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1

First U.S. Large-Scale CO2 Storage Project Advances | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First U.S. Large-Scale CO2 Storage Project Advances First U.S. Large-Scale CO2 Storage Project Advances First U.S. Large-Scale CO2 Storage Project Advances April 6, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Drilling nears completion for the first large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection well in the United States for CO2 sequestration. This project will be used to demonstrate that CO2 emitted from industrial sources - such as coal-fired power plants - can be stored in deep geologic formations to mitigate large quantities of greenhouse gas emissions. The Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) hosted an event April 6 for a CO2 injection test at their Decatur, Ill. ethanol facility. The injection well is being drilled into the Mount Simon Sandstone to a depth more than a mile beneath the surface. This is the first drilling into the sandstone geology

2

NETL: News Release - First U.S. Large-Scale CO2 Storage Project Advances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 6, 2009 April 6, 2009 First U.S. Large-Scale CO2 Storage Project Advances One Million Metric Tons of Carbon to be Injected at Illinois Site Washington, DC -Drilling nears completion for the first large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection well in the United States for CO2 sequestration. This project will be used to demonstrate that CO2 emitted from industrial sources - such as coal-fired power plants - can be stored in deep geologic formations to mitigate large quantities of greenhouse gas emissions. MORE INFO Link to the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium web site The Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) hosted an event April 6 for a CO2 injection test at their Decatur, Ill. ethanol facility. The injection well is being drilled into the Mount Simon Sandstone to a depth more than a mile

3

Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems  

SciTech Connect

If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect

The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect

Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result in an accelerated rate of utilization of the nation抯 CO2 storage resource, leaving less high-quality storage capacity for other carbon-producing industries including electric power generation.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

6

Large Scale Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is mainly an experimental investigation on the storage of solar energy and/or the waste heat of a ... lake or a ground cavity. A model storage unit of (1󫎼.75)m3 size was designed and constructed. The...

F. 泅mez; R. Oskay; A. ?. 茜er

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Comparing large scale CCS deployment potential in the USA and China: a detailed analysis based on country-specific CO2 transport & storage cost curves  

SciTech Connect

The United States and China are the two largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the world and their projected continued growth and reliance on fossil fuels, especially coal, make them strong candidates for CCS. Previous work has revealed that both nations have over 1600 large electric utility and other industrial point CO2 sources as well as very large CO2 storage resources on the order of 2,000 billion metric tons (Gt) of onshore storage capacity. In each case, the vast majority of this capacity is found in deep saline formations. In both the USA and China, candidate storage reservoirs are likely to be accessible by most sources with over 80% of these large industrial CO2 sources having a CO2 storage option within just 80 km. This suggests a strong potential for CCS deployment as a meaningful option to efforts to reduce CO2 emissions from these large, vibrant economies. However, while the USA and China possess many similarities with regards to the potential value that CCS might provide, including the range of costs at which CCS may be available to most large CO2 sources in each nation, there are a number of more subtle differences that may help us to understand the ways in which CCS deployment may differ between these two countries in order for the USA and China to work together - and in step with the rest of the world - to most efficiently reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This paper details the first ever analysis of CCS deployment costs in these two countries based on methodologically comparable CO2 source and sink inventories, economic analysis, geospatial source-sink matching and cost curve modeling. This type of analysis provides a valuable insight into the degree to which early and sustained opportunities for climate change mitigation via commercial-scale CCS are available to the two countries, and could facilitate greater collaboration in areas where those opportunities overlap.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

8

AZ CO2 Storage Pilot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Storage Pilot Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania October 7, 2008 John Henry Beyer, Ph.D. WESTCARB Program Manager, Geophysicist 510-486-7954, jhbeyer@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 2 WESTCARB region has major CO2 point sources 3 WESTCARB region has many deep saline formations - candidates for CO2 storage WESTCARB also created GIS layers for oil/gas fields and deep coal basins Source: DOE Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada 4 - Aspen Environmental - Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. Arizona Utilities CO2 Storage Pilot Contracting and Funding Flow Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National

9

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews Requirements for Science: Target 2014 Nuclear Physics (NP) Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics:...

10

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction August 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration project funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to move into the construction phase. Led by the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM), a member of DOE's Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, the Illinois-ICCS project is designed to sequester approximately 2,500 metric tons of carbon dioxide

11

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction August 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration project funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to move into the construction phase. Led by the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM), a member of DOE's Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, the Illinois-ICCS project is designed to sequester approximately 2,500 metric tons of carbon dioxide

12

Chapter 9 - Large-Scale Hydrogen Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Storage technologies are essential for the integration of fluctuating renewable energies. Large scale storage provides grid stability, which are fundamental for a reliable energy systems and the energy balancing in hours to weeks time ranges to match demand and supply. Our system analysis showed that storage needs are in the two-digit terawatt hour and gigawatt range. Other reports confirm that assessment by stating that by 2040, 40燭Wh would be required for this application. The present chapter outlines the general components and functions as well as the economics of a large-scale hydrogen energy storage system.

Erik Wolf

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ocean currents may prevent stagnation or accumulatioLegal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy #12;Introduction Ocean sequestration of CO2, a potentially significant technique to be used

14

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

15

First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles September 18, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In support of large-scale carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) projects, a collaboration of five U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories has completed first-generation risk profiles that, for the first time, offer a means to predict the probability of complications that could arise from specific carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites. With their detailed methodology for quantifying risk potential at underground carbon storage sites, the profiles will help support safe, large-scale CCUS projects, an important option in the effort to reduce human-generated CO2 emissions linked by many experts to global climate

16

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide more guidance and support. Large Scale 燙omputing 燼nd Storage 燫equirements 爁or 燜usion 燛nergy 爌rovide much-needed additional resources there remains a need to employ codes Large Scale 燙omputing 燼nd Storage 燫equirements 爁or 燜usion 燛nergy 爌rovide large gains with little application porting effort. Large Scale 燙omputing 燼nd Storage 燫equirements 爁or 燜usion 燛nergy

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

081001 CA CO2 Storage Pilot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California CO2 Storage Pilot Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania October 7, 2008 John Henry Beyer, Ph.D. WESTCARB Program Manager, Geophysicist 510-486-7954, jhbeyer@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 2 Industry Partner: Shell Oil Company Committed to reducing global CO2 emissions Extensive technical expertise in: - Geologic evaluation - Well log analysis - Porosity and permeability evaluation - Geophysics - Deep well drilling - CO2 injection A welcome industry partner 3 - Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. (DOE/PIER) - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (PIER) - Sandia Technologies, LLC (DOE/PIER) - Terralog (DOE) Northern California CO2 Storage Pilot Contracting and Funding Flow

18

Role of large scale storage in a UK low carbon energy future Philipp Grunewalda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

round trip efficiency, both compressed air energy storage and hydrogen storage could become potentialRole of large scale storage in a UK low carbon energy future Philipp Gr篓unewalda , Tim Cockerilla Large scale storage offers the prospect of using excess electricity within a low carbon energy system

19

Increasing CO2 Storage in Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing CO Increasing CO 2 Storage in Oil Recovery Kristian Jessen (krisj@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-6348) Linda C. Sam-Olibale (chizoba@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-725-0831) Anthony R. Kovscek (kovscek@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-1218) Franklin M. Orr, Jr. (fmorr@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-2750) Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University 65 Green Earth Sciences Building 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA 94305-2220 Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) injection has been used as a commercial process for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) since the 1970's. Because the cost of oil recovered is closely linked to the purchase cost of the CO 2 injected, considerable reservoir engineering design effort has gone into reducing the total amount of CO 2 required to recover each barrel of oil. If,

20

Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois November 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A project important to demonstrating the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) from an industrial plant at a large-scale test site in Illinois. Led by the Illinois State Geological Survey, the Illinois Basin-Decatur Project is the first demonstration-scale project in the United States to use CO2 from an industrial source and inject it into a saline reservoir. The CO2 is being captured from an ethanol production facility operated by the Archer Daniels Midland Company in Decatur, Ill., and is being injected

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy and utility applications, such as pump hydro, compressed air, y-wheel and electrochemicalRoom-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage Huilin Pan attention particularly in large- scale electric energy storage applications for renewable energy and smart

Wang, Wei Hua

22

Current status of MHI CO2 capture plant technology, large scale demonstration project and road map to commercialization for coal fired flue gas application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) It is becoming increasingly evident that the prolonged utilization of fossil fuels for primary energy production, especially coal which is relatively cheap and abundant, is inevitable and that Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology can significantly reduce CO2 emissions from this sector thus allowing the continued environmentally sustainable use of this important energy commodity on a global basis. (2) MHI has co-developed the Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process (KM-CDR Process) and KS-1 absorbent, which has been deployed in seven CO2 capture plants, now under commercial operation operating at a CO2 capture capacity of 450 metric tons per day (tpd). In addition, a further two commercial plants are now under construction all of which capture CO2 from natural gas fired flue gas boilers and steam reformers. Accordingly this technology is now available for commercial scale CO2 capture for gas boiler and gas turbine application. (3) However before offering commercial CO2 capture plants for coal fired flue gas application, it is necessary to verify the influence of, and develop countermeasures for, related impurities contained in coal fired flue gas. This includes the influence on both the absorbent and the entire system of the CO2 capture plant to achieve high operational reliability and minimize maintenance requirements. (4) Preventing the accumulation of impurities, especially the build up of dust, is very important when treating coal fired flue gas and MHI has undertaken significant work to understand the impact of impurities in order to achieve reliable and stable operating conditions and to efficiently optimize integration between the CO2 capture plant, the coal fired power plant and the flue gas clean up equipment. (5) To achieve this purpose, MHI constructed a 10 tpd CO2 capture demonstration plant at the Matsushima 1000燤W Power Station and confirmed successful, long term demonstration following ?5000爃ours of operation in 200607 with 50% financial support by RITE, as a joint program to promote technological development with the private sector, and cooperation from J-POWER. (6) Following successful demonstration testing at Matsushima, additional testing was undertaken in 2008 to examine the impact of entrainment of higher levels of flue gas impurities (primarily \\{SOx\\} and dust by bypassing the existing FGD) and to determine which components of the CO2 recovery process are responsible for the removal of these impurities. Following an additional 1000 demonstration hours, results indicated stable operational performance in relation to the following impurities; (1) SO2: Even at higher SO2 concentrations were almost completely removed from the flue gas before entering the CO2 absorber. (2) Dust: The accumulation of dust in the absorbent was higher, leading to an advanced understanding of the behavior of dust in the CO2 capture plant and the dust removal efficiency of each component within the CO2 recovery system. The data obtained is useful for the design of large-scale units and confirms the operating robustness of the CO2 capture plant accounting for wide fluctuations in impurity concentrations. (7) This important coal fired flue gas testing showed categorically that minimizing the accumulation of large concentrations of impurities, and to suppress dust concentrations below a prescribed level, is important to achieve long-term stable operation and to minimize maintenance work for the CO2 capture plant. To comply with the above requirement, various countermeasures have been developed which include the optimization of the impurity removal technology, flue gas pre treatment and improved optimization with the flue gas desulfurization facility. (8) In case of a commercial scale CO2 capture plant applied for coal fired flue gas, its respective size will be several thousand tpd which represents a considerable scale-up from the 10 tpd demonstration plant. In order to ensure the operational reliability and to accurately confirm the influence and the behavior of the impurities in coal fired fl

Takahiko Endo; Yoshinori Kajiya; Hiromitsu Nagayasu; Masaki Iijima; Tsuyoshi Ohishi; Hiroshi Tanaka; Ronald Mitchell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

NETL: Carbon Storage - CO2 Utilization Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon Storage CO2 Utilization Focus Area Carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization efforts focus on pathways and novel approaches for reducing CO2 emissions by developing beneficial uses for the CO2 that will mitigate CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. CO2 can be used in applications that could generate significant benefits. It is possible to develop alternatives that can use captured CO2 or convert it to useful products such chemicals, cements, or plastics. Revenue generated from the utilized CO2 could also offset a portion of the CO2 capture cost. Processes or concepts must take into account the life cycle of the process to ensure that additional CO2 is not produced beyond what is already being removed from or going into the atmosphere. Furthermore, while the utilization of CO2 has some potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, CO2 has certain disadvantages as a chemical reactant. Carbon dioxide is rather inert and non-reactive. This inertness is the reason why CO2 has broad industrial and technical applications. Each potential use of CO2 has an energy requirement that needs to be determined; and the CO2 produced to create the energy for the specific utilization process must not exceed the CO2 utilized.

24

On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2  

SciTech Connect

Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

Pruess, Karsten

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

Towards a middleware for configuring large-scale storage infrastructures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rapid proliferation of cloud and service-oriented computing infrastructure is creating an ever increasing thirst for storage within data centers. Ideally management applications in cloud deployments should operate in terms of high-level goals, and ... Keywords: SAN, best practice, machine learning, middleware

David M. Eyers; Ramani Routray; Rui Zhang; Douglas Willcocks; Peter Pietzuch

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

SciTech Connect

IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE抯 Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE抯 Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC抯 continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called 揷ase studies, of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, 搈ulti-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

27

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

28

Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This project's goal is to develop remote sensing methods for early detection and spatial mapping, over whole regions simultaneously, of any surface areas under which there are significant CO2 leaks from deep underground storage formations. If large amounts of CO2 gas percolated up from a storage formation below to within plant root depth of the surface, the CO2 soil concentrations near the surface would become elevated and would affect individual plants and their local plant ecologies. Excessive soil CO2 concentrations are observed to significantly affect local plant

29

Influence of capillary pressure on CO2 storage and monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solutions to mitigate the greenhouse effect. We are interested in analyzing the influence of capillary pressure on CO2 in- jection, storage and monitoring in saline...

gabriela

30

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: Adaptable, Multi-Stage, Sustainable, Energy-Recovery Strategies that Reduce Carbon Intensity and Environmental Risk...

31

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

Pennycook, Steve

32

Modeling of CO2 storage in aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 6, 2011 ... atmosphere, increasing its temperature (greenhouse effect). To minimize climate change impacts, geological sequestration of CO2 is an...

santos,,,

33

Enhanced CO2 Gas Storage in Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) such as carbon dioxide (CO2) is largely believed to be a primary contributor to global warming. ... Four coals of various rank exploited from four main coal seams in China were tested. ...

Shu-Qing Hao; Sungho Kim; Yong Qin; Xue-Hai Fu

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

34

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Consultant, Division of Carbon Management Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and

36

CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage and Sink Enhancements: Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics Richard G. Rhudy (rrhudy@epri.com; 650-855-2421) Electric Power Research Institute P.O. Box 10412 Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 Bert R. Bock (brbock@tva.gov; 256-386-3095) David E. Nichols (denichols@tva.gov; 256-386-2489) Tennessee Valley Authority P.O. Box 1010 Muscle Shoals, AL 35662-1010 Abstract One of the major difficulties in evaluating CO 2 sequestration technologies and practices, both geologic storage of captured CO 2 and storage in biological sinks, is obtaining consistent, transparent, accurate, and comparable economics. This paper reports on a project that compares the economics of major technologies and practices under development for CO 2 sequestration, including captured CO 2 storage options, such as active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas

37

DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada August 19, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs). The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership , a collaboration of over 80 U.S. and Canadian stakeholders, conducted the field test at sites in the Prairie Pothole Region, extending from central Iowa into Northern Alberta,

38

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 12, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Industry Recruitment/Support , Technical Feasibility Projects Affected Technologies Coal with CCS Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Brandon Nutall, Division of Carbon Management Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/carbon/Pages/default.aspx Summary Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In

39

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEASIBILITY: TEAPOT DOME EOR PILOT L. Chiaramonte, M.TO IDENTIFY OPTIMAL CO 2 EOR STORAGE SITES V. Nez Lopez,from a carbon dioxide EOR/sequestration project. Energy

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Implications of diurnal and seasonal variations in renewable energy generation for large scale energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large scale implementation of solar and wind powered renewable electricity generation will use up to continent sized connected electricity grids built to distribute the locally fluctuating power. Systematic power output variation will then become manifest since solar power has an evident diurnal period but also surface winds梬hich are driven by surface temperatures梖ollow a diurnal periodic behavior lagging about 4 h in time. On an ordinary day a strong diurnal varying renewable electricity generation results when combining wind and solar power on such continent sized grid. Comparison with possible demand patterns indicates that coping with such systematically varying generation will require large scale renewable energy storage and conversion for timescales and storage capacities of at least up to half a day. Seasonal timescales for versatile high quality generally applicable energy conversion and storage are equally essential since the continent wide insolation varies a factor ?3 e.g. in Europe and Northern Africa together. A first order model for estimating required energy storage and conversion magnitudes is presented taking into account potential diurnal and seasonal energy demand and generation patterns. A few scalable energy storage methods are briefly indicated.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Nitrogen-Oxygen Battery for Large Scale Energy Storage - Frank Delnick, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program US DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Peer Review, Washington, DC Sept. 26-28, 2012 Frank Delnick, David Ingersoll, Karen Waldrip, Peter Feibelman Nitrogen/Oxygen Battery A Transformational Architecture for Large Scale Energy Storage Power Sources Technology Group Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM SAND2012-7881P N 2 /O 2 Battery Project Overview 飩 Air/Air battery. 飩 N 2 electrochemistry enables the redefinition of a gas (diffusion) electrode and the three phase interface. 飩 Operated as redox flow battery. 飩 Provide a very high energy density, very low cost, environmentally benign electrochemical platform for load leveling and for grid-integrated storage of energy generated by wind, solar and other sustainable but intermittent sources.

42

Enhanced CO2 Storage and Sequestration in Deep Saline Aquifers by Nanoparticles: Commingled Disposal of Depleted Uranium and CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geological storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in deep saline aquifers has recently received tremendous attention in the scientific literature. Injected buoyant CO2 accumulates at the top part of the aquifer u...

Farzam Javadpour; Jean-Philippe Nicot

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Utilization of CO2 as cushion gas for porous media compressed air energy storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage for large-scale deployment of intermittent solar andsolar energy systems. The number of cycles that occur in 30 years in a natural gas storage

Oldenburg, C.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Selection of coals of different maturities for CO2 Storage by modelling of CH4 and CO2 adsorption isotherms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this study is to compare and model pure gas sorption isotherms (CO2 and CH4) for well-characterised coals of different maturities to determine the most suitable coal for CO2 storage. Carbon dioxide and methane; Coals; Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption; Modelling isotherms 1. Introduction CO2 is a greenhouse

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

45

Co-optimising CO2 storage and enhanced recovery in gas and gas condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Burning fossil fuels supply energy and releases carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon capture and storage (CCS) can reduce CO2 emissions. However, CCS is an expensive process. (more)

Tan, Jo Ann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However, additional analyses plus detailed regional and site characterization is needed, along with a closer examination of competing storage demands.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

A verification study on saving energy cost and reducing CO2 emission with large-scale geothermal heat pump systems in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents economic and environmental effects by using monitoring data collected over a 2-yr period in geothermal heating and cooling facilities in Jungwon University Korea. The facility has heating capacity of 7045?kW and cooling capacity of 5947?kW. Such monitoring data are rarely reported in the literature; thus the evaluation based on long-term operational data will contribute greatly to the objective assessment of the geothermal heat pump system (GHPS) as a renewable energy resource. The effects of relative energy cost saving and reductions in CO2 emission were predicted for comparison with conventional heating and cooling systems. The GHPS was estimated to reduce energy costs by 76.4%85.3% and yield a reduction of CO2 emission of 398595 tons annually. We also conducted an economic analysis using the benefit/cost ratio (BCR) method according to scenarios in which the lifespan and discount rate for the GHPS were varied. Since the BCR for the GHPS was in the range of 1.993.58 (case 1) and 1.673.01 (case 2) GHPS is considered to be more economic than other types of heating and cooling systems. These results provide evidentiary data to help overcome skepticism over the applicability of large-scale GHPSs.

Byeong-Hak Park; Hyoung-Soo Kim; Kang-Kun Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

New Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential New Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential December 21, 2012 - 9:58am Addthis Atlas IV was created by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and includes input from the more than 400 organizations in 43 states and four Canadian provinces that make up the Department芒聙聶s seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (as shown above). See this map here. Atlas IV was created by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and includes input from the more than 400 organizations in 43 states and four Canadian provinces that make up the Department's seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (as shown above). See this map here.

49

Reliability sensitivity analysis based on probability distribution perturbation with application to CO2 storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to CO2 storage Ekaterina Sergienkoa,b , Paul Lema^itrec,d , Aur麓elie Arnaudc , Daniel Busbyb , Fabrice a computationally expensive simulation code for evaluating the failure probability such as the CO2 storage risk analysis. An application of the method to a synthetic CO2 storage case study is provided together with some

Boyer, Edmond

50

Opportunities for Using Anthropogenic CO2 for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO2 Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colorado and Wyoming ... At the end of a CO2 flood, essentially all of the CO2 that is originally purchased is stored in the reservoir when the operator closes the field at pressure. ... Under special conditions, such as gravity-stable CO2 flooding, the CO2-EOR process can store considerably more CO2 than the carbon content of the oil (Figure 7). ...

Michael L. Godec; Vello A. Kuuskraa; Phil Dipietro

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Sustainable Carbon Sequestration: Increasing CO2-Storage Efficiency through a CO2-Brine Displacement Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed methods for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore mitigating global climate change. Few studies on storing CO2 in an aquifer have been conducted on a regional scale. This study...

Akinnikawe, Oyewande

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

52

A dynamic model for optimally phasing in CO2 capture and storage infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO"2 capture and storage (CCS) is a climate-change mitigation strategy that requires an investment of many billions of dollars and tens of thousands of miles of dedicated CO"2 pipelines. To be effective, scientists, stakeholders, and policy makers will ... Keywords: CO2 capture and storage, Climate-change policy, Infrastructure modeling, Pipeline modeling, SimCCS, Spatiotemporal optimization

Richard S. Middleton; Michael J. Kuby; Ran Wei; Gordon N. Keating; Rajesh J. Pawar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program: Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program: Closing Long-Term CO2 Geological Storage Gaps Relevant to Regulatory and Policy Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program: Closing Long-Term CO2 Geological Storage Gaps Relevant to Regulatory and Policy Development Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MiamiImageURL&_cid=277910&_user=10&_ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-dioxide-co2-capture-project-ph Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This paper describes results of Phase 2 of the Storage Program of the

54

DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage January 5, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The most promising methods for assessing potential carbon dioxide (CO2) geologic storage sites - a crucial component of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology - is the focus of the latest in a series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CCS "best practices" manuals. Developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the manual - Site Screening, Site Selection and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations - is a resource for future project developers and CO2 producers and transporters. It can also be used to apprise government agencies of the

55

DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage January 5, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The most promising methods for assessing potential carbon dioxide (CO2) geologic storage sites - a crucial component of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology - is the focus of the latest in a series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CCS "best practices" manuals. Developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the manual - Site Screening, Site Selection and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations - is a resource for future project developers and CO2 producers and transporters. It can also be used to apprise government agencies of the

56

In situ carbonation of peridotite for CO2 storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reaction in 1 region can be pumped into an adjacent area to...dissolved CO 2 in convecting seawater梠nly ?10 4 tons of CO 2 per km 3...convection, near-surface seawater would descend one hole...dissolved CO 2 from evolving seawater along the flow path...

Peter B. Kelemen; J黵g Matter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Earthquake triggering and large-scale geologic storage of carbon dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mountaineer plant each year. Similarly, stress measurements at Teapot Dome, Wyoming, the US government-owned oil field where pilot...Seal integrity and feasibility of CO2 sequestration in the Teapot Dome EOR pilot: Geomechanical site characterization . Environ...

Mark D. Zoback; Steven M. Gorelick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

59

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

60

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EOR) and enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBMR) becauseand potential for coalbed methane. The Mannville coals areCO 2 injectivity and coalbed methane producibility. Thus,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced Methane Recovery Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced Methane Recovery June 16, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- Field testing the potential for combining geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage with enhanced methane recovery is underway at a site in Alabama by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners. Members of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) are injecting CO2 into a coalbed methane well in Tuscaloosa County to assess the capability of mature coalbed methane reservoirs to receive and adsorb significant volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2). Southern Company, El Paso Exploration & Production, the Geological Survey of Alabama, and the

62

Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as the final technical report and users manual for the 'Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II SBIR project. Advanced Resources International has developed a screening tool by which users can technically screen, assess the storage capacity and quantify the costs of CO2 storage in four types of CO2 storage reservoirs. These include CO2-enhanced oil recovery reservoirs, depleted oil and gas fields (non-enhanced oil recovery candidates), deep coal seems that are amenable to CO2-enhanced methane recovery, and saline reservoirs. The screening function assessed whether the reservoir could likely serve as a safe, long-term CO2 storage reservoir. The storage capacity assessment uses rigorous reservoir simulation models to determine the timing, ultimate storage capacity, and potential for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Finally, the economic assessment function determines both the field-level and pipeline (transportation) costs for CO2 sequestration in a given reservoir. The screening tool has been peer reviewed at an Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical meeting in March 2009. A number of useful observations and recommendations emerged from the Workshop on the costs of CO2 transport and storage that could be readily incorporated into a commercial version of the Screening Tool in a Phase III SBIR.

George J. Koperna Jr.; Vello A. Kuuskraa; David E. Riestenberg; Aiysha Sultana; Tyler Van Leeuwen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1 *, P.D.C. D茅fossez1 storage of CO2 in unmineable coal seams could be a very interesting option in the sustainable management of coal basins. However, the various chemical and physical parameters that determine the success

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

64

CO2/EOR and Geological Carbon Storage Resource Potential in the Niagaran Pinnacle Reef Trend, Lower Michigan, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Early Silurian age, Niagaran pinnacle reef trend (NPRT) oil fields in the Guelph Formation in Northern Lower Michigan (NNPRT) comprise a giant oil province with nearly 63.6 million cubic meters (Mm3) of cumulative petroleum and 680 billion cubic meters (Bm3) of natural gas production (through 2010) from over 700 discrete reservoirs at depths of 800-2100 m. Several NNPRT fields are the main target of a proposed, DOE-NETL funded, large scale carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization and sequestration project. The NNPRT comprises closely-spaced, but highly geologically compartmentalized and laterally discontinuous oil and gas fields many of which have either reached or are nearing their economic limit in primary production mode. Total oil production from the largest 207 oil fields in the NNPRT, each with more than 80,000 m3 of cumulative oil production per field, constitutes 86% or 54.6 Mm3 of trend oil production totals and are considered most likely targets for CO2/EOR activities in the future. We have evaluated regional CO2/Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) potential in these NNPRT fields from historic production data in addition to recovery efficiencies observed in seven, on-going, commercial CO2/EOR projects and determined that incremental CO2/EOR potential in these fields ranges from 22-33 Mm3. We have also evaluated trend-wide Geological Storage Resource (GSR) potential using 2 different approaches: 1) a produced fluid volumes approach, and 2) a gross storage capacity approach using petrophysical well log estimates of net, effective porosity in NNPRT field wells and estimates of reservoir acreage from GIS data. These approaches provide robust low and high estimates of more than 200 Mmt but less than 500 Mmt (respectively) for Geological Storage Resource (GSR) potential in the NNPRT.

David Barnes; Bill Harrison; G. Michael Grammer; Jason Asmus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

CO2 Capture and Storage Project, Education and Training Center...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) Project is one of the nation's largest carbon capture and storage endeavors. Part of the project includes the National...

66

Dehydrated Prussian Blues for CO2 Storage and Separation Applications  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption isotherms of pure gases present in flue and natural gas including CO2, N2, CH4 and water were studied using prussian blues of chemical formula M3[Co(CN)6]2 (M = Cu, Ni, Mn). These materials adsorbed 8-12 wt % of CO2 at room temperature and 1 bar of pressure with heats of adsorption ranging from 6 to 16 kcal/mol.

Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Ghorishi, Behrooz S.

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

67

Scenario Development and Analysis of Hydrogen as a Large-Scale Energy Storage Medium (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions from this report are: (1) hydrogen has several important advantages over competing technologies, including - very high storage energy density (170 kWh/m{sup 3} vs. 2.4 for CAES and 0.7 for pumped hydro) which allows for potential economic viability of above-ground storage and relatively low environmental impact in comparison with other technologies; and (2) the major disadvantage of hydrogen energy storage is cost but research and deployment of electrolyzers and fuel cells may reduce cost significantly.

Steward, D. M.

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at Three Sites DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at Three Sites May 3, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Evaluation-related test drilling at geologic sites in three states that could store a combined 64 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions - an important component of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology development - has been completed in projects supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. If the potential of the sites is eventually fulfilled, they could safely and permanently store combined CO2 emissions equivalent to that produced by more than 11 million passenger vehicles annually or from the electricity use of more than 7 million homes for one year, according to Environmental

69

DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at Three Sites DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at Three Sites May 3, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Evaluation-related test drilling at geologic sites in three states that could store a combined 64 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions - an important component of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology development - has been completed in projects supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. If the potential of the sites is eventually fulfilled, they could safely and permanently store combined CO2 emissions equivalent to that produced by more than 11 million passenger vehicles annually or from the electricity use of more than 7 million homes for one year, according to Environmental

70

DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations October 5, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact onCCS Opportunities in the United States [click on imageto link to the publication]Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed the manual to better understand the characteristics of geologic formations

71

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test November 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a key technology for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change. The injection, which is expected to last 6-8 months, is an integral step in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is conducting the field test to

72

Economic analysis of large-scale hydrogen storage for renewable utility applications.  

SciTech Connect

The work reported here supports the efforts of the Market Transformation element of the DOE Fuel Cell Technology Program. The portfolio includes hydrogen technologies, as well as fuel cell technologies. The objective of this work is to model the use of bulk hydrogen storage, integrated with intermittent renewable energy production of hydrogen via electrolysis, used to generate grid-quality electricity. In addition the work determines cost-effective scale and design characteristics and explores potential attractive business models.

Schoenung, Susan M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Seismic modeling to monitor CO2 geological storage: The Atzbach ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 8, 2012 ... greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide in depleted hydrocarbon...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,500 users working on some 650 projects that involve nearly 600 codes in a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In March 2013, NERSC, DOE?s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE?s Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) held a review to characterize High Performance Computing (HPC) and storage requirements for FES research through 2017. This report is the result.

Gerber, Richard

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

DOE Selects Projects to Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage DOE Selects Projects to Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of 19 projects to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. The projects' total value is approximately $35.8 million over four years, with $27.6 million of DOE funding and $8.2 million of non-Federal cost sharing. The work will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Coal is the Nation's most abundant energy resource, supplying nearly 50 percent of domestic electricity. In order for low-cost electricity from

76

Political commitment to CO2 capture and storage: evidence from government RD&D budgets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For CO2 capture and storage (CCS) to succeed as a mitigation strategy, political commitment is one of several prerequisites. This article offers an appraisal of political commitment to a CCS strategy among high-i...

Andreas Tjernshaugen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Department of Energy, Shell Canada to Collaborate on CO2 Storage Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) and Shell Canada announced today they intend to collaborate in field tests to validate advanced monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) technologies for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO2).

78

In situ carbonation of peridotite for CO2 storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Gottschalk M ( 1997 ) Internally consistent thermodynamic data for rock-forming minerals in the system SiO2-TiO2-Al2O3-Fe2O3-CaO-MgO-FeO-K2O-Na2O-H2O-CO2 . Eur J Mineral 9 : 175 223 . 37 Blackwell DD ( 1971 ) in The Structure and Physical...

Peter B. Kelemen; J黵g Matter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Assessment of Methanol Synthesis Utilizing Exhaust CO2 for Chemical Storage of Electrical Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1, 2) Sequestration is principally an available and technologically feasible way to reduce the CO2 emission into the atmosphere, although there are still obvious ecological, environmental, and safety aspects to clarify before it can be implemented in large scale. ... Furthermore, these chemicals could be used also as traffic fuel, where they are applicable easily with minor modifications with the existing infrastructure and vehicle fleet. ... The product H is considered a fuel for fuel cell vehicles and a substitute for gasoline. ...

Liisa K. Rihko-Struckmann; Andreas Peschel; Richard Hanke-Rauschenbach; Kai Sundmacher

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

80

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DOE-Sponsored Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs DOE-Sponsored Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs June 28, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test conducted by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has demonstrated that using carbon dioxide (CO2) in an enhanced oil recovery method dubbed "huff-and-puff" can help assess the carbon sequestration potential of geologic formations while tapping America's valuable oil resources. The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program, collaborated with Eagle Operating Inc. to complete the test in the Northwest McGregor Oil Field in Williams

82

Regional Partner Announces Plans for Carbon Storage Project Using CO2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partner Announces Plans for Carbon Storage Project Using Regional Partner Announces Plans for Carbon Storage Project Using CO2 Captured from Coal-Fired Power Plant Regional Partner Announces Plans for Carbon Storage Project Using CO2 Captured from Coal-Fired Power Plant July 20, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Southern Company and the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), one of seven members of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, have announced plans to store carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from an existing coal-fired power plant. The project represents a major step toward demonstrating the viability of integrating carbon capture and storage to mitigate climate change. This storage project, located in the Citronelle Oil Field north of Mobile,

83

Commercial-Scale Tests Demonstrate Secure CO2 Storage in Underground Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CommerCial-SCale TeSTS DemonSTraTe CommerCial-SCale TeSTS DemonSTraTe SeCure Co 2 STorage in unDergrounD FormaTionS Two industry-led commercial-scale projects, the Sleipner Project off the coast of Norway and the Weyburn Project in Ontario, Canada, have enhanced the option of sequestering carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in underground geologic formations. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated in both projects, primarily by providing rigorous monitoring of the injected CO 2 and studying CO 2 behavior to a greater extent than the project operators would have pursued on their own - creating a mutually beneficial public/private partnership. The most significant outcome from both field projects is that CO 2 leakage has not been observed, nor is there any indication that CO 2 will leak in the future.

84

Redundancy Control in Large Scale Sensor Networks via Compressive Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, China. The authors deployed 100 sensor nodes and 1096 relay nodes to monitor the urban CO2 in a 5000(mRedundancy Control in Large Scale Sensor Networks via Compressive Sensing Liwen Xu1 , Yongcai Wang1, and require high data storage and management costs. To deal with these challenges, compressive sensing (CS

Wang, Yongcai

85

On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), of the U.S. Departmentis jointly coordinated by NETL and the U.S. Environmental

Zhou, Q.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility August 24, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy issued the following statement in support of today's groundbreaking for construction of the nation's first large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage (ICCS) facility in Decatur, Illinois. Supported by the 2009 economic stimulus legislation - the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - the ambitious project will capture and store one million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year produced as the result of processing corn into fuel-grade ethanol from the nearby Archer Daniels Midland biofuels plant. Since all of

87

Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility August 24, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy issued the following statement in support of today's groundbreaking for construction of the nation's first large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage (ICCS) facility in Decatur, Illinois. Supported by the 2009 economic stimulus legislation - the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - the ambitious project will capture and store one million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year produced as the result of processing corn into fuel-grade ethanol from the nearby Archer Daniels Midland biofuels plant. Since all of

88

DOE-Sponsored Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of CO2 in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of CO2 in Lignite Seams DOE-Sponsored Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of CO2 in Lignite Seams November 4, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has demonstrated that opportunities to permanently store carbon in unmineable seams of lignite may be more widespread than previously documented. This finding supports national efforts to address climate change through long-term storage of CO2 in underground geologic reservoirs. Lowering the core barrel at the PCOR Partnership lignite site.The PCOR Partnership, one of seven partnerships in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, collaborated with Eagle Operating Inc. (Kenmare, N.D.) to complete the field test in Burke County, N.D. In March

89

The low cost of geological assessment for underground CO2 storage: Policy and economic implication  

SciTech Connect

The costs for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) in geologic formations is estimated to be $675/t CO2. In the absence of a mandate to reduce greenhouse gas emissions or some other significant incentive for CCS deployment, this cost effectively limits CCS technology deployment to small niche markets and stymies the potential for further technological development through learning by doing until these disincentives for the free venting of CO2 are in place. By far, the largest current fraction of these costs is capture (including compression and dehydration), commonly estimated at $2560/t CO2 for power plant applications, followed byCO2 transport and storage, estimated at $015/tCO2.Of the storage costs, only a small fraction of the cost will go to accurate geological characterization. These one time costs are probably on the order of $0.1/t CO2 or less as these costs are spread out over the many millions of tons likely to be injected into a field over many decades. Geologic assessments include information central to capacity prediction, risk estimation for the target intervals and development facilities engineering. Since assessment costs are roughly two orders of magnitude smaller than capture costs, and assessment products carry other tangible societal benefits, such as improved accuracy in fossil fuel and ground water reserves estimates, government or joint private杙ublic funding of major assessment initiatives should underpin early policy choices regarding CO2 storage deployment and should serve as a point of entry for policy makers and regulators. Early assessment is also likely to improve the knowledge base upon which the first commercial CCS deployments will rest.

Friedmann, S. J.; Dooley, James J.; Held, Herman; Ottmar, Edenhofer

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Potential impact of CO2 leakage from Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) systems on growth and yield in maize  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anthropogenic release of CO2...is an important factor in the continuing rise in mean global temperature. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) offers a promising technology to capture and sequester CO2 in deep geologi...

Manal Al-Traboulsi; Sofie Sj鰃ersten; Jeremy Colls; Michael Steven

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

NETL: News Release - DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2010 5, 2010 DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Information in Comprehensive Report Important to Carbon Capture and Storage Research Washington, D.C. - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact on CCS Opportunities in the United States Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact on CCS Opportunities in the United States [click on image to link to the publication] Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's

92

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada December 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There could be as much as 5,700 years of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential available in geologic formations in the United States and portions of Canada, according to the latest edition of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Atlas (Atlas III). The updated preliminary estimate, based on current emission rates, documents 1,800 billion to more than 20,000 billion metric tons of CO2 storage potential in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal areas. This suggests the availability of approximately

93

Coordinated control for large-scale EV charging facilities and energy storage devices participating in frequency regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With the increasing penetration of renewable energy, automatic generation control (AGC) capacity requirements will increase dramatically, becoming a challenging task that must be addressed. The rapid growth of electric vehicles (EVs) provides new approaches for the stable operation of power systems. Vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology has the potential to provide frequency regulation (FR) services. Fully taking into account the advantages of \\{EVs\\} and battery energy storage stations (BESSs), i.e. rapid response and large instantaneous power, this paper presents a coordinated control strategy for large-scale EVs, \\{BESSs\\} and traditional FR resources involved in AGC. Response priorities and control strategies for the FR resources vary with different operating states. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, dynamic simulations for EV/BESS to participate in AGC of a two-area interconnected power system are performed in the Matlab/Simulink program. The simulation results show that the proposed method can not only fully utilize the advantages of EV/BESS, but also achieve the coordination among different FR resources, thus improving the frequency stability and facilitating the integration of renewable energy.

Jin Zhong; Lina He; Canbing Li; Yijia Cao; Jianhui Wang; Baling Fang; Long Zeng; Guoxuan Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing June 10, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Three Recovery Act funded projects have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to continue testing large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) from industrial sources. The projects - located in Texas, Illinois, and Louisiana - were initially selected for funding in October 2009 as part of a $1.4 billion effort to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial sources for storage or beneficial use. The first phase of research and development (R&D) included $21.6 million in Recovery Act funding and $22.5 million in private funding for a total initial investment of $44.1 million.

95

Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect

This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled 揝imulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers. The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, 揇evelopment of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module, we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary 損arasitic reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, 揇evelopment of a Rock Mechanical Module, we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, 揑ncorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species, we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task 揝tudy of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes, We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

SPE -124703 Process for tracking the evolving perception of risk during CO2 storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of reducing risk to an acceptable level. Introduction The current attention to climate change has increased1 SPE -124703 Process for tracking the evolving perception of risk during CO2 storage projects of SPE copyright. Abstract The paper describes a process for constructing a risk register to be used

97

High Resolution Simulation and Characterization of Density-Driven Flow in CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at which CO2 gas dissolves into a negatively buoyant aqueous phase, will reach a stabilized state the immiscible CO2 gas that forms on top of the brine from leaking to the surface. However, on geological timeHigh Resolution Simulation and Characterization of Density-Driven Flow in CO2 Storage in Saline

98

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 Jason J. Heinrich, Howard J. Herzog, David M. Reiner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) since the 1970's. By 2000, there were a total of 84 of reducing CO2 emissions. The storage of CO2 in underground geologic reservoirs is one such idea that employs techniques developed for oil and gas production and transmission. For example, CO2 has been injected

99

Developing a Comprehensive Risk Assessment Framework for Geological Storage CO2  

SciTech Connect

The operational risks for CCS projects include: risks of capturing, compressing, transporting and injecting CO?; risks of well blowouts; risk that CO? will leak into shallow aquifers and contaminate potable water; and risk that sequestered CO? will leak into the atmosphere. This report examines these risks by using information on the risks associated with analogue activities such as CO2 based enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), natural gas storage and acid gas disposal. We have developed a new analysis of pipeline risk based on Bayesian statistical analysis. Bayesian theory probabilities may describe states of partial knowledge, even perhaps those related to non-repeatable events. The Bayesian approach enables both utilizing existing data and at the same time having the capability to adsorb new information thus to lower uncertainty in our understanding of complex systems. Incident rates for both natural gas and CO2 pipelines have been widely used in papers and reports on risk of CO2 pipelines as proxies for the individual risk created by such pipelines. Published risk studies of CO2 pipelines suggest that the individual risk associated with CO2 pipelines is between 10-3 and 10-4, which reflects risk levels approaching those of mountain climbing, which many would find unacceptably high. This report concludes, based on a careful analysis of natural gas pipeline failures, suggests that the individual risk of CO2 pipelines is likely in the range of 10-6 to 10-7, a risk range considered in the acceptable to negligible range in most countries. If, as is commonly thought, pipelines represent the highest risk component of CCS outside of the capture plant, then this conclusion suggests that most (if not all) previous quantitative- risk assessments of components of CCS may be orders of magnitude to high. The potential lethality of unexpected CO2 releases from pipelines or wells are arguably the highest risk aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), carbon capture, and storage (CCS). Assertions in the CCS literature, that CO2 levels of 10% for ten minutes, or 20 to 30% for a few minutes are lethal to humans, are not supported by the available evidence. The results of published experiments with animals exposed to CO2, from mice to monkeys, at both normal and depleted oxygen levels, suggest that lethal levels of CO2 toxicity are in the range 50 to 60%. These experiments demonstrate that CO2 does not kill by asphyxia, but rather is toxic at high concentrations. It is concluded that quantitative risk assessments of CCS have overestimated the risk of fatalities by using values of lethality a factor two to six lower than the values estimated in this paper. In many dispersion models of CO2 releases from pipelines, no fatalities would be predicted if appropriate levels of lethality for CO2 had been used in the analysis.

Duncan, Ian

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Physical and Economic Potential of Geological CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Physical and Economic Potential of Geological CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers ... To put this result in context, a minimum of approximately 0.7 km3 of reservoir volume at the optimal depth would be required to store the emissions from a typical 500 MW coal plant capturing 7389 tons of CO2 per day for 20 years with an 80% capacity factor (2). ... Since our analysis is performed on a single-well basis, though, we do not account for possible economies of scale in a multiwell system. ...

Jordan K. Eccles; Lincoln Pratson; Richard G. Newell; Robert B. Jackson

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage...

102

Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization January 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A breakthrough carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) project in Texas has begun capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) and piping it to an oilfield for use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Read the project factsheet The project at Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facility in Port Arthur, Texas, is significant for demonstrating both the effectiveness and commercial viability of CCUS technology as an option in helping mitigate atmospheric CO2 emissions. Funded in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the project is managed by the U.S.

103

Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization January 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A breakthrough carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) project in Texas has begun capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) and piping it to an oilfield for use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Read the project factsheet The project at Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facility in Port Arthur, Texas, is significant for demonstrating both the effectiveness and commercial viability of CCUS technology as an option in helping mitigate atmospheric CO2 emissions. Funded in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the project is managed by the U.S.

104

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO 2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Background Pulverized coal-fired power plants provide more than 50 percent of electricity needs while accounting for a third of the total carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in the United States. However, capturing CO 2 from the flue gas stream in coal-fired power plants using current commercial CO 2 capture technology could consume up

105

Running Large Scale Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Running Large Scale Jobs Running Large Scale Jobs Users face various challenges with running and scaling large scale jobs on peta-scale production systems. For example, certain...

106

Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO 2 Storage Michael G. Waddell and John M. Shafer Earth Sciences and Resources Institute University of South Carolina - Columbia Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting Pittsburgh, PA November 15-17, 2011 Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting - November 15-17, 2011 Research Team Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting - November 15-17, 2011 John Shafer and Michael Waddell James Knapp and Camelia Knapp Lee Kurtzweil and Phil VanHollebeke C.W. "Bill" Clendenin Richard Berg James Rine Integrated Services Contract for Drilling/Coring/Logging - TBD Study Area Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting - November 15-17, 2011

107

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leveraging regionaL expLoration Leveraging regionaL expLoration to DeveLop geoLogic Framework For co 2 Storage in Deep FormationS Background The Midwestern region encompasses numerous coal-fired power plants that could be adversely impacted by carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission control restrictions. Geologic sequestration could be a viable option to mitigate the CO 2 emissions within this region. Unfortunately, the understanding of rock properties within deep forma- tions in the region is poorly understood due to lack of deep well data. Under this project, regional geologic characterization is being refined with new rock property data being collected in collaboration with regional oil and gas drilling companies. Description The project is designed to develop an improved understanding of the geologic frame-

108

Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO2 Storage in the Alberta Basin, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO 2 Storage in the Alberta Basin, Canada Stefan Bachu (Stefan.Bachu@gov.ab.ca; 780-427-1517) Alberta Energy and Utilities Board 4999-98 Avenue Edmonton, AB, T6B 2X3, Canada Introduction Human activity since the industrial revolution has had the effect of increasing atmospheric concentrations of gases with a greenhouse effect, such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ), leading to climate warming and weather changes (Bryant, 1997; Jepma and Munasinghe, 1998). Because of its relative abundance compared with the other greenhouse gases, CO 2 is by far the most important, being responsible for about 64% of the enhanced "greenhouse effect" (Bryant, 1997). Given their inherent advantages, such as availability, competitive cost, ease of

109

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

110

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

111

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

112

Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Storage: Regulatory and Capacity Implications  

SciTech Connect

Industrial-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into saline sedimentary basins will cause large-scale fluid pressurization and migration of native brines, which may affect valuable groundwater resources overlying the deep sequestration reservoirs. In this paper, we discuss how such basin-scale hydrologic impacts can (1) affect regulation of CO{sub 2} storage projects and (2) may reduce current storage capacity estimates. Our assessment arises from a hypothetical future carbon sequestration scenario in the Illinois Basin, which involves twenty individual CO{sub 2} storage projects in a core injection area suitable for long-term storage. Each project is assumed to inject five million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for 50 years. A regional-scale three-dimensional simulation model was developed for the Illinois Basin that captures both the local-scale CO{sub 2}-brine flow processes and the large-scale groundwater flow patterns in response to CO{sub 2} storage. The far-field pressure buildup predicted for this selected sequestration scenario suggests that (1) the area that needs to be characterized in a permitting process may comprise a very large region within the basin if reservoir pressurization is considered, and (2) permits cannot be granted on a single-site basis alone because the near- and far-field hydrologic response may be affected by interference between individual sites. Our results also support recent studies in that environmental concerns related to near-field and far-field pressure buildup may be a limiting factor on CO{sub 2} storage capacity. In other words, estimates of storage capacity, if solely based on the effective pore volume available for safe trapping of CO{sub 2}, may have to be revised based on assessments of pressure perturbations and their potential impact on caprock integrity and groundwater resources, respectively. We finally discuss some of the challenges in making reliable predictions of large-scale hydrologic impacts related to CO{sub 2} sequestration projects.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Zhou, Q.

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

Sensitivity study of CO2 storage capacity in brine aquifers withclosed boundaries: Dependence on hydrogeologic properties  

SciTech Connect

In large-scale geologic storage projects, the injected volumes of CO{sub 2} will displace huge volumes of native brine. If the designated storage formation is a closed system, e.g., a geologic unit that is compartmentalized by (almost) impermeable sealing units and/or sealing faults, the native brine cannot (easily) escape from the target reservoir. Thus the amount of supercritical CO{sub 2} that can be stored in such a system depends ultimately on how much pore space can be made available for the added fluid owing to the compressibility of the pore structure and the fluids. To evaluate storage capacity in such closed systems, we have conducted a modeling study simulating CO{sub 2} injection into idealized deep saline aquifers that have no (or limited) interaction with overlying, underlying, and/or adjacent units. Our focus is to evaluate the storage capacity of closed systems as a function of various reservoir parameters, hydraulic properties, compressibilities, depth, boundaries, etc. Accounting for multi-phase flow effects including dissolution of CO{sub 2} in numerical simulations, the goal is to develop simple analytical expressions that provide estimates for storage capacity and pressure buildup in such closed systems.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Predicting PVT data for CO2brine mixtures for black-oil simulation of CO2 geological storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trapping mechanism. In the petroleum industry, compositional reservoir simu- lators use EOS thermodynamic Leonenko a a Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Calgary, Canada b Department of Petroleum Engineering, Kuwait University, Kuwait 1. Introduction The sequestration of anthropogenic CO2

Santos, Juan

115

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Thomas A. Buscheck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensions. Vertical discretization of grid size allows to improve aquifer influx modeling......................................... 55 Table 4.2? Reservoir model properties. ................................................................ 58 Table 4... fuel dependency will continue in the near future, increasing the need to develop economic and technologically feasible approaches to reduce and capture and dispose CO2 emissions. Geological storage of CO2 in aquifers and depleted oil and gas...

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10.1007/s12665-009-0401-1. NETL (National Energy Technologyfor Storage of CO 2 in Deep Geologic Formations, NETL ReportDOE/NETL-401/090808, November 2010. Nicot, J.P. , 2008.

Birkholzer, J.T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

119

Influence of Methane in CO2 Transport and Storage for CCS Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is one of several effective strategies (along with energy efficiency, fuel switching, and use of renewable energy sources) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) levels in the atmosphere in the medium term. ... Properties were measured in P and T ranges which are within the estimated pressures and temperatures in CO2 pipelines (7.520 MPa and 273303 K)(9) and in geologic storage sites on the basis of a geothermic gradient(21) of 25 K/km and an average gradient of hydrostatic pressure of 10 MPa/km. ... parameter into parts representing dispersion, permanent dipole-permanent dipole, and H-bonding energies of cohesion is necessary to make full use of these concepts. ...

Sof韆 T. Blanco; Clara Rivas; Javier Fern醤dez; Manuela Artal; Inmaculada Velasco

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

No geologic evidence that seismicity causes fault leakage that would render large-scale carbon capture and storage unsuccessful  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent Perspective (1), Zoback and Gorelick argued that carbon capture and storage (CCS) is likely not a viable strategy for reducing CO[subscript 2] emissions to the atmosphere. They argued that maps of earthquake ...

Juanes, Ruben

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Integration of Pipeline Operations Sourced with CO2 Captured at a Coal-fired Power Plant and Injected for Geologic Storage: SECARB Phase III CCS Demonstration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a case study of the design and operation of a fit-for-purpose pipeline sourced with anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) associated with a large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) Research & Demonstration Program located in Alabama, USA. A 10.2 centimeter diameter pipeline stretches approximately 19 kilometers from the outlet of the CO2 capture facility, located at Alabama Power Company's James M. Barry 2,657 - megawatt coal-fired electric generating plant, to the point of injection into a saline reservoir within Citronelle Dome. The CO2 pipeline has a 6.5 meter wide easement that primarily parallels an existing high-voltage electric transmission line in undulating terrain with upland timber, stream crossings, and approximately 61,000 square meters of various wetland types. In addition to wetlands, the route transects protected habitat of the Gopher Tortoise. Construction methods included horizontal drilling under utilities, wetlands, and tortoise habitat and 憃pen cutting trenching where vegetation is removed and silt/storm-water management structures are employed to limit impacts to water quality and ecosystems. A total of 18 horizontal directional borings, approximately 8 kilometers, were used to avoid sensitive ecosystems, roads, and utilities. The project represents one of the first and the largest fully-integrated pulverized coal-fired CCS demonstration projects in the USA and provides a test bed of the operational reliability and risk management for future pipelines sourced with utility CO2 capture and compression operations sole-sourced to injection operations. An update on status of the project is presented, covering the permitting of the pipeline, risk analysis, design, construction, commissioning, and integration with compression at the capture plant and underground injection at the storage site.

R. Esposito; C. Harvick; R. Shaw; D. Mooneyhan; R. Trautz; G. Hill

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection ProcessDuring CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect

For purposes of geologic storage, CO2 would be injected into saline formations at supercritical temperature and pressure conditions, and would form a separate phase that is immiscible with the aqueous phase (brine). At typical subsurface temperature and pressure conditions, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) has lower density than the aqueous phase and would experience an upward buoyancy force. Accordingly, the CO2 is expected to accumulate beneath the caprock at the top of the permeable interval, and could escape from the storage formation wherever (sub-)vertical pathways are available, such as fractures or faults through the caprock, or improperly abandoned wells. Over time, an increasing fraction of CO2 may dissolve in the aqueous phase, and eventually some of the aqueous CO2 may react with rock minerals to form poorly soluble carbonates. Dissolution into the aqueous phase and eventual sequestration as carbonates are highly desirable processes as they would increase permanence and security of storage. Dissolution of CO2 will establish phase equilibrium locally between the overlying CO2 plume and the aqueous phase beneath. If the aqueous phase were immobile, CO2 dissolution would be limited by the rate at which molecular diffusion can remove dissolved CO2 from the interface between CO2-rich and aqueous phases. This is a slow process. However, dissolution of CO2 is accompanied by a small increase in the density of the aqueous phase, creating a negative buoyancy force that can give rise to downward convection of CO2-rich brine, which in turn can greatly accelerate CO2 dissolution. This study explores the process of dissolution-diffusion-convection (DDC), using high-resolution numerical simulation. We find that geometric features of convection patterns are very sensitive to small changes in problem specifications, reflecting self-enhancing feedbacks and the chaotic nature of the process. Total CO2 dissolution rates on the other hand are found to be quite robust against modest changes in problem parameters, and are essentially constant as long as no dissolved CO2 reaches the lower boundary of the system.

Pruess, Karsten; Zhang, Keni

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

Large-scale Demonstration and Deployment Project for D&D of Fuel Storage Canals and Associated Facilities at INEEL  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA), sponsored a Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) under management of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The INEEL LSDDP is one of several LSDDPs sponsored by DOE. The LSDDP process integrates field demonstrations into actual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations by comparing new or improved technologies against existing baseline technologies using a side-by-side comparison. The goals are (a) to identify technologies that are cheaper, safer, faster, and cleaner (produce less waste), and (b) to incorporate those technologies into D&D baseline operations. The INEEL LSDDP reviewed more than 300 technologies, screened 141, and demonstrated 17. These 17 technologies have been deployed a total of 70 times at facilities other than those where the technology was demonstrated, and 10 have become baseline at the INEEL. Fifteen INEEL D&D needs have been modified or removed from the Needs Management System as a direct result of using these new technologies. Conservatively, the ten-year projected cost savings at the INEEL resulting from use of the technologies demonstrated in this INEEL LSDDP exceeds $39 million dollars.

Whitmill, Larry Joseph

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Chapter 11 - Operation of Independent Large-Scale Battery-Storage Systems in Energy and Reserve Markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this chapter, we consider a scenario where a group of investor-owned independently-operated storage units seek to offer energy and reserve in the day-ahead market and energy in the hour-ahead market. We are particularly interested in the case where a significant portion of the power generated in the grid is from wind and other intermittent renewable energy resources. In this regard, we formulate a stochastic programming framework to choose optimal energy and reserve bids for the storage units that takes into account the fluctuating nature of the market prices due to the randomness in the renewable power generation availability. We show that the formulated stochastic program can be converted to a convex optimization problem to be solved efficiently. Our simulation results also show that our design can assure profitability of the private investment on storage units. We also investigate the impact of various design parameters, such as the size and location of the storage unit on increasing the profit.

Hossein Akhavan-Hejazi; Hamed Mohsenian-Rad

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Impact of Sorption Isotherms on the Simulation of CO2-Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage Process in Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reservoirs, natural gas occurs as free gas in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay Continuous, low-permeability, fractured, organic-rich gas shale units are widespread and are possible geologic storage targets .The Marcellus could act as a storage reservoir for captured CO2. In this scenario

Mohaghegh, Shahab

126

Site Characterization for CO2 Geologic Storage and Vice Versa -The Frio Brine Pilot as a Case Study  

SciTech Connect

Careful site characterization is critical for successfulgeologic sequestration of CO2, especially for sequestration inbrine-bearing formations that have not been previously used for otherpurposes. Traditional site characterization techniques such asgeophysical imaging, well logging, core analyses, interference welltesting, and tracer testing are all valuable. However, the injection andmonitoring of CO2 itself provides a wealth of additional information.Rather than considering a rigid chronology in which CO2 sequestrationoccurs only after site characterization is complete, we recommend thatCO2 injection and monitoring be an integral part of thesite-characterization process. The advantages of this approach arenumerous. The obvious benefit of CO2 injection is to provide informationon multi-phase flow properties, which cannot be obtained from traditionalsitecharacterization techniques that examine single-phase conditions.Additionally, the low density and viscosity of CO2 compared to brinecauses the two components to flow through the subsurface differently,potentially revealing distinct features of the geology. Finally, tounderstand sequestered CO2 behavior in the subsurface, there is nosubstitute for studying the movement of CO2 directly. Making CO2injection part of site characterization has practical benefits as well.The infrastructure for surface handling of CO2 (compression, heating,local storage) can be developed, the CO2 injection process can bedebugged, and monitoring techniques can be field-tested. Prior to actualsequestration, small amounts of CO2 may be trucked in. Later, monitoringaccompanying the actual sequestration operations may be used tocontinually refine and improve understanding of CO2 behavior in thesubsurface.

Doughty, Christine

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB Geologic Pilot Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using injected CO 2 to driveof enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using injected CO 2 to swell

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Assessing health impacts of CO2 leakage from a geological storage site into buildings: role of attenuation in the unsaturated zone and building foundation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a) Title Assessing health impacts of CO2 leakage from a geological storage site into buildings of the greenhouse gas CO2 has the potential to be a widespread and effective option to mitigate climate change. As any industrial activity, CO2 storage may lead to adverse impact on human health and the environment

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

129

Natural Analogs for Geologic Storage of CO2: An Integrated Global Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JAF21006.DOC JAF21006.DOC First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory May 15-17, 2001 Washington, D.C. Natural Analogs for Geologic Storage of CO 2 : An Integrated Global Research Program S. H. Stevens (sstevens@adv-res.com, (703) 528 8420) Advanced Resources International, Inc. 1110 N. Glebe Road, Suite 600 Arlington, VA USA 22201 703-528-8420 J. M. Pearce (jmpe@bgs.ac.uk, (0)115 9363 222) British Geological Survey Nottingham, NG12 5GG, United Kingdom. A. A. J. Rigg (a.rigg@petroleum.crc.org.au, 61-2-9490 8225) Australian Petroleum Cooperative Research Centre Sydney, NSW Australia ABSTRACT Coordinated research efforts are underway on three continents (North America, Europe,

130

Why we need the and in CO2 utilization and storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2(1): 919 (2012). 3. US DOE, EOR fact sheet. [Online]. DOE,programs/reserves/npr/CO 2 _EOR_ Fact_Sheet.pdf [Decemberoil recovery ( CO 2 - EOR). While much of the current

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), serving to sequester CO 2allocation methods for EOR LCA, finding that the allocation

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects Map of the United States...

133

Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain: What Do They Tell Us about the Security of Engineered Storage of CO2 Underground?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Nyos aNd MaMMoth MouNtaiN: Lake Nyos aNd MaMMoth MouNtaiN: What do they teLL us about the security of eNgiNeered storage of co 2 uNdergrouNd? Introduction Lake Nyos in the Northwest Province of Cameroon in western Africa and Mammoth Mountain in California are the sites of two well-known underground releases of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in nature, both with adverse effects. Both Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain are atop current or former volcanoes and the released CO 2 is volcanic in origin (sometimes referred to as magmatic origin). Molten rock (magma) far below the Earth's surface contains entrained amounts of water, CO 2 , and other gases. If the magma rises toward the Earth's surface, the pressure it is under is reduced and the entrained gases begin to expand. The expansion of the

134

Hydro-mechanical modelling of geological CO2 storage and the study of possible caprock fracture mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to tensile stresses is treated. The stress intensity factor is used as the driving parameter describing mechanisms N. Guy,1-2 D.M. Seyedi,1 F. Hild2 BRGM, Natural Risks & CO2 Storage Safety Division, 3 av. Claude studies have shown that gas injection into deep permeable formations induce changes of the total

135

R&D Project CLEAN in the context of CO2 storage and enhanced gas recovery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications during Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) andRussia, India, and China. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)2005) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage

Kuhn, M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aaron DS, Williams KA. Is carbon capture and storage reallyal. Comparison of carbon capture and storage with renewablefuel power plants with carbon capture and storage. Energy

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondary accumulation at shallow depth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feedback between Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer, Geophys. Res.Pruess, K. On CO2 Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Behavior in

Pruess, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Discussion of the Influence of CO and CH4 in CO2 Transport, Injection, and Storage for CCS Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of CCS is to avoid the release to the atmosphere of anthropogenic CO2 generated by industrial and energy-related sources. ... (26, 28) The experiments were performed at T and P relevant to those in CO2 pipelines and in geologic storage sites (geothermic gradient = 25 K/km; hydrostatic pressure gradient = 10 MPa/km). ... assessment, which showed an energetic improvement of 0.7?-points for the CASPER model solvent system in comparison to the baseline 30wt? MEA case. ...

Sof韆 T. Blanco; Clara Rivas; Ram髇 Bravo; Javier Fern醤dez; Manuela Artal; Inmaculada Velasco

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

An Improved Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Improved Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Large-scale geological storage of CO2 is likely to bring CO2 plumes into contact with a large number of existing wellbores. Wellbores that no longer provide proper zonal isolation establish a primary pathway for a buoyant CO2-rich phase to escape from the intended storage formation. The hazard of CO2 leakage along these pathways will depend on the rate of leakage. Thus a useful component of a risk assessment framework is a model of CO2 leakage. Predicting the flux of CO2 along a leaking wellbore requires a model of fluid properties and of transport along the leakage

140

Investigation of CO2 plume behavior for a large-scale pilot test of geologic carbon storage in a saline formation  

SciTech Connect

The hydrodynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on trapping mechanisms that lead to CO{sub 2} plume stabilization. A numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture is developed to simulate a planned pilot test, in which 1,000,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} is injected over a four-year period, and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume for hundreds of years. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of the partitioning of CO{sub 2} between dissolved, immobile free-phase, and mobile free-phase forms. Model results indicate that the injected CO{sub 2} plume is effectively immobilized at 25 years. At that time, 38% of the CO{sub 2} is in dissolved form, 59% is immobile free phase, and 3% is mobile free phase. The plume footprint is roughly elliptical, and extends much farther up-dip of the injection well than down-dip. The pressure increase extends far beyond the plume footprint, but the pressure response decreases rapidly with distance from the injection well, and decays rapidly in time once injection ceases. Sensitivity studies that were carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual CO{sub 2} saturation indicate that small changes in properties can have a large impact on plume evolution, causing significant trade-offs between different trapping mechanisms.

Doughty, C.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwater resources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact on groundwater systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion and Management. NETL Project Annual Report,a future project phase. NETL Project Annual Report, October70 NETL Project Annual Report, October 1, 2006 to September

Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan, Preston; Zhang, K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Potential for CO2 storage in depleted fields on the Dutch Continental Shelf朇ost estimate for offshore facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was performed on capital and operational costs for offshore injection of CO2 into depleted fields. The main focus was on the design and costs of process requirements for injection, required conservation (hibernation) and modification of existing platforms between end of gas/oil production and start of CO2 injection. Also cost estimates for new platforms are provided. The study is 慼igh level and generic in nature as no specific target for CO2 storage has been selected. For the purpose of this study a simplified approach is used for determination of the required injection facilities and platform modifications. Nevertheless, the study provides a good indication on the level of expenditures that can be expected.

Floor Jansen; Rob Steinz; Boudewijn van Gelder

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A feasibility study of ECBM recovery and CO2 storage for a producing CBM field in Southeast Qinshui Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a geo-engineering and economic analysis of the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery and CO2 storage in the South Shizhuang CBM Field, Southeast Qinshui Basin, China. We construct a static model using the well log and laboratory data and then upscale this model to use in dynamic simulations. We history match field water and gas rates using the dynamic model. The parameters varied during the history match include porosity and permeability. Using the history matched dynamic model, we make predictions of CBM and ECBM recoveries for various field developments. We build a techno-economic model that calculates the incremental nominal net present value (NPV) of the ECBM incremental recovery and CO2 storage over the CBM recovery. We analyse how the NPV is affected by well spacing, CH4 price, carbon credit and the type of coal. Our analyses suggest that 300爉 is the optimum well spacing for the study area under the current CH4 price in China and with a zero carbon credit. Using this well spacing, we predict the recoveries for different injection gas compositions of CO2 and N2 and different injection starting times. The results show that gas injection yields incremental CBM production whatever the composition of the injected gas. Pure CO2 injection yields highest ECBM for low swelling coals while flue gas injection gives highest ECBM for high swelling coals. However, the differences in recoveries are small. Injection can be economically viable depending on the CH4 price and the carbon credit. At current prices and no carbon credit, flue gas injection is commercial. At higher CH4 prices and/or with the introduction of carbon credits, co-optimisation could be commercially viable. High carbon credits favour injecting pure CO2 rather than other gases because this stores more CO2. Injecting CO2 at late stage increases CO2 storage but decreases the project's NPV. High-swelling coals require about $20/tonnes additional carbon credit.

Fengde Zhou; Wanwan Hou; Guy Allinson; Jianguang Wu; Jianzhong Wang; Yildiray Cinar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon 66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project December 18, 2007 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of One Million Tons of CO2 at Illinois Site WASHINGTON, DC - Following closely on the heels of three recent awards through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, DOE today awarded $66.7 million to the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) for the Department's fourth large-scale carbon sequestration project. The Partnership led by the Illinois State Geological Survey will conduct large volume tests in the Illinois Basin to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to

145

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capture of CO 2 from gasifier process producing electricalPlaquemine, Louisiana. The gasifier is a proprietary designGasifier .

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Utilization of CO2 as cushion gas for porous media compressed air energy storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design of compressed air energy storage electric powerS and Williams RH, Compressed Air Energy Storage: Theory,Porous media compressed air energy storage (PM-CAES): theory

Oldenburg, C.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Where is CO2 storage happening today? Where is CO2 storage happening today? Sleipner Project (Norway) Sleipner Project (Norway) Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is currently happening across the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway, the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, and the In Salah project in Algeria, have been injecting CO2 for many years. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, too. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. Additionally, a multitude of pilot efforts are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future

148

Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

28, 2013 28, 2013 Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization DOE-Supported Project in Texas Demonstrates Viability of CCUS Technology Washington, D.C. - A breakthrough carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) project in Texas has begun capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) and piping it to an oilfield for use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). MORE INFO Read the project factsheet The project at Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facility in Port Arthur, Texas, is significant for demonstrating both the effectiveness and commercial viability of CCUS technology as an option in helping mitigate atmospheric CO2 emissions. Funded in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the project is managed by the U.S.

149

Synthetic Catalysts for CO2 Storage: Catalytic Improvement of Solvent Capture Systems  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: LLNL is designing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants so it can be transported, stored, or utilized elsewhere. Human lungs rely on an enzyme known as carbonic anhydrase to help separate CO2 from our blood and tissue as part of the normal breathing process. LLNL is designing a synthetic catalyst with the same function as this enzyme. The catalyst can be used to quickly capture CO2 from coal exhaust, just as the natural enzyme does in our lungs. LLNL is also developing a method of encapsulating chemical solvents in permeable microspheres that will greatly increase the speed of binding of CO2. The goal of the project is an industry-ready chemical vehicle that can withstand the harsh environments found in exhaust gas and enable new, simple process designs requiring less capital investment.

None

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between rocks and fluids, and heat transfer. Much currentFeedback between Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer, Geophys. Res.Pruess, K. On CO2 Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Behavior in

Pruess, Karsten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

RESPONSES OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND TOTAL CARBON STORAGE TO CHANGES IN CLIMATE AND ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONCENTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model (TEM, version 4.0) to estimate global responses of annual net primary production (NPP) and total. For contemporary climate with 315 ppmv CO2, TEM estimated that global NPP is 47.9 PgC/yr and global total carbon-q climate and +20.6% (9.9 PgC/yr) for the GISS climate. The responses of global total carbon storage are +17

152

7, 1553315563, 2007 Large-scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Pacific, correlations with CO, CO2, CH4, and C2Cl4 were dif- fuse overall, but recognizable on flights out Chemistry and Physics Discussions Factors influencing the large-scale distribution of Hg in the Mexico City the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) cam- paign in spring 2006. Flights were conducted

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

153

Thermodynamics and Kinetics of CO2 Adsorption on Dehydrated Palladium/Cobalt-Based Cyanogels:? A Highly Selective, Fully Reversible System for CO2 Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerogel versus xerogel structures have a profound effect on the thermodynamics and kinetics of CO2 adsorption. ... The selective adsorption of CO2 by the cyanogels can be harnessed practically in at least two principal ways:? by using the cyanogels as reservoirs for trapping CO2 reversibly and by constructing filters having an embedded layer of the gels. ... The water of gelation was eliminated by smearing out the gel on filter paper and drying it overnight in an oven at 95 癈. ...

Rahul S. Deshpande; Stefanie L. Sharp-Goldman; Andrew B. Bocarsly

2002-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feedbacks between fluid flow and heat transfer can occur oninterplay between fluid flow and heat transfer gives rise toof multiphase fluid flow and heat transfer. CO 2 rising

Pruess, K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Physics and Seismic Modeling for Monitoring CO2 Storage JOSE M. CARCIONE,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, methane-bearing coal beds and saline aquifers. An example of the latter is the Sleipner field in the North-elastical equations model the seismic properties of reservoir rocks saturated with CO2, methane, oil and brine conditions, and can approach that of liquid water. Instead, pure CH4 (methane, hydrocarbon gas) exhibits

Santos, Juan

156

The H-Cube Project: Hydrodynamics, Heterogeneity and Homogenization in CO2 storage modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Audigane, BRGM, E. Mouche, CEA, S. Viseur, CEREGE, D. Gu茅rillot, TERRA 3E And the H-CUBE team Key words-scaling processes We propose to assess the buoyant forces on the CO2 and brine vertical migration of heterogeneity field distribution on the same 3D static earth model appropriate ranking measures of the static

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

157

Hypothesized Link Between Glacial/Interglacial Atmospheric CO2 Cycles and Storage/Release of CO2-Rich Fluids From Deep-Sea Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volcanic vents. Hydrothermal systems in the Pacific act as both a source and sink for carbon by changes in 14 C production alone and therefore appears to require a flux of 14 C- depleted carbon of CO2 regulation. Here we explore the possibility that hydrothermal sources of CO2 contributed

Stott, Lowell

158

Tagging CO2 to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage  

SciTech Connect

In the wake of concerns about the long term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with carbon isotope 14C immediately prior to sequestration to a level that is normal on the surface (one part per trillion). Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon from anthropogenic injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we have developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This system consists of a gas-exchange apparatus to make disposable cartridges ready for controlled injection into a fast flowing stream of pressurized CO2. We built a high-pressure injection and tagging system, and a 14C detection system. The disposable cartridge and injection system have been successfully demonstrated in the lab with a high-pressure flow reactor, as well as in the field at the CarbFix CO2 sequestration site in Iceland. The laser-based 14C detection system originally conceived has been shown to possess inadequate sensitivity for ambient levels. Alternative methods for detecting 14C, such as saturated cavity absorption ringdown spectroscopy and scintillation counting, may still be suitable. KEYWORDS

Lackner, Klaus; Matter, Juerg; Park, Ah-Hyung; Stute, Martin; Carson, Cantwell; Ji, Yinghuang

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

A quantitative comparison of the cost of employing EOR-coupled CSS supplemented with secondary DSF storage for two large CO2 point sources  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the impact of the temporally dynamic demand for CO2 for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery with CO2 storage. Previous evaluations of economy-wide CO2 capture and geologic storage (CCS) deployment have typically applied a simplifying assumption that 100% of the potential storage capacity for a given formation is available on the first day of the analysis, and that the injection rate impacts only the number of wells required to inject a given volume of fluid per year, making it a cost driver rather than a technical one. However, as discussed by Dahowski and Bachu [1], storing CO2 in a field undergoing CO2 flooding for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is subject to a set of constraints to which storage in DSFs is not, and these constraints combined with variable demand for CO2 may strongly influence the ability of an EOR field to serve as a baseload storage formation for commercial scale CCS projects undertaken as a means of addressing climate change mitigation targets. This analysis assumes that CCS is being undertaken in order to reduce CO2 emissions from the industrial sources evaluated and that there is enough of a disincentive associated with venting CO2 to the atmosphere that any CO2 not used within the EOR field will be stored in a suitable nearby deep saline formation (DSF). The authors have applied a CO2 demand profile to two cases chosen to illustrate the differences in cost impacts of employing EOR-based CCS as a part of a given source抯 CCS portfolio. The first scenario is a less-than-ideal case in which a single EOR field is used for storage and all CO2 not demanded by the EOR project is stored in a DSF; the second scenario is designed to optimize costs by minimizing storage in the DSF and maximizing lower-cost EOR-based storage. Both scenarios are evaluated for two facilities emitting 3 and 6 MtCO2/y, corresponding to a natural gas processing facility and an IGCC electric power plant, respectively. Annual and lifetime average CO2 transport and storage costs are presented, and the impact of added capture and compression costs on overall project economics is examined.

Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

CO2 Capture and Storage Project, Education and Training Center Launched in Decatur, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One of the nation抯 largest carbon capture and storage endeavors includes an education center for students and local residents.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 31 in Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in DeepChapter 14 in Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in DeepSummary. Chapter 25 in Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

CO2 Storage in Shallow Underground and Surface Coal Mines: Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brine saturated with C-type (alkaline) fly ash that reacts with flue gas can provide an additional mechanism of chemical trapping (5). ... In addition, we thank Robert Virta, Mineral Commodity Specialist with the U.S. Geological Survey, for providing a digital map of swelling clay in high-resolution raster format, Garrett Veloski, for vectorization of the raster data, and Robert Dilmore, for developing the GIS database for the clay-and-coal map, expert advice on verifying the mineral stabilization aspects, and editorial input. ... Ozdemir, E. Chemistry of the adsorption of carbon dioxide by Argonne premium coals and a model to simulate CO2 sequestration in coal seams. ...

Vyacheslav N. Romanov; Terry E. Ackman; Yee Soong; Robert L. Kleinman

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

163

Supercritical CO2-Corrosion in Heat Treated Steel Pipes during Carbon Capture and Storage CCS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat treatment of steels used for engineering a saline aquifer Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) site may become...2...) into deep geological rock formations. 13% Chromium steel injection pipes heat treated differ...

Anja Pfennig; Phillip Zastrow

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

FY 2014 Research Projects on CO2 Storage in Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In FY 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy selected five projects focused on advancing the state of knowledge and developing and validating technologies that would allow for more effective storage...

165

Numerical Modeling of Hydrate Formation in Sand Sediment Simulating Sub-Seabed CO2 Storage in the form of Gas Hydrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Among several methods for CO2 capture and storage, we focus on CO2 sequestration in the form of gas hydrate under the seafloor, mainly for many sequestration sites offshore Japan and for little risk of CO2 leakage from the sediment. However, it is difficult to evaluate the precise storage potential and cost of this method due to the lack of the relevant information. Here, in order to do feasibility studies of this technique so as to make an effective storage method, we made a 3-dimentional gas water flow simulator with kinetic hydrate formation. The new design of CO2 hydrate formation in porous media under two-phase flow condition was implemented in this simulator, and unknown parameters in necessary mathematical models for gas-water flow in sand sediments were verified from the comparison between the results of the numerical simulations and the experimental measurements from the previous study.

Takuya Nakashima; Toru Sato; Masayuki Inui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

8 - Measurement and monitoring technologies for verification of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in underground reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The chapter reviews some of the current technologies available for storage site monitoring, focusing on a limited range of core monitoring technologies required to provide storage site assurance at the industrial scale. Monitoring strategy has two elements: deep-focused for storage performance testing and verification and the early detection of deviations from predicted behaviour; and shallow -focused for leakage detection, verification of emissions performance and public acceptance. Key deep-focused monitoring technologies include 3D time-lapse seismic and downhole pressure and temperature measurement. For shallow monitoring, key technologies include soil gas, surface flux and atmospheric measurement. Selection of suitable monitoring strategies is highly site-specific, and tool testing and development is ongoing.

R.A. Chadwick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Begins in Illinois Begins in Illinois CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois November 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon storage technologies nationwide, has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) for their large-scale CO2 injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. "Establishing long-term, environmentally safe and secure underground CO2 storage is a critical component in achieving successful commercial

168

Safe storage and effective monitoring of CO2 in depleted gas fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Exploration Geophysics...engineering and the oil and gas industries...The higher costs of offshore storage...rate was the benchmark for the...because of cost. Figure S4...Asia Pacific Oil & Gas Conference...2009), A benchmark study on...sequestration process. Exploration Geophysics...

Charles R. Jenkins; Peter J. Cook; Jonathan Ennis-King; James Undershultz; Chris Boreham; Tess Dance; Patrice de Caritat; David M. Etheridge; Barry M. Freifeld; Allison Hortle; Dirk Kirste; Lincoln Paterson; Roman Pevzner; Ulrike Schacht; Sandeep Sharma; Linda Stalker; Milovan Urosevic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Teapot Dome: Characterization of a CO2-enhanced oil recovery and storage site in Eastern Wyoming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...storage, and underground coal gasification. Vicki Stamp has more than...unparalleled opportunity for industry and others to use the site...projects are intimately linked to industry-driven enhanced oil recovery...three-dimensional models United States waste disposal Wyoming GeoRef...

S. Julio Friedmann; Vicki W. Stamp

170

Geomechanical Simulations of CO2 Storage Integrity using the Livermore Distinct Element Method  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects involving annual injections of millions of tons of CO{sub 2} are a key infrastructural element needed to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The large rate and volume of injection will induce pressure and stress gradients within the formation that could activate existing fractures and faults, or drive new fractures through the caprock. We will present results of an ongoing investigation to identify conditions that will activate existing fractures/faults or make new fractures within the caprock using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC). LDEC is a multiphysics code, developed at LLNL, capable of simulating dynamic fracture of rock masses under a range of conditions. As part of a recent project, LDEC has been extended to consider fault activation and dynamic fracture of rock masses due to pressurization of the pore-space. We will present several demonstrations of LDEC functionality and applications of LDEC to CO{sub 2} injection scenarios including injection into an extensively fractured rockmass. These examples highlight the advantages of explicitly including the geomechanical response of each interface within the rockmass. We present results from our investigations of Teapot Dome using LDEC to study the potential for fault activation during injection. Using this approach, we built finite element models of the rock masses surrounding bounding faults and explicitly simulated the compression and shear on the fault interface. A CO{sub 2} injection source was introduced and the area of fault activation was predicted as a function of injection rate. This work presents an approach where the interactions of all locations on the fault are considered in response to specific injection scenarios. For example, with LDEC, as regions of the fault fail, the shear load is taken up elsewhere on the fault. The results of this study are consistent with previous studies of Teapot Dome and indicate significantly elevated pore pressures are required to activate the bounding faults, given the assumed in situ stress state on the faults.

Morris, J P; Johnson, S M; Friedmann, S J

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

171

Feasibility of Large-Scale Ocean CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO{sub 2}. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves. In this report we detail research carried out in the period October 1, 2007 through September 30, 2008. The primary body of work is contained in a formal publication attached as Appendix 1 to this report. In brief we have surveyed the recent literature with respect to the natural occurrence of clathrate hydrates (with a special emphasis on methane hydrates), the tools used to investigate them and their potential as a new source of natural gas for energy production.

Peter Brewer

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

173

Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect

Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

Doughty, Christine

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface reservoirs being considered for storing CO{sub 2} include saline aquifers, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams (Baines and Worden, 2004; IPCC, 2005). By far the greatest storage capacity is in saline aquifers (Dooley et al., 2004), and our discussion will focus primarily on CO{sub 2} storage in saline formations. Most issues for safety and security of CO{sub 2} storage arise from the fact that, at typical temperature and pressure conditions encountered in terrestrial crust, CO{sub 2} is less dense than aqueous fluids. Accordingly, CO{sub 2} will experience an upward buoyancy force in most subsurface environments, and will tend to migrate upwards whenever (sub-)vertical permeable pathways are available, such as fracture zones, faults, or improperly abandoned wells (Bachu, 2008; Pruess, 2008a, b; Tsang et al., 2008). CO{sub 2} injection will increase fluid pressures in the target formation, thereby altering effective stress distributions, and potentially triggering movement along fractures and faults that could increase their permeability and reduce the effectiveness of a caprock in containing CO{sub 2} (Rutqvist et al., 2008; Chiaramonte et al., 2008). Induced seismicity as a consequence of fluid injection is also a concern (Healy et al., 1968; Raleigh et al., 1976; Majer et al., 2007). Dissolution of CO{sub 2} in the aqueous phase generates carbonic acid, which may induce chemical corrosion (dissolution) of minerals with associated increase in formation porosity and permeability, and may also mediate sequestration of CO{sub 2} as solid carbonate (Gaus et al., 2008). Chemical dissolution of caprock minerals could promote leakage of CO{sub 2} from a storage reservoir (Gherardi et al., 2007). Chemical dissolution and geomechanical effects could reinforce one another in compromising CO{sub 2} containment. Additional issues arise from the potential of CO{sub 2} to mobilize hazardous chemical species (Kharaka et al., 2006), and from migration of the large amounts of brine that would be mobilized by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} injection (Nicot et al., 2008; Birkholzer et al., 2008a, b).

Pruess, Karsten; Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment  

SciTech Connect

Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January-March 2006 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main accomplishments were analysis of Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' reservoir test results from the AEP No.1 well and design and feasibility support tasks. Reservoir test results indicate injection potential in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' may be significantly higher than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. In addition, organizational and scheduling issues were addressed to move the project toward an integrated carbon capture and storage system at the Mountaineer site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

Neeraj Gupta

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

177

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants CO2 Emissions Control RD&D Roadmap Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program Accomplishments DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations DOE/NETL's Monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter Program Goals and Targets Pre-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Advanced Combustion CO2 Compression Other Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Reference Shelf Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. There are commercially available 1st-Generation CO2

178

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

179

Department of Energy Announces 15 Projects Aimed at Secure CO2 Underground  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 Projects Aimed at Secure CO2 15 Projects Aimed at Secure CO2 Underground Storage Department of Energy Announces 15 Projects Aimed at Secure CO2 Underground Storage August 11, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selection of 15 projects to develop technologies aimed at safely and economically storing carbon dioxide in geologic formations. Funded with $21.3 million over three years, today's selections will complement existing DOE initiatives to help develop the technology and infrastructure to implement large-scale CO2 storage in different geologic formations across the Nation. The projects selected today will support the goals of helping reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, developing and deploying near-zero-emission coal technologies and making the U.S. a leader in

180

Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2  

SciTech Connect

Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

Pruess, K.

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

183

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect

It has been suggested that enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) may be operated with supercritical CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid (D.W. Brown, 2000). Such a scheme could combine recovery of geothermal energy with simultaneous geologic storage of CO{sub 2}, a greenhouse gas. At geothermal temperature and pressure conditions of interest, the flow and heat transfer behavior of CO{sub 2} would be considerably different from water, and chemical interactions between CO{sub 2} and reservoir rocks would also be quite different from aqueous fluids. This paper summarizes our research to date into fluid flow and heat transfer aspects of operating EGS with CO{sub 2}. (Chemical aspects of EGS with CO{sub 2} are discussed in a companion paper; Xu and Pruess, 2010.) Our modeling studies indicate that CO{sub 2} would achieve heat extraction at larger rates than aqueous fluids. The development of an EGS-CO{sub 2} reservoir would require replacement of the pore water by CO{sub 2} through persistent injection. We find that in a fractured reservoir, CO{sub 2} breakthrough at production wells would occur rapidly, within a few weeks of starting CO{sub 2} injection. Subsequently a two-phase water-CO{sub 2} mixture would be produced for a few years,followed by production of a single phase of supercritical CO{sub 2}. Even after single-phase production conditions are reached,significant dissolved water concentrations will persist in the CO{sub 2} stream for many years. The presence of dissolved water in the production stream has negligible impact on mass flow and heat transfer rates.

Pruess, K.; Spycher, N.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Integrated Underground Gas Storage of CO2 and CH4 to Decarbonise the 揚ower-to-gas-to-gas-to-power Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Excess energy produced from renewables can be stored and reused via the 損ower-to-gas-to-power (PGP) technology. We present an innovative idea which represents a decarbonised extension of PGP based on a closed carbon cycle. Our show case for the cities Potsdam and Brandenburg/Havel (Germany) outlines an overall efficiency for the entire process chain of 28% with total costs of electricity of 20 eurocents/kWh. If existing locations in Europe, where natural gas storage in porous formations is performed, were to be extended by CO2 storage sites, a significant quantity of wind and solar energy could be stored economically as methane.

Michael K黨n; Martin Streibel; Natalie Nakaten; Thomas Kempka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO2 effect to diminish, with consequences for change in soil elevation.

J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

CO2.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STORAGE & ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY STORAGE & ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Objective R MOTC can play a signifi cant role in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage and enhanced oil recovery technology development and fi eld demonstra- tions. RMOTC completed a scoping engineering study on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3's (NPR-3) CO 2 enhanced oil recovery potential. More recent character- ization studies indicate geologic carbon storage would also be an excellent use of NPR-3 resources beyond their economic life in conventional production. Geologic Storage Fossil fuels will remain the mainstay of energy production well into the 21st century. Availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is es- sential for the prosperity and security of the United States. However, increased atmospheric concentrations

187

CO2 maritime transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to describe the complete transport chain of CO2 between capture and storage including a ship transport. This last one is composed by the following steps: Shore terminal including the liquefaction, temporary storage and CO2 loading. Ship with a capacity of 30,000爉3. On or off shore terminal including an unloading system, temporary storage and export towards the final storage. Between all the possible thermodynamic states, the liquid one is most relevant two options are compared in the study (?50牥C, 7燽ar) and (?30牥C, 15燽ar). The ship has an autonomy of 6 days, is able to cover 1000爇m with a cargo of 2.5燤t/year. Several scenarios are studied varying the geographical position of the CO2 source, the number of harbours and the way the CO2 is finally stored. Depending on the option, the transport cost varies from 24 to 32爛/tCO2. This study confirms the conclusion of a previous study supported by ADEME, the cost transport is not negligible regarding the capture one when ships are considered. Transport by ship becomes a more economical option compared with an off shore pipeline when the distance exceeds 350爇m and with an onshore pipeline when it exceeds 1100爇m.

Sandrine Decarre; Julien Berthiaud; Nicolas Butin; Jean-Louis Guillaume-Combecave

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

CO2 Utilization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon dioxide (CO2) use and reuse efforts focus on the conversion of CO2 to useable products and fuels that will reduce CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. These include: Enhanced Oil/Gas Recovery - Injecting CO2 into depleting oil or gas bearing fields to maximize the amount of CO2 that could be stored as well as maximize hydrocarbon production. CO2 as Feedstock - Use CO2 as a feedstock to produce chemicals (including fuels and polymers) and find applications for the end products. Non-Geologic Storage of CO2 - Use CO2 from an effluent stream to immobilize the CO2 permanently by producing stable solid material that are either useful products with economic value or a low cost produced material.

189

Strategic use of the underground in an energy mix plan: Synergies among CO2, CH4 geological storage and geothermal energy. Latium Region case study (Central Italy)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In recent decades, the worldwide demand for energy has been increasing, with an associated rise in CO2 emissions being observed. In such conditions, the development of 搇ow carbon energy technologies and strategic energy-mix plans is necessary, and an evaluation of the underground energy potential may be a useful step in developing these plans. This evaluation involves the synergic development of such technologies as: coal combustion in combination with CO2 geological storage (CCS), natural gas geological storage (CH4-GS) and geothermal energy (GE), especially in densely populated countries, such as Italy. Currently, 13.7% of Italian energy demand is met by foreign providers. Most of the Italian regions have energy deficits, and the Latium Region (in Central Italy) represents one of those in the worst conditions. This work proposes a methodology to develop energy-mix scenarios, starting in Latium, to identify areas that are potentially suitable for CCS, CH4-GS and GE. Six geothermal systems and one CO2/CH4 storage potential area were identified. Three main scenarios are proposed: (A) a combination of CH4-GS with methane as cushion gas and GE; (B) a combination of CH4-GS with CO2 as cushion gas and GE; (C) a combination of CCS and GE. Scenario A results in a reduction of the regional energy deficit that ranges from 21.8% to 45.6%. In Scenario B, the regional energy deficit reduction ranges from 30.8% to 80.7% and the CO2 emissions reduction ranges from 1.4% to 5.6%, supposing an injection of 20爕ears. Scenario C shows a decrease in the regional energy deficit that ranges from 15.9% to 22.1%, while the CO2 emissions reduction ranges from 7.1% to 31.3%, over the same time period. The proposed scenarios may be useful not only for the scientific community but also for policymakers as they identify the most reliable energetic strategies. Thus, this case study could be extended to the entire Italian territory with the ultimate goal of reaching energy autonomy in each region.

M. Procesi; B. Cantucci; M. Buttinelli; G. Armezzani; F. Quattrocchi; E. Boschi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Comparison of geomechanical deformation induced by megatonne-scale CO2 storage at Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Otway (62) Basins, a sedimentary basin in Japan (63), Teapot Dome, Wyoming (64), and The Rose Run Sandstone, Ohio (65), Weyburn (66), and the Dogger Carbonate, Paris...simulation of a CO 2 sequestration project in a mature oil field, Teapot Dome, Wy. PhD thesis (Stanford University, Stanford, CA...

James P. Verdon; J.-Michael Kendall; Anna L. Stork; R. Andy Chadwick; Don J. White; Rob C. Bissell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

192

Large-Scale Hydropower Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Hydropower Basics Large-Scale Hydropower Basics Large-Scale Hydropower Basics August 14, 2013 - 3:11pm Addthis Large-scale hydropower plants are generally developed to produce electricity for government or electric utility projects. These plants are more than 30 megawatts (MW) in size, and there is more than 80,000 MW of installed generation capacity in the United States today. Most large-scale hydropower projects use a dam and a reservoir to retain water from a river. When the stored water is released, it passes through and rotates turbines, which spin generators to produce electricity. Water stored in a reservoir can be accessed quickly for use during times when the demand for electricity is high. Dammed hydropower projects can also be built as power storage facilities.

193

Large-Scale Hydropower Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Hydropower Basics Large-Scale Hydropower Basics Large-Scale Hydropower Basics August 14, 2013 - 3:11pm Addthis Large-scale hydropower plants are generally developed to produce electricity for government or electric utility projects. These plants are more than 30 megawatts (MW) in size, and there is more than 80,000 MW of installed generation capacity in the United States today. Most large-scale hydropower projects use a dam and a reservoir to retain water from a river. When the stored water is released, it passes through and rotates turbines, which spin generators to produce electricity. Water stored in a reservoir can be accessed quickly for use during times when the demand for electricity is high. Dammed hydropower projects can also be built as power storage facilities.

194

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and liability for carbon capture and sequestration, Environ.Wilson and Gerard, editors, Carbon Capture and SequestrationSpecial Report on carbon dioxide capture and storage, ISBN

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A method for quick assessment of CO2 storage capacity in closedand semi-closed saline formations  

SciTech Connect

Saline aquifers of high permeability bounded by overlying/underlying seals may be surrounded laterally by low-permeability zones, possibly caused by natural heterogeneity and/or faulting. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into and storage in such 'closed' systems with impervious seals, or 'semi-closed' systems with nonideal (low-permeability) seals, is different from that in 'open' systems, from which the displaced brine can easily escape laterally. In closed or semi-closed systems, the pressure buildup caused by continuous industrial-scale CO{sub 2} injection may have a limiting effect on CO{sub 2} storage capacity, because geomechanical damage caused by overpressure needs to be avoided. In this research, a simple analytical method was developed for the quick assessment of the CO{sub 2} storage capacity in such closed and semi-closed systems. This quick-assessment method is based on the fact that native brine (of an equivalent volume) displaced by the cumulative injected CO{sub 2} occupies additional pore volume within the storage formation and the seals, provided by pore and brine compressibility in response to pressure buildup. With nonideal seals, brine may also leak through the seals into overlying/underlying formations. The quick-assessment method calculates these brine displacement contributions in response to an estimated average pressure buildup in the storage reservoir. The CO{sub 2} storage capacity and the transient domain-averaged pressure buildup estimated through the quick-assessment method were compared with the 'true' values obtained using detailed numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} and brine transport in a two-dimensional radial system. The good agreement indicates that the proposed method can produce reasonable approximations for storage-formation-seal systems of various geometric and hydrogeological properties.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Tsang, C.F.; Rutqvist, J.

2008-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: Industrial Capture & Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Technologies Industrial Capture & Storage Area 1 Large-Scale Industrial CCS Program The United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL, or DOE) is currently implementing a program titled "Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use." This CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and CO2 use program is a cost-shared collaboration between the Government and industry whose purpose is to increase investment in clean industrial technologies and sequestration projects. In accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and Section 703 of Public Law 110-140, DOE's two specific objectives are to demonstrate: (1) Large-Scale Industrial CCS projects from industrial sources, and (2) Innovative Concepts for beneficial CO2 use.

197

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a comparison of hydrologic issues and technical approaches used in deep-well injection and disposal of liquid wastes, and those issues and approaches associated with injection and storage of CO{sub 2} in deep brine formations. These comparisons have been discussed in nine areas: (1) Injection well integrity; (2) Abandoned well problems; (3) Buoyancy effects; (4) Multiphase flow effects; (5) Heterogeneity and flow channeling; (6) Multilayer isolation effects; (7) Caprock effectiveness and hydrogeomechanics; (8) Site characterization and monitoring; and (9) Effects of CO{sub 2} storage on groundwater resources There are considerable similarities, as well as significant differences. Scientifically and technically, these two fields can learn much from each other. The discussions presented in this paper should help to focus on the key scientific issues facing deep injection of fluids. A substantial but by no means exhaustive reference list has been provided for further studies into the subject.

Tsang, C.-F.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

NETL: Industrial Capture & Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Capture & Storage Industrial Capture & Storage Technologies Industrial Capture & Storage The United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL, or DOE) is currently implementing a program titled "Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use." This CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and CO2 use program is a cost-shared collaboration between the Government and industry whose purpose is to increase investment in clean industrial technologies and sequestration projects. In accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and Section 703 of Public Law 110-140, DOE's two specific objectives are to demonstrate: (1) Large-Scale Industrial CCS projects from industrial sources, and (2) Innovative Concepts for beneficial CO2 use.

199

Conundrum of the Large Scale Streaming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The etiology of the large scale peculiar velocity (large scale streaming motion) of clusters would increasingly seem more tenuous, within the context of the gravitational instability hypothesis. Are there any alternative testable models possibly accounting for such large scale streaming of clusters?

T. M. Malm

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ECO2N - A New TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Studies of CO2Storage in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect

ECO2N is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.0) that was designed for applications to geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers. It includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H{sub 2}O-NaCl-CO{sub 2} mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for the temperature, pressure and salinity conditions of interest(10 C {le} T {le} 110 C; P {le} 600 bar; salinity up to full halite saturation). Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO{sub 2}-rich) phase, as well as two-phase mixtures. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. ECO2N can model super- as well as sub-critical conditions, but it does not make a distinction between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. This paper highlights significant features of ECO2N, and presents illustrative applications.

Pruess, Karsten; Spycher, Nicholas

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

202

CO2 Sequestration short course  

SciTech Connect

Given the public抯 interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Cole, David R [The Ohio State University; Navrotsky, Alexandra [University of California-Davis; Bourg, Ian C [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

Carbon Capture and a Commercial Market for CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With increasing evidence that the earth is warming at a faster rate than previously expected, there is pressure to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions on a large scale. Because carbon capture helps to internali...

Thomas R. Sadler

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Synthetic fuel concept to steal CO2 from air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to steal CO2 from air Lab has developed a low-risk, transformational concept, called Green Freedom(tm), for large-scale production of carbon-neutral, sulfur-free fuels and...

205

A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models  

SciTech Connect

A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution of Design Rules for Biological Automation, polydimethylsiloxane Abstract Microfluidic large-scale integration (mLSI) refers to the develop- ment of microfluidic, are discussed. Several microfluidic components used as building blocks to create effective, complex, and highly

Quake, Stephen R.

207

Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (? 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and shale cores, which were pressurized with high pressure CO2, determine the fate of sequestered CO2 in these cores. Our results suggested that Illinois bituminous coal in its unperturbed state, i.e., when not pressurized with CO2, showed large variations in the mechanical properties. Modulus varied from 0.7 GPa to 3.4 GPa even though samples were extracted from a single large chunk of coal. We did not observe any glass transition for Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, however, when the coal was pressurized with CO2 at ambient ? P ? 20.7 MPa, the viscosity of the coal decreased and inversely scaled with the CO2 pressure. The decrease in viscosity as a function of pressure could pose CO2 injection problems for coal as lower viscosity would allow the solid coal to flow to plug the fractures, fissures, and cleats. Our experiments also showed a very small fraction of CO2 was absorbed in coal; and when CO2 pressurized coals were exposed to atmospheric conditions, the loss of CO2 from coals was massive. Half of the sequestered gas from the coal cores was lost in less than 20 minutes. Our shockwave experiments on Illinois bituminous coal, New Albany shale (Illinois), Devonian shale (Ohio), and Utica shale (Ohio) presented clear evidence that the significant emission of the sequestered CO2 from these formations cannot be discounted during seismic activity, especially if caprock is compromised. It is argued that additional shockwave studies, both compressive and transverse, would be required for successfully mapping the risks associated with sequestering high pressure CO2 in coal and shale formations.

Malhotra, Vivak

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications Large scale Python and other dynamic applications may spend huge...

209

Metal Organic Framework Research: High Throughput Discovery of Robust Metal Organic Framework for CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: LBNL is developing a method for identifying the best metal organic frameworks for use in capturing CO2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Metal organic frameworks are porous, crystalline compounds that, based on their chemical structure, vary considerably in terms of their capacity to grab hold of passing CO2 molecules and their ability to withstand the harsh conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Owing primarily to their high tunability, metal organic frameworks can have an incredibly wide range of different chemical and physical properties, so identifying the best to use for CO2 capture and storage can be a difficult task. LBNL uses high-throughput instrumentation to analyze nearly 100 materials at a time, screening them for the characteristics that optimize their ability to selectively adsorb CO2 from coal exhaust. Their work will identify the most promising frameworks and accelerate their large-scale commercial development to benefit further research into reducing the cost of CO2 capture and storage.

None

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on "CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 saturation at the Weyburn CO 2 EOR injection project inMonitoring CO 2 storage during EOR at the Weyburn-Midalean excellent example of a CO 2 EOR (enhanced oil recovery)

Lumley, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

CO2 sequestration | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 sequestration CO2 sequestration Leads No leads are available at this time. Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on...

212

Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

Oehmen, Josef

213

Large-scale adaptive mantle convection simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage...International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage...International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage......

Carsten Burstedde; Georg Stadler; Laura Alisic; Lucas C. Wilcox; Eh Tan; Michael Gurnis; Omar Ghattas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA (Amazon) LBA (Amazon) The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) Overview [LBA Logo] The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is an international research initiative conducted from 1995-2005 and led by Brazil. The LBA Project encompasses several scientific disciplines, or components. The LBA-ECO component focuses on the question: "How do tropical forest conversion, regrowth, and selective logging influence carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, trace gas fluxes, and the prospect for sustainable land use in Amazonia?" The Amazon rain forest or Amazonia, is the largest remaining expanse of tropical rain forest on Earth, harboring approximately one-third of all Earth's species. Although the rain forest's area is so large that it

215

Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources In 2009, the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-quarter of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, according to data from DOE's Energy Information Administration. In a major step forward in the fight to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial plants, DOE has allocated Recovery Act funds to more than 25 projects that capture and sequester CO2 emissions from industrial sources - such as cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, paper mills, and manufacturing facilities - into underground formations. Large-Scale Projects Three projects are aimed at testing large-scale industrial carbon capture

216

NETL: Industrial Capture & Storage Area 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Technologies Industrial Capture & Storage Area 2 Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use The United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL, or DOE) is currently implementing a program titled "Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use." This CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and CO2 use program is a cost-shared collaboration between the Government and industry whose purpose is to increase investment in clean industrial technologies and sequestration projects. In accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and Section 703 of Public Law 110-140, DOE's two specific objectives are to demonstrate: (1) Large-Scale Industrial CCS projects from industrial sources, and (2) Innovative Concepts for beneficial CO2 use.

217

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 Solar energy Nuclear CO2 recovery and storage (CCS)Solar C O Emissions after Reductiori I Nuclear I CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) J energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

CO2 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 CO2 Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2 sulfur dioxide emissions

219

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce...

Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed 1984-

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership--Development Phase - Large Scale Field Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov Andrea McNemar Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Edward N. Steadman Technical Contact Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geomechanical effects on CO2 leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of Shale-Gasfault reactivation and hydraulic fracturing during shale gas

Rinaldi, A.P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

An air杔iquid contactor for large-scale capture of CO2 from air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...taking control of our planet's...as a pre-treatment before cryogenic...industrial-scale AC systems using current...at power plants because it...towers and waste treatment...thermally integrated with the...K-based systems with packed...outside the plant boundary...easily integrated with the...needed to control the particle...configuration. These systems are very...wastewater treatment applications...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Geomechanical effects on CO2 leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic fracturing of Shale-Gas reservoir. J. Petrol. Sci.hydraulic fracturing during shale gas operations (Rutqvist

Rinaldi, A.P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

An air杔iquid contactor for large-scale capture of CO2 from air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the air contactor. It would be much less costly if an operable process could be designed with a more open system, such as...kind to risks from other energy technology, such as biofuel refineries. We anticipate that existing health, safety and environmental...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cost Comparison Among Concepts of Injection for CO2 Offshore Underground Sequestration Envisaged in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Japan is in the process of 5-year R&D program of underground storage of CO2, and this study was carried out as part of this program. Offshore saline aquifers are the target geological formation in this program because (1) most of large-scale emission sources of CO2 are located near the coast in Japan, (2) aquifers of large volume are expected to be found more in offshore than on land, and (3) site acquisition is much more costly on land. At present, the total time scheme of the sequestration process is assumed, which is based on practical results from similar processes such as large-scale underground storage of natural gas in aquifers. The total system of underground sequestration can be roughly divided into three processes: recovery, transportation, and injection. Although the methods of recovery and transportation have been well studied, the injection process has not been established as it is significantly affected by geographic, geological, and topographic features of the site. The cost of injection into an offshore aquifer varies with the method applied. One reason is that there are a variety of applicable designs and construction methods of wells and surface facilities (especially offshore) that depend on the conditions of injection site. The other reason is that there are many uncertainties in exploration and operation, as is the case with petroleum development. This chapter presents the results of the preliminary analysis on the costs of injection facilities.

Hironori Kotsubo; Takashi Ohsumi; Hitoshi Koide; Motoo Uno; Takeshi Ito; Toshio Kobayashi; Kozo Ishida

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

"Applications and future trends in polymer materials for green energy systems: from energy generation and storage, to CO2 capture and transportaion"  

SciTech Connect

Presentation describes United Technologies Research Center's recent work in green energy systems, including APRA-E project content to create a synthetic analogue of the carbonic anhydrase enzyme and incorporate it into a membrane for CO2 separation from the flue gas of a coal power plant.

George Zafiris

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

NETL: Industrial Capture and Storage (ICCS): Area 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ICCS Area 1 ICCS Area 1 Major Demonstrations Industrial Capture and Storage (ICCS): Area 1 The Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects (Area 1) are managed by NETL under the Major Demonstrations Program. In October 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of 12 Large-Scale projects intended to capture CO2 from industrial sources for storage or beneficial use. Read more! These Phase I projects were cost-shared collaborations between the government and industry to increase investment in clean industrial technologies and sequestration projects. The Phase I duration of each project selected was approximately seven months. On June 10, 2010, DOE selected three projects from Phase I to enter into Phase 2 for design, construction, and operation. Potential additional applications for funding of large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage projects are pending further clarification and review. Collapse Text

228

Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering at Large Scale at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume Rendering at Large Scale Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering at Large Scale volrend-swes.png We studied the performance and scalability characteristics of hybrid''...

229

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Guide Renewable Energy Guide Brad Gustafson, FEMP 2 Large-scale RE Guide Large-scale RE Guide: Developing Renewable Energy Projects Larger than 10 MWs at Federal Facilities Introduction and Overview Federal Utility Partnership Working Group May 22, 2013 Federal Energy Management Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy 3 Federal Energy Management Program FEMP works with key individuals to accomplish energy change within organizations by bringing expertise from all levels of project and policy implementation to enable Federal Agencies to meet energy related goals and to provide energy leadership to the country. 4 FEMP Renewable Energy * Works to increase the proportion of renewable energy in the Federal government's energy mix.

230

The large-scale structure of vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vacuum state in quantum field theory is known to exhibit an important number of fundamental physical features. In this work we explore the possibility that this state could also present a non-trivial space-time structure on large scales. In particular, we will show that by imposing the renormalized vacuum energy-momentum tensor to be conserved and compatible with cosmological observations, the vacuum energy of sufficiently heavy fields behaves at late times as non-relativistic matter rather than as a cosmological constant. In this limit, the vacuum state supports perturbations whose speed of sound is negligible and accordingly allows the growth of structures in the vacuum energy itself. This large-scale structure of vacuum could seed the formation of galaxies and clusters very much in the same way as cold dark matter does.

Albareti, F D; Maroto, A L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage of carbon dioxide is being actively considered for the reduction of green house gases. To make an impact on the environment CO2 should be put away on the scale of gigatonnes per annum. The storage capacity of deep saline aquifers...

Anchliya, Abhishek

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

232

NETL: CO2 Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Compression CO2 Compression The CO2 captured from a power plant will need to be compressed from near atmospheric pressure to a pressure between 1,500 and 2,200 psi in order to be transported via pipeline and then injected into an underground sequestration site. Read More! CO2 Compression The compression of CO2 represents a potentially large auxiliary power load on the overall power plant system. For example, in an August 2007 study conducted for DOE/NETL, CO2 compression was accomplished using a six-stage centrifugal compressor with interstage cooling that required an auxiliary load of approximately 7.5 percent of the gross power output of a subcritical pressure, coal-fired power plant. As a result, DOE/NETL is sponsoring R&D to develop novel methods that can significantly decrease the

233

EMSL - CO2 sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

co2-sequestration en Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on Alumina. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

234

Large-Scale Cotton Production in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

introduction of tractor power and improved farm machinery in cotton-growing, the new methods in cotton har- vesting, and the recent improvements in machinery for ex- tracting the burs and cleaning the lint in the ginning process, mark the beginning of a new.... Specifically, it seeks: (1) to describe the common practices and show the ac- complishn~ents in the principal operations involved in large- scale cotton production, (2) to compare the use of animal and tractor power, (3) to point out the influence...

Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.); Jones, Fred Rufus

1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

CO2 Hydrate Composite for Ocean Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 Hydrate Composite for Ocean Carbon Sequestration ... Further studies are needed to address hydrate conversion efficiency, scale-up criteria, sequestration longevity, and impact on the ocean biota before in-situ production of sinking CO2 hydrate composite can be applied to oceanic CO2 storage and sequestration. ...

Sangyong Lee; Liyuan Liang; David Riestenberg; Olivia R. West; Costas Tsouris; Eric Adams

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Climatology of Tropical Anvil and Its Relationship to the Large-Scale Circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research was sponsored by the ARM-DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64174. viii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT??????.???????????????????..??? iii DEDICATION... the climate feedback obtained from doubled CO 2 experiments with different parameterizations of large-scale clouds and moist convection by using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. They showed that the presence of optically thick anvil...

Li, Wei

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

237

BNL | CO2 Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Laser CO2 Laser The ATF is one of the only two facilities worldwide operating picosecond, terawatt-class CO2 lasers. Our laser system consists of a picoseconds pulse-injector based on fast optical switching from the output of a conventional CO2 laser oscillator, and a chain of high-pressure laser amplifiers. It starts with a wavelength converter wherein a near-IR picosecond solid-state laser with l禄1 渭m produces a mid-IR 10-渭m pulse. This process employs two methods; semiconductor optical switching, and the Kerr effect. First, we combine the outputs from a multi-nanosecond CO2 laser oscillator with a picosecond Nd:YAG laser on a germanium Brewster-plate to produce an ~200 ps, 10渭m pulse by semiconductor optical switching. Co-propagating this pulse with a Nd:YAG's 2nd harmonic in a

238

DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000032 The Immobility of CO2 in Marine Sediments Beneath 1500  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of seawater has been suggested for the permanent storage of an- thropogenic CO2. At the pressures of injecting CO2 into marine sediments at depths shallower than required for denser-than-seawater CO2 storage and temperature conditions compress CO2 to a liquid phase that is denser than seawater.[11] Storing denser

Schrag, Daniel

239

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proceedings of High Performance Computing 2011 (HPC-2011)In recent years, high performance computing has becomeNERSC is the primary high-performance computing facility for

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Type Ia supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, X-ray bursts and corerelativistic jet, making a gamma-ray burst, the luminositythose that lead to gamma-ray bursts. The current frontier is

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the process of thermonuclear incineration of theircore-collapse and thermonuclear events to test predictionsprocesses. In contrast to thermonuclear supernova modeling,

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

second resulting from a thermonuclear explosion of materialresult from the thermonuclear burning of a carbon-oxygensensitive to how the thermonuclear runaway is ignited (

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator science and technology objectives for all applications * Achieve higher energy and intensity, faster and cheaper machine design, more reliable operation a wide...

244

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research program in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This research addresses fundamental questions in high energy and nuclear

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a strong program of research in theoretical nuclear physics,Research 12.1 Overview The Nuclear Physics programan extensive program of experimental research in nuclear

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Harvey Wasserman! Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a nd reach a greement o n k ey fi ndings Expectations: Final Report * Final r eports f rom 2 009---2011 w orkshops ( Target: 2014) on web - h%p:www.nersc.govscience...

247

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic Spectrometer, Dark Energy Survey, Palomar Transientform the basis for dark energy surveys. Unlike high-redshiftDark Energy Mission (JDEM) and the Large Synoptic Sky Survey (

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-Energy Nuclear Physics National Joseph Carlson / HPC Initiative: Building a Universal Joseph Carlson Jonathan Engel Nuclear Energy Density Functional Structure and Reactions

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neutrino matrix. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments,process called neutrinoless double beta decay in nuclei,

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for High Energy Physics for High Energy Physics Accelerator Physics P. Spentzouris, Fermilab Motivation Accelerators enable many important applications, both in basic research and applied sciences Different machine attributes are emphasized for different applications * Different particle beams and operation principles * Different energies and intensities Accelerator science and technology objectives for all applications * Achieve higher energy and intensity, faster and cheaper machine design, more reliable operation a wide spectrum of requirements for very complex instruments. Assisting their design and operation requires an equally complex set of computational tools. High Energy Physics Priorities High energy frontier * Use high-energy colliders to discover new particles and

251

Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description We propose a large scale demonstration of solar assisted GSHP systems on two poultry farms in mid-Missouri. The heating load of Farm A with 4 barns will be 510 tons and Farm B with 5 barns will be 440 tons. Solar assisted GSHP systems will be installed, and new utility business model will be applied to both farms. Farm A will be constructed with commercial products in order to bring immediate impact to the industry. Farm B will also have a thermal energy storage system installed, and improved solar collectors will be used. A comprehensive energy analysis and economic study will be conducted.

252

DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing May 16, 2005 - 12:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE's Office of Science is seeking proposals to support innovative, large-scale computational science projects to enable high-impact advances through the use of advanced computers not commonly available in academia or the private sector. Projects currently funded are helping to reduce engine pollution and to improve our understanding of the stars and solar systems and human genetics. Successful proposers will be given the use of substantial computer time and data storage at the department's scientific

253

DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing May 16, 2005 - 12:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE's Office of Science is seeking proposals to support innovative, large-scale computational science projects to enable high-impact advances through the use of advanced computers not commonly available in academia or the private sector. Projects currently funded are helping to reduce engine pollution and to improve our understanding of the stars and solar systems and human genetics. Successful proposers will be given the use of substantial computer time and data storage at the department's scientific

254

Atypical Behavior Identification in Large Scale Network Traffic  

SciTech Connect

Cyber analysts are faced with the daunting challenge of identifying exploits and threats within potentially billions of daily records of network traffic. Enterprise-wide cyber traffic involves hundreds of millions of distinct IP addresses and results in data sets ranging from terabytes to petabytes of raw data. Creating behavioral models and identifying trends based on those models requires data intensive architectures and techniques that can scale as data volume increases. Analysts need scalable visualization methods that foster interactive exploration of data and enable identification of behavioral anomalies. Developers must carefully consider application design, storage, processing, and display to provide usability and interactivity with large-scale data. We present an application that highlights atypical behavior in enterprise network flow records. This is accomplished by utilizing data intensive architectures to store the data, aggregation techniques to optimize data access, statistical techniques to characterize behavior, and a visual analytic environment to render the behavioral trends, highlight atypical activity, and allow for exploration.

Best, Daniel M.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Olsen, Bryan K.; Pike, William A.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

255

CINETIQUES DE SORPTION DU CO2 DANS LE CADRE DU STOCKAGE GEOLOGIQUE DU CO2 DANS LE CHARBON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CINETIQUES DE SORPTION DU CO2 DANS LE CADRE DU STOCKAGE GEOLOGIQUE DU CO2 DANS LE CHARBON KINETIC PROCESSES OF CO2 SORPTION FOR CO2 STORAGE IN COAL SEAMS Delphine CHARRIERE1, 2 , Zbigniew POKRYSZKA1 r茅cup茅ration assist茅e du m茅thane requiert des informations sur les m茅canismes de sorption de gaz. Dans ce

Boyer, Edmond

256

Department of Energy Announces 15 Projects Aimed at Secure CO2...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

experimental studies, numerical pore- and reservoir-scale modeling, and high-performance computing to investigate various large-scale storage schemes with the goal of...

257

Developing a monitoring and verification plan with reference to the Australian Otway CO2 pilot project  

SciTech Connect

The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently injecting 100,000 tons of CO{sub 2} in a large-scale test of storage technology in a pilot project in southeastern Australia called the CO2CRC Otway Project. The Otway Basin, with its natural CO{sub 2} accumulations and many depleted gas fields, offers an appropriate site for such a pilot project. An 80% CO{sub 2} stream is produced from a well (Buttress) near the depleted gas reservoir (Naylor) used for storage (Figure 1). The goal of this project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} can be safely transported, stored underground, and its behavior tracked and monitored. The monitoring and verification framework has been developed to monitor for the presence and behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface reservoir, near surface, and atmosphere. This monitoring framework addresses areas, identified by a rigorous risk assessment, to verify conformance to clearly identifiable performance criteria. These criteria have been agreed with the regulatory authorities to manage the project through all phases addressing responsibilities, liabilities, and to assure the public of safe storage.

Dodds, K.; Daley, T.; Freifeld, B.; Urosevic, M.; Kepic, A.; Sharma, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reversible Hydrogen Storage using CO2 and a Proton-Switchable Iridium Catalyst in Aqueous Media under Mild Temperatures and Pressures  

SciTech Connect

Green plants convert CO{sub 2} to sugar for energy storage via photosynthesis. We report a novel catalyst that uses CO{sub 2} and hydrogen to store energy in formic acid. Using a homogeneous iridium catalyst with a proton-responsive ligand, we show the first reversible and recyclable hydrogen storage system that operates under mild conditions using CO{sub 2}, formate and formic acid. This system is energy-efficient and green because it operates near ambient conditions, uses water as a solvent, produces high-pressure CO-free hydrogen, and uses pH to control hydrogen production or consumption. The extraordinary and switchable catalytic activity is attributed to the multifunctional ligand, which acts as a proton-relay and strong {pi}-donor, and is rationalized by theoretical and experimental studies.

Hull J. F.; Himeda, Y.; Wang, W.-H.; Hashiguchi, B.; Szalda, D.J.; Muckerman, J.T.; Fujita, E.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Federal Energy Management Program: Large-scale Renewable Energy Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large-scale Large-scale Renewable Energy Projects (Larger than 10 MWs) to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Large-scale Renewable Energy Projects (Larger than 10 MWs) on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Large-scale Renewable Energy Projects (Larger than 10 MWs) on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Large-scale Renewable Energy Projects (Larger than 10 MWs) on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Large-scale Renewable Energy Projects (Larger than 10 MWs) on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Large-scale Renewable Energy Projects (Larger than 10 MWs) on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Large-scale Renewable Energy Projects (Larger than 10 MWs) on

260

FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects August 21, 2013 - 12:00am...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including 10% post consumer waste. 1 WREF 2012: LESSONS FROM LARGE-SCALE RENEWABLE ENERGY INTEGRATION STUDIES A number of large-scale studies have been conducted in the...

262

Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

Li, Fangfei, E-mail: li-fangfei@163.com [Department of Mathematics, East China University of Science and Technology, No. 130, Meilong Road, Shanghai, Shanghai 200237 (China)] [Department of Mathematics, East China University of Science and Technology, No. 130, Meilong Road, Shanghai, Shanghai 200237 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Theoretical Tools for Large Scale Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the main theoretical aspects of the structure formation paradigm which impinge upon wide angle surveys: the early universe generation of gravitational metric fluctuations from quantum noise in scalar inflaton fields; the well understood and computed linear regime of CMB anisotropy and large scale structure (LSS) generation; the weakly nonlinear regime, where higher order perturbation theory works well, and where the cosmic web picture operates, describing an interconnected LSS of clusters bridged by filaments, with membranes as the intrafilament webbing. Current CMB+LSS data favour the simplest inflation-based $\\Lambda$CDM models, with a primordial spectral index within about 5% of scale invariant and $\\Omega_\\Lambda \\approx 2/3$, similar to that inferred from SNIa observations, and with open CDM models strongly disfavoured. The attack on the nonlinear regime with a variety of N-body and gas codes is described, as are the excursion set and peak-patch semianalytic approaches to object collapse. The ingredients are mixed together in an illustrative gasdynamical simulation of dense supercluster formation.

J. R. Bond; L. Kofman; D. Pogosyan; J. Wadsley

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

264

Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership PCOR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Reduction Partnership PCOR CO2 Reduction Partnership PCOR Jump to: navigation, search Name Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership (PCOR) Place Grand Forks, North Dakota Zip 58202-9018 Product North Dakota-based consortium researching CO2 storage options. PCOR is busy with the ECBM in the Unminable Lignite Research Project. References Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership (PCOR)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership (PCOR) is a company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota . References 鈫 "Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership (PCOR)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Plains_CO2_Reduction_Partnership_PCOR&oldid=349772"

265

Numerical Simulation of CO2 Sequestration in Natural CO2 Reservoirs on the Colorado Plateau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation of CO Simulation of CO 2 Sequestration in Natural CO 2 Reservoirs on the Colorado Plateau Stephen P. White (S.White@irl.cri.nz, (64) 4 5690000) Graham J. Weir (G.Weir@irl.cri.nz, (64) 4 5690000) Warwick M. Kissling (W.Kissling@irl.cri.nz, (64) 4 5690000) Industrial Research Ltd. P.O. Box 31310 Lower Hutt, New Zealand Abstract This paper outlines the proposed research and summarizes pre-project work that forms a basis for a new research program on CO 2 sequestration in saline aquifers. The pre-project work considers storage and disposal of CO 2 several kilometers beneath the surface in generic aquifers and demonstrates the use of reactive chemical transport modeling to simulate mineral sequestration of CO 2. The current research project applies these techniques to particular saline

266

Uncertainty quantification for CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study develops a statistical method to perform uncertainty quantification for understanding CO2 storage potential within an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) environment at the Farnsworth Unit of the Anadarko Basin in northern Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil-water flow and reactive transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major uncertainty metrics: net CO2 injection, cumulative oil production, cumulative gas (CH4) production, and net water injection. A global sensitivity and response surface analysis indicates that reservoir permeability, porosity, and thickness are the major intrinsic reservoir parameters that control net CO2 injection/storage and oil/gas recovery rates. The well spacing and the initial water saturation also have large impact on the oil/gas recovery rates. Further, this study has revealed key insights into the potential behavior and the operational parameters of CO2 sequestration at CO2-EOR s...

Dai, Zhenxue; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Jia, Wei; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Ampomah, William; Grigg, Reid

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale SustainableHydrogen Batteries Nuclear By Lee Lynd, Dartmouth Ethanol 旹thanol, ethyl alcohol, fermentation ethanol, or just

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Solving large scale polynomial convex problems on \\ell_1/nuclear ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 24, 2012 ... Solving large scale polynomial convex problems on \\ell_1/nuclear norm balls by randomized first-order algorithms. Aharon Ben-Tal (abental...

Aharon Ben-Tal

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

Optimization Online - Large-Scale Linear Programming Techniques ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-Scale Linear Programming Techniques for the Design of Protein Folding Potentials. Michael Wagner (mwagner ***at*** odu.edu) Jaroslaw Meller (jmeller

Michael Wagner

270

Microsoft Word - Vit Plant Large Scale Testing_20110901.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sept. 1, 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant awards large-scale testing subcontract to local engineering firm Testing will enable project to finalize safe mixing design MEDIA...

271

Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Shawn Yunsheng Xu University of Missouri May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential,...

272

Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Large Scale GSHP as Alternative...

273

Auxiliary basis expansions for large-scale electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large-scale electronic structure calculations. Yousung Jungcost of electronic structure calculations is to employIntroduction. Electronic structure calculations are normally

Jung, Yousung; Sodt, Alexander; Gill, Peter W.M.; Head-Gordon, Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy consumption analysis for CO2 separation from gas mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract CO2 separation is an energy intensive process, which plays an important role in both energy saving and CO2 capture and storage (CCS) implementation to deal with global warming. To quantitatively investigate the energy consumption of CO2 separation from different CO2 streams and analyze the effect of temperature, pressure and composition on energy consumption, in this work, the theoretical energy consumption of CO2 separation from flue gas, lime kiln gas, biogas and bio-syngas was calculated. The results show that the energy consumption of CO2 separation from flue gas is the highest and that from biogas is the lowest, and the concentration of CO2 is the most important factor affecting the energy consumption when the CO2 concentration is lower than 0.15 in mole fraction. Furthermore, if the CO2 captured from flue gases in CCS was replaced with that from biogases, i.e. bio-CO2, the energy saving would be equivalent to 7.31 million ton standard coal for China and 28.13 million ton standard coal globally, which corresponds to 0.30 billion US$ that can be saved for China and 1.36 billion US$ saved globally. This observation reveals the importance of trading fossil fuel-based CO2 with bio-CO2.

Yingying Zhang; Xiaoyan Ji; Xiaohua Lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-combustion CO2 control systems separate CO2 from the flue gas produced by conventional coal combustion in air. The flue gas is at atmospheric pressure and has a CO2 concentration of 10-15 volume percent. Read More! Capturing CO2 under these conditions is challenging because: (1) the low pressure and dilute concentration dictate a high total volume of gas to be treated; (2) trace impurities in the flue gas tend to reduce the effectiveness of the CO2 separation processes; and (3) compressing captured CO2 from atmospheric pressure to pipeline pressure (1,200 - 2,200 pounds per square inch) represents a large parasitic energy load. Plant Picture DOE/NETL's post-combustion CO2 control technology R&D program includes

276

Synergic and conflicting issues in planning underground use to produce energy in densely populated countries, as Italy: Geological storage of CO2, natural gas, geothermics and nuclear waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In densely populated countries there is a growing and compelling need to use underground for different and possibly coexisting technologies to produce 搇ow carbon energy. These technologies include (i) clean coal combustion merged with CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS); (ii) last-generation nuclear power or, in any case, safe nuclear wastes disposal, both 搕emporary and 揼eological somewhere in Europe (at least in one site): Nuclear wastes are not necessarily associated to nuclear power plants; (iii) safe natural gas (CH4) reserves to allow consumption also when the foreign pipelines are less available or not available for geopolitical reasons and (iv) 搇ow-space-consuming renewables in terms of Energy Density Potential in Land (EDPL measured in [GW爃/ha/year]) as geothermics. When geothermics is exploited as low enthalpy technology, the heat/cool production could be associated, where possible, to increased measures of 揵uilding efficiency, low seismic risks building reworking and low-enthalpy heat managing. This is undispensable to build up 搒mart cities. In any case the underground geological knowledge is prerequisite. All these technologies have been already proposed and defined by the International Energy Agency (IEA) Road Map 2009 as priorities for worldwide security: all need to use underground in a rational and safe manner. The underground is not renewable in most of case histories [10,11]. IEA recently matched and compared different technologies in a unique 揅lean Energy Economy improved document (Paris, November 1617, 2011), by the contribution of this vision too (see reference). In concert with 揺nergy efficiency improvement both for plants and buildings, in the frame of the 搒mart cities scenarios, and the upstanding use of 揺nergy savings, the energetic planning on regional scale where these cities are located, are strategic for the year 2050: this planning is strongly depending by the underground availability and typology. Therefore, if both literature and European Policy are going fast to improve the concept of 搒mart cities this paper stresses the concept of 搒mart regions, more strategic than 搒mart cities, passing throughout a discussion on the synergic and conflicting use of underground to produce energy for the 搒mart regions as a whole. The paper highlights the research lines which are urgent to plan the soundest energy mix for each region by considering the underground performances case by case: a worldwide mapping, by GIS tools of this kind of information could be strategic for all the 搘orld energy management authorities, up to ONU, with its Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the G20, the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) and the European Platforms such as the 揨ero Emissions Fossil Fuel Power Plants (EU-ZEP Platform), the Steel Platform, the Biomass Platform too. All of these organizations agree on the need for synergistic and coexistent uses of underground for geological storage of CO2, CH4, nuclear waste and geothermic exploitation. The paper is therefore a discussion of the tools, methods and approaches to these underground affecting technologies, after a gross view of the different uses of underground to produce energy for each use, with their main critical issues (i.e. public acceptance in different cases). The paper gives some gross evaluation for the Lazio Region and some hints from the Campania Region, located in Central Italy. Energy Density Potential in Land (EDPL), is calculated for each renewable energy technology (solar, wind, geothermal) highlighting the potentiality of the last. Why the Italian case history among the densely populated countries? on the Italian territory is hard to find suitable areas (mostly if greenfields) to use the own underground, with respect to other European countries, due to the presence of seismotectonic activity and many faulted areas characterized by Diffuse Degassing Structures (DDSs, which are rich in CO2 and CH4). In this cases, public acceptan

Fedora Quattrocchi; Enzo Boschi; Angelo Spena; Mauro Buttinelli; Barbara Cantucci; Monia Procesi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

POWER SYSTEMS STABILITY WITH LARGE-SCALE WIND POWER PENETRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of offshore wind farms, wind power fluctuations may introduce several challenges to reliable power system behaviour due to natural wind fluctuations. The rapid power fluctuations from the large scale wind farms Generation Control (AGC) system which includes large- scale wind farms for long-term stability simulation

Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

278

Ethics, Logs and Videotape: Ethics in Large Scale User Trials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethics, Logs and Videotape: Ethics in Large Scale User Trials and User Generated Content Abstract ethical responsibilities we have towards participants. This workshop brings together researchers to discuss the ethical issues of running large-scale user trials, and to provide guidance for future research

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

279

Large Scale Parameter Sweep Studies Using Distributed Matlab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Large Scale Parameter Sweep Studies Using Distributed Matlab Vikas Argod Graduate Assistant 225. The implementation is done in Matlab. The discussion extends to large scale problems of similar type using distributed matlab. Use of distributed matlab reduced computation time significantly

Bj酶rnstad, Ottar Nordal

280

MEMORY MANAGEMENT FOR LARGE-SCALE NUMA MULTIPROCESSORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEMORY MANAGEMENT FOR LARGE-SCALE NUMA MULTIPROCESSORS Thomas J. LeBlanc Brian D. Marsh Michael L@cs.rochester.edu marsh@cs.rochester.edu scott@cs.rochester.edu March 1989 Abstract Large-scale shared-memory multiprocessors such as the BBN Butterfly and IBM RP3 Introduce a new level In the memory hierarchy: multiple

Scott, Michael L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for large scale electronic structure calculations. J. Phys.large-scale electronic struc- ture calculations. Phys. Rev.Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations Lin-Wang Wang,

Wang, Lin-Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Linear scaling 3D fragment method for large-scale electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large-scale electronic structure calculations. Phys. Rev. B,for large scale electronic structure calculations. J. Phys.Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations Lin-Wang Wang,

Wang, Lin-Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

284

Novel CO2 - Philic Absorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Co Novel Co 2 - PhiliC AbsorbeNts Summary The ability to separate a high pressure mixture of CO 2 and H 2 such that a high pressure stream of CO 2 for sequestration and a high pressure stream of H 2 for energy are produced remains an elusive goal. This research has identified a class of compounds that melt in the presence of high pressure CO 2 , forming a liquid phase composed of roughly 50wt% CO 2 and 50wt% of the compound. Unlike conventional solvents that require substantial depressurization during regeneration to release a low pressure CO 2 stream, these novel compounds completely release the CO 2 at many hundreds of psia as the compound solidifies. This work will reveal whether one of more of these compounds can selectively remove CO 2 from a mixture

285

Leakage Risk Assessment of CO2 Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of CO 2 associated with carbon capture & storage projects:2 transportation for carbon capture and storage: sublimationin Gerard, W.A. , ed. , Carbon Capture and Sequestration

Mazzoldi, A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Development of experimental methods for intermediate scale testing of deep geologic CO2 sequestration trapping processes at ambient laboratory conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a potential strategy to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Deep geological formations provide a viable storage site for (more)

Vargas-Johnson, Javier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Interactions between reducing CO2 emissions, CO2 removal and solar radiation management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the geological storage capacity for CO2. For the SRM...reduction in incoming solar radiation that fully...3. Results (a) Solar radiation management...scale set by the heat capacity in the model. For s2030srm2015...reduction in incoming solar radiation in the first...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

289

Stabilization of Large Scale Structure by Adhesive Gravitational Clustering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interplay between gravitational and dispersive forces in a multi-streamed medium leads to an effect which is exposed in the present note as the genuine driving force of stabilization of large-scale structure. The conception of `adhesive gravitational clustering' is advanced to interlock the fairly well-understood epoch of formation of large-scale structure and the onset of virialization into objects that are dynamically in equilibrium with their large-scale structure environment. The classical `adhesion model' is opposed to a class of more general models traced from the physical origin of adhesion in kinetic theory.

Thomas Buchert

1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

290

Northern California CO2 Reduction Project  

SciTech Connect

C6 Resources LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Shell Oil Company, worked with the US Department of Energy (DOE) under a Cooperative Agreement to develop the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project. The objective of the Project is to demonstrate the viability of using Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) to reduce existing greenhouse gas emissions from industrial sources on a large-scale. The Project will capture more than 700,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, which is currently being vented to the atmosphere from the Shell Martinez Refinery in Contra Costa County. The CO2 will be compressed and dehydrated at the refinery and then transported via pipeline to a sequestration site in a rural area in neighboring Solano County. The CO2 will be sequestered into a deep saline formation (more than two miles underground) and will be monitored to assure secure, long-term containment. The pipeline will be designed to carry as much as 1,400,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, so additional capacity will be available to accommodate CO2 captured from other industrial sources. The Project is expected to begin operation in 2015. The Project has two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive design basis for the Project. The Cooperative Agreement with the DOE provided cost sharing for Phase 1 and the opportunity to apply for additional DOE cost sharing for Phase 2, comprising the design, construction and operation of the Project. Phase 1 has been completed. DOE co-funding is provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. As prescribed by ARRA, the Project will stimulate the local economy by creating manufacturing, transportation, construction, operations, and management jobs while addressing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at an accelerated pace. The Project, which will also assist in meeting the CO2 reduction requirements set forth in California?s Climate Change law, presents a major opportunity for both the environment as well as the region. C6 Resources is conducting the Project in collaboration with federally-funded research centers, such as Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and Lawrence Livermore National Lab. C6 Resources and Shell have identified CCS as one of the critical pathways toward a worldwide goal of providing cleaner energy. C6 Resources, in conjunction with the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), has conducted an extensive and ongoing public outreach and CCS education program for local, regional and state-wide stakeholders. As part of a long term relationship, C6 Resources will continue to engage directly with community leaders and residents to ensure public input and transparency. This topical report summarizes the technical work from Phase 1 of the Project in the following areas: ? Surface Facility Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the preliminary engineering work performed for CO2 capture, CO2 compression and dehydration at the refinery, and surface facilities at the sequestration site ? Pipeline Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the pipeline routing study and preliminary engineering design ? Geologic Sequestration: summarizes the work to characterize, model and evaluate the sequestration site ? Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA): summarizes the MVA plan to assure long-term containment of the sequestered CO2

Hymes, Edward

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Effects of diurnally oscillating pCO2 on the calcification and survival of coral recruits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pCO2-mediated, night-time storage of dissolved inorganic...atmospheric CO2 in seawater is thought to be...with surrounding seawater after approximately...indicating active DIC storage is possible. Short-term...store DIC is through storage in the cytosol...transports DIC from seawater into coral tissues...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

ARM - Instrument - co2flx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsco2flx govInstrumentsco2flx Documentation CO2FLX : Handbook CO2FLX : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports CO2FLX : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2FLX) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Carbon General Overview The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind

293

Energy and Climate Impacts of Producing Synthetic Hydrocarbon Fuels from CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These platforms make the case for (more) research on the conversion of CO2 into synthetic fuels as means to utilize CO2 and thereby mitigate its accumulation in the atmosphere. ... Stechel, E. B.; Miller, J. E.Re-energizing CO2 to fuels with the sun: Issues of efficiency, scale, and economics J. CO2 Util. ... Published analyses suggest these air capture systems may cost a few hundred dollars per ton of CO2, making it cost competitive with mainstream CO2 mitigation options like renewable energy, nuclear power, and carbon dioxide capture and storage from large CO2 emitting point sources. ...

Coen van der Giesen; Ren Kleijn; Gert Jan Kramer

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

ARM - Evaluation Product - Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain Site(s) NIM SGP General Description The Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain (VERVELSR) value-added product (VAP) uses the unique properties of a 95-GHz radar Doppler velocity spectra to produce vertical profiles of air motion during low-to-moderate (1-20 mm/hr) rainfall events It is designed to run at ARM sites that include a W-band ARM cloud radar (WACR) radar with spectra data processing. The VERVELSR VAP, based on the work of Giangrande et al. (2010), operates by exploiting a resonance effect that occurs in

295

How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

296

Retroreflective shadowgraph technique for large-scale flow visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for large-scale flow visualization, the simple shadow- graph can often provide the most robust solution photographed the shadowgram of a blasting-cap ex- plosion outdoors in daylight (see Fig. 6.14a of [1]). One

Settles, Gary S.

297

Surrogate modeling for large-scale black-box systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research introduces a systematic method to reduce the complexity of large-scale blackbox systems for which the governing equations are unavailable. For such systems, surrogate models are critical for many applications, ...

Liem, Rhea Patricia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

DOE Awards First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects DOE Awards First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects October 9, 2007 - 3:14pm Addthis U.S. Projects Total $318 Million and Further President Bush's Initiatives to Advance Clean Energy Technologies to Confront Climate Change WASHINGTON, DC - In a major step forward for demonstrating the promise of clean energy technology, U.S Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the first three large-scale carbon sequestration projects in the United States and the largest single set in the world to date. The three projects - Plains Carbon Dioxide Reduction Partnership; Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership; and Southwest Regional Partnership for Carbon

299

NETL: Carbon Storage - Knowledge Sharing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Knowledge Sharing Knowledge Sharing Carbon Storage Knowledge Sharing Outreach Efforts at SECARB's Anthropogenic Test Site in Alabama Outreach Efforts at SECARB's Anthropogenic Test Site in Alabama In order to achieve the commercialization of CO2 storage technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) acknowledges that knowledge sharing between various entities is essential. Distribution of the results and lessons learned from both field projects and Core R&D efforts will provide the foundation for future, large-scale CCS field tests across North America and in addressing future challenges associated with public acceptance, infrastructure (pipelines, compressor stations, etc.), and regulatory framework. DOE promotes information and knowledge sharing through various avenues including the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP)

300

Holographic principle and large scale structure in the universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A reasonable representation of large scale structure, in a closed universe so large it's nearly flat, can be developed by extending the holographic principle and assuming the bits of information describing the distribution of matter density in the universe remain in thermal equilibrium with the cosmic microwave background radiation. The analysis identifies three levels of self-similar large scale structure, corresponding to superclusters, galaxies, and star clusters, between today's observable universe and stellar systems. The self-similarity arises because, according to the virial theorem, the average gravitational potential energy per unit volume in each structural level is the same and depends only on the gravitational constant. The analysis indicates stellar systems first formed at z\\approx62, consistent with the findings of Naoz et al, and self-similar large scale structures began to appear at redshift z\\approx4. It outlines general features of development of self-similar large scale structures at redshift z<4. The analysis is consistent with observations for angular momentum of large scale structures as a function of mass, and average speed of substructures within large scale structures. The analysis also indicates relaxation times for star clusters are generally less than the age of the universe and relaxation times for more massive structures are greater than the age of the universe.

T. R. Mongan

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects November 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Three U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects have been identified by an international carbon storage organization as an important advancement toward commercialization and large-scale deployment of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies. The projects were officially recognized by the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) at its recent meeting in Perth, Australia for making significant contributions to the development of global carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation technologies. All three projects will appear in a yearly project portfolio on the CSLF website to keep the global community

302

Advanced Research Power Program--CO2 Mineral Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Sequestration Robert Romanosky National Energy Technology Laboratory Mineral Carbonation Workshop August 8, 2001 Advanced Research Power Program Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Mineral Sequestration Research Research effort seeks to refine and validate a promising CO 2 sequestration technology option, mineral sequestration also known as mineral carbonation Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date What is Mineral Carbonation * Reaction of CO 2 with Mg or Ca containing minerals to form carbonates * Lowest energy state of carbon is a carbonate and not CO 2 * Occurs naturally in nature as weathering of rock * Already proven on large scale - Carbonate formation linked to formation of the early atmosphere Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Advantages of Mineral Carbonation

303

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 5, 2009 November 5, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 A large-scale carbon dioxide storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. October 21, 2009 DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest. October 13, 2009 Secretary Chu Announces Up To $55 Million in Funding to Develop Advanced

304

Techno-economic modelling of CO2 capture systems for Australian industrial sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Australia is recognising that carbon capture and storage (CCS) may be a feasible pathway for addressing increasing levels of CO2 emissions. This thesis presents a (more)

Ho, Minh Trang Thi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A numerical procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 7, 2012 ... analyze storage integrity, providing early warning should any leakage occurs. A numerical procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration...

santos

306

CO2 interaction with geomaterials.  

SciTech Connect

This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas No.3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or 'geopolymer') theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2 molecules may remain trapped for several months following several hours of exposure to high pressure (supercritical conditions), high temperature (above boiling point of water) or both. Such trapping is well preserved in either inert gas or the ambient environment and appears to eventually result in carbonate formation. We performed computer simulations of CO2 interaction with free cations (normal modes of CO2 and Na+CO2 were calculated using B3LYP / aug-cc-pVDZ and MP2 / aug-cc-pVDZ methods) and with clay structures containing interlayer cations (MD simulations with Clayff potentials for clay and a modified CO2 potential). Additionally, interaction of CO2 with hydrated Na-montmorillonite was studied using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. The sorption energies and the swelling behavior were investigated. Preliminary modeling results and experimental observations indicate that the presence of water molecules in the interlayer region is necessary for intercalation of CO2. Our preliminary conclusion is that CO2 molecules may intercalate into interlayer region of swelling clay and stay there via coordination to the interlayer cations.

Guthrie, George D. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Al-Saidi, Wissam A. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Jordan, Kenneth D. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Voora, Vamsee, K. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lopano, Christina L (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Myshakin, Eugene M. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Hur, Tae Bong (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Warzinski, Robert P. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lynn, Ronald J. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Howard, Bret H. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Sourcekey","N5030CO2","N5010CO2","N5020CO2","N5070CO2","N5050CO2","N5060CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","Colorado Natural Gas in Underground...

308

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2 seepage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2; accepted 17 June 2008; published 31 July 2008. [1] Claystone caprocks are often the ultimate seal for CO2 underground storage when residual CO2 gas reaches the reservoir top due to buoyancy. Permeability changes

Luquot, Linda

309

Interaction between CO2-rich solutions and reservoir-seal rocks. Experimentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formations (after Cook, 1999). Geological Storage Options for CO2 1.Depleted oil and gas reservoirs 2.Use of CO2 in enhanced oil recovery 3.Deep unused saline water-saturated reservoir rocks 4.Deep unmineable coal systems 5.Use of CO2 in enhanced coal bed methane recovery 6.Other suggested options (basalts, oil

Polit猫cnica de Catalunya, Universitat

310

Oldenburg and Pan CO2 as Cushion Gas for CAES 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oldenburg and Pan CO2 as Cushion Gas for CAES 1 CO2 as Cushion Gas for Compressed Air Energy Compressed Air Oldenburg, C.M., Energy&Fuels, 17(1), 240颅246, 2003. #12;Oldenburg and Pan CO2 as Cushion Gas as Cushion Gas for CAES 3 Renewables Need Energy Storage Source: Samir Succar, IAC Workshop, October 2005

Eisen, Michael

311

COMMENTS OF THE LARGE-SCALE SOLAR ASSOCIATION TO DEPARTMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMENTS OF THE LARGE-SCALE SOLAR ASSOCIATION TO DEPARTMENT COMMENTS OF THE LARGE-SCALE SOLAR ASSOCIATION TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S RAPID RESPONSE TEAM FOR TRANSMISSION'S REQUEST FOR INFORMATION Submitted by electronic mail to: Lamont.Jackson@hq.doe.gov The Large-scale Solar Association appreciates this opportunity to respond to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Rapid Response Team for Transmission's (RRTT) Request for Information. 1 We applaud the DOE for creating the RRTT and continuing to advance the efforts already made under the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) entered into by nine Federal agencies in 2009 to expedite electric transmission construction. We also applaud the federal and state agencies that have expanded the Renewable Energy Policy Group and the Renewable Energy Action Team in California to focus on transmission, and hope that the tremendous

312

Large Scale Quantum-mechanical Calculations of Proteins, Nanomaterials and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Quantum-mechanical Calculations of Proteins, Nanomaterials and Large Scale Quantum-mechanical Calculations of Proteins, Nanomaterials and Other Large Systems Event Sponsor: Leadership Computing Facility Seminar Start Date: Dec 5 2013 - 2:00pm Building/Room: Building 240/Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Dmitri G. Fedorov Speaker(s) Title: National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) Host: Yuri Alexeev Our approach to large scale calculations is based on fragmenting a molecular system into pieces, and performing quantum-mechanical calculations of these fragments and their pairs in the fragment molecular orbital method (FMO). After a brief summary of the methodology, some typical applications to protein-ligand complexes, chemical reactions in explicit solvent, and nanomaterials (silicon nanowires, zeolites.

313

Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex July 1, 2010 - 10:11am Addthis What does this project do? This nonprofit weatherized a 22-unit low-income multifamily complex, reducing the building's duct leakage from 90 percent to just 5 percent. The weatherization program of the Rural Nevada Development Corporation (RNDC) reached a recent success in its eleven counties-wide territory. In June, the nonprofit finished weatherizing a 22-unit low-income multifamily complex, reducing the building's duct leakage from 90 percent to just 5 percent. "That is one big savings and is why I am proud of this project," says Dru Simerson, RNDC Weatherization Manager. RNDC's crew replaced all windows and 17 furnaces and installed floor

314

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

315

Biominetic Membrane for Co2 Capture from Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomimetic Membrane for CO Biomimetic Membrane for CO 2 Capture from Flue Gas Background Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is a three-step process including capture, pipeline transport, and geologic storage of which the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the most costly and technically challenging. Current available methods impose significant energy burdens that severely impact their overall effectiveness as a significant deployment option. Of the available capture technologies for post

316

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

317

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks 禄 Storage Environmental Risks 禄 Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

318

Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum September 8, 2010 - 10:10am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier this week Secretary Chu announced $575 Million dollars in funding for 22 projects across 15 states, projects that will accelerate carbon capture and storage research and development for industrial sources. The selections include projects from four different areas of carbon capture and storage (CCS) research and development: 1) Large scale testing of advanced gasification technologies; 2) advanced turbo-machinery to lower emissions from industrial sources; 3) post-combustion CO2 capture with increased efficiencies and decreased costs; and 4) geologic storage site

319

Parallel Stochastic Gradient Algorithms for Large-Scale Matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On large-scale matrix completion tasks, Jellyfish is orders of magnitude more efficient than ...... NNLS was written in Matlab, and some of the functions are available .... Figure 6: Low-Rank Factorization Graph on (A) Movielens1M and (B)

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In general, large-scale integration studies in Europe and the United States find that high penetrations of renewable generation are technically feasible with operational changes and increased access to transmission. This paper describes other key findings such as the need for fast markets, large balancing areas, system flexibility, and the use of advanced forecasting.

Bird, L.; Milligan, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Opportunistic Evolution: Efficient Evolutionary Computation on Large-Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opportunistic Evolution: Efficient Evolutionary Computation on Large-Scale Computational Grids evaluation designed for deployment of evo- lutionary computation to very large grid computing ar- chitectures evolutionary com- putation toolkit to a commercial Java-based grid comput- ing platform known as Frontier

Luke, Sean

322

Opportunistic Evolution: Efficient Evolutionary Computation on Large-Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opportunistic Evolution: Efficient Evolutionary Computation on Large-Scale Computational Grids evaluation designed for deployment of evo- lutionary computation to very large grid computing ar- chitectures evolutionary computa- tion toolkit to a commercial Java-based grid computing plat- form known as Frontier

George Mason University

323

Large Scale Mining of Molecular Fragments with Wildcards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Scale Mining of Molecular Fragments with Wildcards Heiko Hofer1 , Christian Borgelt2 a novel molecule will be active or inactive, so that future chemical tests can be focused on the most molecular fragments to discriminate between active and inactive molecules. In this paper we present two

Borgelt, Christian

324

A Large-Scale Deforestation Experiment: Effects of Patch Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Large-Scale Deforestation Experiment: Effects of Patch Area and Isolation on Amazon Birds Gon莽alo,4 Thomas E. Lovejoy1,5 As compared with extensive contiguous areas, small isolated habitat patches lack many species. Some species disappear after isolation; others are rarely found in any small patch

Stouffer, Phil

325

A large-scale exploration of group viewing patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a large-scale study of television viewing habits, focusing on how individuals adapt their preferences when consuming content with others. While there has been a great deal of research on modeling individual preferences, there has been considerably ... Keywords: group recommendation, group viewing patterns

Allison J.B. Chaney, Mike Gartrell, Jake M. Hofman, John Guiver, Noam Koenigstein, Pushmeet Kohli, Ulrich Paquet

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

CANMET CO2 Consortium - O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CANMET CO CANMET CO 2 Consortium - O 2 /CO 2 Recycle Combustion Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental

327

Re-evaluation of the 1995 Hanford Large Scale Drum Fire Test Results  

SciTech Connect

A large-scale drum performance test was conducted at the Hanford Site in June 1995, in which over one hundred (100) 55-gal drums in each of two storage configurations were subjected to severe fuel pool fires. The two storage configurations in the test were pallet storage and rack storage. The description and results of the large-scale drum test at the Hanford Site were reported in WHC-SD-WM-TRP-246, ''Solid Waste Drum Array Fire Performance,'' Rev. 0, 1995. This was one of the main references used to develop the analytical methodology to predict drum failures in WHC-SD-SQA-ANAL-501, 'Fire Protection Guide for Waste Drum Storage Array,'' September 1996. Three drum failure modes were observed from the test reported in WHC-SD-WM-TRP-246. They consisted of seal failure, lid warping, and catastrophic lid ejection. There was no discernible failure criterion that distinguished one failure mode from another. Hence, all three failure modes were treated equally for the purpose of determining the number of failed drums. General observations from the results of the test are as follows: {lg_bullet} Trash expulsion was negligible. {lg_bullet} Flame impingement was identified as the main cause for failure. {lg_bullet} The range of drum temperatures at failure was 600 C to 800 C. This is above the yield strength temperature for steel, approximately 540 C (1,000 F). {lg_bullet} The critical heat flux required for failure is above 45 kW/m{sup 2}. {lg_bullet} Fire propagation from one drum to the next was not observed. The statistical evaluation of the test results using, for example, the student's t-distribution, will demonstrate that the failure criteria for TRU waste drums currently employed at nuclear facilities are very conservative relative to the large-scale test results. Hence, the safety analysis utilizing the general criteria described in the five bullets above will lead to a technically robust and defensible product that bounds the potential consequences from postulated fires in TRU waste facilities, the means of storage in which are the Type A, 55-gal drums.

Yang, J M

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Lethal effects on different marine organisms, associated with sediment杝eawater acidification deriving from CO2 leakage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 leakages during carbon capture and storage in sub-seabed geological structures could produce...2 seawater acidification, a bubbling CO2...system was designed enabling a battery of different tests to be conduc...

M. D. Basallote; A. Rodr韌uez-Romero

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Title Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Millstein, Dev, and Surabi Menon Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 6 Start Page 1 Pagination 9 Date Published 07/2011 Keywords co2 offsets, cool roof, photovoltaics, radiative forcing, urban environment Abstract Modifications to the surface albedo through the deployment of cool roofs and pavements (reflective materials) and photovoltaic arrays (low reflection) have the potential to change radiative forcing, surface temperatures, and regional weather patterns. In this work we investigate the regional climate and radiative effects of modifying surface albedo to mimic massive deployment of cool surfaces (roofs and pavements) and, separately, photovoltaic arrays across the United States. We use a fully coupled regional climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to investigate feedbacks between surface albedo changes, surface temperature, precipitation and average cloud cover. With the adoption of cool roofs and pavements, domain-wide annual average outgoing radiation increased by 0.16 卤 0.03 W m-2 (mean 卤 95% C.I.) and afternoon summertime temperature in urban locations was reduced by 0.11-0.53 "C, although some urban areas showed no statistically significant temperature changes. In response to increased urban albedo, some rural locations showed summer afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.27 "C and these regions were correlated with less cloud cover and lower precipitation. The emissions offset obtained by this increase in outgoing radiation is calculated to be 3.3 卤 0.5 Gt CO2 (mean 卤 95% C.I.). The hypothetical solar arrays were designed to be able to produce one terawatt of peak energy and were located in the Mojave Desert of California. To simulate the arrays, the desert surface albedo was darkened, causing local afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.4 "C. Due to the solar arrays, local and regional wind patterns within a 300 km radius were affected. Statistically significant but lower magnitude changes to temperature and radiation could be seen across the domain due to the introduction of the solar arrays. The addition of photovoltaic arrays caused no significant change to summertime outgoing radiation when averaged over the full domain, as interannual variation across the continent obscured more consistent local forcing.

330

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Title Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Millstein, Dev, and Surabi Menon Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 6 Start Page 1 Pagination 9 Date Published 07/2011 Keywords co2 offsets, cool roofs, photovoltaics, radiative forcing, urban environment Abstract Modifications to the surface albedo through the deployment of cool roofs and pavements (reflective materials) and photovoltaic arrays (low reflection) have the potential to change radiative forcing, surface temperatures, and regional weather patterns. In this work we investigate the regional climate and radiative effects of modifying surface albedo to mimic massive deployment of cool surfaces (roofs and pavements) and, separately, photovoltaic arrays across the United States. We use a fully coupled regional climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to investigate feedbacks between surface albedo changes, surface temperature, precipitation and average cloud cover. With the adoption of cool roofs and pavements, domain-wide annual average outgoing radiation increased by 0.16 卤 0.03 W m-2 (mean 卤 95% C.I.) and afternoon summertime temperature in urban locations was reduced by 0.11-0.53 "C, although some urban areas showed no statistically significant temperature changes. In response to increased urban albedo, some rural locations showed summer afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.27 "C and these regions were correlated with less cloud cover and lower precipitation. The emissions offset obtained by this increase in outgoing radiation is calculated to be 3.3 卤 0.5 Gt CO2 (mean 卤 95% C.I.). The hypothetical solar arrays were designed to be able to produce one terawatt of peak energy and were located in the Mojave Desert of California. To simulate the arrays, the desert surface albedo was darkened, causing local afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.4 "C. Due to the solar arrays, local and regional wind patterns within a 300 km radius were affected. Statistically significant but lower magnitude changes to temperature and radiation could be seen across the domain due to the introduction of the solar arrays. The addition of photovoltaic arrays caused no significant change to summertime outgoing radiation when averaged over the full domain, as interannual variation across the continent obscured more consistent local forcing.

331

Novel integration options of concentrating solar thermal technology with fossil-fuelled and CO2 capture processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrating solar thermal (CST) technology has been commercially proven in utility-scale power plants that have been in operation since the 1980抯. CST uses reflecting surfaces to focus solar energy onto collectors, generating extreme heat than can be used for a variety of purposes. The current focus of CST is large-scale electrical power generation. However, new applications, such as solar fuels, are quickly gaining momentum. One key shortcoming of CST technology is its sensitivity to disruptions in sunlight availability over time. CST systems require either thermal energy storage or backup systems to operate during heavy cloud periods or at night. On the other hand, fossil-based energy systems have high availability and reliability, but they generate substantial CO2 emissions compared to equivalent CST processes. A novel solution would combine the benefits of CST technology and of fossil-fueled energy systems. Such a solar-fossil hybrid system would guarantee energy availability in the absence of sunlight or stored solar energy. The addition of carbon capture to these systems could reduce their carbon intensity to almost zero. This paper introduces three important solar-fossil hybrid energy systems: (1) Integrated Solar Combined Cycle (ISCC), (2) Solar-assisted post-combustion capture (SAPCAP), and (3) Solar gasification with CO2 capture. These novel concepts have great potential to overcome the inherent limitations of their component technologies and to achieve superior greenhouse gas mitigation techno-economic performance in large-scale applications. The paper describes the features of the three solar-fossil hybrid systems described earlier, discusses its advantages and disadvantages, and provides examples of applications. The goal of this manuscript is to introduce experts in the CCS and CST fields to the opportunities of integration between these technologies and their potential benefits.

Guillermo Ordorica-Garcia; and Alfonso Vidal Delgado; Aranzazu Fernandez Garcia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Development on Public Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Development on Public Lands Boyan Kovacic boyan.kovacic@ee.doe.gov 5/2/12 2 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov * BLM RE Drivers * BLM RE Programs * BLM Permitting and Revenues * Case Studies * Withdrawn Military Land Outline 3 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov BLM: Bureau of Land Management BO: Biological Opinion CSP: Concentrating Solar Power DOE: Department of Energy DOI: Department of Interior EA: Environmental Assessment EIS: Environmental Impact Statement FONSI: Finding of No Significant Impact FS: U.S. Forrest Service IM: Instruction Memorandum MPDS: Maximum Potential Development Scenario NEPA: National Environmental Policy Act NOI: Notice of Intent NOP: Notice to Proceed

333

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Development on Public Lands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Development on Public Lands Boyan Kovacic boyan.kovacic@ee.doe.gov 5/2/12 2 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov * BLM RE Drivers * BLM RE Programs * BLM Permitting and Revenues * Case Studies * Withdrawn Military Land Outline 3 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov BLM: Bureau of Land Management BO: Biological Opinion CSP: Concentrating Solar Power DOE: Department of Energy DOI: Department of Interior EA: Environmental Assessment EIS: Environmental Impact Statement FONSI: Finding of No Significant Impact FS: U.S. Forrest Service IM: Instruction Memorandum MPDS: Maximum Potential Development Scenario NEPA: National Environmental Policy Act NOI: Notice of Intent NOP: Notice to Proceed

334

Prototype Vector Machine for Large Scale Semi-Supervised Learning  

SciTech Connect

Practicaldataminingrarelyfalls exactlyinto the supervisedlearning scenario. Rather, the growing amount of unlabeled data poses a big challenge to large-scale semi-supervised learning (SSL). We note that the computationalintensivenessofgraph-based SSLarises largely from the manifold or graph regularization, which in turn lead to large models that are dificult to handle. To alleviate this, we proposed the prototype vector machine (PVM), a highlyscalable,graph-based algorithm for large-scale SSL. Our key innovation is the use of"prototypes vectors" for effcient approximation on both the graph-based regularizer and model representation. The choice of prototypes are grounded upon two important criteria: they not only perform effective low-rank approximation of the kernel matrix, but also span a model suffering the minimum information loss compared with the complete model. We demonstrate encouraging performance and appealing scaling properties of the PVM on a number of machine learning benchmark data sets.

Zhang, Kai; Kwok, James T.; Parvin, Bahram

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

335

Suppression of large-scale perturbations by stiff solid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of large-scale scalar perturbations in the presence of stiff solid (solid with pressure to energy density ratio > 1/3) is studied. If the solid dominated the dynamics of the universe long enough, the perturbations could end up suppressed by as much as several orders of magnitude. To avoid too steep large-angle power spectrum of CMB, radiation must have prevailed over the solid long enough before recombination.

Balek, Vladim韗

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

9 - Large-scale biomass combustion plants: an overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: For a long time biomass was combusted mostly on a small scale. Now the largest biomass boilers are over 500 MWth. This chapter tries to outline the main methods for large-scale biomass combustion. The main boiler types are the grate and bubbling-fluidised bed boilers although circulating-fluidised bed and pulverised firing do play a role. Particular emphasis has been placed on emissions, the effect of fuel quality and operating issues.

S. Caillat; E. Vakkilainen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects  

SciTech Connect

Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

NETL: Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Commercialization of the Iron Based Coal Direct Chemical Looping Process for Power Production with in situ CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0009761 CDLC Process Concept CDLC Process Concept (click to enlarge) Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W) is developing the coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) process. The CDCL process consists of a unique moving bed reactor - the reducer - where pulverized coal is fully converted using iron-based oxygen carriers. The oxygen carrier is reduced from Fe2O3 to FeO/Fe and the flue gas is a concentrated stream of CO2 that is available for storage or beneficial use. The reduced FeO/Fe is oxidized to Fe2O3 using air in the combustor, liberating heat to produce steam for a

339

Integrated Energy System with Beneficial Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use  

SciTech Connect

To address the public concerns regarding the consequences of climate change from anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) is actively funding a CO2 management program to develop technologies capable of reducing the CO2 emissions from fossil fuel power plants and other industrial facilities. Over the past decade, this program has focused on reducing the costs of carbon capture and storage technologies. Recently, DOE-NETL launched an alternative CO2 mitigation program focusing on beneficial CO2 reuse and supporting the development of technologies that mitigate emissions by converting CO2 to solid mineral form that can be utilized for enhanced oil recovery, in the manufacturing of concrete or as a benign landfill, in the production of valuable chemicals and/or fuels. This project was selected as a CO2 reuse activity which would conduct research and development (R&D) at the pilot scale via a cost-shared Cooperative Agreement number DE-FE0001099 with DOE-NETL and would utilize funds setaside by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration R&D,

Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Update on CO2 emissions  

SciTech Connect

Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

Friedingstein, P. [University of Exeter, Devon, England; Houghton, R.A. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Hackler, J. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Canadell, J.G. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Raupach, Mike [GCP, Canberra, Australia; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Le Quere, Corrine [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CO2 Mineral Sequestration Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Studies Sequestration Studies Introduction, Issues and Plans Philip Goldberg National Energy Technology Laboratory Workshop on CO 2 Sequestration with Minerals August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Program Research effort seeks to refine and validate a promising CO 2 sequestration technology option, mineral sequestration also known as mineral carbonation Goals: * Understand the fundamental mechanisms involved in mineral carbonation * Generate data to support process development * Operate continuous, integrated small-scale process unit to support design Current Partnerships In order to effectively develop Mineral Sequestration, a multi-laboratory Working Group was formed in the Summer of 1998, participants include: * Albany Research Center * Arizona State University * Los Alamos National Laboratory

342

Sun Also Rises: Planning for Large-Scale Solar Power  

SciTech Connect

Wind, solar, and other renewable energy are an important part of any present-day energy. The portion of energy they supply will certainly be increasing over the next few years. Arguably, large-scale wind power has reached technological maturity, and with more than 100 GW of capacity, ample experience exists on integrating wind systems. Solar technologies, on the other hand, are emerging, and substantial R&D investments are being made to achieve parity with retail electricity costs in the near future. As this happens, annual capacity additions of solar power will become significant.

Bebic, J.; Walling, R.; O'Brien, K.; Kroposki, B.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Large scale EPR correlations and cosmic gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how quantum correlations survive at large scales in spite of their exposition to stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves. We consider Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) correlations built up on the polarizations of photon pairs and evaluate how they are affected by the cosmic gravitational wave background (CGWB). We evaluate the quantum decoherence of the EPR correlations in terms of a reduction of the violation of the Bell inequality as written by Clauser, Horne, Shimony and Holt (CHSH). We show that this decoherence remains small and that EPR correlations can in principle survive up to the largest cosmic scales.

B. Lamine; R. Herv; M. -T. Jaekel; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

Large-Scale Anisotropy of EGRET Gamma Ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the course of its operation, the EGRET experiment detected high-energy gamma ray sources at energies above 100 MeV over the whole sky. In this communication, we search for large-scale anisotropy patterns among the catalogued EGRET sources using an expansion in spherical harmonics, accounting for EGRET's highly non-uniform exposure. We find significant excess in the quadrupole and octopole moments. This is consistent with the hypothesis that, in addition to the galactic plane, a second mid-latitude (5^{\\circ} < |b| < 30^{\\circ}) population, perhaps associated with the Gould belt, contributes to the gamma ray flux above 100 MeV.

Luis Anchordoqui; Thomas McCauley; Thomas Paul; Olaf Reimer; Diego F. Torres

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

345

Robust Morphological Measures for Large-Scale Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complete family of statistical descriptors for the morphology of large--scale structure based on Minkowski--Functionals is presented. These robust and significant measures can be used to characterize the local and global morphology of spatial patterns formed by a coverage of point sets which represent galaxy samples. Basic properties of these measures are highlighted and their relation to the `genus statistics' is discussed. Test models like a Poissonian point process and samples generated from a Voronoi--model are put into perspective.

T. Buchert

1994-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

Generation of large-scale winds in horizontally anisotropic convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection between free-slip horizontal plates, rotating about a horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind.

von Hardenberg, J; Provenzale, A; Spiegel, E A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Sub-committee Storage Sub-committee 2012 Work Plan Confidential 1 2012 Storage Subcommittee Work Plan * Report to Congress. (legislative requirement) - Review existing and projected research and funding - Review existing DOE, Arpa-e projects and the OE 5 year plan - Identify gaps and recommend additional topics - Outline distributed (review as group) * Develop and analysis of the need for large scale storage deployment (outline distributed again) * Develop analysis on regulatory issues especially valuation and cost recovery Confidential 2 Large Scale Storage * Problem Statement * Situation Today * Benefits Analysis * Policy Issues * Technology Gaps * Recommendations * Renewables Variability - Reserves and capacity requirements - Financial impacts - IRC Response to FERC NOI and update

348

Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows  

SciTech Connect

We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up to $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $\\approx 1000$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.

Marino, Dr. Raffaele [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Mininni, Dr. Pablo D. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina; Rosenberg, Duane L [ORNL; Pouquet, Dr. Annick [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Popularity and Performance: A Large-Scale Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Social scientists have long sought to understand why certain people, items, or options become more popular than others. One seemingly intuitive theory is that inherent value drives popularity. An alternative theory claims that popularity is driven by the rich-get-richer effect of cumulative advantage---certain options become more popular, not because they are higher quality, but because they are already relatively popular. Realistically, it seems likely that popularity is driven by neither one of these forces alone but rather both together. Recently, researchers have begun using large-scale online experiments to study the effect of cumulative advantage in realistic scenarios, but there have been no large-scale studies of the combination of these two effects. We are interested in studying a case where decision-makers observe explicit signals of both the popularity and the quality of various options. We derive a model for change in popularity as a function of past popularity and past perceived quality. Our mode...

Krafft, Peter; Shmueli, Erez; Della Penna, Nicholas; Tenenbaum, Josh; Pentland, Sandy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Measurement and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Program Storage Program John Litynski, PE Carbon Storage Technology Manager Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting Nov 15-17, 2011 2 Sources: U.S. data from EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011; World data from IEA, World Energy Outlook 2010, Current Policies Scenario 716 QBtu / Year 79% Fossil Energy 114 QBtu / Year 78% Fossil Energy + 14% Energy Demand 2008 100 QBtu / Year 84% Fossil Energy 487 QBtu / Year 81% Fossil Energy 29,259 mmt CO 2 42,589 mmt CO 2 5,838 mmt CO 2 6,311 mmt CO 2 Energy Demand 2035 United States World + 47% * Primarily traditional biomass, wood, and waste. 3 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY CARBON STORAGE PROGRAM with ARRA Projects 2012 Structure Benefits

351

8, 73737389, 2008 Scientists' CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 7373颅7389, 2008 Scientists' CO2 emissions A. Stohl Title Page Abstract Introduction substantial emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). In this pa- per, the CO2 emissions of the employees working, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

352

Energy Storage for the Power Grid  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The iron vanadium redox flow battery was developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a solution to large-scale energy storage for the power grid.

Wang, Wei; Imhoff, Carl; Vaishnav, Dave

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

353

NETL: Carbon Storage Best Practices Manuals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Best Practices Manuals Best Practices Manuals Developing best practices - or reliable and consistent standards and operational characteristics for CO2 collection, injection and storage - is essential for providing the basis for a legal and regulatory framework and encouraging widespread global CCS deployment. The lessons learned during the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Validation Phase small-scale field tests are being utilized to generate a series of Best Practices Manuals (BPMs) that serve as the basis for the design and implementation of both large-scale field tests and commercial carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects. NETL has released six BPMS: NETL's "Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations - 2012 Update" BPM provides an overview of MVA techniques that are currently in use or are being developed; summarizes DOE's MVA R&D program; and presents information that can be used by regulatory organizations, project developers, and policymakers to ensure the safety and efficacy of carbon storage projects.

354

Carbon Utilization and Storage | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Assess Carbon Utilization and Storage Technologies PDF Improving Domestic Energy Security and Lowering CO2 Emissions with "Next Generation" CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery...

355

DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone October 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest. Preliminary results indicate that the formation has good CO2 storage potential and could possibly serve as a repository for CO2 emissions captured from stationary sources in the region. Carbon capture and storage

356

DOE Regional Partner Initiates CO2 Injection Study in Virginia | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partner Initiates CO2 Injection Study in Virginia Partner Initiates CO2 Injection Study in Virginia DOE Regional Partner Initiates CO2 Injection Study in Virginia February 11, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into coal seams in the Central Appalachian Basin to determine the feasibility of CO2 storage in unmineable coal seams and the potential for enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The results of the study will be vital in assessing the potential of carbon storage in coal seams as a safe and permanent method to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions while enhancing production of natural gas. DOE's Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) began injecting CO2 at the test site in Russell County, Virginia, in mid January.

357

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air颅sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air颅sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

358

A review of large-scale LNG spills : experiment and modeling.  

SciTech Connect

The prediction of the possible hazards associated with the storage and transportation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) by ship has motivated a substantial number of experimental and analytical studies. This paper reviews the experimental and analytical work performed to date on large-scale spills of LNG. Specifically, experiments on the dispersion of LNG, as well as experiments of LNG fires from spills on water and land are reviewed. Explosion, pool boiling, and rapid phase transition (RPT) explosion studies are described and discussed, as well as models used to predict dispersion and thermal hazard distances. Although there have been significant advances in understanding the behavior of LNG spills, technical knowledge gaps to improve hazard prediction are identified. Some of these gaps can be addressed with current modeling and testing capabilities. A discussion of the state of knowledge and recommendations to further improve the understanding of the behavior of LNG spills on water is provided.

Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Large-Scale Analyses of Glycosylation in Cellulases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Article Article Large-Scale Analyses of Glycosylation in Cellulases Fengfeng Zhou 1,2 , Victor Olman 1,2 , and Ying Xu 1,2 * 1 Computational Systems Biology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology / Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7229, USA; 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830-8050, USA. *Corresponding author. E-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu DOI: 10.1016/S1672-0229(08)60049-2 Cellulases are important glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) that hydrolyze cellulose poly- mers into smaller oligosaccharides by breaking the cellulose 尾 (1鈫4) bonds, and they are widely used to produce cellulosic ethanol from the plant biomass. N-linked and O-linked glycosylations were proposed to impact the catalytic ef f iciency, cel- lulose binding af f inity and the stability of cellulases based on observations

360

Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Christos Altantzis, MIT, and Martin Schmitt, LAV. All the images were generated from their work at LAV. Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys PI Name: Christos Frouzakis PI Email: frouzakis@lav.mavt.ethz.ch Institution: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 100 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Chemistry The combustion of coal and petroleum-based fuels supply most of the energy needed to meet the world's transportation and power generation demands. To address the anticipated petroleum shortage, along with increasing energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Large Scale Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail Development Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Large Scale Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail Development Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description RiverHeath will be a new neighborhood, with residences, shops, restaurants, and offices. The design incorporates walking trails, community gardens, green roofs, and innovative stormwater controls. A major component of the project is our reliance on renewable energy. One legacy of the land's industrial past is an onsite hydro-electric facility which formerly powered the paper factories. The onsite hydro is being refurbished and will furnish 100% of the project's electricity demand.

362

Nuclear-pumped lasers for large-scale applications  

SciTech Connect

Efficient initiation of large-volume chemical lasers may be achieved by neutron induced reactions which produce charged particles in the final state. When a burst mode nuclear reactor is used as the neutron source, both a sufficiently intense neutron flux and a sufficiently short initiation pulse may be possible. Proof-of-principle experiments are planned to demonstrate lasing in a direct nuclear-pumped large-volume system; to study the effects of various neutron absorbing materials on laser performance; to study the effects of long initiation pulse lengths; to demonstrate the performance of large-scale optics and the beam quality that may be obtained; and to assess the performance of alternative designs of burst systems that increase the neutron output and burst repetition rate. 21 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Anderson, R.E.; Leonard, E.M.; Shea, R.F.; Berggren, R.R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The XMM/Megacam-VST/VIRMOS Large Scale Structure Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the XMM-LSS Survey is to map the large scale structure of the universe, as highlighted by clusters and groups of galaxies, out to a redshift of about 1, over a single 8x8 sq.deg. area. For the first time, this will reveal the topology of the distribution of the deep potential wells and provide statistical measurements at truly cosmological distances. In addition, clusters identified via their X-ray properties will form the basis for the first uniformly-selected, multi-wavelength survey of the evolution of clusters and individual cluster galaxies as a function of redshift. The survey will also address the very important question of the QSO distribution within the cosmic web.

M. Pierre

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

364

Large scale anisotropic bias from primordial non-Gaussianity  

SciTech Connect

In this work we study the large scale structure bias in models of anisotropic inflation. We use the Peak Background Splitting method in Excursion Set Theory to find the scale-dependent bias. We show that the amplitude of the bias is modified by a direction-dependent factor. In the specific anisotropic inflation model which we study, the scale-dependent bias vanishes at leading order when the long wavelength mode in squeezed limit is aligned with the anisotropic direction in the sky. We also extend the scale-dependent bias formulation to the general situations with primordial anisotropy. We find some selection rules indicating that some specific parts of a generic anisotropic bispectrum is picked up by the bias parameter. We argue that the anisotropic bias is mainly sourced by the angle between the anisotropic direction and the long wavelength mode in the squeezed limit.

Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: baghram@ipm.ir, E-mail: mh.namjoo@ipm.ir, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Isolating relativistic effects in large-scale structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a fully relativistic calculation of the observed galaxy number counts in the linear regime. We show that besides the density fluctuations and redshift-space distortions, various relativistic effects contribute to observations at large scales. These effects all have the same physical origin: they result from the fact that our coordinate system, namely the galaxy redshift and the incoming photons' direction, is distorted by inhomogeneities in our universe. We then discuss the impact of the relativistic effects on the angular power spectrum and on the two-point correlation function in configuration space. We show that the latter is very well adapted to isolate the relativistic effects since it naturally makes use of the symmetries of the different contributions. In particular, we discuss how the Doppler effect and the gravitational redshift distortions can be isolated by looking for a dipole in the cross-correlation function between a bright and a faint population of galaxies.

Bonvin, Camille

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Transient simulation for large scale flow in bubble columns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The transient simulation of large scale bubbly flow in bubble columns using the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) equations is investigated in the present paper. An extensive set of bubble forces is used with different models for the bubble induced turbulence. Criteria are given to assess the independence of the simulation time and the time step length. Using these criteria it is shown that a simulation time, time step length and mesh independent solution can be obtained for complex bubbly flows using URANS equations under certain requirements. With the obtained setup the contribution of the resolved turbulence to the total turbulence and the influence of the bubble induced turbulence modeling on the resolved turbulence is investigated. Further, it is pointed out that the virtual mass force is not negligible. The simulations are compared to data from the literature at two different superficial velocities, which cover monodisperse and polydisperse bubbly flows.

T. Ziegenhein; R. Rzehak; D. Lucas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin February 17, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute

368

Training a Large Scale Classifier with the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a previous publication we proposed discrete global optimization as a method to train a strong binary classifier constructed as a thresholded sum over weak classifiers. Our motivation was to cast the training of a classifier into a format amenable to solution by the quantum adiabatic algorithm. Applying adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) promises to yield solutions that are superior to those which can be achieved with classical heuristic solvers. Interestingly we found that by using heuristic solvers to obtain approximate solutions we could already gain an advantage over the standard method AdaBoost. In this communication we generalize the baseline method to large scale classifier training. By large scale we mean that either the cardinality of the dictionary of candidate weak classifiers or the number of weak learners used in the strong classifier exceed the number of variables that can be handled effectively in a single global optimization. For such situations we propose an iterative and piecewise approach in which a subset of weak classifiers is selected in each iteration via global optimization. The strong classifier is then constructed by concatenating the subsets of weak classifiers. We show in numerical studies that the generalized method again successfully competes with AdaBoost. We also provide theoretical arguments as to why the proposed optimization method, which does not only minimize the empirical loss but also adds L0-norm regularization, is superior to versions of boosting that only minimize the empirical loss. By conducting a Quantum Monte Carlo simulation we gather evidence that the quantum adiabatic algorithm is able to handle a generic training problem efficiently.

Hartmut Neven; Vasil S. Denchev; Geordie Rose; William G. Macready

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

Efficient parallel simulation of CO2 geologic sequestration insaline aquifers  

SciTech Connect

An efficient parallel simulator for large-scale, long-termCO2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers has been developed. Theparallel simulator is a three-dimensional, fully implicit model thatsolves large, sparse linear systems arising from discretization of thepartial differential equations for mass and energy balance in porous andfractured media. The simulator is based on the ECO2N module of the TOUGH2code and inherits all the process capabilities of the single-CPU TOUGH2code, including a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics andthermophysical properties of H2O-NaCl- CO2 mixtures, modeling singleand/or two-phase isothermal or non-isothermal flow processes, two-phasemixtures, fluid phases appearing or disappearing, as well as saltprecipitation or dissolution. The new parallel simulator uses MPI forparallel implementation, the METIS software package for simulation domainpartitioning, and the iterative parallel linear solver package Aztec forsolving linear equations by multiple processors. In addition, theparallel simulator has been implemented with an efficient communicationscheme. Test examples show that a linear or super-linear speedup can beobtained on Linux clusters as well as on supercomputers. Because of thesignificant improvement in both simulation time and memory requirement,the new simulator provides a powerful tool for tackling larger scale andmore complex problems than can be solved by single-CPU codes. Ahigh-resolution simulation example is presented that models buoyantconvection, induced by a small increase in brine density caused bydissolution of CO2.

Zhang, Keni; Doughty, Christine; Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Simulation of SMES connected to a large scale system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transaction on Magnetics, Vol. MAG-17, No. 5, September 1981. [13] R. I. Schermer, et al. , "Design and Operation of the 30-MJ Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage System of the Bonneville Power Administration Bus, " Los Alamos National Laboratory... Transaction on Magnetics, Vol. MAG-17, No. 5, September 1981. [13] R. I. Schermer, et al. , "Design and Operation of the 30-MJ Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage System of the Bonneville Power Administration Bus, " Los Alamos National Laboratory...

Gulde, James Ernst

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Response to Comment on "Fate of Rising CO2 Droplets in Seawater"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to Comment on "Fate of Rising CO2 Droplets in Seawater" I welcome the comment by Alendal is greater than ambient seawater so that CO2 liquid would sink and gradually dissolve in seawater." Alendal by which ocean storage could produce a disaster like that at Lake Nyos". The IPCC report (4

Zhang, Youxue

372

Reversible zwitterionic liquids, the reaction of alkanol guanidines, alkanol amidines, and diamines with CO2  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide chemistry is increasingly relevant to real-world issues, thanks to global warming. Key chemistry issues currently being studied are the capture, storage, and utilization of CO2. While the relevance of capture and storage are obvious, the relevance of CO2 utilization is less clear. Although CO2 utilization is unlikely to consume significant quantities of CO2, it can be an significant strategy for the development of sustainable processes. As part of our research efforts towards CO2 utilization, some of us invented switchable solvents, meaning solvents that can switch reversibly from one version to another.1Our original version was a mixture of an amidine and an alcohol (equation 1, where B is a liquid amidine), but since then we and others have developed others such as guanidine/alcohol mixtures (equation 1, where B is a liquid guanidine),2 amidine/primary amine mixtures,3 and secondary amines (equation 2).4Switchable solvents of these types all convert from a low-polarity to a high-polarity ionic liquid form upon exposure to an atmosphere of CO2 and revert back to the low polarity form when the CO2 is removed by heat or flushing with inert gas. We also demonstrated that these switchable solvents can be used as reversible CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) for CO2 capture, and are more energy-efficient in that role than aqueous solutions of ethanolamine.

Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Ang, Trisha; Liang, Chen; Rainbolt, James E.; Yonker, Clement R.; Jessop, Philip G.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Large-scale fabrication and assembly of carbon nanotubes via nanopelleting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Widespread use of carbon nanotubes is predicated on the development of robust large-scale manufacturing techniques. There remain, however, few feasible methods for the large-scale handling of aligned and geometrically ...

El Aguizy, Tarek A., 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Workshop on Scalable Cyber-Security Challenges in Large-Scale Networks: Deployment Obstacles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop on Scalable Cyber-Security Challenges in Large-Scale Networks: Deployment Obstacles Large, and Definitions of Cybersecurity.... 8 Conventional Wisdom is Inadequate....................................... 9 Directions in Scalable Cyber-Security in Large-Scale Networks: Deployment Obstacles." The workshop

Feigenbaum, Joan

375

A Thesaurus and Online Encyclopedia Merging Method for Large Scale Domain-Ontology Automatic Construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While building the large-scale domain ontology, the traditional manually-based construction method is low efficient and not feasible. In order to construct the large scale domain-ontology automatically; therefore...

Ting Wang; Jicheng Song; Ruihua Di; Yi Liang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Mitigating Security Threats to Large-Scale Cross Border Virtualization Infrastructures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The large-scale cross border virtualization infrastructures can be seen as a federation of heterogeneous clouds. We present pragmatic analysis of the potential threats posed to the emerging large-scale cross...in...

Philippe Massonet; Syed Naqvi; Francesco Tusa; Massimo Villari

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Architectural Design and Complexity Analysis of Large-Scale Cortical Simulation on a Hybrid Computing Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- performance computing platform for large-scale mathematical models. Traditional computing architecture cannot hybrid computing architecture for the simulation and evaluation of large-scale associative neural memory models. The proposed architecture achieves very high computing and communication performances

Qiu, Qinru

378

NETL: News Release - Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Large-Scale Test to Inject One Million Metric Tonnes of Carbon Dioxide into Saline Formation Washington, DC-The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change.

379

Biomimetric Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomimetic memBrane for co Biomimetic memBrane for co 2 capture from flue Gas Background Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is a three-step process including capture, pipeline transport and geologic storage of which the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the most costly and technically challenging. Current available methods impose significant energy burdens that severely impact their overall effectiveness as a significant deployment option. Of the available capture technologies for post combustion applications - absorption, adsorption, reaction and membranes chemically facilitated absorption promises to be the most cost-effective membrane solution for post combustion application. The Carbozyme technology extracts CO 2 from low concentration, low pressure sources by means of chemical facilitation of a polymer membrane. The chemical

380

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Distributed Optical Sensor for CO2 Leak Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Sensor for CO Optical Sensor for CO 2 Leak Detection Opportunity Research is active on the technology "Distributed Optical Sensor for CO 2 Leak Detection," for which a Patent Application has been filed. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview The availability of fossil fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, there are concerns over the impacts of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere-particularly carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations is a promising technology to reduce the impact of CO

382

A Linear Scaling Three Dimensional Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large scale electronic structure calculations Lin-Wang Wang,total energy electronic structure calculation method, which

Wang, Lin-Wang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Linear Scaling Three Dimensional Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large scale electronic structure calculations Lin-Wang Wang,total energy electronic structure calculation method, which

Wang, Lin-Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

CO2 http://andrew.ucsd.edu/co2qc/ University of California, San Diego  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooled by liquid nitrogen. The water and CO2 are separated from one another by sublimation and the CO2 for oceanic CO2 analysis: A method for the certification of total alkalinity. Marine Chemistry 80, 185

385

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Analysis Systems Analysis DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Innovations for Existing Plants Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. This work includes technology, benefits, and current situation and trends analyses related to CO2 emissions control. Systems analyses and economic modeling of potential new processes are crucial to providing sound guidance to R&D efforts. Since the majority of new CO2 capture technologies are still at a bench scale level of development, a conceptual design is first generated with emphasis on mass and energy balances. Based on available data and/or engineering estimates, these systems are optimized, and "what-if" scenarios are evaluated to identify barriers to deployment and help the process developers establish system performance targets. Reports that have been generated describing systems analyses in support of carbon capture efforts are shown in the table below.

386

CO2-Emissionszertifikate - Preismodellierung und Derivatebewertung.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??EU-Unternehmen m黶sen seit 2005 entsprechend ihrem CO2-Aussto gen黦end Emissionszertifikate einreichen. Da die Zertifikate frei handelbar sind, stellt sich ihnen CO2 als ein zus鋞zlicher Produktionsfaktor mit (more)

Wagner, Michael W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Engineered yeast for enhanced CO2 mineralization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a biologically catalysed CO2 mineralization process for the capture of CO2 from point sources was designed, constructed at a laboratory scale, and, using standard chemical process scale-up protocols, was ...

Barbero, Roberto Juan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

QGESS: CO2 Impurity Design Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10. Shah, Minish. Capturing CO2 from Oxy-Fuel Combustion Flue Gas. Cottbus, Germany : Praxair Inc., 2005. 11. Spitznogle, Gary O. CO2 Impurity Specification at AEP Mountaineer....

389

CO2 please | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 please CO2 please ORNL researchers look to carbon dioxide as a more environmentally friendly refrigerant gas In an indoor research area, Brian Fricke preps display cases for...

390

Political risk analysis in large-scale mineral investments  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation emphasizes problems encountered in applying current techniques within the framework of the expected-net-present-value investment evaluation paradigms commonly employed by mineral extraction firms. A method of political risk analysis consistent with expected-net-present-value paradigms is presented. This method of political risk analysis is grounded in the neoclassical tradition of economics which holds that economics should determine politics. The method of political risk analysis presented consists of direct and indirect portions. The direct portion of the method requires electoral polling to formulate support distributions for possible host nation policies toward foreign investors. It is applicable in freely politicized host nations. The indirect portion of the method presumes that abnormalities in economic trends produce political pressures intended to return a host nation economy to its normal state. Large-scale mineral investments are particularly vulnerable to political pressures and are at risk whenever economic abnormalities in a host nation manifest themselves. The degree of political risk present at any time is a direct function of the deviation of a host nation economy from its normal condition.

Proehl, T.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure: Connecting Hopes with Reality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large scale structure is however from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm loc}$ ($f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm eq}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are $\\Delta f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm loc, eq.} \\simeq 1$. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.

Marcelo Alvarez; Tobias Baldauf; J. Richard Bond; Neal Dalal; Roland de Putter; Olivier Dor; Daniel Green; Chris Hirata; Zhiqi Huang; Dragan Huterer; Donghui Jeong; Matthew C. Johnson; Elisabeth Krause; Marilena Loverde; Joel Meyers; P. Daniel Meerburg; Leonardo Senatore; Sarah Shandera; Eva Silverstein; An瀍 Slosar; Kendrick Smith; Matias Zaldarriaga; Valentin Assassi; Jonathan Braden; Amir Hajian; Takeshi Kobayashi; George Stein; Alexander van Engelen

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Large Scale Obscuration and Related Climate Effects Workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

A Workshop on Large Scale Obsurcation and Related Climate Effects was held 29--31 January, 1992, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The objectives of the workshop were: to determine through the use of expert judgement the current state of understanding of regional and global obscuration and related climate effects associated with nuclear weapons detonations; to estimate how large the uncertainties are in the parameters associated with these phenomena (given specific scenarios); to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on obscuration predictions; and to develop an approach for the prioritization of further work on newly-available data sets to reduce the uncertainties. The workshop consisted of formal presentations by the 35 participants, and subsequent topical working sessions on: the source term; aerosol optical properties; atmospheric processes; and electro-optical systems performance and climatic impacts. Summaries of the conclusions reached in the working sessions are presented in the body of the report. Copies of the transparencies shown as part of each formal presentation are contained in the appendices (microfiche).

Zak, B.D.; Russell, N.A.; Church, H.W.; Einfeld, W.; Yoon, D.; Behl, Y.K. [eds.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

HTS cables open the window for large-scale renewables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a realistic approach to future energy consumption, the effects of sustainable power sources and the effects of growing welfare with increased use of electricity need to be considered. These factors lead to an increased transfer of electric energy over the networks. A dominant part of the energy need will come from expanded large-scale renewable sources. To use them efficiently over Europe, large energy transits between different countries are required. Bottlenecks in the existing infrastructure will be avoided by strengthening the network. For environmental reasons more infrastructure will be built underground. Nuon is studying the HTS technology as a component to solve these challenges. This technology offers a tremendously large power transport capacity as well as the possibility to reduce short circuit currents, making integration of renewables easier. Furthermore, power transport will be possible at lower voltage levels, giving the opportunity to upgrade the existing network while re-using it. This will result in large cost savings while reaching the future energy challenges. In a 6 km backbone structure in Amsterdam Nuon wants to install a 50 kV HTS Triax cable for a significant increase of the transport capacity, while developing its capabilities. Nevertheless several barriers have to be overcome.

A Geschiere; D Will閚; E Piga; P Barendregt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Large Scale Structure in the SDSS DR1 Galaxy Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Large Scale Structure in the galaxy distribution is investigated using The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using the Minimal Spanning Tree technique we have extracted sets of filaments, of wall--like structures, of galaxy groups, and of rich clusters from this unique sample. The physical properties of these structures were then measured and compared with the statistical expectations based on the Zel'dovich' theory. The measured characteristics of galaxy walls were found to be consistent with those for a spatially flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with $\\Omega_m\\approx$ 0.3 and $\\Omega_\\Lambda \\approx$ 0.7, and for Gaussian initial perturbations with a Harrison -- Zel'dovich power spectrum. Furthermore, we found that the mass functions of groups and of unrelaxed structure elements generally fit well with the expectations from Zel'dovich' theory. We also note that both groups and rich clusters tend to prefer the environments of walls, which tend to be of higher density, rather than the environments of filaments, which tend to be of lower density.

A. Doroshkevich; D. L. Tucker; S. Allam; M. J. Way

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

Parallel Index and Query for Large Scale Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Modern scientific datasets present numerous data management and analysis challenges. State-of-the-art index and query technologies are critical for facilitating interactive exploration of large datasets, but numerous challenges remain in terms of designing a system for process- ing general scientific datasets. The system needs to be able to run on distributed multi-core platforms, efficiently utilize underlying I/O infrastructure, and scale to massive datasets. We present FastQuery, a novel software framework that address these challenges. FastQuery utilizes a state-of-the-art index and query technology (FastBit) and is designed to process mas- sive datasets on modern supercomputing platforms. We apply FastQuery to processing of a massive 50TB dataset generated by a large scale accelerator modeling code. We demonstrate the scalability of the tool to 11,520 cores. Motivated by the scientific need to search for inter- esting particles in this dataset, we use our framework to reduce search time from hours to tens of seconds.

Chou, Jerry; Wu, Kesheng; Ruebel, Oliver; Howison, Mark; Qiang, Ji; Prabhat,; Austin, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes; Ryne, Rob D.; Shoshani, Arie

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

396

Breakdown of large-scale circulation in turbulent rotating convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Turbulent rotating convection in a cylinder is investigated both numerically and experimentally at Rayleigh number Ra=109 and Prandtl number ?=6.4. In this letter we discuss two topics: the breakdown under rotation of the domain-filling large-scale circulation (LSC) typical for confined convection, and the convective heat transfer through the fluid layer, expressed by the Nusselt number. The presence of the LSC is addressed for several rotation rates. For Rossby numbers Ro1.2 no LSC is found (the Rossby number indicates relative importance of buoyancy over rotation, hence small Ro indicates strong rotation). For larger Rossby numbers a precession of the LSC in anticyclonic direction (counter to the background rotation) is observed. It is shown that the heat transfer has a maximal value close to Ro=0.18 being about 15% larger than in the non-rotating case Ro=?. Since the LSC is no longer present at this Rossby value we conclude that the peak heat transfer is independent of the LSC.

R. P. J. Kunnen; H. J. H. Clercx; B. J. Geurts

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Numerical simulation of leakage from a geologic disposal reservoirfor CO2, with transitions between super- and sub-criticalconditions  

SciTech Connect

The critical point of CO2 is at temperature and pressureconditions of Tcrit = 31.04oC, Pcrit = 73.82 bar. At lower (subcritical)temperatures and/or pressures, CO2 can exist in two different phases, aliquid and a gaseous state, as well as in two-phase mixtures of thesestates. Disposal of CO2 into brine formations would be made atsupercritical pressures. However, CO2 escaping from the storage reservoirmay migrate upwards towards regions with lower temperatures andpressures, where CO2 would be in subcritical conditions. An assessment ofthe fate of leaking CO2 requires a capability to model not onlysupercritical but also subcritical CO2, as well as phase changes betweenliquid and gaseous CO2 in sub-critical conditions. We have developed amethodology for numerically simulating the behavior of water-CO2 mixturesin permeable media under conditions that may include liquid, gaseous, andsupercritical CO2. This has been applied to simulations of leakage from adeep storage reservoir in which a rising CO2 plume undergoes transitionsfrom supercritical to subcritical conditions. We find strong coolingeffects when liquid CO2 rises to elevations where it begins to boil andevolve a gaseous CO2 phase. A three-phase zone forms (aqueous - liquid -gas), which over time becomes several hundred meters thick as decreasingtemperatures permit liquid CO2 to advance to shallower elevations. Fluidmobilities are reduced in the three-phase region from phase interferenceeffects. This impedes CO2 upflow, causes the plume to spread outlaterally, and gives rise to dispersed CO2 discharge at the land surface.Our simulations suggest that temperatures along a CO2 leakage path maydecline to levels low enough so that solid water ice and CO2 hydratephases may be formed.

Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

398

Effects of CO2-Induced Seawater Acidification on Microbial Processes Involving Dissolved Organic Matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We used laboratory experiments covering a wide range of carbon dioxide (CO2) induced seawater acidification to simulate ocean CO2 storage and assess the potential effects on heterotrophic microbial processes associated with labile dissolved organic matter (DOM). There was no noticeable effect of increased CO2 concentration on short-term decomposition of labile DOM or nutrient uptake. However, microbial activities producing 搉ew DOM were apparently enhanced under treatments with 2000 or 5000爌pm CO2. Under these conditions, production of aggregates was inhibited in early stage. Both of acute and chronic effects should be included for assessment of biogeochemical cycle related to microbe process.

Namiha Yamada; Nobuo Tsurushima; Masahiro Suzumura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Exploiting separability in large-scale linear support vector machine ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 7, 2007 ... With the exponential increases in storage capacity and computing power, ... Approaches have been proposed to adapt the SVM training .... The Newton system to be solved at each iteration (steps 35) can be ..... Table 1: Time taken (

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

CO2 laser frequency multiplication  

SciTech Connect

The duration of the mode-locked CO(2) laser pulses was measured to be 0.9 + or - nsec by the technique of (second harmonic) autocorrelation. Knowing the pulse duration, the spot size, and the harmonic conversion efficiency, a detailed fit of experiment to theory gave an estimate of the nonlinear coefficient of AgGaSe(2). d36 = 31 + or - V(1), in agreement with the most accurate literature values. A number of experiments were made with longer pulse trains in which the highest harmonic energy conversion reached 78%. The damage threshold was measured and it turned out to be related much more strongly to fluence than intensity. The shorter pulse trains had peak intensities of close to 300 MW 1/cm squared whereas the longer trains (3 usec) had intensities up to 40 MW 1/cm squared.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

In-Situ MVA of CO2 Sequestration Using Smart Field Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In-Situ MVA of CO In-Situ MVA of CO 2 Sequestration Using Smart Field Technology Background Through its core research and development program administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) emphasizes monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation and risk assessment, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2 geologic storage sites. MVA efforts focus on the development and deployment of technologies that can provide an accurate accounting of stored CO 2 , with a high level of confidence that the CO 2 will remain stored underground permanently. Effective application of these MVA technologies will ensure the safety of geologic storage projects with respect to both human health and the environment, and can provide the basis for establishing

402

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width length) 0.3 5 to 2.74 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Cosmological Implications of the CMB Large-scale Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WMAP and Planck may have uncovered several anomalies in the full CMB sky that could indicate possible new physics driving the growth of density fluctuations in the early Universe. These include an unusually low power at the largest scales and an apparent alignment of the quadrupole and octopole moments. In LCDM, the quadrupole and octopole moments should be statistically independent. These low probability features may simply be due to posterior selections from many such possible effects. If this is not the case, however, their combined statistical significance would be equal to the product of their individual significances. Ignoring the biasing due to posterior selection, the missing large-angle correlations would have a probability as low as ~0.1% and the low-l multipole alignment would be unlikely at the ~4.9% level; under the least favourable conditions, their simultaneous observation in the context of the standard model could then be likely at only the ~0.005% level. In this paper, we explore the possibility that these features are indeed anomalous, and show that the corresponding probability of CMB multipole alignment in the R_h=ct Universe would then be ~7-10%, depending on the number of large-scale Sachs-Wolfe induced fluctuations. Since the low power at the largest spatial scales is reproduced in this cosmology without the need to invoke cosmic variance, the overall likelihood of observing both of these features in the CMB is > 7%, much more likely than in LCDM. The key physical ingredient responsible for this difference is the existence in the former of a maximum fluctuation size at the time of recombination, which is absent in the latter because of inflation.

Fulvio Melia

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

404

Large Scale Structure in the SDSS Galaxy Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Large Scale Structure (LSS) in the galaxy distribution is investigated using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release (SDSS EDR). Using the Minimal Spanning Tree technique we have extracted sets of filaments, of wall-like structures, of galaxy groups, and of rich clusters from this unique sample. The physical properties of these structures were then measured and compared with the expectations from Zel'dovich' theory. The measured characteristics of galaxy walls were found to be consistent with those for a spatially flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with $\\Omega_m\\approx$ 0.3 and $\\Omega_\\Lambda \\approx$ 0.7, and for Gaussian initial perturbations with a Harrison -- Zel'dovich power spectrum. Furthermore, we found that the mass functions of groups and of unrelaxed structure elements generally fit well with the expectations from Zel'dovich' theory, although there was some discrepancy for lower mass groups which may be due to incompleteness in the selected sample of groups. We also note that both groups and rich clusters tend to prefer the environments of walls, which tend to be of higher density, rather than the environments of filaments, which tend to be of lower density. Finally, we note evidence of systematic differences in the properties of the LSS between the Northern Galactic Cap stripe and the Southern Galactic Cap stripe -- in particular, in the physical properties of the walls, their spatial distribution, and the relative numbers of clusters embedded in walls. Because the mean separation of walls is $\\approx$ 60 -- 70$h^{-1}$ Mpc, each stripe only intersects a few tens of walls. Thus, small number statistics and cosmic variance are the likely drivers of these systematic differences.

A. Doroshkevich; D. L. Tucker; S. Allam

2002-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Lateral solids dispersion coefficient in large-scale fluidized beds  

SciTech Connect

The design of fuel feed ports in a large-scale fluidized bed combustor depends on the fuel characteristics and lateral solids mixing. However, the reported values of the effective lateral solids dispersion coefficient (D{sub sr}) are scattered in the broad range of 0.0001-0.1 m{sup 2}/s. With the aim of predicting D{sub sr} in wider fluidized beds which is difficult to measure directly or deduce from experimental results in lab-scale facilities, a computational method is proposed. It combines the Eulerian-Granular simulation and fictitious particle tracing technique. The value of D{sub sr} is calculated based on the movement of the tracers. The effect on D{sub sr} of bed width (W) ranging from 0.4 m up to 12.8 m at different levels of superficial gas velocity (U{sub 0}) is investigated. It is found that increasing W whilst maintaining U{sub 0}, D{sub sr} initially increases markedly, then its increase rate declines, and finally it stays around a constant value. The computed values of D{sub sr} are examined quantitatively and compared with a thorough list of the measured D{sub sr} in the literature since 1980s. Agreed with the measurements performed in the pilot-scale fluidized beds, the value of D{sub sr} in wider facilities at higher fluidizing velocities is predicted to be around the order of magnitude of 0.1 m{sup 2}/s, much higher than that in lab-scale beds. Finally, the effect of D{sub sr} on the distribution of fuel particles over the cross section in fluidized beds with the specified layout of feed ports is discussed. (author)

Liu, Daoyin; Chen, Xiaoping [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

DOE Regional Partnership Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam DOE Regional Partnership Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam March 10, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- A U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) team of regional partners has begun injecting CO2 into a deep lignite coal seam in Burke County, North Dakota, to demonstrate the economic and environmental viability of geologic CO2 storage in the U.S. Great Plains region. Ultimately, geologic carbon sequestration is expected to play an important role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and combating climate change. The Lignite Field Validation Test is being conducted by the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven regional partnerships under DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The seven

407

Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions November 16, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Geologic capacity exists to permanently store hundreds of years of regional carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in nine states stretching from Indiana to New Jersey, according to injection field tests conducted by the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). MRCSP's just-released Phase II final report indicates the region has likely total storage of 245.5 billion metric tons of CO2, mostly in deep saline rock formations, a large capacity compared to present day emissions. While distributed sources such as agriculture, transportation, and home heating account for a significant amount of CO2 emissions in the MRCSP

408

Gulf of Mexico Miocene CO2 Site Characterization Mega Transect  

SciTech Connect

This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration 搇eads and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO2-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format 慉tlas of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the offshore Miocene interval is a storage resource of National interest for providing CO2 storage as an atmospheric emissions abatement strategy. The natural petroleum system was used as an analog to infer seal quality and predict possible migration pathways of fluids in an engineered system of anthropogenic CO2 injection and storage. The regional structural features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone) that exert primary control on the trapping and distribution of Miocene hydrocarbons are expected to perform similarly for CCS. Industrial?scale CCS will require storage capacity utilizing well?documented Miocene hydrocarbon (dominantly depleted gas) fields and their larger structural closures, as well as barren (unproductive, brine?filled) closures. No assessment was made of potential for CO2 utilization for enhanced oil and gas recovery. The use of 3D numerical fluid flow simulations have been used in the study to greatly assist in characterizing the potential storage capacity of a specific reservoir. Due to the complexity of geologic systems (stratigraphic heterogeneity) and inherent limitations on producing a 3D geologic model, these simulations are typically simplified scenarios that explore the influence of model property variability (sensitivity study). A specific site offshore San Luis Pass (southern Galveston Island) was undertaken successfully, indicating stacked storage potential. Downscaling regional capacity estimates to the local scale (and the inverse) has proven challenging, and remains an outstanding gap in capacity assessments. In order to characterize regional seal performance and identify potential brine and CO2 leakage pathways, results from three high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic datasets acquired by the study using novel HR3D (P-Cable) acquisition system showed steady and significant improvements in data quality because of improved acquisition and processing technique. Finely detailed faults and stratigraphy in the shallowest 1000 milliseconds (~800 m) of data allowed for the identification and mapping of unconformable surfaces including what is probably

Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

MAC-Kaust Project P1 CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAC-Kaust Project P1 颅 CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter identification and numerical simulation M. Brokate, O. A. PykhteevHysteresis aspects of CO2 sequestration modeling K-H. Hoffmann, N. D. Botkin Objectives and methods of CO2 sequestration There is a popular belief

Turova, Varvara

410

A superstructure-based optimal synthesis of PSA cycles for post-combustion CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Recent developments have shown pressure/vacuum swing adsorption (PSA/VSA) to be a promising option to effectively capture CO2 from flue gas streams. In most commercial PSA cycles, the weakly adsorbed component in the mixture is the desired product, and enriching the strongly adsorbed CO2 is not a concern. On the other hand, it is necessary to concentrate CO2 to high purity to reduce CO2 sequestration costs and minimize safety and environmental risks. Thus, it is necessary to develop PSA processes specifically targeted to obtain pure strongly adsorbed component. A multitude of PSA/VSA cycles have been developed in the literature for CO2 capture from feedstocks low in CO2 concentration. However, no systematic methodology has been suggested to develop, evaluate, and optimize PSA cycles for high purity CO2 capture. This study presents a systematic optimization-based formulation to synthesize novel PSA cycles for a given application. In particular, a novel PSA superstructure is presented to design optimal PSA cycle configurations and evaluate CO2 capture strategies. The superstructure is rich enough to predict a number of different PSA operating steps. The bed connections in the superstructure are governed by time-dependent control variables, which can be varied to realize most PSA operating steps. An optimal sequence of operating steps is achieved through the formulation of an optimal control problem with the partial differential and algebraic equations of the PSA system and the cyclic steady state condition. Large-scale optimization capabilities have enabled us to adopt a complete discretization methodology to solve the optimal control problem as a largescale nonlinear program, using the nonlinear optimization solver IPOPT. The superstructure approach is demonstrated for case studies related to post-combustion CO2 capture. In particular, optimal PSA cycles were synthesized, which maximize CO2 recovery for a given purity, and minimize overall power consumption. The results show the potential of the superstructure to predict PSA cycles with up to 98% purity and recovery of CO2. Moreover, for recovery of around 85% and purity of over 90%, these cycles can recover CO2 from atmospheric flue gas with a low power consumption of 465 kWh tonne#1;1 CO2. The approach presented is, therefore, very promising and quite useful for evaluating the suitability of different adsorbents, feedstocks, and operating strategies for PSA, and assessing its usefulness for CO2 capture.

Agarwal, A.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Design advanced for large-scale, economic, floating LNG plant  

SciTech Connect

A floating LNG plant design has been developed which is technically feasible, economical, safe, and reliable. This technology will allow monetization of small marginal fields and improve the economics of large fields. Mobil`s world-scale plant design has a capacity of 6 million tons/year of LNG and up to 55,000 b/d condensate produced from 1 bcfd of feed gas. The plant would be located on a large, secure, concrete barge with a central moonpool. LNG storage is provided for 250,000 cu m and condensate storage for 650,000 bbl. And both products are off-loaded from the barge. Model tests have verified the stability of the barge structure: barge motions are low enough to permit the plant to continue operation in a 100-year storm in the Pacific Rim. Moreover, the barge is spread-moored, eliminating the need for a turret and swivel. Because the design is generic, the plant can process a wide variety of feed gases and operate in different environments, should the plant be relocated. This capability potentially gives the plant investment a much longer project life because its use is not limited to the life of only one producing area.

Naklie, M.M. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

NETL: SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001780 DOE is partnering with the University of Akron (Akron) to conduct research and training to develop an effective solid amine sorbent for large scale post-combustion CO2 capture from power plant flue gas. Sorbent materials developed by Akron consist of immobilized carbon and hydrogen structures (paraffin) distributed inside of the amine pores and aromatic amines located on the external surface and the pore mouth of the sorbent. The immobilized paraffinic amines have been shown to display excellent CO2 capture capacity by adsorbing CO2 at temperatures below 55 掳C and releasing it at temperatures between 80-120 掳C. This effort will focus on increasing scientific understanding of the chemical and physical principles affecting amines deposited on a series of porous solids that generally have large pore space, high surface area, and/or high thermal conductivity.

413

Integration of the steam cycle and CO2 capture process in a decarbonization power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A new integrated system with power generation and CO2 capture to achieve higher techno-economic performance is proposed in this study. In the new system, three measures are adopted to recover the surplus energy from the CO2 capture process. The three measures are as follows: (1) using a portion of low-pressure steam instead of high-pressure extracted steam by installing the steam ejector, (2) mixing a portion of flash-off water with the extracted steam to utilize the superheat degree of the extracted steam, and (3) recycling the low-temperature waste heat from the CO2 capture process to heat the condensed water. As a result, the power output of the new integrated system is 107.61燤W higher than that of a decarbonization power plant without integration. The efficiency penalty of CO2 capture is expected to decrease by 4.91%-points. The increase in investment produced by the new system is 3.25燤$, which is only 0.88% more than the total investment of a decarbonization power plant without integration. Lastly, the cost of electricity and CO2 avoided is 15.14% and 33.1% lower than that of a decarbonization power generation without integration, respectively. The promising results obtained in this study provide a new approach for large-scale CO2 removal with low energy penalty and economic cost.

Gang Xu; Yue Hu; Baoqiang Tang; Yongping Yang; Kai Zhang; Wenyi Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dark energy, dark matter, and inflation point to future breakthrough discoveriesDriven Discovery for the Dark Universe (cusp) 3) Dark Energy

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation Wei-li Lee (PPPL) C. S. Chang 13 M gc3 MagneticBreslau, J. Chen, G. Fu (PPPL), N Ferraro (General Atomics),Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in mid-2011 Currently at

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL); I. 燚. 燢aganovich (PPPL); 燗. 燛. 燢oniges 燼nd 燫onald 燚avidson, 燩PPL, 燩I) 10.1.1 Project 燤IT General 燗tomics PPPL Area 爋f 營nterest NERSC

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasmas for thermonuclear fusion. Because 爋f 爐he 燭hermonuclear 燫esearch (CTR) 燼nd 爐he 燦ational 燤agnetic Fusion

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate and earth system models, based on theoreticalemerging class of Earth System Models that include detailedof integrated earth system model predictions requires

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office BER,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion 燛nergy 燬ciences: 燭arget 2017 4 Meeting 燘ackground 燼nd 燬tructure In support of its mission to provide

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

February 9-10, 2010 DOE Office of Science Office of BasicDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced ScientificDirectors of the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office (BER), DOE Office of Science National Energy ResearchDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced ScientificDirectors of the Office of Science, Office of Biological &

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office BER,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment showing 爋f 爐he 燬warthmore 燬pheromak Experiment (SSX) 爐he Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment is shown

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rest of the infrastructure should be hybrid enabled in thehybrid (MPI-OpenMP) mode into the entire model infrastructure.infrastructure currently uses MPI and we are in the process of moving to a hybrid

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office BER,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Earthquake triggering and large-scale geologic storage of carbon dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion...accumulation of greenhouse gases, it must operate at...billion barrels of oil currently produced annually...zone in southeast Missouri. Fig. 1.Upper...hydrocarbons. Depleted oil and gas reservoirs are potentially...

Mark D. Zoback; Steven M. Gorelick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19 8 Magnetic 燜usion 燛nergy 燬cience (MFES) 燙ase 2017 8 Magnetic 燜usion 燛nergy 燬cience (MFES) 燙ase 燼nd NERSC Senior 燬cience 燗dvisor Magnetic Fusion

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Plasma Science Magnetic Fusion Energy Magneticfor 燜usion 燛nergy 燬ciences Magnetic 燜usion 燩lasma 爁rom the crosscutting science of magnetic reconnection and

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Ignition Facility (NIF) coming online, this is theof SRS/2wp instabilities in NIF relevant regimes. However,parameters relevant to NIF. There are important questions

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mp288 Magnetic Fusion Energy Materials High Energy Densitymaterials science, experimental validation enabled by targeted validation platforms, and high energymaterials needed to support a burning plasma environment; Pursue scientific opportunities and grand challenges in high energy

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Nanostructure Electronic Structure Calculations mp261d) Some electronic structure calculations, including someNanostructure Electronic Structure Calculations Lin-Wang

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of focus include magnetohydrodynamics, plasma turbulence andsystems, with a focus on the physics of plasmas in magneticas well as space plasmas. The focus of his work is on

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a focus on the physics of plasmas in 爓ell 燼s 爏pace plasmas. The focus of his work 爐hermal 爌lasmas. 燭his 燾ase 爏tudy 爁ocuses 爋n 爐he

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ignition Facility (NIF) the world's most powerful laser, and 爈aser-?plasma interactions 爎elevant 爐o 燿irect-? drive 營CF 爄mplosions Investigations 爋f 燼dvanced ignition

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerator Laboratory Dark Energy Survey Data Analysis desDark Universe (cusp) 3) Dark Energy Survey (des, not coveredSurvey (BOSS), the Dark Energy Survey (DES), and the South

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fundamental connections to atomic, molecular, and electronicfundamental connections to atomic, molecular, and electronic

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Stephane Ethier Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratoryof New Hampshire MIT Princeton Plasma Physics LaboratoryLudlow Auburn University Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.S. 燙hang (Princeton 燩lasma 燩hysics 燣aboratory) 燼t the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. 燬ystems 燜acility Princeton 燩lasma 燩hysics 燣aboratory

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

damage in fusion 爎eactors 爄s 爐ritium 爎etention. 燼 reliable fusion energy reactor, small-?scale 爎eactor components and ultimately the development of high-? performance, radiation resistant materials for advanced nuclear fission and fusion

Gerber, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon...

Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

439

A Novel CO2 Separation System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel CO Novel CO 2 Separation System Robert J. Copeland (copeland@tda.com 303-940-2323) Gokhan Alptekin (galtpekin@tda.com 303 940-2349) Mike Cesario (czar@tda.com 303-940-2336) Yevgenia Gershanovich (ygershan@tda.com 303-940-2346) TDA Research, Inc. 12345 West 52 nd Avenue Wheat Ridge, Colorado 80033-1917 Project Summary NEED Concern over global climate change has led to a need to reduce CO 2 emissions from power plants. Unfortunately, current CO 2 capture processes reduce the efficiency with which fuel can be converted to electricity by 9-37%, and CO 2 capture costs can exceed $70 per tonne 1 of CO 2 (Herzog, Drake, and Adams 1997). OBJECTIVE To generate electricity with little reduction in conversion efficiency while emitting little or no CO 2 to the atmosphere, TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is developing a Novel CO

440

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large-scale co2 storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The global financial markets: an ultra-large-scale systems perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We argue here that, in recent years, the world's financial markets have become a globally interconnected complex adaptive ultra-large-scale socio-technical system-of-systems, and that this has important consequences for how the financial markets should ... Keywords: algorithmic trading, financial markets, flash crash, high-frequency trading, large-scale complex IT systems, normalization of deviance, ultra-large-scale systems

Dave Cliff; Linda Northrop

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite. Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite. Abstract: The fundamental adsorption behavior of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) onto...

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysical large-scale dynamos Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dynamo cycle periods in astrophysical objects. An important... dynamos into three types: 1. magnetically dominated helical dynamos which sustain a large-scale magnetic... )...

444

DOE/NNSA Participates in Large-Scale CTBT On-Site Inspection...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Large-Scale CTBT On-Site Inspection Exercise in Jordan | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

445

Comparison of Large Scale Renewable Energy Projects for the United States Air Force.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focused on the performance of large-scale renewable energy projects for the United States Air Force. As global energy demands continue to rise, the (more)

Hughes, Jeffrey S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Enabling Large-Scale Linear Systems of Equations on Hybrid HPC Infrastructures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scientific research is becoming increasingly dependent on the large-scale analysis of data using High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures. Scientific computing aims at constructing mathematical models ......

H. Astsatryan; V. Sahakyan; Yu. Shoukouryan; M. Dayd; A. Hurault

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large scale electronic structure calculations Zhengji Zhaoin [8]. 3. Electronic structure calculations for asymmetricd) initio electronic structure Pure CdS calculations. This

Zhao, Zhengji

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Optimization and control of a large-scale solar chimney power plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The dissertation builds on previous research (Pretorius, 2004) and investigates the optimization and control of a large-scale solar chimney power plant. Performance results (more)

Pretorius, Johannes Petrus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CO 2 Heat Pump Water Heater 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Evaporator Kyle Gluesenkamp, gluesenkampk@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline:...

450

Project Profile: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

feasibility of using phase change materials (PCM) at elevated temperatures and to acquire engineering results that will lead to the demonstration of large-scale thermal storage...

451

Large Scale Computing Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences (An BES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop) Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Meeting Center, Rockville MD 3D Geophysical Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences (An BES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop) Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Meeting Center, Rockville MD 3D Geophysical Modeling and Imaging G. A. Newman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory February 9 - 10 , 2010 Talk Outline * SEAM Geophysical Modeling Project - Its Really Big! * Geophysical Imaging (Seismic & EM) - Its 10 to 100x Bigger! - Reverse Time Migration - Full Waveform Inversion - 3D Imaging & Large Scale Considerations - Offshore Brazil Imaging Example (EM Data Set) * Computational Bottlenecks * Computing Alternatives - GPU's & FPGA's - Issues Why ? So that the resource industry can tackle grand geophysical challenges (Subsalt imaging, land acquisition, 4-D, CO2, carbonates ......) SEAM Mission Advance the science and technology of applied

452

The National Weather Sensor Grid: a large-scale cyber-sensor infrastructure for environmental monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sensor grid integrates sensor networks with grid infrastructures to enable the real-time collection of sensor data, and the sharing of computational and storage resources for sensor data processing and management. We have developed a sensor grid architecture framework, called the Scalable Proxy-based aRchItecture for seNsor Grid (SPRING). Based on the SPRING framework, we designed the National Weather Sensor Grid (NWSG), a large-scale cyber-sensor infrastructure for environmental monitoring. The NWSG integrates mini weather stations deployed geographically across Singapore for weather data collection, processing and management. We have designed and implemented core sensor grid middleware components and services such as resource discovery, meta scheduling, job migration and security. The NWSG is designed to support long-term weather monitoring. The performance of the NWSG has been demonstrated in terms of reduction in latency for end-user response, significant improvement in overall system throughput, and even load balance across the sensor grid infrastructure.

Hock Beng Lim; Mudasser Iqbal; Wenqiang Wang; Yuxia Yao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Chapter 26 - Economic and Reliability Benefits of Large-Scale Solar Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distributed and large-scale solar resources are expected to expand rapidly in some regional and utility systems over the next few years. As this growth takes place, utilities and regional planners are increasingly using economic valuation methods to determine the net costs of alternative renewable resource additions. The net cost equation is the renewable plant's contracted cost or estimated levelized cost of energy plus its transmission and integration costs, minus its energy, ancillary service, and capacity benefits. There is a large and growing research literature analyzing components of this net cost equation for solar resources on an individual project level and as components of expanding renewable portfolios. A key finding is that because of solar's production shape, there are significant changes in energy and capacity value for marginal solar additions in many regions as aggregate solar penetration increases beyond 510% of annual energy. To date, studies have not identified significant constraints on integration into system operations until solar penetrations reach 1015% and even higher (with a larger renewable portfolio), especially if solar resources are sufficiently spatially distributed. However, there are indications that actual system operations may encounter integration constraints at lower penetrations. These operational limits are leading to an increasing focus on integration solutions, including storage, as a possible long-term requirement for continued solar penetration.

Udi Helman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Integrating Online Compression to Accelerate Large-Scale Data Analytics Applications  

SciTech Connect

Abstract梂ith growing dataset sizes, and as computing cycles are increasing faster than storage and wide-area bandwidths, compression appears like a promising approach for improving the performance of large-scale data analytics applications. In this context, this paper makes the following contributions. First, we develop a new compression methodology, which exploits the similarities between spatial and/or temporal neighbors in a simulation dataset, and enables high compression ratios and low decompression costs. Second, we have developed a framework that can be used to incorporate a variety of compression and decompression algorithms. This framework also supports a simple API to allow integration with an existing application or data processing middleware. Once a compression algorithm is implemented, this framework can allow multi-threaded retrieval, multi-threaded data decompression, and use of informed prefetching and caching. By integrating this framework with a data-intensive middleware, we have applied our compression methodology and framework to three applications over two datasets, including a GCRM climate model dataset. We obtained an average compression ratio of 51.68%, and up to 53.27% improvement in execution time of data analysis applications.

Bicer, T.; Yin, Jian; Chiu, David; Agrawal, Gagan; Schuchardt, Karen L.

2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Building a Large Scale Climate Data System in Support of HPC Environment  

SciTech Connect

The Earth System Grid Federation (ESG) is a large scale, multi-institutional, interdisciplinary project that aims to provide climate scientists and impact policy makers worldwide a web-based and client-based platform to publish, disseminate, compare and analyze ever increasing climate related data. This paper describes our practical experiences on the design, development and operation of such a system. In particular, we focus on the support of the data lifecycle from a high performance computing (HPC) perspective that is critical to the end-to-end scientific discovery process. We discuss three subjects that interconnect the consumer and producer of scientific datasets: (1) the motivations, complexities and solutions of deep storage access and sharing in a tightly controlled environment; (2) the importance of scalable and flexible data publication/population; and (3) high performance indexing and search of data with geospatial properties. These perceived corner issues collectively contributed to the overall user experience and proved to be as important as any other architectural design considerations. Although the requirements and challenges are rooted and discussed from a climate science domain context, we believe the architectural problems, ideas and solutions discussed in this paper are generally useful and applicable in a larger scope.

Wang, Feiyi [ORNL] [ORNL; Harney, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Modeling CO2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas Background Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial,

457

The supply chain of CO2 emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...secondary fuels (e.g., diesel, gasoline, electricity, etc.), which...Warming and Energy Policy , Free-market approaches to controlling...ofnatural gas (MtCO2) GDP[B$, Market Exchange Rate(MER...ofnatural gas (MtCO2) GDP[B$, Market Exchange Rate(MER...

Steven J. Davis; Glen P. Peters; Ken Caldeira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Interactions of Supercritical CO2 with Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) mainly emitted from fossil fuel combustion causes global warming. ... (23) CO2 and methane might penetrate the coal matrix and cause coals to expand to some extent. ... Four coals ranging in carbon content from 77 to 84% C were warmed in the weak swelling solvent chlorobenzene at 132癈 for 2 wk, and samples were withdrawn at intervals. ...

Dengfeng Zhang; Lili Gu; Songgeng Li; Peichao Lian; Jun Tao

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sequestration of CO2 by Concrete Carbonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO2 by Concrete Carbonation ... Carbonation of reinforced concrete is one of the causes of corrosion, but it is also a way to sequester CO2. ... This work attempts to advance the knowledge of the carbon footprint of cement. ...

Isabel Galan; Carmen Andrade; Pedro Mora; Miguel A. Sanjuan

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

460

Absorption of 9.6-?m CO2 laser radiation by CO2 at elevated temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absorption of 9.6-?m CO2 laser radiation by CO2 at temperatures between 296 and 625 K has been measured at a pressure of 200 Torr. Experimental results for the...

Robinson, A M

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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