of fossil fuels, and no production of greenhouse gases. Thermal CO2-splitting and water splitting for syn-gas production can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis, using high-temperature nuclear process heat and electricity. A high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-syn-gas conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%.

Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO2 storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO2. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO2 pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO2 emissions from large point sources across the Arches Province) may be feasible,

Sminchak, Joel

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Findings and Recommendations by the California Carbon Capture and Storage Review Panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................13 Standards and Reporting Requirements for Geological CO2 Storage Projects ...........................................15 Ownership and Use of Pore Space for CO2 Storage Commission ­ California Energy Commission EOR ­ enhanced oil recovery EPS ­ Emissions Performance Standard

482

Growth, CO2 Consumption, and H2 Production of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413-U under Different Irradiances and CO2 Concentrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase Medium Irradiance ? H2 ? CO2 Maximum Reported Ratesa) Specific CO 2 uptake rate, ? CO2 (kg CO 2 /kg dry cell/h)

Berberoglu, Halil; Barra, Natasha; Pilon, Laurent; Jay, Jenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Census: Location-Aware Membership Management for Large-Scale Distributed Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Census, a platform for building large-scale distributed applications. Census provides a membership service and a multicast mechanism. The membership service provides every node with a consistent view of the ...

Cowling, James Alexander

484

Modeling and Analysis of Large-Scale On-Chip Interconnects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in computer aided design areas. This dissertation presents new methodologies for addressing the above two important challenging issues for large scale on-chip interconnect modeling and analysis: In the past, the standard statistical circuit modeling techniques...

Feng, Zhuo

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - air reveals large-scale Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reduce PS,1,1,0,Pa, surface... 12;LargeScale Data Analytics beyond MapReduce Text Mining in the Biosciences Cleansing ... Source: Swedish Institute of Computer Science,...

486

Large-Scale Identification of Single-Feature Polymorphisms in Complex Genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-Scale Identification of Single-Feature Polymorphisms in Complex Genomes Justin O. Borevitz,1 hybridization can be combined with bulk segregant analysis to quickly map mutations. The extension

Kihara, Daisuke

487

Programmable window : a large-scale transparent electronic display using SPD film  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research demonstrates that Suspended Particle Device (SPD) film is a viable option for the development of large-scale transparent display systems. The thesis analyzes the SPD film from an architectural display application ...

Ramos, Martin (Ramos Rizo-Patron)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No.2 LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THEMINE AND, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST Lars Lundstrom and HakanSUMMARY REPORT Background TEST SITE Layout of test places

Lundstrom, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Probing the imprint of interacting dark energy on very large scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observed galaxy power spectrum acquires relativistic corrections from lightcone effects, and these corrections grow on very large scales. Future galaxy surveys in optical, infrared and radio bands will probe increasingly large wavelength modes and reach higher redshifts. In order to exploit the new data on large scales, an accurate analysis requires inclusion of the relativistic effects. This is especially the case for primordial non-Gaussianity and for extending tests of dark energy models to horizon scales. Here we investigate the latter, focusing on models where the dark energy interacts non-gravitationally with dark matter. Interaction in the dark sector can also lead to large-scale deviations in the power spectrum. If the relativistic effects are ignored, the imprint of interacting dark energy will be incorrectly identified and thus lead to a bias in constraints on interacting dark energy on very large scales.

Duniya, Didam; Maartens, Roy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490