National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for large water tunnel

  1. Penn Large Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina:ParamountEnergy GroupPeetzPenescalLarge

  2. Design fires for tunnel water mist suppression systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvel, Ricky O

    Water mist systems are unable to suppress or control large fires, therefore the ‘design fire’ for a water mist system in a tunnel should not be specified in terms of peak heat release rate, but rather in terms of the ...

  3. Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its potential applications for energy storage, charge storage and power supplies. Friday, May 27, 2011 - 4:00pm...

  4. Penn Small Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina:ParamountEnergySmall Water Tunnel Jump

  5. Carderock Large Cavitation Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy ResourcesRanchCirculating Water Channel

  6. Far-infrared laser vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy of the propane-water compkx: Torsional dynamics of the hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elrod, Matthew J.

    Far-infrared laser vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy of the propane-water compkx: Torsional 1993) The far-infrared laservibration-rotation-tunneling (FIR-VRT) spectrumof the propane-water complex calculations. In the present paper and in its counterpart,13we present our results for the water-propane

  7. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  8. Efficient Sensor Placement Optimization for Securing Large Water Distribution Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Efficient Sensor Placement Optimization for Securing Large Water Distribution Networks Andreas Abstract: The problem of deploying sensors in a large water distribution network is considered, in order water--exhibits an important diminishing returns effect called submodularity. The submodularity

  9. Instability of large solitary water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiwu Lin

    2008-03-03

    We consider the linearized instability of 2D irrotational solitary water waves. The maxima of energy and the travel speed of solitary waves are not obtained at the highest wave, which has a 120 degree angle at the crest. Under the assumption of non-existence of secondary bifurcation which is confirmed numerically, we prove linear instability of solitary waves which are higher than the wave of maximal energy and lower than the wave of maximal travel speed. It is also shown that there exist unstable solitary waves approaching the highest wave. The unstable waves are of large amplitude and therefore this type of instability can not be captured by the approximate models derived under small amplitude assumptions. For the proof, we introduce a family of nonlocal dispersion operators to relate the linear instability problem with the elliptic nature of solitary waves. A continuity argument with a moving kernel formula is used to study these dispersion operators to yield the instability criterion.

  10. Large-scale fabrication of BN tunnel barriers for graphene spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Wangyang; Makk, Péter; Maurand, Romain; Bräuninger, Matthias; Schönenberger, Christian

    2014-08-21

    We have fabricated graphene spin-valve devices utilizing scalable materials made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both the spin-transporting graphene and the tunnel barrier material are CVD-grown. The tunnel barrier is realized by Hexagonal boron nitride, used either as a monolayer or bilayer and placed over the graphene. Spin transport experiments were performed using ferromagnetic contacts deposited onto the barrier. We find that spin injection is still greatly suppressed in devices with a monolayer tunneling barrier due to resistance mismatch. This is, however, not the case for devices with bilayer barriers. For those devices, a spin relaxation time of ?260 ps intrinsic to the CVD graphene material is deduced. This time scale is comparable to those reported for exfoliated graphene, suggesting that this CVD approach is promising for spintronic applications which require scalable materials.

  11. Terahertz vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy of the water tetramer-d8: Combined analysis of vibrational bands at 4.1 and 2.0 THz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Terahertz vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy of the water tetramer-d8: Combined analysis in the global fit of the water trimer. The detailed understanding of the water tetramer evolving from this work calculated concentrations of water trimers, tetramers, and pentamers of 1012 , 1011 , and 1010 cm-3

  12. Glendale Water and Power- Large Business Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glendale Water and Power (GWP) offers a rebate to its medium and large business customers with electric bills of more than $3000 per month (electric usage of 250,000 kWh annually ~ $36,000 per year...

  13. An ultrahigh vacuum fast-scanning and variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope for large scale imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    rigid STM head with low thermal expansion, axial symmetry, and a self aligning sample-holder/STM-head holder and STM head permits imaging of the same nanometer-size area of the sample before and after sample able to achieve subangstrom resolu- tions in a large temperature range while having low thermal drifts

  14. Design and calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope for large machined surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    During the last year the large sample STM has been designed, built and used for the observation of several different samples. Calibration of the scanner for prope dimensional interpretation of surface features has been a chief concern, as well as corrections for non-linear effects such as hysteresis during scans. Several procedures used in calibration and correction of piezoelectric scanners used in the laboratorys STMs are described.

  15. Monitoring microbial corrosion in large oilfield water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, E.Y.; Chen, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    Monitoring of microbial corrosion is always difficult because of the sessile nature of bacteria and the lack of meaningful correlation between routine bacteria counts and bacterial activity. This problem is further aggravated in a large oilfield water system because of its size and sampling difficulties. This paper discusses some monitoring techniques currently used in the oil industry, their limitations and the possible areas for improvement. These suggested improvements either are presently being implemented or will be implemented in the Aramco systems.

  16. Monitoring microbial corrosion in large oilfield water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, E.Y.; Chen, R.B.

    1984-07-01

    Monitoring of microbial corrosion is always difficult because of the sessile nature of bacteria and the lack of meaningful correlation between routine bacteria counts and bacterial activity. This problem is further aggravated in a large oilfield water system because of size and sampling difficulties. This paper discusses some monitoring techniques currently used in the oil industry, their limitations, and possible areas for improvement. These improved techniques are in use or will be implemented in the Aramco systems.

  17. Terahertz Laser Vibration-Rotation Tunneling Spectroscopy of the Water Tetramer Jeff D. Cruzan, Mark R. Viant, Mac G. Brown, and Richard J. Saykally*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Terahertz Laser Vibration-Rotation Tunneling Spectroscopy of the Water Tetramer Jeff D. Cruzan, which increase nonlinearly with increasing J, were found in both D2O and H2O tetramer spectra. Evidence of 1% of the total stabilization energy of the tetramer and pentamer.12-21 Xantheas' recent MP2

  18. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    2008-01-15

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  19. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  20. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Theoretical Study of Water Adsorption on Fe3O4: Implications for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rim, Kwang T.; Eom, Daejin; Chan, Siu-Wai; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Flynn, George; Wen, Xiaodong; Batista, Enrique R.

    2012-10-23

    The reduced surface of a natural Hematite single crystal a-Fe2O3(0001) sample has multiple surface domains with di!erent terminations, Fe2O3(0001), FeO(111), and Fe3O4(111). The adsorption of water on this surface was investigated via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and first-principle theoretical simulations. Water species are observed only on the Fe-terminated Fe3O4(111) surface at temperatures up to 235 K. Between 235 and 245 K we observed a change in the surface species from intact water molecules and hydroxyl groups bound to the surface to only hydroxyl groups atop the surface terminating FeIII cations. This indicates a low energy barrier for water dissociation on the surface of Fe3O4 that is supported by our theoretical computations. Our first principles simulations con"rm the identity of the surface species proposed from the STM images, finding that the most stable state of a water molecule is the dissociated one (OH + H), with OH atop surface terminating FeIII sites and H atop under-coordinated oxygen sites. Attempts to simulate reaction of the surface OH with coadsorbed CO fail because the only binding sites for CO are the surface FeIII atoms, which are blocked by the much more strongly bound OH. In order to promote this reaction we simulated a surface decorated with gold atoms. The Au adatoms are found to cap the under-coordinated oxygen sites and dosed CO is found to bind to the Au adatom. This newly created binding site for CO not only allows for coexistence of CO and OH on the surface of Fe3O4 but also provides colocation between the two species. These two factors are likely promoters of catalytic activity on Au/Fe3O4(111) surfaces.

  1. Future large-scale water-Cherenkov detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Agostino; M. Buizza-Avanzini; M. Marafini; T. Patzak; A. Tonazzo; M. Dracos; N. Vassilopoulos; D. Duchesneau; M. Mezzetto; L. Mosca

    2013-06-28

    MEMPHYS (MEgaton Mass PHYSics) is a proposed large-scale water-Cherenkov experiment to be performed deep underground. It is dedicated to nucleon decay searches and the detection of neutrinos from supernovae, solar, and atmospheric neutrinos, as well as neutrinos from a future beam to measure the CP violating phase in the leptonic sector and the mass hierarchy. This paper provides an overview of the latest studies on the expected performance of MEMPHYS in view of detailed estimates of its physics reach, mainly concerning neutrino beams.

  2. Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2005-04-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

  3. Channel tunnel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Jacques Lemley, américain et "chief executif" parle du projet de l'Eurotunnel - tunnel sous la manche

  4. Water in the Soil http://www.alison-burke.com/jpgs-large/lifesciences/soil_waterflow.jpg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    Recap Recap Recap #12;Water in the Soil http://www.alison-burke.com/jpgs-large/lifesciences/soil_waterflow.jpg Soil water potential More negative #12;Less water requires more force As the soil water content decreases, plants need to excerpt more pressure to take water Photosynthesis and Water A decreases

  5. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  6. Water dynamics in large and small reverse micelles: From two ensembles to collective behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water dynamics in large and small reverse micelles: From two ensembles to collective behavior David July 2009 The dynamics of water in Aerosol-OT reverse micelles are investigated with ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch. In large reverse micelles, the dynamics of water are separable into two

  7. Flooding Experiments with Steam and Water in a Large Diameter Vertical Tube 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Susan Nicole

    2010-10-12

    An experimental study on flooding with steam and water in a large diameter vertical tube was conducted. This research has been performed to provide a better prediction of flooding in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ...

  8. Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Improved technology is needed for use in properly managing large agricultural watersheds. Proper watershed management means selecting land uses that are appropriate for each subarea, using erosion control measures where ...

  9. Analysis of Large- Capacity Water Heaters in Electric Thermal Storage Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Alan L.; Anderson, David M.; Winiarski, David W.; Carmichael, Robert T.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Fisher, Andrew R.

    2015-03-17

    This report documents a national impact analysis of large tank heat pump water heaters (HPWH) in electric thermal storage (ETS) programs and conveys the findings related to concerns raised by utilities regarding the ability of large-tank heat pump water heaters to provide electric thermal storage services.

  10. Discrete tunneling current fluctuations in metalwatermetal tunnel S. Boussaad and B. Q. Xu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Nongjian

    fluctuations to random trapping or escaping of a single electron in or from a localized state in the tunnel gap February 2003 We have studied electron tunneling through water between two metal electrodes supported. © 2003 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1566933 INTRODUCTION Electron tunneling through

  11. Optimal control of a large dam, taking into account the water costs [New Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramov, Vyacheslav M

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies large dam models where the difference between lower and upper levels $L$ is assumed to be large. Passage across the levels leads to damage, and the damage costs of crossing the lower or upper level are proportional to the large parameter $L$. Input stream of water is described by compound Poisson process, and the water cost depends upon current level of water in the dam. The aim of the paper is to choose the parameters of output stream (specifically defined in the paper) minimizing the long-run expenses. The particular problem, where input stream is Poisson and water costs are not taken into account has been studied in [Abramov, \\emph{J. Appl. Prob.}, 44 (2007), 249-258]. The present paper partially answers the question \\textit{How does the structure of water costs affect the optimal solution?} In particular the case of linear costs is studied.

  12. A penalization method for calculating the flow beneath travelling water waves of large amplitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Constantin; Konstantinos Kalimeris; Otmar Scherzer

    2014-08-08

    A penalization method for a suitable reformulation of the governing equations as a constrained optimization problem provides accurate numerical simulations for large-amplitude travelling water waves in irrotational flows and in flows with constant vorticity.

  13. Cavitation on a modern ship propeller.This photograph was taken by Mark Duttweiler (PhD '01) in Caltech's Mechanical Engineering, Low Turbulence Water Tunnel. The flow is from right to left. Enter the second issue of ENGenious.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    ) in Caltech's Mechanical Engineering, Low Turbulence Water Tunnel. The flow is from right to left. #12;4 5 of Engineering and Applied Science itself is ever evolving--a collection of exceptional people doing exceptional of Engineering and Applied Science. Finally, before you read on, I would like to take this opportunity to thank

  14. Subcooling Effects for Flooding Experiments with Steam and Water in a Large Diameter Vertical Tube 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullum, Wes

    2012-10-19

    rate needed to induce flooding. The data more closely follow air-water data at low subcooling. Such data has not been seen in the literature for steam-water flooding experiments in a large diameter vertical tube and will serve as an important benchmark....

  15. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  16. Large-scale Gadolinium-doped Water Cerenkov Detector for Non-Proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweany, M; Bowden, N S; Dazeley, S; Keefer, G; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, M

    2011-01-01

    Fission events from Special Nuclear Material (SNM), such as highly enriched uranium or plutonium, can produce simultaneous emission of multiple neutrons and high energy gamma-rays. The observation of time correlations between any of these particles is a significant indicator of the presence of fissionable material. Cosmogenic processes can also mimic these types of correlated signals. However, if the background is sufficiently low and fully characterized, significant changes in the correlated event rate in the presence of a target of interest constitutes a robust signature of the presence of SNM. Since fission emissions are isotropic, adequate sensitivity to these multiplicities requires a high efficiency detector with a large solid angle with respect to the target. Water Cerenkov detectors are a cost-effective choice when large solid angle coverage is required. In order to characterize the neutron detection performance of large-scale water Cerenkov detectors, we have designed and built a 3.5 kL water Cerenko...

  17. PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1 , Andrew M. Parsons2 , Loren R. Anderson3 and Terry F. Glover4 ABSTRACT This paper summarises the Portfolio Risk Assessment (PRA a reconnaissance-level engineering assessment and risk assessment. These assessments were performed for floods

  18. Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe Miguel Á energy, that proposes that richness will be best described by energy inputs into an area (e.g., Turner et and amphibian species richness in Europe and 11 environmental variables related to five hypotheses

  19. ARM - PI Product - Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSA RelatedInhibitionProductsIn-SituProductsLarge

  20. In Situ Observation of Water Dissociation with Lattice Incorporation at FeO Particle Edges Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xingyi; Lee, Junseok; Wang, Congjun; Matranga, Christopher; Aksoy, Funda; Liu, Zhi

    2011-03-15

    The dissociation of H2O and formation of adsorbed hydroxyl groups, on FeO particles grown on Au(111) were identified with in situ,: X:ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at water pressures ranging from 3 x 10-8 to 0.1 Torr. The facile dissociation of H2O takes place at FeO particle edges, and it was successfully observed in situ With atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The in situ STM studies show that adsorbed hydroxyl groups were formed exclusively along the edges of the FeO particles with the 0 atom becoming directly incorporated into the oxide crystalline lattice The STM results are consistent with coordinatively unsaturated ferrous (CUF) sites along the FeO particle edge causing the observed reactivity with H2O. Our results also directly illustrate how structural defects and under.-coordinated sites participate in chemical reactions.

  1. Breach and safety analysis of spills over water from large liquefied natural gas carriers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Attaway, Stephen W.

    2008-05-01

    In 2004, at the request of the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) prepared a report, ''Guidance on the Risk and Safety Analysis of Large Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Spills Over Water''. That report provided framework for assessing hazards and identifying approaches to minimize the consequences to people and property from an LNG spill over water. The report also presented the general scale of possible hazards from a spill from 125,000 m3 o 150,000 m3 class LNG carriers, at the time the most common LNG carrier capacity.

  2. Large-scale Gadolinium-doped Water Cerenkov Detector for Non-Proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sweany; A. Bernstein; N. S. Bowden; S. Dazeley; G. Keefer; R. Svoboda; M. Tripathi

    2011-05-11

    Fission events from Special Nuclear Material (SNM), such as highly enriched uranium or plutonium, can produce simultaneous emission of multiple neutrons and high energy gamma-rays. The observation of time correlations between any of these particles is a significant indicator of the presence of fissionable material. Cosmogenic processes can also mimic these types of correlated signals. However, if the background is sufficiently low and fully characterized, significant changes in the correlated event rate in the presence of a target of interest constitutes a robust signature of the presence of SNM. Since fission emissions are isotropic, adequate sensitivity to these multiplicities requires a high efficiency detector with a large solid angle with respect to the target. Water Cerenkov detectors are a cost-effective choice when large solid angle coverage is required. In order to characterize the neutron detection performance of large-scale water Cerenkov detectors, we have designed and built a 3.5 kL water Cerenkov-based gamma-ray and neutron detector, and modeled the detector response in Geant4 [1]. We report the position-dependent neutron detection efficiency and energy response of the detector, as well as the basic characteristics of the simulation.

  3. Universal Time Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenter Nimtz

    2009-01-26

    How much time does a tunneling wave packet spent in traversing a barrier? Quantum mechanical calculations result in zero time inside a barrier . In the nineties analogous tunneling experiments with microwaves were carried out. The results agreed with quantum mechanical calculations. Electron tunneling time is hard to measure being extremely short and parasitic effects due to the electric charge of electrons may be dominant. However, quite recently the atomic ionization tunneling time has been measured. Experimental data of photonic, phononic, and electronic tunneling time is available now and will be presented. It appears that the tunneling time is a universal property independent of the field in question.

  4. Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district heating system ­ and makes a proposal for a technical and economic improvement. Monitoring of water quality in district heating systems is necessary

  5. Predictive Modeling of Large-Scale Commercial Water Desalination Plants: Data-Based Neural Network and Model-Based Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y. A.

    Predictive Modeling of Large-Scale Commercial Water Desalination Plants: Data-Based Neural Network for developing predictive models for large-scale commercial water desalination plants by (1) a data (MSF) and reverse osmosis (RO) desalination plants in the world. Our resulting neural network

  6. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sweany; A. Bernstein; S. Dazeley; J. Dunmore; J. Felde; R. Svoboda; M. Tripathi

    2011-10-14

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 $\\pm$ 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 $\\pm$ 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 $\\pm$ 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  7. A BIOMECHANICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ROLE OF LARGE STEM VOLUME AND HIGH WATER CONTENT IN BAOBAB TREES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, N. Michele

    A BIOMECHANICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ROLE OF LARGE STEM VOLUME AND HIGH WATER CONTENT IN BAOBAB TREES storage capacity in the six Madagascar baobab species. Baobab wood has a high water content (up to 79 to that in temperate deciduous trees. Furthermore, the elastic modulus of the wood decreases with water content

  8. Large

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and mastheadLakeLanguage of a fly provesLarge

  9. Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-04-10

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl{sub 3} extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants.

  10. Study of the performance of a large scale water-Cherenkov detector (MEMPHYS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Agostino; M. Buizza-Avanzini; M. Dracos; D. Duchesneau; M. Marafini; M. Mezzetto; L. Mosca; T. Patzak; A. Tonazzo; N. Vassilopoulos

    2013-01-21

    MEMPHYS (MEgaton Mass PHYSics) is a proposed large-scale water Cherenkov experiment to be performed deep underground. It is dedicated to nucleon decay searches, neutrinos from supernovae, solar and atmospheric neutrinos, as well as neutrinos from a future Super-Beam or Beta-Beam to measure the CP violating phase in the leptonic sector and the mass hierarchy. A full simulation of the detector has been performed to evaluate its performance for beam physics. The results are given in terms of "Migration Matrices" of reconstructed versus true neutrino energy, taking into account all the experimental effects.

  11. Tunnel Hunter: Detecting Application-Layer Tunnels with Statistical Fingerprinting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salgarelli, Luca

    Tunnel Hunter: Detecting Application-Layer Tunnels with Statistical Fingerprinting M. Dusi, M, Italy Abstract Application-layer tunnels nowadays represent a significant security threat for any network protected by firewalls and Application Layer Gateways. The encapsulation of protocols subject

  12. Modeling direct interband tunneling. I. Bulk semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    Interband tunneling is frequently studied using the semiclassical Kane model, despite uncertainty about its validity. Revisiting the physical basis of this formula, we find that it neglects coupling to other bands and underestimates transverse tunneling. As a result, significant errors can arise at low and high fields for small and large gap materials, respectively. We derive a simple multiband tunneling model to correct these defects analytically without arbitrary parameters. Through extensive comparison with band structure and quantum transport calculations for bulk InGaAs, InAs, and InSb, we probe the accuracy of the Kane and multiband formulas and establish the superiority of the latter. We also show that the nonlocal average electric field should be used when applying either of these models to nonuniform potentials. Our findings are important for efficient analysis and simulation of bulk semiconductor devices involving tunneling.

  13. Homogeneous SPC/E water nucleation in large molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angelil, R; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, H

    2015-01-01

    We perform direct large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous SPC/E water nucleation, using up to $\\sim 4\\cdot 10^6$ molecules. Our large system sizes allow us to measure extremely low and accurate nucleation rates, down to $\\sim 10^{19}\\,\\textrm{cm}^{-3}\\textrm{s}^{-1}$, helping close the gap between experimentally measured rates $\\sim 10^{17}\\,\\textrm{cm}^{-3}\\textrm{s}^{-1}$. We are also able to precisely measure size distributions, sticking efficiencies, cluster temperatures, and cluster internal densities. We introduce a new functional form to implement the Yasuoka-Matsumoto nucleation rate measurement technique (threshold method). Comparison to nucleation models shows that classical nucleation theory over-estimates nucleation rates by a few orders of magnitude. The semi-phenomenological nucleation model does better, under-predicting rates by at worst, a factor of 24. Unlike what has been observed in Lennard-Jones simulations, post-critical clusters have temperatures consistent with the run avera...

  14. Tunneling of Polymer Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Martín-Ruiz; E. Chan-López; A. Carbajal-Domínguez; J. Bernal

    2014-08-28

    In this paper we study the tunneling using a background independent (polymer) quantization scheme. We show that at low energies, for the tunneling through a single potential barrier, the polymer transmission coefficient and the polymer tunneling time converge to its quantum-mechanical counterparts in a clear fashion. As the energy approaches the maximum these polymer quantities abruptly decrease to zero. We use the transfer matrix method to study the tunneling through a series of identical potential barriers. We obtain that the transmission coefficients (polymer and quantum-mechanical) behave qualitatively in a similar manner, as expected. Finally we show that the polymer tunneling time exhibits anomalous peaks compared with the standard result. Numerical results are also presented.

  15. Introduction The first practical supersonic wind tunnel, built by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    #12;Introduction #12;The first practical supersonic wind tunnel, built by A. Busemann in Germany in the mid-1930s. #12;A large hypersonic wind tunnel at the U.S. Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, quasi-one-dimensional flow. #12;Energy Equation for steady, adiabatic, inviscid quasi-one dimensional

  16. Mass hierarchy discrimination with atmospheric neutrinos in large volume ice/water Cherenkov detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Franco; C. Jollet; A. Kouchner; V. Kulikovskiy; A. Meregaglia; S. Perasso; T. Pradier; A. Tonazzo; V. Van Elewyck

    2013-03-14

    Large mass ice/water Cherenkov experiments, optimized to detect low energy (1-20 GeV) atmospheric neutrinos, have the potential to discriminate between normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies. The sensitivity depends on several model and detector parameters, such as the neutrino flux profile and normalization, the Earth density profile, the oscillation parameter uncertainties, and the detector effective mass and resolution. A proper evaluation of the mass hierarchy discrimination power requires a robust statistical approach. In this work, the Toy Monte Carlo, based on an extended unbinned likelihood ratio test statistic, was used. The effect of each model and detector parameter, as well as the required detector exposure, was then studied. While uncertainties on the Earth density and atmospheric neutrino flux profiles were found to have a minor impact on the mass hierarchy discrimination, the flux normalization, as well as some of the oscillation parameter (\\Delta m^2_{31}, \\theta_{13}, \\theta_{23}, and \\delta_{CP}) uncertainties and correlations resulted critical. Finally, the minimum required detector exposure, the optimization of the low energy threshold, and the detector resolutions were also investigated.

  17. Author's personal copy How large is the subducted water flux? New constraints on mantle regassing rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    as pore water and chemically- bound water in sediments, altered oceanic crust and serpentinized lith (Fig. 1). A quantitative assessment of the long-term water cycle is critical to our understanding and Kohlstedt, 1996; Karato and Jung, 2003; Mei and Kohlstedt, 2000), structure and style of convection (Crowley

  18. Transport properties in resonant tunneling heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presilla, Carlo

    Transport properties in resonant tunneling heterostructures Carlo Presillaa) Dipartimento di Fisica approximation in terms of instantaneous resonances to study the steady-state and time-dependent transport leads, in a natural way, to a transport model of large applicability consisting of reservoirs coupled

  19. Fire Size in Tunnels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvel, Ricky O

    In recent years, a number of high profile accidental fires have occurred in several road and rail tunnels throughout the world. Many of these fires grew rapidly to catastrophic size and claimed many lives. The processes ...

  20. Reduced methane emissions from large-scale changes in water management of China's rice paddies during 19802000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reduced methane emissions from large-scale changes in water management of China's rice paddies; accepted 1 July 2002; published 24 October 2002. [1] Decreased methane emissions from paddy rice may have contributed to the decline in the rate of increase of global atmospheric methane (CH4) concentration over

  1. Last year, a large, water-filled pocket in the Tte Rousse Glacier of the French Alps threatened

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagliardini, Olivier

    Last year, a large, water-filled pocket in the Tête Rousse Glacier of the French Alps threatened,000 seconds. The achievement may enable studies of the energy levels of antihydrogen, and allow comparison. They then inserted a fluorescence-laser- microscopy probe into the animals to detect the light. The pattern of light

  2. Numerical wind tunnels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souza, Paulo Victor Santos

    2015-01-01

    Flow of viscous fluids are not usually discussed in detail in general and basic courses of physics. This is due in part to the fact that the Navier-Stokes equation has analytical solution only for a few restricted cases, while more sophisticated problems can only be solved by numerical methods. In this text, we present a computer simulation of wind tunnel, i.e., we present a set of programs to solve the Navier-Stokes equation for an arbitrary object inserted in a wind tunnel. The tunnel enables us to visualize the formation of vortices behind object, the so-called von K\\'arm\\'an vortices, and calculate the drag force on the object. We believe that this numerical wind tunnel can support the teacher and allow a more elaborate discussion of viscous flow. The potential of the tunnel is exemplified by the study of the drag on a simplified model of wing whose angle of attack can be controlled. A link to download the programs that make up the tunnel appears at the end.

  3. Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Teams competing in the U.S. Department of...

  4. Air and water flows in a large sand box with a two-layer aquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    the initial water table, the larger the vacuum, and the longer the time to reach the maximum vacuum table is close to the interface of the two layers. Keywords Sand box . Groundwater hydraulics

  5. Factors Influencing Water Heating Energy Use and Peak Demand in a Large Scale Residential Monitoring Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchelle, M. P.; Parker, D. S.; Anello, M. T.

    2000-01-01

    , as well as obtain improved appliance energy consumption indexes and load profiles. A portion of the monitoring measures water heater energy use and demand in each home on a 15-minute basis....

  6. Large Field Erected and Packaged High Temperature Water (HTW) Generators for Coal Firing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boushell, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to disseminate information on the energy savings possible with High Temperature Water (HTW) for heating and industrial process application and to provide information on coal fired HTW generator ...

  7. Risk analysis for tunneling projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa. Rita L

    2010-01-01

    Tunnel construction is increasing world wide. Although the majority of tunnel construction projects have been completed safely, there have been several incidents that have resulted in delays, cost overruns, and sometimes ...

  8. INTERBAND TUNNEL TRANSISTORS A Dissertation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D and 2D semiconductors.................................13 2.3 Comparison of Zener tunneling current the design and modeling of semiconducting and graphene nanoribbon-based tunnel transistors, to understand-dimensional semiconductors are derived to establish the guidelines for tunnel transistor design. An analytic expression

  9. Commissioning the Domestic Hot Water System on a Large University Campus: A Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Bensouda, N.; Claridge, D.; Bruner, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Texas A&M University (TAMU) main campus in College Station consists of 110 buildings with 12.5 million square feet of gross building space. Seventy-one of these buildings are connected to the main campus domestic hot water (DHW) distribution...

  10. INTRODUCTION The Amazon basin is a large body of extremely soft water. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Graham

    in oxygen concentrations can be substantial and hypoxic waters are very common. Studies on several fish that scale positively with fish size (Almeida-Val et al., 2000; Sloman et al., 2006). Ventilation does increase under hypoxia (Chippari-Gomes et al., 2005; Scott et al., 2008), which puts the fish at risk

  11. Institute for Water Resources, US Army Corps of Engineers Australian National Committee on Large Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Committee on Large Dams LIFESim: A Model for Estimating Dam Failure Life Loss DRAFT by Maged A. Aboelata and David S. Bowles Institute for Dam Safety Risk Management Utah State University Logan, Utah 2005 #12;ii ABSTRACT Catastrophic events such as dam failures or severe floods are considered to be of low probability

  12. Steam-water two-phase flow in large diameter vertical piping at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasanein, H.A.; Kawaji, Masahiro [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chan, A.M.C. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yoshioka, Yuzuru [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    No information on steam/water two-phase flow behavior in large diameter pipes (10 inch or larger) at elevated pressures is available in the open literature. However, there are many applications, in the nuclear, chemical and petroleum industries among others where two-phase flows in large diameter pipes at elevated pressures and temperatures are encountered routinely or under accident scenarios. Experimental data on steam-water two-phase flow in a large diameter (20 inch, 50.08 cm I.D.) vertical pipe at elevated pressures and temperatures (2.8 MPa/230 C--6.4 MPa/280 C) have been obtained. Void fraction, two-phase mass flux, phase and velocity distributions as well as pressure drop along the test pipe have been measured using the Ontario Hydro Technologies (OHT) Pump Test Loop. The void fraction distributions were found to be axially symmetric and nearly flat over a wide range of two-phase flow conditions. The two-phase flow regime could be inferred from the dynamic void fluctuations data. For the 280 C tests, the flow was found to be relatively stable with bubbly flow at low average void fractions and churn turbulent or wispy-annular flow at higher void fractions. At 230 C, the flow became rather oscillatory and slugging was suspected at relatively low voids. It has also been found that the average void fractions in the test section can be determined reasonably accurately using the axial pressure drop data.

  13. Natural convection in tunnels at Yucca Mountain and impact on drift seepage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson, P.

    2010-04-15

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock in the drift center to the drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water-induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  14. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  15. Global study of lake surface water temperature (LSWT) behaviour and the tuning of a 1-dimensional model to determine the LSWTs of large lakes worldwide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layden, Aisling

    2014-11-27

    Lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) of 246 globally distributed large lakes were derived from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) for the period 1991 to 2011. These LSWTs, derived in a systematic manner, presents ...

  16. Study of Cost Effective Large Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors that Employ Passive Safety Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, J. W.; Corletti, M. M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2003-11-12

    A report of DOE sponsored portions of AP1000 Design Certification effort. On December 16, 1999, The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Design Certification of the AP600 standard nuclear reactor design. This culminated an 8-year review of the AP600 design, safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment. The AP600 is a 600 MWe reactor that utilizes passive safety features that, once actuated, depend only on natural forces such as gravity and natural circulation to perform all required safety functions. These passive safety systems result in increased plant safety and have also significantly simplified plant systems and equipment, resulting in simplified plant operation and maintenance. The AP600 meets NRC deterministic safety criteria and probabilistic risk criteria with large margins. A summary comparison of key passive safety system design features is provided in Table 1. These key features are discussed due to their importance in affecting the key thermal-hydraulic phenomenon exhibited by the passive safety systems in critical areas. The scope of some of the design changes to the AP600 is described. These changes are the ones that are important in evaluating the passive plant design features embodied in the certified AP600 standard plant design. These design changes are incorporated into the AP1000 standard plant design that Westinghouse is certifying under 10 CFR Part 52. In conclusion, this report describes the results of the representative design certification activities that were partially supported by the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. These activities are unique to AP1000, but are representative of research activities that must be driven to conclusion to realize successful licensing of the next generation of nuclear power plants in the United States.

  17. Monitoring temporal opacity fluctuations of large structures with muon tomography : a calibration experiment using a water tower tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Jourde; Dominique Gibert; Jacques Marteau; Jean de Bremond d'Ars; Serge Gardien; Claude Girerd; Jean-Christophe Ianigro

    2015-04-09

    The idea of using secondary cosmic muons to scan the internal structure of a given body has known significant developments since the first archaeological application by Alvarez and collaborators on the Gizah pyramids. Recent applications cover the fields of volcanology, hydrology, civil engineering, mining, archaeology etc. Muon radiography features are essentially identical to those of medical X-ray imaging techniques. It is a contrast densitometry method using the screening effect of the body under study on the natural flux of cosmic muons. This technique is non-invasive and complements the standard geophysical techniques, e.g. electrical tomography or gravimetry. It may be applied to a large variety of geological targets, among which the domes of active volcanoes. In this context muon tomography presents the noticeable advantage to perform measurements of large volumes, with a large aperture, from a distant point, far from the potentially dangerous zones. The same conclusions apply regarding the monitoring of the volcano's activity since muon tomography provides continuous data taking, provided the muon detectors are sufficiently well designed and autonomous. Recent measurements on La Soufri\\`ere of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles, France) show, over a one year period, large modulations of the crossing muon flux, correlated with an increase of the activity in the dome. In order to firmly establish the sensitivity of the method and of our detectors and to disentangle the effects on the muon flux modulations induced by the volcano's hydrothermal system from those induced by other sources, e.g. atmospheric temperature and pressure, we perform a dedicated calibration experiment inside a water tower tank. We show how the method is fully capable of dynamically following fast variations in the density.

  18. Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrailTrosky,EnergyTullahassee,TunicaTunnel Jump to:

  19. Thin power law film flow down an inclined plane: consistent shallow water models and stability under large scale perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we derive consistent shallow water equations for thin films of power law fluids down an incline. These models account for the streamwise diffusion of momentum which is important to describe accurately the full dynamic of the thin film flows when instabilities like roll-waves arise. These models are validated through a comparison with Orr Sommerfeld equations for large scale perturbations. We only consider laminar flow for which the boundary layer issued from the interaction of the flow with the bottom surface has an influence all over the transverse direction to the flow. In this case the concept itself of thin film and its relation with long wave asymptotic leads naturally to flow conditions around a uniform free surface Poiseuille flow. The apparent viscosity diverges at the free surface which, in turn, introduces a singularity in the formulation of the Orr-Sommerfeld equations and in the derivation of shallow water models. We remove this singularity by introducing a weaker formulation of Cauc...

  20. Nonorientable spacetime tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González-Diáz, P F; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Garay, Luis J.

    1999-01-01

    Misner space is generalized to have the nonorientable topology of a Klein bottle, and it is shown that in a classical spacetime with multiply connected space slices having such a topology, closed timelike curves are formed. Different regions on the Klein bottle surface can be distinguished which are separated by apparent horizons fixed at particular values of the two angular variables that eneter the metric. Around the throat of this tunnel (which we denote a Klein bottlehole), the position of these horizons dictates an ordinary and exotic matter distribution such that, in addition to the known diverging lensing action of wormholes, a converging lensing action is also present at the mouths. Associated with this matter distribution, the accelerating version of this Klein bottlehole shows four distinct chronology horizons, each with its own nonchronal region. A calculation of the quantum vacuum fluctuations performed by using the regularized two-point Hadamard function shows that each chronology horizon nests a...

  1. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15

    Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMsâ�� cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10�° (latitude) x 10�° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

  2. How large is the subducted water flux? New constraints on mantle regassing1 R. Parai and S. Mukhopadhyay4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    and14 mantle source water contents, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to set limits on long-term global rates and water contents in primary magmas generated at ocean islands, mid-ocean ridges, arcs17 and back mantle water content of up to 24 ppm/Ga.30 31 #12;3 1. Introduction32 Exchange of water between the Earth

  3. H-CANYON AIR EXHAUST TUNNEL INSPECTION VEHICLE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minichan, R.; Fogle, R.; Marzolf, A.

    2011-05-24

    The H-Canyon at Savannah River Site is a large concrete structure designed for chemical separation processes of radioactive material. The facility requires a large ventilation system to maintain negative pressure in process areas for radioactive contamination control and personnel protection. The ventilation exhaust is directed through a concrete tunnel under the facility which is approximately five feet wide and 8 feet tall that leads to a sand filter and stack. Acidic vapors in the exhaust have had a degrading effect on the surface of the concrete tunnels. Some areas have been inspected; however, the condition of other areas is unknown. Experience from historical inspections with remote controlled vehicles will be discussed along with the current challenge of inspecting levels below available access points. The area of interest in the exhaust tunnel must be accessed through a 14 X 14 inch concrete plug in the floor of the hot gang valve corridor. The purpose for the inspection is to determine the condition of the inside of the air tunnel and establish if there are any structural concerns. Various landmarks, pipe hangers and exposed rebar are used as reference points for the structural engineers when evaluating the current integrity of the air tunnel.

  4. A study on the characteristics of upward air-water two-phase flow in a large diameter pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Xiuzhong; Saito, Yasushi; Mishima, Kaichiro [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Nakamura, Hideo [Nuclear Safety Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2006-10-15

    An adiabatic upward co-current air-water two-phase flow in a vertical large diameter pipe (inner diameter, D: 0.2m, ratio of pipe length to diameter, L/D: 60.5) was experimentally investigated under various inlet conditions. Flow regimes were visually observed, carefully analyzed and classified into five, i.e. undisturbed bubbly, agitated bubbly, churn bubbly, churn slug and churn froth. Void fraction, bubble frequency, Sauter mean diameter, interfacial area concentration (IAC) and interfacial direction were measured with four-sensor optical probes. Both the measured void fraction and the measured IAC demonstrated radial core-peak distributions in most of the flow regimes and radial wall peak in the undisturbed bubbly flow only. The bubble frequency also showed a wall-peak radial distribution only when the bubbles were small in diameter and the flow was in the undisturbed bubbly flow. The Sauter mean diameter of bubbles did not change much in the radial direction in undisturbed bubbly, agitated bubbly and churn bubbly flows and showed a core-peak radial distribution in the churn slug flow due to the existence of certain amount of large and deformed bubbles in this flow regime. The measurements of interfacial direction showed that the main and the secondary bubbly flow could be displayed by the main flow peak and the secondary flow peak, respectively, in the probability density function (PDF) of the interfacial directional angle between the interfacial direction and the z-axis, {eta}{sub zi}. The local average {eta}{sub zi }at the bubble front or rear hemisphere ({eta}{sub zi}{sup F} and {eta}{sub zi}{sup R}) reflected the local bubble movement and was in direct connection with the flow regimes. Based on the analysis, the authors classified the flow regimes in the vertical large diameter pipe quantitatively by the cross-sectional area-averaged {eta}{sub zi }at bubbly front hemisphere ({eta}{sub zi}{sup F}-bar). Bubbles in the undisturbed bubbly flow moved in a vertical way with some swerving motions and those in other flow regimes moved along the lateral secondary flow with an averaging net upward velocity. (author)

  5. Water maser variability over 20 years in a large sample of star-forming regions: the complete database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Felli; J. Brand; R. Cesaroni; C. Codella; G. Comoretto; S. Di Franco; F. Massi; L. Moscadelli; R. Nesti; L. Olmi; F. Palagi; D. Panella; R. Valdettaro

    2007-10-03

    Context. Water vapor emission at 22 GHz from masers associated with star-forming regions is highly variable. Aims. We present a database of up to 20 years of monitoring of a sample of 43 masers within star-forming regions. The sample covers a large range of luminosities of the associated IRAS source and is representative of the entire population of H2O masers of this type. The database forms a good starting point for any further study of H2O maser variability. Methods. The observations were obtained with the Medicina 32-m radiotelescope, at a rate of 4-5 observations per year. Results. To provide a database that can be easily accessed through the web, we give for each source: plots of the calibrated spectra, the velocity-time-flux density plot, the light curve of the integrated flux, the lower and upper envelopes of the maser emission, the mean spectrum, and the rate of the maser occurrence as a function of velocity. Figures for just one source are given in the text for representative purposes. Figures for all the sources are given in electronic form in the on-line appendix. A discussion of the main properties of the H2O variability in our sample will be presented in a forthcoming paper.

  6. Relativistic tunneling through opaque barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano; Leonardi, Vinicius [Department of Applied Mathematics, State University of Campinas, SP 13083-970, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    We propose an analytical study of relativistic tunneling through opaque barriers. We obtain a closed formula for the phase time. This formula is in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations and corrects the standard formula obtained by the stationary phase method. An important result is found when the upper limit of the incoming energy distribution coincides with the upper limit of the tunneling zone. In this case, the phase time is proportional to the barrier width.

  7. Propeller design optimization for tunnel bow thrusters in the bollard pull condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, James R., IV

    2012-01-01

    Tunnel bow thrusters are often used by large ships to provide low-speed lateral maneuverability when docking. Required to provide high thrust while essentially at a standstill, the design point for these thrusters is the ...

  8. Reinventing the PN Junction: Dimensionality Effects on Tunneling Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Sapan

    2012-01-01

    Effects on Tunneling Switches By Sapan Agarwal AEffects on Tunneling Switches Copyright © 2012 by SapanEffects on Tunneling Switches by Sapan Agarwal Doctor of

  9. Stacking fault induced tunnel barrier in platelet graphite nanofiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Yann-Wen, E-mail: chiidong@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chen, Chii-Dong, E-mail: chiidong@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-Hao [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Opto-Mechatronics, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi 62102, Taiwan (China); Li, Yuan-Yao [Graduate Institute of Opto-Mechatronics, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi 62102, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-08

    A correlation study using image inspection and electrical characterization of platelet graphite nanofiber devices is conducted. Close transmission electron microscopy and diffraction pattern inspection reveal layers with inflection angles appearing in otherwise perfectly stacked graphene platelets, separating nanofibers into two domains. Electrical measurement gives a stability diagram consisting of alternating small-large Coulomb blockade diamonds, suggesting that there are two charging islands coupled together through a tunnel junction. Based on these two findings, we propose that a stacking fault can behave as a tunnel barrier for conducting electrons and is responsible for the observed double-island single electron transistor characteristics.

  10. Evaluation of Ice Water Content Retrievals from Cloud Radar Reflectivity and Temperature Using a Large Airborne In Situ Microphysical Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protat, Alain

    Evaluation of Ice Water Content Retrievals from Cloud Radar Reflectivity and Temperature Using the performances of the proposed ice water content (IWC)­radar reflectivity Z and IWC­Z­temperature T relationships produce a very different ice water path, spanning an order of magnitude (Stephens et al. 2002). Clouds

  11. Determining Exchange Splitting in a Magnetic Semiconductor by Spin-Filter Tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, T. S.; Moodera, J. S.; Venkataraman, K.; Negusse, E.; Holroyd, J.; Dvorak, J.; Liberati, M.; Idzerda, Y. U.; Arenholz, E.

    2008-06-24

    A large exchange splitting of the conduction band in ultrathin films of the ferromagnetic semiconductor EuO was determined quantitatively, by using EuO as a tunnel barrier and fitting the current-voltage characteristics and temperature dependence to tunneling theory. This exchange splitting leads to different tunnel barrier heights for spin-up and spin-down electrons, and is large enough to produce a near fully spin-polarized current. Moreover, the magnetic properties of these ultrathin films (<6 nm) show a reduction in Curie temperature with decreasing thickness, in agreement with theoretical calculation [R. Schiller et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3847 (2001)].

  12. Nonorientable spacetime tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro F. Gonzalez-Diaz; Luis J. Garay

    1999-01-07

    Misner space is generalized to have the nonorientable topology of a Klein bottle, and it is shown that in a classical spacetime with multiply connected space slices having such a topology, closed timelike curves are formed. Different regions on the Klein bottle surface can be distinguished which are separated by apparent horizons fixed at particular values of the two angular variables that eneter the metric. Around the throat of this tunnel (which we denote a Klein bottlehole), the position of these horizons dictates an ordinary and exotic matter distribution such that, in addition to the known diverging lensing action of wormholes, a converging lensing action is also present at the mouths. Associated with this matter distribution, the accelerating version of this Klein bottlehole shows four distinct chronology horizons, each with its own nonchronal region. A calculation of the quantum vacuum fluctuations performed by using the regularized two-point Hadamard function shows that each chronology horizon nests a set of polarized hypersurfaces where the renormalized momentum-energy tensor diverges. This quantum instability can be prevented if we take the accelerating Klein bottlehole to be a generalization of a modified Misner space in which the period of the closed spatial direction is time-dependent. In this case, the nonchronal regions and closed timelike curves cannot exceed a minimum size of the order the Planck scale.

  13. Development of a wireless sensor unit for tunnel monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheekiralla, Sivaram M. S. L., 1980-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis we describe the development of a wireless sensor module for tunnel monitoring. The tunnel in question is a part of the London Underground system. Construction of a new tunnel beneath the existing tunnel is ...

  14. Hybrid Inflation Exit through Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjorn Garbrecht; Thomas Konstandin

    2006-10-24

    For hybrid inflationary potentials, we derive the tunneling rate from field configurations along the flat direction towards the waterfall regime. This process competes with the classically rolling evolution of the scalar fields and needs to be strongly subdominant for phenomenologically viable models. Tunneling may exclude models with a mass scale below 10^12 GeV, but can be suppressed by small values of the coupling constants. We find that tunneling is negligible for those models, which do not require fine tuning in order to cancel radiative corrections, in particular for GUT-scale SUSY inflation. In contrast, electroweak scale hybrid inflation is not viable, unless the inflaton-waterfall field coupling is smaller than approximately 10^-11.

  15. Enhanced tunneling through nonstationary barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomares-Baez, J. P.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. L. [Advanced Materials Department, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi 78231 (Mexico); Ivlev, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and NanoCenter, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi 78000 (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    Quantum tunneling through a nonstationary barrier is studied analytically and by a direct numerical solution of Schroedinger equation. Both methods are in agreement and say that the main features of the phenomenon can be described in terms of classical trajectories which are solutions of Newton's equation in complex time. The probability of tunneling is governed by analytical properties of a time-dependent perturbation and the classical trajectory in the plane of complex time. Some preliminary numerical calculations of Euclidean resonance (an easy penetration through a classical nonstationary barrier due to an underbarrier interference) are presented.

  16. Amending constructed roadside and urban soils with large volume-based compost applications: effects on water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Nels Edward

    2007-04-25

    Mineral nutrients imported in composted dairy manure (CDM) and municipal biosolid (CMB) amendments for highway-rights-of-way and urban landscapes can pose a threat to surface water quality. Treatments were developed to evaluate recommendations...

  17. Wind Tunnel Building - 7 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    or gravitational energy to some extent. Moreover, wave energy provides “15-20 times more available energy per square meter than either wind or solar” [1]. Of these the most commercially viable resources studied so far are ocean currents and waves. Some... limited commercial development and is therefore of more interest. Ocean waves arise from the transfer of energy from the sun to wind then water. Solar energy creates wind, which then blows over the ocean, converting wind energy to wave energy. Once...

  18. Neuroreceptor Activation by Vibration-Assisted Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoehn, Ross D; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hypothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopo...

  19. Guidance on risk analysis and safety implications of a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Gerald William; Melof, Brian Matthew; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Irwin, Michael James; Kaneshige, Michael Jiro; Morrow, Charles W.

    2004-12-01

    While recognized standards exist for the systematic safety analysis of potential spills or releases from LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) storage terminals and facilities on land, no equivalent set of standards or guidance exists for the evaluation of the safety or consequences from LNG spills over water. Heightened security awareness and energy surety issues have increased industry's and the public's attention to these activities. The report reviews several existing studies of LNG spills with respect to their assumptions, inputs, models, and experimental data. Based on this review and further analysis, the report provides guidance on the appropriateness of models, assumptions, and risk management to address public safety and property relative to a potential LNG spill over water.

  20. Troll Phase I pipelines: Tie-ins to the subsea tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hove, F.; Kuhlmann, H.

    1995-12-31

    Subsea approaches to the Norwegian coast are characterized by very rugged topography. Landfall of offshore pipelines therefore often require dedicated subsea tunnel and pipeline tie in concepts. To land the 36 inch and 40 inch offshore pipelines associated with the Troll Phase 1 development, a 4 km long landfall tunnel was constructed terminating at a water depth of 165 m with vertical shaft connections to the seabed. This paper describes the design of the Troll Phase 1 tie-ins of offshore to tunnel pipeline sections. These comprise two main elements, i.e. 180 Te tie-in spools -- which are installed between the offshore pipelines and the piercing shafts -- and prefabricated 450 Te riser bundles -- which are installed into the vertical tunnel piercing shafts.

  1. Observing remnants by fermions' tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D.Y.; Wu, H.W.; Yang, H. E-mail: iverwu@uestc.edu.cn

    2014-03-01

    The standard Hawking formula predicts the complete evaporation of black holes. In this paper, we introduce effects of quantum gravity into fermions' tunneling from Reissner-Nordstrom and Kerr black holes. The quantum gravity effects slow down the increase of Hawking temperatures. This property naturally leads to a residue mass in black hole evaporation. The corrected temperatures are affected by the quantum numbers of emitted fermions. Meanwhile, the temperature of the Kerr black hole is a function of ? due to the rotation.

  2. Hawking Radiation and Classical Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene R. Tracy; Dmitriy Zhigunov

    2015-09-26

    Acoustic waves in fluids undergoing the transition from sub- to supersonic flow satisfy governing equations similar to those for light waves in the immediate vicinity of a black hole event horizon. This acoustic analogy has been used by Unruh and others as a conceptual model for `Hawking radiation.' Here we use variational methods, originally introduced by Brizard for the study of linearized MHD, and ray phase space methods, to analyze linearized acoustics in the presence of background flows. The variational formulation endows the evolution equations with natural Hermitian and symplectic structures that prove useful for later analysis. We derive a $2\\times 2$ normal form governing the wave evolution in the vicinity of the `event horizon.' This shows that the acoustic model can be reduced locally (in ray phase space) to a standard (scalar) tunneling process weakly coupled to a unidirectional non-dispersive wave (the `incoming wave'). Given the normal form, the Hawking `thermal spectrum' can be derived by invoking standard tunneling theory, but only by ignoring the coupling to the incoming wave. Deriving the normal form requires a novel extension of the modular ray-based theory used previously to study tunneling and mode conversion in plasmas. We also discuss how ray phase space methods can be used to change representation, which brings the problem into a form where the wave functions are less singular than in the usual formulation, a fact that might prove useful in numerical studies.

  3. Background Study on nu_e Appearance from a nu_mu Beam in Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments with a Large Water Cherenkov Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiaki Yanagisawa; Chang Kee Jung; Trung Le; Brett Viren

    2011-02-23

    There is a growing interest in very long baseline neutrino oscillation experimentation using accelerator produced neutrino beam as a machinery to probe the last three unmeasured neutrino oscillation parameters: the mixing angle theta_13, the possible CP violating phase delta_CP and the mass hierarchy, namely, the sign of delta-m^2_32. Water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have shown to be very successful at detecting neutrino interactions. Scaling up this technology may continue to provide the required performance for the next generation of experiments. This report presents the latest effort to demonstrate that a next generation (> 100 kton) water Cherenkov detector can be used effectively for the rather difficult task of detecting nu_e events from the neutrino oscillation nu_mu -> nu_e despite the large expected potential background resulting from pi^0 events produced via neutral current interactions.

  4. Highly Efficient Midinfrared On-Chip Electrical Generation of Graphene Plasmons by Inelastic Electron Tunneling Excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ooi, Kelvin J A; Hsieh, Chang Yu; Tan, Dawn T H; Ang, Lay Kee

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling provides a low-energy pathway for the excitation of surface plasmons and light emission. We theoretically investigate tunnel junctions based on metals and graphene. We show that graphene is potentially a highly efficient material for tunneling excitation of plasmons because of its narrow plasmon linewidths, strong emission, and large tunability in the midinfrared wavelength regime. Compared to gold and silver, the enhancement can be up to 10 times for similar wavelengths and up to 5 orders at their respective plasmon operating wavelengths. Tunneling excitation of graphene plasmons promises an efficient technology for on-chip electrical generation and manipulation of plasmons for graphene-based optoelectronics and nanophotonic integrated circuits.

  5. Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind turbine with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind turbine with NACA 0012 blades Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind...

  6. Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical and Chemical Measurements of PM Dispersing Plume of Heavy Duty Diesel Truck Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for...

  7. Enhancing metal-insulator-insulator-metal tunnel diodes via defect enhanced direct tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alimardani, Nasir; Conley, John F.

    2014-08-25

    Metal-insulator-insulator-metal tunnel diodes with dissimilar work function electrodes and nanolaminate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} bilayer tunnel barriers deposited by atomic layer deposition are investigated. This combination of high and low electron affinity insulators, each with different dominant conduction mechanisms (tunneling and Frenkel-Poole emission), results in improved low voltage asymmetry and non-linearity of current versus voltage behavior. These improvements are due to defect enhanced direct tunneling in which electrons transport across the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} via defect based conduction before tunneling directly through the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, effectively narrowing the tunnel barrier. Conduction through the device is dominated by tunneling, and operation is relatively insensitive to temperature.

  8. Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Joiner, C. A.; Vogel, E. M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Liu, L.; Gu, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, 1520 Middle Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Barrera, S. de la; Feenstra, R. M. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chakrabarti, B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene symmetric field effect transistors. Gate control of the tunneling characteristics is observed similar to previously reported results for exfoliated graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene devices. Density-of-states features are observed in the tunneling characteristics of the devices, although without large resonant peaks that would arise from lateral momentum conservation. The lack of distinct resonant behavior is attributed to disorder in the devices, and a possible source of the disorder is discussed.

  9. Regularization of Tunneling Rates with Quantum Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pecora, Louis M; Wu, Dong-Ho

    2012-01-01

    We study tunneling in various shaped, closed, two-dimensional, flat potential, double wells by calculating the energy splitting between symmetric and anti-symmetric state pairs. For shapes that have regular or nearly regular classical behavior (e.g. rectangular or circular) the tunneling rates vary greatly over wide ranges often by several orders of magnitude. However, for well shapes that admit more classically chaotic behavior (e.g. the stadium, the Sinai billiard) the range of tunneling rates narrows, often by orders of magnitude. This dramatic narrowing appears to come from destabilization of periodic orbits in the regular wells that produce the largest and smallest tunneling rates and causes the splitting vs. energy relation to take on a possibly universal shape. It is in this sense that we say the quantum chaos regularizes the tunneling rates.

  10. A Vision-based Method for On-Road Truck Height Measurement in Proactive Prevention of 2 Collision with Overpasses and Tunnels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Fei; Park, Man-Woo; Sandidge, Matthew; Brilakis, Ioannis

    2014-11-26

    Television, 2012 490 (http://www.metro.us/philadelphia/news/local/2012/08/14/large-truck-strikes-signs-in-tip-oneill-491 tunnel/). 492 [6] J. Brooks, Stuck truck in Burnley Tunnel cost Victorians $1 million, 3AW, 2013 493 (http://www.3aw.com.au/blogs/neil...

  11. Electromagnetic model for near-field microwave microscope with atomic resolution: Determination of tunnel junction impedance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reznik, Alexander N.

    2014-08-25

    An electrodynamic model is proposed for the tunneling microwave microscope with subnanometer space resolution as developed by Lee et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 183111 (2010)]. Tip-sample impedance Z{sub a} was introduced and studied in the tunneling and non-tunneling regimes. At tunneling breakdown, the microwave current between probe and sample flows along two parallel channels characterized by impedances Z{sub p} and Z{sub t} that add up to form overall impedance Z{sub a}. Quantity Z{sub p} is the capacitive impedance determined by the near field of the probe and Z{sub t} is the impedance of the tunnel junction. By taking into account the distance dependences of effective tip radius r{sub 0}(z) and tunnel resistance R{sub t}(z)?=?Re[Z{sub t}(z)], we were able to explain the experimentally observed dependences of resonance frequency f{sub r}(z) and quality factor Q{sub L}(z) of the microscope. The obtained microwave resistance R{sub t}(z) and direct current tunnel resistance R{sub t}{sup dc}(z) exhibit qualitatively similar behavior, although being largely different in both magnitude and the characteristic scale of height dependence. Interpretation of the microwave images of the atomic structure of test samples proved possible by taking into account the inductive component of tunnel impedance ImZ{sub t}?=??L{sub t}. Relation ?L{sub t}/R{sub t}???0.235 was obtained.

  12. The fluid dynamics of a miniature dilution tunnel for internal-combustion engine aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kommer, Eric M.; Puzinauskas, Paulius V.; Buckley, Steven G.

    2007-11-15

    This paper investigates the fluid dynamics of a particular mini-dilution tunnel using LDV, flow visualization, a tracer sample technique and CFD. The mini-dilution tunnel studied had a 3.175 mm inside diameter tube discharging on the centerline of the tunnel where the diameter increases in a single step to 7.62 cm. The large diameter portion of the tunnel was 75 cm long. Most of the testing was performed at a flow rate of 15 l/min. The experimental investigation indicates that the flow field in the particular dilution tunnel tested has a persistent jet throughout its length, and this confined jet creates eddy recirculation zones which may cause the temperature and dilution histories of particles trapped in these eddies to be significantly different than particles which remain in the jet until extracted by the sample probe. Similarly, the location of the sample probe could also affect measured size distribution profiles, particularly if it were moved in or out of the path of the persistent jet. In addition to the simple tunnel geometry with a single abrupt expansion, a conical diffuser and a perforated plate were separately tested to investigate their effects on the tunnel fluid dynamics. The particular diffuser tested appeared to cause the jet to stall and therefore led to an even more unpredictable path for the fluid within. Limited testing with the perforated plate indicated that it increased the jet deceleration and laminarization, and therefore could lead to a more predictable flow path for aerosol sampled from the tunnel. (author)

  13. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  14. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    In attempting to detect and map out underground facilities, whether they be large-scale hardened deeply-buried targets (HDBT's) or small-scale tunnels for clandestine border or perimeter crossing, seismic imaging using reflections from the tunnel interface has been seen as one of the better ways to both detect and delineate tunnels from the surface. The large seismic impedance contrast at the tunnel/rock boundary should provide a strong, distinguishable seismic response, but in practice, such strong indicators are often lacking. One explanation for the lack of a good seismic reflection at such a strong contrast boundary is that the damage caused by the tunneling itself creates a zone of altered seismic properties that significantly changes the nature of this boundary. This report examines existing geomechanical data that define the extent of an excavation damage zone around underground tunnels, and the potential impact on rock properties such as P-wave and S-wave velocities. The data presented from this report are associated with sites used for the development of underground repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste; these sites have been excavated in volcanic tuff (Yucca Mountain) and granite (HRL in Sweden, URL in Canada). Using the data from Yucca Mountain, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the damage zone on seismic responses. Calculations were performed using the parallelized version of the time-domain finitedifference seismic wave propagation code developed in the Geophysics Department at Sandia National Laboratories. From these numerical simulations, the damage zone does not have a significant effect upon the tunnel response, either for a purely elastic case or an anelastic case. However, what was discovered is that the largest responses are not true reflections, but rather reradiated Stoneley waves generated as the air/earth interface of the tunnel. Because of this, data processed in the usual way may not correctly image the tunnel. This report represents a preliminary step in the development of a methodology to convert numerical predictions of rock properties to an estimation of the extent of rock damage around an underground facility and its corresponding seismic velocity, and the corresponding application to design a testing methodology for tunnel detection.

  15. Neuroreceptor Activation by Vibration-Assisted Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross D. Hoehn; David Nichols; Hartmut Neven; Sabre Kais

    2015-03-24

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hypothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction.

  16. Hawking Radiation and Classical Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracy, Eugene R

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves in fluids undergoing the transition from sub- to supersonic flow satisfy governing equations similar to those for light waves in the immediate vicinity of a black hole event horizon. This acoustic analogy has been used by Unruh and others as a conceptual model for `Hawking radiation.' Here we use variational methods, originally introduced by Brizard for the study of linearized MHD, and ray phase space methods, to analyze linearized acoustics in the presence of background flows. The variational formulation endows the evolution equations with natural Hermitian and symplectic structures that prove useful for later analysis. We derive a $2\\times 2$ normal form governing the wave evolution in the vicinity of the `event horizon.' This shows that the acoustic model can be reduced locally (in ray phase space) to a standard (scalar) tunneling process weakly coupled to a unidirectional non-dispersive wave (the `incoming wave'). Given the normal form, the Hawking `thermal spectrum' can be derived by invok...

  17. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua J. (Madison, WI); Ladwig, Peter F. (Hutchinson, MN)

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  18. Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene hexagonal boron nitride graphene junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene ­ hexagonal boron nitride ­ graphene junctions T. Roy1 , L. Liu2 , S. de la Barrera,3 B. Chakrabarti1,4 , Z. R. Hesabi1 , C. A. Joiner1 Abstract: Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate

  19. Wind tunnel testing of a generic telescope enclosure Tait S. Pottebaum*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMynowski, Douglas G. - MacMynowski, Douglas G.

    -buffeting, wind tunnel, DPIV 1. INTRODUCTION Various design studies are currently underway for the next generation that CFD can be used with confidence in future design work. Keywords: Extremely-Large-Telescopes, Wind with confidence in future design work. For an 80m diameter telescope dome in a 12m/s external wind (roughly the 85

  20. Rock mechanics design in mining and tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the design process as applied to rock mechanics aspects of underground mining and tunneling. Topics covered include a historical perspective, the design process in engineering, empirical methods of design, observational methods of design, and guided design.

  1. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of unoccupied surface resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Mats

    - induced series, produced when an electron is trapped in a potential well define* *d by the image Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of unoccupied surface resonances at free-electron-like metal surfaces. T. Fond'eny, S

  2. Tunneling as a Source for Quantum Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofir Flom; Asher Yahalom; Haggai Zilberberg; L. P. Horwitz; Jacob Levitan

    2015-07-17

    We use an one dimensional model of a square barrier embedded in an infinite potential well to demonstrate that tunneling leads to a complex behavior of the wave function and that the degree of complexity may be quantified by use of the spatial entropy function defined by S = -\\int |\\Psi(x,t)|^2 ln |\\Psi(x,t)|^2 dx. There is no classical counterpart to tunneling, but a decrease in the tunneling in a short time interval may be interpreted as an approach of a quantum system to a classical system. We show that changing the square barrier by increasing the height/width do not only decrease the tunneling but also slows down the rapid rise of the entropy function, indicating that the entropy growth is an essentially quantum effect.

  3. Photon tunnelling microscopy of polyethylene single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasarao, Mohan

    Photon tunnelling microscopy of polyethylene single crystals Mohan Srinivasarao* and Richard S:photon tunnellingmicroscopy;single crystals; polyethylene) INTRODUCTION The study of morphology of polymers is an area

  4. Nondestructive Testing of Rail Tunnel Linings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Nathan Douglas

    2014-11-14

    potential problems and then test those areas with slow, detailed methods. This would provide a more thorough investigation of the tunnel lining’s health. Infrared thermography (IRT), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and ultrasonic tomography (UST) techniques...

  5. Screening and Tunneling at Metal-Surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KENNER, VE; Allen, Roland E.; SASLOW, WM.

    1973-01-01

    and charge neutrality re- quirements, and to agree with the correct work function for tungsten. Although this procedure has advantages in calculating tunneling currents (see Sec. IV), a treatment which is not fully self- consistent can lead to unphysical...

  6. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klem, John F. (Sandia Park, NM); Zolper, John C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  7. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  8. Le LHC, un tunnel cosmique

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Et si la lumière au bout du tunnel du LHC était cosmique ? En d?autres termes, qu?est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter dans la connaissance de l?Univers ? Car la montée en énergie des accélérateurs de particules nous permet de mieux appréhender l?univers primordial, chaud et dense. Mais dans quel sens dit-on que le LHC reproduit des conditions proches du Big bang ? Quelles informations nous apporte-t-il sur le contenu de l?Univers ? La matière noire est-elle détectable au LHC ? L?énergie noire ? Pourquoi l?antimatière accumulée au CERN est-elle si rare dans l?Univers ? Et si le CERN a bâti sa réputation sur l?exploration des forces faibles et fortes qui opèrent au sein des atomes et de leurs noyaux, est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter des informations sur la force gravitationnelle qui gouverne l?évolution cosmique ? Depuis une trentaine d?années, notre compréhension de l?univers dans ses plus grandes dimensions et l?appréhension de son comportement aux plus petites distances sont intimement liées : en quoi le LHC va-t-il tester expérimentalement cette vision unifiée ? Tout public, entrée libre / Réservations au +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  9. Giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a molecular junction: Molecular spin-valve transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit, E-mail: patir@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    Amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance by gate field in a molecular junction is the most important requirement for the development of a molecular spin valve transistor. Herein, we predict a giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a single molecular spin valve junction, which consists of Ru-bis-terpyridine molecule as a spacer between two ferromagnetic nickel contacts. Based on the first-principles quantum transport approach, we show that a modest change in the gate field that is experimentally accessible can lead to a substantial amplification (320%) of tunnel magnetoresistance. The origin of such large amplification is attributed to the spin dependent modification of orbitals at the molecule-lead interface and the resultant Stark effect induced shift in channel position with respect to the Fermi energy.

  10. Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David D.; Waldhauer, Ann

    2015-08-18

    Method of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

  11. Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David; Waldhauer, Ann

    2012-12-18

    Methods of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

  12. Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David D; Waldhauer, Ann

    2014-04-29

    Methods of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

  13. TABLE OF CONTENTS Underground Construction (Tunnels), Shafts and Caissons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 30 Nov 14 26-i Section 26 TABLE OF CONTENTS Underground Construction (Tunnels), Shafts ......................................................................................................... 26-16 26.F Shafts-1 SECTION 26 Underground Construction (Tunnels), Shafts and Caissons 26. General. This section applies

  14. Simulation of localized barrier defects in resonant tunneling diodes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoneberg, Jason Neal

    1995-01-01

    defect assisted tunneling as a possible current mechanism. This study attempts to ascertain the effects of defect potentials in the barriers on current in a simulation of a double barrier resonant tunneling diode. Results indicate that these defects could...

  15. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua Joshua (Madison, WI)

    2008-11-11

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  16. Global Tunnel Boring Machine Industry 2015 Market Research Report...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Tunnel Boring Machine Industry 2015 Market Research Report Home There are currently no posts in this category. Syndicate content...

  17. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    Institute of Technology Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel INFORMATION FOR USE BY INDUSTRY Revised July 2002 #12;ii MIT photograph/W. Litant A model is prepared for testing in the MIT Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel. #12 information and sketches of use to those planning a test program at the Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel have also

  18. Multiferroic tunnel junctions and ferroelectric control of magnetic state at interface (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Y. W.; Raju, M.; Li, Qi; Hu, W. J.; Burton, J. D.; Gruverman, A.; Tsymbal, E. Y.; Kim, Y.-M.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Pennycook, S. J.; Yang, S. M.; Noh, T. W.; Li, X. G.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2015-05-07

    As semiconductor devices reach ever smaller dimensions, the challenge of power dissipation and quantum effect place a serious limit on the future device scaling. Recently, a multiferroic tunnel junction (MFTJ) with a ferroelectric barrier sandwiched between two ferromagnetic electrodes has drawn enormous interest due to its potential applications not only in multi-level data storage but also in electric field controlled spintronics and nanoferronics. Here, we present our investigations on four-level resistance states, giant tunneling electroresistance (TER) due to interfacial magnetoelectric coupling, and ferroelectric control of spin polarized tunneling in MFTJs. Coexistence of large tunneling magnetoresistance and TER has been observed in manganite/(Ba, Sr)TiO{sub 3}/manganite MFTJs at low temperatures and room temperature four-resistance state devices were also obtained. To enhance the TER for potential logic operation with a magnetic memory, La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} /La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} MFTJs were designed by utilizing a bilayer tunneling barrier in which BaTiO{sub 3} is ferroelectric and La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} is close to ferromagnetic metal to antiferromagnetic insulator phase transition. The phase transition occurs when the ferroelectric polarization is reversed, resulting in an increase of TER by two orders of magnitude. Tunneling magnetoresistance can also be controlled by the ferroelectric polarization reversal, indicating strong magnetoelectric coupling at the interface.

  19. Band-to-band tunneling in silicon diodes and tunnel transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teherani, James Towfik

    2010-01-01

    This work studies the effect of mechanically applied uniaxial strain on reverse-bias band-to-band tunneling current in n+/p+ vertical silicon diodes fabricated on {100} and {110} substrate orientations. The Band Structure ...

  20. Spin-polarized tunneling in MgO-based tunnel junctions with superconducting electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schebaum, Oliver

    We prepared magnetic tunnel junctions with one ferromagnetic and one superconducting Al–Si electrode. Pure cobalt electrodes were compared with a Co–Fe–B alloy and the Heusler compound Co[subscript 2]FeAl. The polarization ...

  1. Inelastic Tunneling Spectroscopy in Unconventional Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inelastic Tunneling Spectroscopy in Unconventional Superconductors Molecular Vibration and Single Superconductors ­ p.1/13 #12;Old Results R.C. Jaklevic and J. Lambe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 17, 1139-1140 (1966 in Unconventional Superconductors ­ p.2/13 #12;STM observation of local inelastic mode B.C. Stipe, M.A Rezaei, and W

  2. B-Target Room Tunnel Redesigned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esfandiari, Reza; /San Jose State U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    Several groups at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are currently working on a RF Modulator prototype for a future linear collider known as the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC runs using about a 1000 Klystrons which create high power carrier waves for the particle acceleration. Klystrons receive their electrical input power from modulators. In order to move beyond the prototype phase, the laboratory might expand its ground base further down a tunnel located at the End Station B (ESB) in order to house four new Klystron Modulator Test Stations. This area is known as the B-Target Room Tunnel, and the task was to redesign the tunnel layout for the upcoming changes. The project first began by collecting substantial amount of information about the prototyped project, the tunnel and the researchers feedback of what they would like to see in the upcoming design. Subsequent to numerous planning and presentations, one particular design was. Calculations for this design were then performed for the most complex aspects of the project. Based on the results of the calculations, specific sample beams, welds, bolts and materials were chosen for the possible future construction.

  3. Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy ResourcesRanch JumpMarketsCarbotrader

  4. Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy ResourcesRanch

  5. Superpoissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cascales, Juan Pedro; Martinez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G.; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Szczepa?ski, Tomasz; Dugaev, Vitalii K.; Barna?, Józef

    2014-12-08

    Organic molecules have recently revolutionized ways to create new spintronic devices. Despite intense studies, the statistics of tunneling electrons through organic barriers remains unclear. Here, we investigate conductance and shot noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) barriers a few nm thick. For junctions in the electron tunneling regime, with magnetoresistance ratios between 10% and 40%, we observe superpoissonian shot noise. The Fano factor exceeds in 1.5–2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. We explain our main findings in terms of a model which includes tunneling through a two level (or multilevel) system, originated from interfacial bonds of the PTCDA molecules. Our results suggest that interfaces play an important role in the control of shot noise when electrons tunnel through organic barriers.

  6. A normal metal tunnel-junction heat diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornieri, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.fornieri@sns.it; Martínez-Pérez, María José; Giazotto, Francesco, E-mail: giazotto@sns.it [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-05-05

    We propose a low-temperature thermal rectifier consisting of a chain of three tunnel-coupled normal metal electrodes. We show that a large heat rectification is achievable if the thermal symmetry of the structure is broken and the central island can release energy to the phonon bath. The performance of the device is theoretically analyzed and, under the appropriate conditions, temperature differences up to ?200 mK between the forward and reverse thermal bias configurations are obtained below 1?K, corresponding to a rectification ratio R?2000. The simplicity intrinsic to its design joined with the insensitivity to magnetic fields make our device potentially attractive as a fundamental building block in solid-state thermal nanocircuits and in general-purpose cryogenic electronic applications requiring energy management.

  7. Determination of leaf area index of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and its relationship to site water balance across a large precipitation gradient in East Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebert, Mark Thomas

    1996-01-01

    was estimated using the Thornthwaite and Mather (1957) model to predict potential and actual evapotranspiration and moisture deficit. LAI and site water balance were estimated in both 1994 and 1995. 1 hypothesized that LAI would be positively correlated...

  8. Improved tunneling magnetoresistance at low temperature in manganite junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Petrov, A. Yu.; Davidson, B. A.; Mino, L. Alvarez

    2011-04-18

    We report resistance versus magnetic field measurements for a La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} tunnel junction grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, that show a large field window of extremely high tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) at low temperature. Scanning the in-plane applied field orientation through 360 deg., the TMR shows fourfold symmetry, i.e., biaxial anisotropy, aligned with the crystalline axis but not the junction geometrical long axis. The TMR reaches {approx}1900% at 4 K, corresponding to an interfacial spin polarization of >95% assuming identical interfaces. These results show that uniaxial anisotropy is not necessary for large TMR, and lay the groundwork for future improvements in TMR in manganite junctions.

  9. Graphene on Ru(0001) Moire Corrugation Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy on Au/Graphene/Ru(0001) Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Graphene on Ru(0001) Moire Corrugation Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy on Au/Graphene on graphene/Ru(0001) were used to study the corrugation of the moire structure of graphene/Ru(0001 for the graphene/Ru(0001) moire is of structural nature rather than electronic. STM showed a large value

  10. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroelectricity for agriculture and hydroelectricity. Large volumes of waterElectricity Production Hydroelectricity The most common type

  11. Water Privatisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zölls, Elisa

    2011-08-17

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  12. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  13. Gravitinos Tunneling From Traversable Lorentzian Wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakalli, I

    2015-01-01

    Recent research shows that Hawking radiation (HR) is also possible around the trapping horizon of a wormhole. In this article, we show that the HR of gravitino (spin-$3/2$) particles from the traversable Lorentzian wormholes (TLWH) reveals a negative Hawking temperature (HT). We first introduce the TLWH in the past outer trapping horizon geometry (POTHG). Next, we derive the Rarita-Schwinger equations (RSEs) for that geometry. Then, using both the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) ans\\"{a}tz and the WKB approximation in the quantum tunneling method, we obtain the probabilities of the emission/absorption modes. Finally, we derive the tunneling rate of the emitted gravitino particles, and succeed to read the HT of the TLWH.

  14. Gravitinos Tunneling From Traversable Lorentzian Wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Sakalli; A. Ovgun

    2015-08-12

    Recent research shows that Hawking radiation (HR) is also possible around the trapping horizon of a wormhole. In this article, we show that the HR of gravitino (spin-$3/2$) particles from the traversable Lorentzian wormholes (TLWH) reveals a negative Hawking temperature (HT). We first introduce the TLWH in the past outer trapping horizon geometry (POTHG). Next, we derive the Rarita-Schwinger equations (RSEs) for that geometry. Then, using both the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) ans\\"{a}tz and the WKB approximation in the quantum tunneling method, we obtain the probabilities of the emission/absorption modes. Finally, we derive the tunneling rate of the emitted gravitino particles, and succeed to read the HT of the TLWH.

  15. Windthrow Mechanics: Tree Winching and Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Stephen

    (Maple Ridge) July: Tree Winching in Prince George August: Second Wind Tunnel Session Plans for the year in Prince George Summary Averaged between 2 and 3 trees per day 18 Sx pulled (range 16-40 cm DBH) 13 Pl pulled (range 20-40 cm DBH) Grand total of 66 trees pulled in MKRF and Prince George #12;10/21/2003 8 #12

  16. Highly Charged Ion (HCI) Modified Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, J. M.; Grube, H. [Atomic Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 100 Bureau Dr., MS 8423, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8423 (United States)

    2009-03-10

    The neutralization energy carried by highly charged ions (HCIs) provides an alternative method for localizing energy on a target's surface, producing features and modifying surfaces with fluences and kinetic energy damage that are negligible compared to singly ionized atoms. Since each HCI can deposit an enormous amount of energy into a small volume of the surface (e.g., Xe{sup 44+} delivers 51 keV of neutralization energy per HCI), each individual HCI's interaction with the target can produce a nanoscale feature. Many studies of HCI-surface features have characterized some basic principles of this unique ion-surface interaction, but the activity reported here has been focused on studying ensembles of HCI features in ultra-thin insulating films by fabricating multi-layer tunnel junction devices. The ultra-thin insulating barriers allow current to flow by tunneling, providing a very sensitive means of detecting changes in the barrier due to highly charged ion irradiation and, conversely, HCI modification provides a method of finely tuning the transparency of the tunnel junctions that spans several orders of magnitude for devices produced from a single process recipe. Systematic variation of junction bias, temperature, magnetic field and other parameters provides determination of the transport mechanism, defect densities, and magnetic properties of these nano-features and this novel approach to device fabrication.

  17. 08 Oct 1999 Visualisatie Heinenoord Tunnel -Hack & Ozmutlu -LWI dag 1 VISUALISATIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    08 Oct 1999 Visualisatie Heinenoord Tunnel - Hack & Ozmutlu - LWI dag 1 VISUALISATIE HEINENOORD applications in the Netherlands #12;08 Oct 1999 Visualisatie Heinenoord Tunnel - Hack & Ozmutlu - LWI dag 2 Visualisatie Heinenoord Tunnel - Hack & Ozmutlu - LWI dag 3 Heinenoord tunnel · Eerste geboorde tunnel

  18. Time Evolution of Tunneling in Thermal Medium -- Environment-driven Excited Tunneling --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sh. Matsumoto; M. Yoshimura

    2003-07-18

    Time evolution of tunneling phenomena proceeding in thermal medium is studied using a standard model of environment interaction. A semiclassical probability formula for the particle motion in a metastable state of one dimensional system put in thermal medium is combined with the formula of quantum penetration factor through a potential barrier, to derive the tunneling rate in medium. Effect of environment, its influence on time evolution in particular, is clarified in a real-time formalism. A nonlinear resonance effect is shown to enhance the tunneling rate at finite times of order $2/\\eta $, with $\\eta $ the friction coefficient. In the linear approximation this effect has relevance to the parametric resonance. This effect enhances the possibility of early termination of the cosmological phase transition much prior to the typical Hubble time.

  19. Enhancement of Spin-transfer torque switching via resonant tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterji, Niladri; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A.; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2014-12-08

    We propose the use of resonant tunneling as a route to enhance the spin-transfer torque switching characteristics of magnetic tunnel junctions. The proposed device structure is a resonant tunneling magnetic tunnel junction based on a MgO-semiconductor heterostructure sandwiched between a fixed magnet and a free magnet. Using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism coupled self consistently with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation, we demonstrate enhanced tunnel magneto-resistance characteristics as well as lower switching voltages in comparison with traditional trilayer devices. Two device designs based on MgO based heterostructures are presented, where the physics of resonant tunneling leads to an enhanced spin transfer torque thereby reducing the critical switching voltage by up to 44%. It is envisioned that the proof-of-concept presented here may lead to practical device designs via rigorous materials and interface studies.

  20. Self-contained instrument for measuring subterranean tunnel wall deflection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Donald Edgar (Kennewick, WA); Hof, Jr., Peter John (Richland, WA)

    1978-01-01

    The deflection of a subterranean tunnel is measured with a rod-like, self-contained instrument that is adapted to be inserted into a radially extending bore of the tunnel adjacent an end of the tunnel where the tunnel is being dug. One end of the instrument is anchored at the end of the bore remote from the tunnel wall, while the other end of the intrument is anchored adjacent the end of the wall in proximity to the tunnel wall. The two ends of the instrument are linearly displaceable relative to each other; the displacement is measured by a transducer means mounted on the instrument. Included in the instrument is a data storage means including a paper tape recorder periodically responsive to a parallel binary signal indicative of the measured displacement.

  1. Ferroelectric tunneling element and memory applications which utilize the tunneling element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Christen, Hans M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baddorf, Arthur P. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Meunier, Vincent (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Lee, Ho Nyung (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-20

    A tunneling element includes a thin film layer of ferroelectric material and a pair of dissimilar electrically-conductive layers disposed on opposite sides of the ferroelectric layer. Because of the dissimilarity in composition or construction between the electrically-conductive layers, the electron transport behavior of the electrically-conductive layers is polarization dependent when the tunneling element is below the Curie temperature of the layer of ferroelectric material. The element can be used as a basis of compact 1R type non-volatile random access memory (RAM). The advantages include extremely simple architecture, ultimate scalability and fast access times generic for all ferroelectric memories.

  2. Tunneling in Polymer Quantization and the Quantum Zeno Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durmus Ali Demir; Ozan Sargin

    2014-09-25

    As an application of the polymer quantization scheme, in this work we investigate the one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling phenomenon from the perspective of polymer representation of a non-relativistic point particle and derive the transmission and reflection coefficients. Since any tunneling phenomenon inevitably evokes a tunneling time we attempt an analytical calculation of tunneling times by defining an operator well suited in discrete spatial geometry. The results that we come up with hint at appearance of the Quantum Zeno Effect in polymer framework.

  3. Spin Torques in Magnetic and Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Silas Eli

    2012-01-01

    Tunnel Junctions for Spintronic Memories and Beyond. ” IEEEto their application in spintronic devices. Injecting a spinforecasts a new kind of spintronic device that manipulates

  4. The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot resonant tunneling structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puthen-Veettil, B. Patterson, R.; König, D.; Conibeer, G.; Green, M. A.

    2014-10-28

    Efficient iso-entropic energy filtering of electronic waves can be realized through nanostructures with three dimensional confinement, such as quantum dot resonant tunneling structures. Large-area deployment of such structures is useful for energy selective contacts but such configuration is susceptible to structural disorders. In this work, the transport properties of quantum-dot-based wide-area resonant tunneling structures, subject to realistic disorder mechanisms, are studied. Positional variations of the quantum dots are shown to reduce the resonant transmission peaks while size variations in the device are shown to reduce as well as broaden the peaks. Increased quantum dot size distribution also results in a peak shift to lower energy which is attributed to large dots dominating transmission. A decrease in barrier thickness reduces the relative peak height while the overall transmission increases dramatically due to lower “series resistance.” While any shift away from ideality can be intuitively expected to reduce the resonance peak, quantification allows better understanding of the tolerances required for fabricating structures based on resonant tunneling phenomena/.

  5. Charge transport in molecular junctions: From tunneling to hopping with the probe technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgour, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a simple phenomenological approach can be used to simulate electronic conduction in molecular wires under thermal effects induced by the surrounding environment. This "Landauer-B\\"uttiker's probe technique" can properly replicate different transport mechanisms: phase coherent nonresonant tunneling, ballistic behavior, and hopping conduction, to provide results consistent with experiments. Specifically, our simulations with the probe method recover the following central characteristics of charge transfer in molecular wires: (i) The electrical conductance of short wires falls off exponentially with molecular length, a manifestation of the tunneling (superexchange) mechanism. Hopping dynamics overtakes superexchange in long wires demonstrating an ohmic-like behavior. (ii) In off-resonance situations, weak dephasing effects facilitate charge transfer. Under large dephasing the electrical conductance is suppressed. (iii) At high enough temperatures, $k_BT/\\epsilon_B>1/25$, with $\\epsilon_B$ as ...

  6. Large grain growth of Ge-rich Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} (x???0.02) on insulating surfaces using pulsed laser annealing in flowing water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurosawa, Masashi, E-mail: kurosawa@alice.xtal.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); JSPS, 5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 (Japan); Taoka, Noriyuki; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ikenoue, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2014-02-10

    We investigate Sn incorporation effects on the growth characteristics of Ge-rich Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} (x?water. Despite the very low Sn content of 2%, Sn atoms within the GeSn layers play a role in preventing ablation and aggregation of the layers during these PLA. Raman and electron backscatter diffraction measurements demonstrate achievement of large-grain (?800?nm?) growth of Ge{sub 0.98}Sn{sub 0.02} polycrystals by using PLA in water. These polycrystals also show a tensile-strain of ?0.68%. This result opens up the possibility for developing GeSn-based devices fabricated on flexible substrates as well as Si platforms.

  7. Electron tunneling studies of Mn12-Acetate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lianxi

    2008-10-10

    laser deposition (PLD) was used to deposit two monolayers of Mn 12 -Acetate on thin Pt wires (diame- ter 0.001 in). The electron tunneling current was measured with typical bias voltages from -1 to 1 V at liquid helium temperature, 4.2 K. I, dI/dV, and d... 2 I/dV 2 signals were directly acquired with the aid of a current amplifier and two lock-in-amplifiers. Results show that the differential conductance is approximately 10 ?6 S for bias volt- ages 0.04 V ?|V |? 1 V and exhibits a strong voltage...

  8. Tunneling of the 3rd kind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holger Gies; Joerg Jaeckel

    2009-04-03

    We study a new kind of tunneling of particles through a barrier particular to quantum field theory. Here, the particles traverse the barrier by splitting into a virtual pair of particles of a different species which interacts only very weakly with the barrier and can therefore pass through it. Behind the barrier, the pair recombines into a particle of the original species. As an example, we discuss the case where photons split into a pair of minicharged particles. This process could be observed in experiments of the light-shining-through-a-wall type and may be used to search for minicharged particles in laboratory experiments.

  9. Optical isolation via unidirectional resonant photon tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moccia, Massimo; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Galdi, Vincenzo; Alù, Andrea; Engheta, Nader

    2014-01-28

    We show that tri-layer structures combining epsilon-negative and magneto-optical material layers can exhibit unidirectional resonant photon tunneling phenomena that can discriminate between circularly polarized (CP) waves of given handedness impinging from opposite directions, or between CP waves with different handedness impinging from the same direction. This physical principle, which can also be interpreted in terms of a Fabry-Perot-type resonance, may be utilized to design compact optical isolators for CP waves. Within this framework, we derive simple analytical conditions and design formulae, and quantitatively assess the isolation performance, also taking into account the unavoidable imperfections and nonidealities.

  10. Tunneling of Graphene Massive Dirac Fermions through a Double Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hocine Bahlouli; El Bouazzaoui Choubabi; Ahmed Jellal; Miloud Mekkaoui

    2011-10-04

    We study the tunneling of Dirac fermions in graphene through a double barrier potential allowing the carriers to have an effective mass inside the barrier as generated by a lattice miss-match with the boron nitride substrate. The consequences of this gap opening on the transmission are investigated. The realization of resonant tunneling conditions is also analyzed.

  11. Vibration-Assisted Electron Tunneling in C140 Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Paul L.

    Vibration-Assisted Electron Tunneling in C140 Transistors A. N. Pasupathy, J. Park, C. Chang, A. V C140, a molecule with a mass-spring-mass geometry chosen as a model system to study electron-vibration coupling. We observe vibration-assisted tunneling at an energy corresponding to the stretching mode of C140

  12. Sensor integration study for a shallow tunnel detection system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, Mark L.; Abbott, Robert E.; Bonal, Nedra; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Senglaub, Michael E.

    2010-02-01

    During the past several years, there has been a growing recognition of the threats posed by the use of shallow tunnels against both international border security and the integrity of critical facilities. This has led to the development and testing of a variety of geophysical and surveillance techniques for the detection of these clandestine tunnels. The challenges of detection of these tunnels arising from the complexity of the near surface environment, the subtlety of the tunnel signatures themselves, and the frequent siting of these tunnels in urban environments with a high level of cultural noise, have time and again shown that any single technique is not robust enough to solve the tunnel detection problem in all cases. The question then arises as to how to best combine the multiple techniques currently available to create an integrated system that results in the best chance of detecting these tunnels in a variety of clutter environments and geologies. This study utilizes Taguchi analysis with simulated sensor detection performance to address this question. The analysis results show that ambient noise has the most effect on detection performance over the effects of tunnel characteristics and geological factors.

  13. High Tunnel Crop Production Tips Lewis W. Jett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    . Specifically, high tunnels are passively vented, solar greenhouses covered with 1-2 layers of greenhouse supplemental heating systems? High tunnels should be designed and managed as passively vented and solar heated structures. However, supplemental heat (propane space heaters, wood stoves, etc) can be used to protect

  14. ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF THE HIGHRESOLUTION SEISMIC TECHNIQUES: TUNNEL DRILLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    tomography were used for tunnel design in two different areas. Two seismic data acquisition experimentsENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF THE HIGHRESOLUTION SEISMIC TECHNIQUES: TUNNEL DRILLING Álvarez. Tel. +34 93 409.54.10 Fax. +34 93 411.00.12 Email: rcarbo@ija.csic.es Seismic methologies has been

  15. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1 , T. Ndukum3 , K. C. Schwab3 measurementsinmesoscopicelectronicsandmechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection tech- niques, and the radio

  16. Emptying and filling a tunnel bronze

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marley, Peter M.; Abtew, Tesfaye A.; Farley, Katie E.; Horrocks, Gregory A.; Dennis, Robert V.; Zhang, Peihong; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-01-13

    The classical orthorhombic layered phase of V2O5 has long been regarded as the thermodynamic sink for binary vanadium oxides and has found great practical utility as a result of its open framework and easily accessible redox states. Herein, we exploit a cation-exchange mechanism to synthesize a new stable tunnel-structured polymorph of V2O5 (?-V2O5) and demonstrate the subsequent ability of this framework to accommodate Li and Mg ions. The facile extraction and insertion of cations and stabilization of the novel tunnel framework is facilitated by the nanometer-sized dimensions of the materials, which leads to accommodation of strain without amorphization. The topotacticmore »approach demonstrated here indicates not just novel intercalation chemistry accessible at nanoscale dimensions but also suggests a facile synthetic route to ternary vanadium oxide bronzes (MxV2O5) exhibiting intriguing physical properties that range from electronic phase transitions to charge ordering and superconductivity.« less

  17. Pyrotechnic ignition studies using a gun tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    A gun tunnel is being used to investigate the ignition characteristics of center-hole iron/potassium perchlorate thermal battery discs. Details are given of the construction, operation, and data reduction method for the gun tunnel. To simulate an igniter, this system can readily produce a pulse of hot argon at maximum pressures and temperatures up to P/sub max/ = 8 MPa and T/sub max/ = 4000K, respectively, with flow times of the order of 3 msec. For a single battery disc, a segment of the ignition boundary was found to lie in the region of T/sub max/ = 1200 to 1300K and 0.7 MPa < P/sub max/ < 2.0 MPa. The results also showed two types of ignition: prompt ignition, requiring an average delivered enthalpy /ovr /Delta/H//sub ig/ = 6 cal during an average flow time /ovr /Delta/t//sub ig/ = 0.7 msec, and delayed ignition, with /ovr /Delta/H//sub ig/ = 16 cal and /ovr /Delta/t//sub ig/ = 2.4 msec. In addition, near an ignition boundary, high speed motion photography showed the ignition delay increased to 6 msec with significant spatial non-uniformity. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  18. Computational Role of Multiqubit Tunneling in a Quantum Annealer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Boixo; Vadim N. Smelyanskiy; Alireza Shabani; Sergei V. Isakov; Mark Dykman; Vasil S. Denchev; Mohammad Amin; Anatoly Smirnov; Masoud Mohseni; Hartmut Neven

    2015-02-20

    Quantum tunneling, a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers above the energy of the state itself, has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization. Here we show that multiqubit tunneling plays a computational role in a currently available, albeit noisy, programmable quantum annealer. We develop a non-perturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics predicting the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunneling. We devise a computational primitive with 16 qubits where quantum evolutions enable tunneling to the global minimum while the corresponding classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunneling can outperform thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. Our results indicate that many-body quantum phenomena could be used for finding better solutions to hard optimization problems.

  19. Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-01-28

    We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

  20. Monitoring the waste water of LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rühl, I

    1999-01-01

    Along the LEP sites CERN is discharging water of differing quality and varying amounts into the local rivers. This wastewater is not only process water from different cooling circuits but also water that infiltrates into the LEP tunnel. The quality of the discharged wastewater has to conform to the local environmental legislation of our Host States and therefore has to be monitored constantly. The most difficult aspect regarding the wastewater concerns LEP Point 8 owing to an infiltration of crude oil (petroleum), which is naturally contained in the soil along octant 7-8 of the LEP tunnel. This paper will give a short summary of the modifications made to the oil/water separation unit at LEP Point 8. The aim was to obtain a satisfactory oil/water separation and to install a monitoring system for a permanent measurement of the amount of hydrocarbons in the wastewater.

  1. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool formore »direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.« less

  2. Computational modeling of electrophotonics nanomaterials: Tunneling in double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlahovic, Branislav Filikhin, Igor

    2014-10-06

    Single electron localization and tunneling in double quantum dots (DQD) and rings (DQR) and in particular the localized-delocalized states and their spectral distributions are considered in dependence on the geometry of the DQDs (DQRs). The effect of violation of symmetry of DQDs geometry on the tunneling is studied in details. The cases of regular and chaotic geometries are considered. It will be shown that a small violation of symmetry drastically affects localization of electron and that anti-crossing of the levels is the mechanism of tunneling between the localized and delocalized states in DQRs.

  3. Modeling direct interband tunneling. II. Lower-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the applicability of the two-band Hamiltonian and the widely used Kane analytical formula to interband tunneling along unconfined directions in nanostructures. Through comparisons with k·p and tight-binding calculations and quantum transport simulations, we find that the primary correction is the change in effective band gap. For both constant fields and realistic tunnel field-effect transistors, dimensionally consistent band gap scaling of the Kane formula allows analytical and numerical device simulations to approximate non-equilibrium Green's function current characteristics without arbitrary fitting. This allows efficient first-order calibration of semiclassical models for interband tunneling in nanodevices.

  4. Is spin transport through molecules really occurring in organic spin valves? A combined magnetoresistance and inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbiati, Marta; Tatay, Sergio; Delprat, Sophie; Khanh, Hung Le; Deranlot, Cyrile; Collin, Sophie; Seneor, Pierre Mattana, Richard Petroff, Frédéric

    2015-02-23

    Molecular and organic spintronics is an emerging research field which combines the versatility of chemistry with the non-volatility of spintronics. Organic materials have already proved their potential as tunnel barriers (TBs) or spacers in spintronics devices showing sizable spin valve like magnetoresistance effects. In the last years, a large effort has been focused on the optimization of these organic spintronics devices. Insertion of a thin inorganic tunnel barrier (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO) at the bottom ferromagnetic metal (FM)/organic interface seems to improve the spin transport efficiency. However, during the top FM electrode deposition, metal atoms are prone to diffuse through the organic layer and potentially short-circuit it. This may lead to the formation of a working but undesired FM/TB/FM magnetic tunnel junction where the organic plays no role. Indeed, establishing a protocol to demonstrate the effective spin dependent transport through the organic layer remains a key issue. Here, we focus on Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Alq{sub 3}/Co junctions and show that combining magnetoresistance and inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy measurements one can sort out working “organic” and short-circuited junctions fabricated on the same wafer.

  5. Shot noise in resonant tunneling through a zero-dimensional state with a complex energy spectrum A. Nauen,* F. Hohls, J. Konemann, and R. J. Haug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohls, Frank

    Shot noise in resonant tunneling through a zero-dimensional state with a complex energy spectrum A; published 30 March 2004 We investigate the noise properties of a GaAs /AlxGa1 xAs resonant discuss the suppression of the shot noise in the framework of a coupled two-state system. For large bias

  6. Atomic-scale movement induced in nanoridges by scanning tunneling microscopy on epitaxial graphene grown on 4H-SiC(0001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibado, Paul M.

    in which forward and reverse images are simultaneously recorded. An apparent 100% enlarged graphene lattice of top- gated, electrically isolated devices, and furthermore, it is already available in the form tunneling microscopy (STM) studies have confirmed this interpretation and have shown that the large ridges

  7. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn?? acetate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lendinez, S.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn?? acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn?? acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for amore »single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn?? acetate. Our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.« less

  8. Response of continuous pipelines to tunnel induced ground deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ieronymaki, Evangelia S

    2011-01-01

    This thesis develops analytical solutions for estimating the bending moments and axial loads in a buried pipeline due to ground movements caused by tunnel construction in soft ground. The solutions combine closed-form, ...

  9. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-08-15

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed.

  10. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn?? acetate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lendinez, S. [Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (Europe); Billinge, S. J. L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Zarzuela, R. [Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (Europe); Tejada, J. [Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (Europe); Terban, M. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Espin, J. [Univ. Autonoma Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (Europe); Imaz, I. [Univ. Autonoma Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (Europe); Maspoch, D. [Univ. Autonoma Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (Europe); Chudnovsky, E. M. [City Univ. of New York, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn?? acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn?? acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for a single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn?? acetate. Our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.

  11. UNSTEADY WIND TUNNEL CONTROL OF STABILITY AND TRANSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fluid Mechanics #12;UNSTEADY WIND TUNNEL 3-D BOUNDARY LAYERS · CROSSFLOW ­ Swept Wing ­ Rotating Disk INSTABILITY MECHANISMS · Leading-edge contamination · Streamwise instabilities · Crossflow instabilities AT ASU · BASIC CROSSFLOW EXPERIMENT with Ray Dagenhart 1988, 1989 isolate crossflow mechanism from T

  12. Refurbishment and Testing Techniques in a Transonic Ludwieg Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Refurbishment and Testing Techniques in a Transonic Ludwieg Tunnel Thania S. Balcazar, Eric M recently been refurbished, an overview of the unique high Reynolds number facility at UT Arlington

  13. Brane tunneling and virtual brane-antibrane pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam R. Brown

    2007-09-24

    We survey barrier penetration by quantum tunneling for four cases: nonrelativistic point particles, scalar fields, relativistic point particles, and DBI branes. We examine two novel features that arise for DBI brane tunneling: the rate can sometimes increase as the barrier gets higher; and the instanton "wrinkles". We show that these features can be understood as the effect of the quantum sea of virtual brane-antibrane pairs. This sea exponentially augments the decay rate, with possible cosmological consequences.

  14. Computational Role of Collective Tunneling in a Quantum Annealer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Boixo; Vadim N. Smelyanskiy; Alireza Shabani; Sergei V. Isakov; Mark Dykman; Vasil S. Denchev; Mohammad Amin; Anatoly Smirnov; Masoud Mohseni; Hartmut Neven

    2015-02-19

    Quantum tunneling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers above the energy of the state itself. Tunneling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization. Here we present the first experimental evidence of a computational role of multiqubit quantum tunneling in the evolution of a programmable quantum annealer. We develop a theoretical model based on a NIBA Quantum Master Equation to describe the multiqubit dissipative tunneling effects under the complex noise characteristics of such quantum devices. We start by considering a computational primitive, an optimization problem consisting of just one global and one false minimum. The quantum evolutions enable tunneling to the global minimum while the corresponding classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In our study the non-convex potentials are realized by frustrated networks of qubit clusters with strong intra-cluster coupling. We show that the collective effect of the quantum environment is suppressed in the "critical" phase during the evolution where quantum tunneling "decides" the right path to solution. In a later stage dissipation facilitates the multiqubit tunneling leading to the solution state. The predictions of the model accurately describe the experimental data from the D-Wave Two quantum annealer at NASA Ames. In our computational primitive the temperature dependence of the probability of success in the quantum model is opposite to that of the classical paths with thermal hopping. Specifically, we provide an analysis of an optimization problem with sixteen qubits, demonstrating eight qubit tunneling that increases success probabilities. Furthermore, we report results for larger problems with up to 200 qubits that contain the primitive as subproblems.

  15. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    Turbid water Clear water pixel position cameraresponsecameraresponse pixel position ABSTRACT: A new underwater laser scanning system, providing microbathymetric information in coastal waters is described the backscatter component resulting in enhanced performance in turbid waters. The system is expected to provide

  16. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J.; Soriano, D.; Pedersen, J. G.; Roche, S.

    2014-11-03

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ?100%.

  17. Resonant tunneling with high peak to valley current ratio in SiO{sub 2}/nc-Si/SiO{sub 2} multi-layers at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D. Y.; Sun, Y.; He, Y. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, J.

    2014-01-28

    We have investigated carrier transport in SiO{sub 2}/nc-Si/SiO{sub 2} multi-layers by room temperature current-voltage measurements. Resonant tunneling signatures accompanied by current peaks are observed. Carrier transport in the multi-layers were analyzed by plots of ln(I/V{sup 2}) as a function of 1/V and ln(I) as a function of V{sup 1/2}. Results suggest that besides films quality, nc-Si and barrier sub-layer thicknesses are important parameters that restrict carrier transport. When thicknesses are both small, direct tunneling dominates carrier transport, resonant tunneling occurs only at certain voltages and multi-resonant tunneling related current peaks can be observed but with peak to valley current ratio (PVCR) values smaller than 1.5. When barrier thickness is increased, trap-related and even high field related tunneling is excited, causing that multi-current peaks cannot be observed clearly, only one current peak with higher PVCR value of 7.7 can be observed. While if the thickness of nc-Si is large enough, quantum confinement is not so strong, a broad current peak with PVCR value as high as 60 can be measured, which may be due to small energy difference between the splitting energy levels in the quantum dots of nc-Si. Size distribution in a wide range may cause un-controllability of the peak voltages.

  18. Clyde Tunnel refurbishment: Modelling the performance of the new lining system and drainage channel in the event of a fire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvel, Ricky O; Torero, Jose L

    2006-04-19

    The Clyde Tunnel in Glasgow, Scotland, is currently undergoing refurbishment. This refurbishment includes the installation of a new tunnel lining / fire protection system in both tunnel tubes. This lining system has ...

  19. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  20. Spectral Properties and Dynamical Tunneling in Constant-Width Billiards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dietz; T. Guhr; B. Gutkin; M. Miski-Oglu; A. Richter

    2014-07-24

    We determine with unprecedented accuracy the lowest 900 eigenvalues of two quantum constant-width billiards from resonance spectra measured with flat, superconducting microwave resonators. While the classical dynamics of the constant-width billiards is unidirectional, a change of the direction of motion is possible in the corresponding quantum system via dynamical tunneling. This becomes manifest in a splitting of the vast majority of resonances into doublets of nearly degenerate ones. The fluctuation properties of the two respective spectra are demonstrated to coincide with those of a random-matrix model for systems with violated time-reversal invariance and a mixed dynamics. Furthermore, we investigate tunneling in terms of the splittings of the doublet partners. On the basis of the random-matrix model we derive an analytical expression for the splitting distribution which is generally applicable to systems exhibiting dynamical tunneling between two regions with (predominantly) chaotic dynamics.

  1. Relation between Tunneling and Particle Production in Vacuum Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Mersini

    1999-02-17

    The field-theoretical description of quantum fluctuations on the background of a tunneling field $\\sigma$ is revisited in the case of a functional Schrodinger approach. We apply this method in the case when quantum fluctuations are coupled to the $\\sigma$ field through a mass-squared term, which is 'time-dependent' since we include the dynamics of $\\sigma$ . The resulting mode functions of the fluctuation field, which determine the quantum state after tunneling, display a previously unseen resonance effect when their mode number is comparable to the curvature scale of the bubble. A detailed analysis of the relation between the excitations of the field about the true vacuum (interpreted as particle creation) and the phase shift coming from tunneling is presented.

  2. Composting Large Animal Carcasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

    2006-10-31

    and Kevin Heflin* Livestock producers and large-animal veterinar- ians face a growing problem in rural Texas?what to do with dead animals. Rendering services are getting more expensive and harder to come by, and just leav- ing carcasses to predators... set up a polyethylene tank to hold water and rig it with a float valve so that it stays ?topped off? and ready. If one of your stock tanks stays wet year-round, you can simply lay a suction line with a foot valve into the middle of the pond...

  3. Internal Image Potential in Semiconductors - Effect on Scanning-Tunneling-Microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HUANG, ZH; WEIMER, M.; Allen, Roland E.

    1993-01-01

    The tunneling of electrons from a semiconductor surface to a metal tip, across a vacuum gap, is influenced by two image interactions: an attractive image potential in the vacuum region, which lowers the apparent tunneling barrier, and a repulsive...

  4. EFFECT OF PREPARATION PARAMETERS ON LIGHT SENSITIVITY IN SUPERCONDUCTIVE TUNNEL JUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Italy Résumé. 2014 Des jonctions « tunnel » supraconductrices utilisant du sulfure de cadmium et du al. [17] have considered semiconductor barriers for low capacitance tunnel junctions. Light can be depo- sited in ultra high vacuum systems without fear of contamination. Work

  5. Acoustics in the Klebanoff-Saric Wind Tunnel: Background Identification, Forcing, and Active Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuester, Matthew

    2012-07-16

    Low disturbance wind tunnels, such as the Klebanoff–Saric Wind Tunnel (KSWT), offer an ideal environment to study boundary layer transition. In particular, the leading-edge receptivity of sound can be measured by creating acoustic disturbances...

  6. Development of the resource model for the Decision Aids for Tunneling (DAT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Sangyoon, 1973-

    2008-01-01

    The Decision Aids for Tunneling (DAT) are a computer based method with which distributions of tunnel construction time and cost as well as required and produced resources can be estimated considering uncertainties in ...

  7. Calculation and design of tunnel ventilation systems using a two-scale modelling approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colella, Francesco; Rein, Guillermo; Borchiellini, Romano; Carvel, Ricky O; Torero, Jose L; Verda, Vittorio

    This paper develops a novel modelling approach for ventilation flow in tunnels at ambient conditions (i.e. cold flow). The complexity of full CFD models of low in tunnels or the inaccuracies of simplistic assumptions are ...

  8. Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0 -Using supercritical carbon dioxideVIDEO:potential

  9. Horizons and Tunneling in the Euclidean False Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kate Marvel; Neil Turok

    2007-12-17

    In the thin-wall approximation, the decay of a gravitating false vacuum to a lower-energy state is affected by the cosmological horizon structure in both spaces. The nucleation radius of a bubble of true vacuum depends on the surface tension of its boundary and equals the false vacuum cosmological horizon at a critical tension. We argue that there is no tunneling instanton solution beyond the critical tension and argue that there is therefore a bound on allowed membrane tension in theories which rely on semiclassical tunneling to relax the cosmological constant.

  10. Quantum tunneling, quantum computing, and high temperature superconductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qian

    2005-02-17

    -1 QUANTUM TUNNELING, QUANTUM COMPUTING, AND HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTIVITY A Dissertation by QIAN WANG Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful?llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY... December 2003 Major Subject: Physics QUANTUM TUNNELING, QUANTUM COMPUTING, AND HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTIVITY A Dissertation by QIAN WANG Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial ful?llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

  11. Decoherence on Quantum Tunneling in the Multi-Dimensional Wave Function Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiro Tanaka

    1994-10-07

    We consider fundamental problems on the understanding of the tunneling phenomena in the context of the multi-dimensional wave function. In this paper, we reconsider the quantum state after tunneling and extend our previous formalism to the case when the quantum state before tunneling is in a squeezed state. Through considering this problem, we reveal that the quantum decoherence plays a crucial role to allow us of the concise description of the quantum state after tunneling.

  12. Water Clean Water Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Keep Our Water Clean Keep Our Water Clean Home and garden pesticides and fertilizers are polluting residues wash into gutters, storm drains, and streams by rain,garden watering,or cleaning up drinking water. Follow these tips to keep our rivers, creeks, and oceans clean. What can you do to protect

  13. Water, water everywhere,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    1 Water, water everywhere, but is it safe to drink? An Inquiry-based unit investigating the journey of your drinking water from source to tap of drinking water will contain different contaminants, based on surrounding land uses (guided inquiry activity

  14. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  15. Resolved dynamics of single electron tunneling using the RF-SET Julie Helen Love

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoret, Michel H.

    .4 Tunneling Rates in the single Electron Trap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 5 CotunnellingAbstract Resolved dynamics of single electron tunneling using the RF-SET Julie Helen Love 2007 This thesis presents measurements of time resolved single electron tunneling events in a metallic thin film

  16. A Geologic Prediction Model For Tunneling By Photios G. Ioannou, A.M. ASCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Geologic Prediction Model For Tunneling By Photios G. Ioannou, A.M. ASCE Abstract: Geologic to inflated costs. This paper presents a general model for the probabilistic prediction of tunnel geology. The geologic conditions along the tunnel alignment are modeled by a set of geologic parameters (such as rock

  17. Developing a Practical Wind Tunnel Test Engineering Course for Undergraduate Aerospace Engineering Students 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recla, Benjamin Jeremiah

    2013-04-19

    This thesis describes the development and assessment of an undergraduate wind tunnel test engineering course utilizing the 7ft by 10ft Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). Only 5 other universities in the United States have a wind tunnel...

  18. Seismic modeling and analysis of a prototype heated nuclear waste storage tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Seismic modeling and analysis of a prototype heated nuclear waste storage tunnel, Yucca Mountain rock surrounding a tunnel in Yucca Mountain tuff and com- pared the results with field data obtained waves diffracted around the tunnel in the region of changing velocity. INTRODUCTION The Yucca Mountain

  19. Wind Tunnel Data Fusion and Immersive Visualization: A Case Study Kurt Severance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    Wind Tunnel Data Fusion and Immersive Visualization: A Case Study Kurt Severance NASA Langley@cs.brown.edu ABSTRACT This case study describes the process of fusing the data from several wind tunnel experiments, Wind tunnel, Landing gear, Texture mapping, Image-based rendering, VRML. 1. INTRODUCTION Experimental

  20. 12 1092-3063/00/$10.00 2000 IEEE IEEE Concurrency Wisconsin Wind Tunnel II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, David A.

    12 1092-3063/00/$10.00 © 2000 IEEE IEEE Concurrency Wisconsin Wind Tunnel II: A Fast, Portable been painfully obvious to us as developers of two generations of parallel direct- execution simulators the Wisconsin Wind Tunnel II-- the successor to the original Wisconsin Wind Tunnel5--to a range of platforms

  1. REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 82, 033510 (2011) Calibrated cylindrical Mach probe in a plasma wind tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    wind tunnel X. Zhang,1,a) D. Dandurand,1 T. Gray,1 M. R. Brown,1 and V. S. Lukin2 1 Department probe is described along with an independent calibration procedure in a magnetized plasma wind tunnel calibration method based on magnetic time-of-flight in a magnetized wind tunnel is pre- sented and a particle

  2. RESEARCH PAPER Centrifuge model test on the face stability of shallow tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    RESEARCH PAPER Centrifuge model test on the face stability of shallow tunnel Gregor Idinger · Pelin on a small-scale tunnel model in a geotechnical centrifuge. By making use of symmetry, half of the tunnel wall and measured by digital image correlation. The results from centrifuge model tests were compared

  3. Power and efficiency analysis of a realistic resonant tunneling diode thermoelectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Akshay; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran, E-mail: bm@ee.iitb.ac.in [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India)

    2014-07-07

    Low-dimensional systems with sharp features in the density of states have been proposed as a means for improving the efficiency of thermoelectric devices. Quantum dot systems, which offer the sharpest density of states achievable, however, suffer from low power outputs while bulk (3-D) thermoelectrics, while displaying high power outputs, offer very low efficiencies. Here, we analyze the use of a resonant tunneling diode structure that combines the best of both aspects, that is, density of states distortion with a finite bandwidth due to confinement that aids the efficiency and a large number of current carrying transverse modes that enhances the total power output. We show that this device can achieve a high power output (?0.3?MW?m{sup 2}) at efficiencies of ?40% of the Carnot efficiency due to the contribution from these transverse momentum states at a finite bandwidth of kT?2. We then provide a detailed analysis of the physics of charge and heat transport with insights on parasitic currents that reduce the efficiency. Finally, a comparison between the resonant tunneling diode and a quantum dot device with comparable bandwidth reveals that a similar performance requires ultra-dense areal quantum dot densities of ?10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}.

  4. A novel high capacity positive electrode material with tunnel-type structure for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Mu, Linqin; Liu, Jue; Yang, Zhenzhong; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Hu, Yong -Sheng; Li, Hong; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Chen, Liquan; et al

    2015-08-06

    In this study, aqueous sodium-ion batteries have shown desired properties of high safety characteristics and low-cost for large-scale energy storage applications such as smart grid, because of the abundant sodium resources as well as the inherently safer aqueous electrolytes. Among various Na insertion electrode materials, tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 has been widely investigated as a positive electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. However, the low achievable capacity hinders its practical applications. Here we report a novel sodium rich tunnel-type positive material with a nominal composition of Na0.66[Mn0.66Ti0.34]O2. The tunnel-type structure of Na0.44MnO2 obtained for this compound was confirmed by XRD and atomic-scale STEM/EELS.more »When cycled as positive electrode in full cells using NaTi2(PO4)3/C as negative electrode in 1M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte, this material shows the highest capacity of 76 mAh g-1 among the Na insertion oxides with an average operating voltage of 1.2 V at a current rate of 2C. These results demonstrate that Na0.66[Mn0.66Ti0.34]O2 is a promising positive electrode material for rechargeable aqueous sodium-ion batteries.« less

  5. Semiclassical tunneling and magnetic flux effects on the circle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginie Bonnaillie-Noël; Frédéric Hérau; Nicolas Raymond

    2015-08-26

    This paper is devoted to semiclassical tunneling estimates induced on the circle by a double well electric potential in the case when a magnetic field is added. When the two electric wells are connected by two geodesics for the Agmon distance, we highlight an oscillating factor (related to the circulation of the magnetic field) in the splitting estimate of the first two eigenvalues.

  6. Exercice session Cargse, October 2008 Klein tunneling in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud 11, Université de

    Exercice session Cargèse, October 2008 Klein tunneling in graphene Pierre Allain and Jean-Noël Fuchs 1 Introduction : plane wave The goal is to compute the probability transmission T of a graphene 1 = n2 sin 2 for an electron in graphene and show that the optical index n is proportional

  7. Topeka’s “Green Light Tunnel” Saves Fuel and Time

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Topeka, Kansas is saving their motorists time and gasoline through the use of a real-time, adaptive "green light tunnel". A traffic signal system that synchronizes traffic lights in order to create a series of green lights that result in fewer stops and less travel time.

  8. Tunneling control using classical non-linear oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    A quantum particle is placed in symmetric double well potential which is coupled to a classical non-linear oscillator via a coupling function. With different spatial symmetry of the coupling and under various controlling fashions, the tunneling of the quantum particle can be enhanced or suppressed, or totally destroyed.

  9. INFLATABLE PLUG FOR THREAT MITIGATION IN TRANSPORTATION TUNNELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbero, Ever J.

    Internacional de Mètodes Numèrics a l'Enginyeria (CIMNE). Gran Capita s/n. Edifici C1. Campus Nord. UPC. 08034 at a cost of $40 million [2]. Although it is difficult to prevent all situations that can lead to initial protective devices and the cost of interrupting the tunnel operations to proceed with the required

  10. Wind and saltation driven particle resuspension in a wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairchild, C.I.; Tillery, M.I.; Wheat, L.D.; Redmond, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    To determine parameters of primary importance in wind and saltation driven resuspension of fine particles from surfaces, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to study the resuspension of small polydisperse particles (diameter <10 ..mu..m) by monodisperse saltation particles (diameter >80 ..mu..m). The experiments were designed to simulate the atmospheric boundary layer resuspension of fine particles. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  12. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  13. Illinois Wireless Wind Tunnel: A Testbed for Experimental Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaidya, Nitin

    Illinois Wireless Wind Tunnel: A Testbed for Experimental Evaluation of Wireless Networks Nitin H. Vaidya Jennifer Bernhard V. V. Veeravalli P. R. Kumar R. K. Iyer Department of Electrical and Computer of the testbed is to imple- ment "scaled" versions of wireless networks for the purpose of accurate repeatable

  14. Tunneling control by highfrequency driving Ilya Vorobeichik and Nimrod Moiseyev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    Tunneling control by high­frequency driving Ilya Vorobeichik and Nimrod Moiseyev Department @3# supports this hypothesis. However, in the limit of high­frequency driving, the Kramers systems in strong laser fields @1,2#. We show that high­frequency second­order perturbation theory based

  15. Metallic adhesion and tunnelling at the atomic A Schirmeisen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grütter, Peter

    Metallic adhesion and tunnelling at the atomic scale A Schirmeisen1 , G Cross1 , A Stalder1 , P Gr scaling parameter of = 0.2 nm. We conclude that not only the apex atoms contribute to the adhesion forces are discussed. The study of metallic adhesion on the atomic scale lays the foundation for the understanding

  16. Investigation of Data Quality for Wind Tunnel Internal Balance Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidore, John Preston

    2013-04-04

    center of the tunnel. At the center of each strut is a 1.5-5 ACME screw, driven by a Baldor motor. The motor is connected to a Carson Manufacturing gearbox that provides a 22:1 torque multiplication ratio. The gear system between the gearbox and ACME...

  17. Charged fermions tunneling from accelerating and rotating black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehman, Mudassar; Saifullah, K., E-mail: mudassir051@yahoo.com, E-mail: saifullah@qau.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-03-01

    We study Hawking radiation of charged fermions from accelerating and rotating black holes with electric and magnetic charges. We calculate the tunneling probabilities of incoming and outgoing fermionic particles and find the Hawking temperature of these black holes. We also provide an explicit expression of the classical action for the massive and massless particles in the background of these black holes.

  18. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the August 5, 1998, Load Haul Dump Accident at U16b Tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thisis theType B Accident Investigation Board report of an industrial accident at the Nevada Test site (NTS), U16b tunnel in which a Bechtel Nevada (BN) employee suffered a compressed skull fracture as a result of being struck onthe head by a valve and fitting assembly on the end of a hose whichhad been broken from a water pipe by a moving piece of construction equipment.

  19. Surface Preparation in Ultra High Vacuum for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Surface Preparation in Ultra High Vacuum for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    Department of Physics University of New Hampshire, Durham NH 03824 Ultra High Vacuum environments bring about removing the sample from the vacuum environment. New sets of tools must be developed that are usable within of the tunneling current the feedback electronic keeps the distance between tip and sample constant. Piezo electric

  20. Observation of the Dynamical Change in a Water Monolayer Adsorbed on a ZnO Surface Olga Dulub,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    a wide temperature range from below 200 K up to the boiling point of water [12]. Scanning tunneling-dissociated water structure [see Fig. 1(a) and top left inset, labeled with ``HD'']. A part of the surfaceObservation of the Dynamical Change in a Water Monolayer Adsorbed on a ZnO Surface Olga Dulub,1

  1. SmartTunnel: Achieving Reliability in the Internet Yi Li, Yin Zhang, LiLi Qiu, Simon Lam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Lili

    1 SmartTunnel: Achieving Reliability in the Internet Yi Li, Yin Zhang, LiLi Qiu, Simon Lam's Internet. In this paper, we propose SmartTunnel, an end-to-end approach to achieving reliability. A SmartTunnel is a logical point-to-point tunnel between two end points that spans multiple physical network paths

  2. Saving Water Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-06-15

    Hot water use in households, for showers and baths as wellas for washing clothes and dishes, is a major driver of household energyconsumption. Other household uses of water (such as irrigatinglandscaping) require additional energy in other sectors to transport andtreat the water before use, and to treat wastewater. In California, 19percent of total electricity for all sectors combined and 32 percent ofnatural gas consumption is related to water. There is a criticalinterdependence between energy and water systems: thermal power plantsrequire cooling water, and water pumping and treatment require energy.Energy efficiency can be increased by a number of means, includingmore-efficient appliances (e.g., clothes washers or dishwashers that useless total water and less heated water), water-conserving plumbingfixtures and fittings (e.g., showerheads, faucets, toilets) and changesin consumer behavior (e.g., lower temperature set points for storagewater heaters, shorter showers). Water- and energy-conserving activitiescan help offset the stress imposed on limited water (and energy) suppliesfrom increasing population in some areas, particularly in drought years,or increased consumption (e.g., some new shower systems) as a result ofincreased wealth. This paper explores the connections between householdwater use and energy, and suggests options for increased efficiencies inboth individual technologies and systems. Studies indicate that urbanwater use can be reduced cost-effectively by up to 30 percent withcommercially available products. The energy savings associated with watersavings may represent a large additional and largely untappedcost-effective opportunity.

  3. Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip B. West

    2009-06-01

    Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

  6. Analysis of different tunneling mechanisms of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/AlGaAs tunnel junction light-emitting transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Cheng-Han; Wu, Chao-Hsin

    2014-10-27

    The electrical and optical characteristics of tunnel junction light-emitting transistors (TJLETs) with different indium mole fractions (x?=?5% and 2.5%) of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As base-collector tunnel junctions have been investigated. Two electron tunneling mechanisms (photon-assisted or direct tunneling) provide additional currents to electrical output and resupply holes back to the base region, resulting in the upward slope of I-V curves and enhanced optical output under forward-active operation. The larger direct tunneling probability and stronger Franz-Keldysh absorption for 5% TJLET lead to higher collector current slope and less optical intensity enhancement when base-collector junction is under reverse-biased.

  7. Subbarrier fusion reactions and many-particle quantum tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagino; N. Takigawa

    2012-10-17

    Low energy heavy-ion fusion reactions are governed by quantum tunneling through the Coulomb barrier formed by a strong cancellation of the repulsive Coulomb force with the attractive nuclear interaction between the colliding nuclei. Extensive experimental as well as theoretical studies have revealed that fusion reactions are strongly influenced by couplings of the relative motion of the colliding nuclei to several nuclear intrinsic motions. Heavy-ion subbarrier fusion reactions thus provide a good opportunity to address a general problem on quantum tunneling in the presence of couplings, which has been a popular subject in the past decades in many branches of physics and chemistry. Here we review theoretical aspects of heavy-ion subbarrier fusion reactions from the view point of quantum tunneling in systems with many degrees of freedom. Particular emphases are put on the coupled-channels approach to fusion reactions, and the barrier distribution representation for multi-channel penetrability. We also discuss an application of the barrier distribution method to elucidation of the mechanism of dissociative adsorption of H$_2$ melecules in surface science.

  8. Invariance of the Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method for black holes and FRW model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Xin Chen; Kai-Nan Shao

    2010-07-31

    In this paper we revisit the topic of Hawking radiation as tunneling. We show that the imaginary part of the action of the tunneling particle should be reconstructed in a covariant way, as a line integral along the classical forbidden trajectory of tunneling particles. As the quantum tunneling phenomenon, the probability of tunneling is related to the imaginary part of the action for the classical forbidden trajectory. We do the calculations for massless and massive particles, in Schwarzschild coordinate and Painlev?coordinate. The construction of particle action is invariant under coordinate transformations, so this method of calculation black hole tunneling does not have the so called "factor 2 problem". As an application, we find that the temperature of Hawking temperature of apparent horizon in a FRW universe is $T=\\frac{\\kappa}{2\\pi}$. Based on this result, we briefly discuss the unified first law of apparent horizon in FRW universe.

  9. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  10. MISTY ECHO Tunnel Dynamics Experiment--Data report: Volume 1; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

    1992-04-01

    Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

  11. Facility Closure Report for T-Tunnel (U12t), Area 12, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-08-01

    This Facility Closure Report (FCR) has been prepared to document the actions taken to permanently close the remaining accessible areas of U12t-Tunnel (T-Tunnel) in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of T-Tunnel was a prerequisite to transfer facility ownership from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Closure of the facility was accomplished with the cooperation and concurrence of both NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The purpose of this FCR is to document that the closure of T-Tunnel complied with the closure requirements specified in the Facility Closure Plan for N- and T-Tunnels Area 12, Nevada Test Site (Appendix D) and that the facility is ready for transfer to NNSA/NSO. The Facility Closure Plan (FCP) is provided in Appendix D. T-Tunnel is located approximately 42 miles north of Mercury in Area 12 of the NTS (Figure 1). Between 1970 and 1987, T-Tunnel was used for six Nuclear Weapons Effects Tests (NWETs). The tunnel was excavated horizontally into the volcanic tuffs of Rainier Mesa. The T-Tunnel complex consists of a main access drift with two NWET containment structures, a Gas Seal Plug (GSP), and a Gas Seal Door (GSD) (Figure 2). The T-Tunnel complex was mothballed in 1993 to preserve the tunnel for resumption of testing, should it happen in the future, to stop the discharge of tunnel effluent, and to prevent unauthorized access. This was accomplished by sealing the main drift GSD.

  12. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service (NPS) views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other NPS tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr for this tunnel to a much larger figure national

  13. Single-Particle Tunneling in Doped Graphene-Insulator-Graphene Junctions R. M. Feenstra*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    -insulator-graphene (GIG) tunnel junctions. * feenstra@cmu.edu djena@nd.edu ggu1@utk.edu Published in J. Appl. Phys. 111

  14. Comment on "Direct space-time observation of pulse tunneling in an electromagnetic band gap"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Nimtz; A. A. Stahlhofen

    2008-01-13

    The investigation presented by Doiron, Hache, and Winful [Phys. Rev. A 76, 023823 (2007)] is not valid for the tunneling process as claimed in the paper.

  15. Investigating Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02

    This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity...

  16. Water and Development Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water and Development Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni email: sohoni scientists on how water appears as a development need, its basic scientific and engineering processes NGOs, or want to pursue the study of the sector as a researcher. Our focus is largely on drinking water

  17. Competing quantum effects in the dynamics of a flexible water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Habershon; Thomas E. Markland; David E. Manolopoulos

    2010-11-04

    Numerous studies have identified large quantum mechanical effects in the dynamics of liquid water. In this paper, we suggest that these effects may have been overestimated due to the use of rigid water models and flexible models in which the intramolecular interactions were described using simple harmonic functions. To demonstrate this, we introduce a new simple point charge model for liquid water, q-TIP4P/F, in which the O--H stretches are described by Morse-type functions. We have parameterized this model to give the correct liquid structure, diffusion coefficient, and infra-red absorption frequencies in quantum (path integral-based) simulations. By comparing classical and quantum simulations of the liquid, we find that quantum mechanical fluctuations increase the rates of translational diffusion and orientational relaxation in our model by a factor of around 1.15. This effect is much smaller than that observed in all previous simulations of simple empirical water models, which have found a quantum effect of at least 1.4 regardless of the quantum simulation method or the water model employed. The small quantum effect in our model is a result of two competing phenomena. Intermolecular zero point energy and tunneling effects destabilize the hydrogen bonding network, leading to a less viscous liquid with a larger diffusion coefficient. However this is offset by intramolecular zero point motion, which changes the average water monomer geometry resulting in a larger dipole moment, stronger intermolecular interactions, and slower diffusion. We end by suggesting, on the basis of simulations of other potential energy models, that the small quantum effect we find in the diffusion coefficient is associated with the ability of our model to produce a single broad O-H stretching band in the infra-red absorption spectrum.

  18. Low frequency noise measurements of resonant tunnel diodes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villareal, Samuel Simon

    1988-01-01

    26 28 31 31 32 32 18a Bias dependence of 4. 5 KHz noise at 388 K under forward bias 33 Bias dependence of 4. 5 KHz noise at 388 K under inverted bias 33 lla Noise spectrum of RTD under 8. 46 V forward bias at 288 K 38 lib Noise spectrum...]. RTD applications include very fast switching devices, memory devices, logic gates, and high-frequency oscillators and detectors [4] ~ A resonant tunneling diode is simply an energy well sandwiched between two confining energy barriers. The RTD...

  19. Fabrication of a gated gallium arsenide heterostructure resonant tunneling diode 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinard, William Brian

    1989-01-01

    , . ' 'CONTACT PAD' PLANAR I ZED POLYAM I DE RECTIFYI CONTACT N DBHS Pig. 2. f'utavvay vieiv of a gated gallium arsenide heterostructure resonant tunneling diode 1018 graded from 10 18 io" 10? (lightly doped) units=cm 8 ?graded from 10 to 18...FABRICATION OF A GATED GALLIL". tl ARSEXIDE HETEROSTRL CTL RF. RESONANT TF'XXELI'XG DIODE A Thesis bt ttrILLIAAI BRIA'. s KI'iARD Subnut ted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AE;M Eniverstty tn partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  20. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  1. Minimal Length Effects on Tunnelling from Spherically Symmetric Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benrong Mu; Peng Wang; Haitang Yang

    2015-01-24

    In this paper, we investigate effects of the minimal length on quantum tunnelling from spherically symmetric black holes using the Hamilton-Jacobi method incorporating the minimal length. We first derive the deformed Hamilton-Jacobi equations for scalars and fermions, both of which have the same expressions. The minimal length correction to the Hawking temperature is found to depend on the black hole's mass and the mass and angular momentum of emitted particles. Finally, we calculate a Schwarzschild black hole's luminosity and find the black hole evaporates to zero mass in infinite time.

  2. Minimal Length Effects on Tunnelling from Spherically Symmetric Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu, Benrong; Yang, Haitang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate effects of the minimal length on quantum tunnelling from spherically symmetric black holes using the Hamilton-Jacobi method incorporating the minimal length. We first derive the deformed Hamilton-Jacobi equations for scalars and fermions, both of which have the same expressions. The minimal length correction to the Hawking temperature is found to depend on the black hole's mass and the mass and angular momentum of emitted particles. Finally, we calculate a Schwarzschild black hole's luminosity and find the black hole evaporates to zero mass in infinite time.

  3. Merguerian, Charles, 1986a, Tunnel vision -A deep view of the bedrock geology of New York City (NYC).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Merguerian, Charles, 1986a, Tunnel vision - A deep view of the bedrock geology of New York City This Abstract: Merguerian, Charles, 1986a, Tunnel vision - A deep view of the bedrock geology of New York City

  4. Shot noise in tunneling through a single InAs quantum dot Frank Hohls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohls, Frank

    Shot noise in tunneling through a single InAs quantum dot Frank Hohls , André Nauen , Niels Maire by measuring the shot noise of the current. We observe an approximately linear voltage dependence of both the shot noise, characterized by the Fano factor, and the tunneling current itself. We ascribe

  5. Interaction between surface structures and tunnelling in sand: centrifuge and computational modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giardina, Giorgia; DeJong, Matthew J.; Mair, Robert J.

    2015-07-30

    historische Geba¨ude am Beispiel einer neuen U-Bahnlinie in Rom, Geomechanics and Tunnelling 5 (3) (2012) 275–299. [36] G. Giardina, M. A. N. Hendriks, J. G. Rots, Sensitivity study on tunnelling induced damage to a masonry fac¸ade, Engineering Structures 89...

  6. A Tunnel Freezing Process with Adaptive Control A Stochastic Modeling Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautam, Natarajan

    Statement and Research Objective Cryogenic freezing tunnels can be operated in a variety of modes. The needA Tunnel Freezing Process with Adaptive Control ­ A Stochastic Modeling Approach S. Ramakrishnan N University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A. Abstract The estimation of freezing times using various analytical

  7. Sharp Tunneling Peaks in a Parametric Oscillator: Quantum Resonances Missing in the Rotating Wave Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dykman, Mark

    [1] to optical cav- ity modes [2], electrons in a Penning trap [3], and opto- and nanomechanicalSharp Tunneling Peaks in a Parametric Oscillator: Quantum Resonances Missing in the Rotating Wave March 2012; published 27 August 2012) We describe a new mechanism of tunneling between period

  8. Nonlinear resonant tunneling in systems coupled to quantum reservoirs Carlo Presilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presilla, Carlo

    -dependent transport of interacting electrons in biased resonant-tunneling heterostructures. The resulting model and recognized as a consequence of the mutual interaction of the electrons trapped in the resonance.2,3 We showNonlinear resonant tunneling in systems coupled to quantum reservoirs Carlo Presilla Dipartimento

  9. Temperature study of Zero Bias Features using self-assembling tunnel junctions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savitski, Stephen Ronald

    2000-01-01

    Inelastic Tunneling Spectroscopy (IETS). In a SATJ, a barrier gas is deposited in situ between two metal wires that can be remotely manipulated by a magnetic field, to vary the junction conductance. The ZBF is studied for platinum/neon/platinum tunnel...

  10. Low-temperature Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Surfaces R. M. Feenstra1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Low-temperature Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Surfaces R. M. Feenstra1 Low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements on semiconductor surface are described that measurements at low temperatures have been conducted. Most notably, discrete accumulation layer states have

  11. Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram Sharafatb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram deposited as a coating, it can protect the substrate surface from high heat flux. In this study, tungsten (W) sprayed coatings were formed on stainless steel substrates by gas tunnel type plasma spraying at a short

  12. Molecular engineering of oligomerization and metabolite channeling through a molecular tunnel of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungwook

    2004-09-30

    ATP, the mutation appeared to interrupt the binding of the substrate. The ammonia tunnel has been engineered to contain a hole to further support the proposed role of the tunnel that it is utilized in guiding diffusion of ammonia from the site of glutamine...

  13. Assessment of Flow Efficiency Through a Closed Circuit Wind Tunnel with Recommendations for Improvements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guthery, John

    2013-12-02

    Wind tunnels are designed for a certain range of test velocities and model sizes. The Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) at Texas A&M, was designed to reach 200 mph (M=0.26) with its original 1250 hp motor and 7 x 10 ft test section. In 2012...

  14. Observation of Turbulent Intermittency Scaling with Magnetic Helicity in an MHD Plasma Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    Observation of Turbulent Intermittency Scaling with Magnetic Helicity in an MHD Plasma Wind Tunnel. An unstable spheromak injected into the MHD wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment displays. Differences in magnetic intermittent character have been seen between fast and slow solar wind turbulence [2

  15. House Flies andPigManureVolatiles: Wind TunnelBehavioral Studiesand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    House Flies andPigManureVolatiles: Wind TunnelBehavioral Studiesand Electrophysiological pig manure were identified as electrophysiologically active on virgin female house fly (Muscadomstica of standards, and wind tunnel behavioral studies The pig manure volatiles eliciting responses from female

  16. The development of a wind tunnel facility for the study of V/STOL noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widnall, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    An open-jet wind tunnel operating within an anechoic chamber was developed for the purpose of the study of V/STOL noise mechanisms. An existing low-speed conventional hard-walled wind tunnel was modified to operate as an ...

  17. Wind Tunnels in Pheromone Research T. C ~ a k e r 'and C E. Linn. ~ r : ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 3 Wind Tunnels in Pheromone Research T. C ~ a k e r 'and C E. Linn. ~ r : ~ I. Introduction" conditions: flight through space from a distance of several meters or more in shifting wind fields. Upwind Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York. #12;#12;T. C. Baker and C. E. Linn, Jr, Wind Tunnels

  18. Josephson Junctions with Tunnel Barriers Grown Via In Situ Atomic Layer Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliot, Alan Jesson

    2014-12-31

    in the thermally oxidized tunnel barrier. In order to realize the full potential of JJ qubits, an alternative method to thermal oxidation must be found for tunnel barrier growth. This work explores using atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the growth of ultrathin...

  19. Authenticated Wireless Roaming via Tunnels: Making Mobile Guests Feel at Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Authenticated Wireless Roaming via Tunnels: Making Mobile Guests Feel at Home Mark Manulis1|francois.koeune|olivier.bonaventure|jean-jacques.quisquater}@uclouvain.be Abstract. In wireless roaming a mobile device obtains a service from some foreign network while being. Such Wireless Roaming via Tunnels (WRT) offers several (security) benefits but states also new security

  20. INFLUENCE OF GEOMETRY ON THE MEAN FLOW WITHIN URBAN STREET CANYONS A COMPARISON OF WIND TUNNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savory, Eric

    INFLUENCE OF GEOMETRY ON THE MEAN FLOW WITHIN URBAN STREET CANYONS ­ A COMPARISON OF WIND TUNNEL. A comparison between numerical simulations and wind tunnel modelling has been per- formed to examine ); = Kinematic viscosity of air (m2 s-1 ). 1. Introduction Many different aspects of the wind flow within urban

  1. Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information and Observation Technology, KNMI September 17, 2007 #12;#12;Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic.....................................................................................................1 2. Wind sensors

  2. Large Spin Entangled Current from a Passive Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avinash Kolli; Simon C. Benjamin; Jose Garcia Coello; Sougato Bose; Brendon W. Lovett

    2008-08-25

    We show that a large entangled current can be produced from a very simple passive device: a cluster of three resonant quantum dots, tunnel coupled to one input lead and two output leads. The device can function in a `clean' mode, when almost all emitted electrons are paired in Bell states, or a `dirty' mode with a far higher emission rate but a significant portion of non-entangled electrons. Subsequent charge detection can enhance performance by identifying the pairs that are most likely to be entangled. The device is robust to specific choice of system parameters and therefore lends itself to immediate experimental demonstration. Applications include quantum repeaters and unconditionally secure interfaces.

  3. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    LBNL collected water and waste water tariffs in Californiastate. Current water and waste water tariffs for these areaswas based on water and waste water tariffs in California

  4. Facility Closure Report for Tunnel U16a, Area 16, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-07-01

    U16a is not listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The closure of U16a was sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) and performed with the cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. This report documents closure of this site as identified in the DTRA Fiscal Year 2008 Statement of Work, Task 6.3. Closure activities included: · Removing and disposing of a shack and its contents · Disposing of debris from within the shack and in the vicinity of the tunnel entrance · Verifying that the tunnel is empty · Welding screened covers over tunnel vent holes to limit access and allow ventilation · Constructing a full-tunnel cross-section fibercrete bulkhead to prevent access to the tunnel Field activities were conducted from July to August 2008.

  5. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  6. SAGEEP 2010 Keystone, Colorado http://www.eegs.org CONTINUOUS EXPLORATION AHEAD OF THE TUNNEL FACE BY TSWD -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brückl, Ewald

    SAGEEP 2010 Keystone, Colorado http://www.eegs.org CONTINUOUS EXPLORATION AHEAD OF THE TUNNEL FACE BY TSWD - TUNNEL SEISMIC WHILE DRILLING EEGS' Annual Meeting Keystone, Colorado April 11-15, 2010 Ewald ahead of the tunnel face (Brückl et al., 2008). 353 #12;SAGEEP 2010 Keystone, Colorado http

  7. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  8. Water Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  9. Value engineering the construction of long tunnels in the dolomites of northern Illinois, United States of America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughton, Christopher; /Fermilab

    2000-01-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a high-energy physics laboratory operated by the Universities Research Association for the US Department of Energy, is developing plans for the construction of accelerator tunnels. The accelerator designs vary as a function of particles accelerated, technologies used and energies targeted. However, all accelerators require the excavation of long tunnels, up to 700 km in length, and tunnel costs represent a major portion of project budgets. This paper documents the findings of two studies undertaken to identify tunnel cost-drivers and outlines steps taken to initiate the ''value engineering'' of the tunnels.

  10. Physical properties and analytical models of band-to-band tunneling in low-bandgap semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chun-Hsing Dang Chien, Nguyen

    2014-01-28

    Low-bandgap semiconductors, such as InAs and InSb, are widely considered to be ideal for use in tunnel field-effect transistors to ensure sufficient on-current boosting at low voltages. This work elucidates the physical and mathematical considerations of applying conventional band-to-band tunneling models in low-bandgap semiconductors, and presents a new analytical alternative for practical use. The high-bandgap tunneling generates most at maximum field region with shortest tunnel path, whereas the low-bandgap generations occur dispersedly because of narrow tunnel barrier. The local electrical field associated with tunneling-electron numbers dominates in low-bandgap materials. This work proposes decoupled electric-field terms in the pre-exponential factor and exponential function of generation-rate expressions. Without fitting, the analytical results and approximated forms exhibit great agreements with the sophisticated forms both in high- and low-bandgap semiconductors. Neither nonlocal nor local field is appropriate to be used in numerical simulations for predicting the tunneling generations in a variety of low- and high-bandgap semiconductors.

  11. The importance of Fe surface states for spintronic devices based on magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chantis, Athanasios N

    2008-01-01

    In this article we give a review of our recent theoretical studies of the influence of Fe(001) surface (interface) states on spin-polarized electron transport across magnetic tunnel junctions with Fe electrodes. We show that minority-spin surface (interface) states are responsible for at least two effects which are important for spin electronics. First, they can produce a sizable tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions with a single Fe electrode. The effect is driven by a Rashba shift of the resonant surface band when the magnetization changes direction. This can introduce a new class of spintronic devices, namely, tunneling magnetoresistance junctions with a single ferromagnetic electrode. Second, in Fe/GaAs(001) magnetic tunnel junctions minority-spin interface states produce a strong dependence of the tunneling current spin polarization on applied electrical bias. A dramatic sign reversal within a voltage range of just a few tenths of an eV is predicted. This explains the observed sign reversal of spin polarization in recent experiments of electrical spin injection in Fe/GaAs(001) and related reversal of tunneling magnetoresistance through vertical Fe/GaAs/Fe trilayers.

  12. Polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Akyol, Fatih; Park, Pil Sung; Esposto, Michele; Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    We report on the design and demonstration of polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel junction diodes with high current density and low tunneling turn-on voltage. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculations were used to model and design tunnel junctions with narrow band gap InGaN-based barrier layers. N-polar p-GaN/In{sub 0.33}Ga{sub 0.67}N/n-GaN heterostructure tunnel diodes were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Efficient interband tunneling was achieved close to zero bias with a high current density of 118 A/cm{sup 2} at a reverse bias of 1 V, reaching a maximum current density up to 9.2 kA/cm{sup 2}. These results represent the highest current density reported in III-nitride tunnel junctions and demonstrate the potential of III-nitride tunnel devices for a broad range of optoelectronic and electronic applications.

  13. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for deactivation of the PUREX storage tunnel number 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    1999-10-11

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Storage Tunnel Number 2 (hereafter referred to as the PUREX Tunnel) was built in 1964. Since that time, the PUREX Tunnel has been used for storage of radioactive and mixed waste. In 1991, the PUREX Plant ceased operations and was transitioned to deactivation. The PUREX Tunnel continued to receive PUREX Plant waste material for storage during transition activities. Before 1995, a decision was made to store radioactive and mixed waste in the PUREX Tunnel generated from other onsite sources, on a case-by-case basis. This notice of construction (NOC) describes the activities associated with the reactivation of the PUREX Tunnel ventilation system and the transfer of up to 3.5 million curies (MCi) of radioactive waste to the PUREX Tunnel from any location on the Hanford Site. The unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimated for the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) is 5.6 E-2 millirem (mrem). The abated TEDE conservatively is estimated to account for 1.9 E-5 mrem to the MEI. The following text provides information requirements of Appendix A of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 (requirements 1 through 18).

  14. Implications of the Baltimore Rail Tunnel Fire for Full-Scale Testing of Shipping Casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) does not currently require full-scale physical testing of shipping casks as part of its certification process. Stakeholders have long urged NRC to require full-scale testing as part of certification. NRC is currently preparing a full-scale casktesting proposal as part of the Package Performance Study (PPS) that grew out of the NRC reexamination of the Modal Study. The State of Nevada and Clark County remain committed to the position that demonstration testing would not be an acceptable substitute for a combination of full-scale testing, scale-model tests, and computer simulation of each new cask design prior to certification. Based on previous analyses of cask testing issues, and on preliminary findings regarding the July 2001 Baltimore rail tunnel fire, the authors recommend that NRC prioritize extra-regulatory thermal testing of a large rail cask and the GA-4 truck cask under the PPS. The specific fire conditions and other aspects of the full-scale extra-regulatory tests recommended for the PPS are yet to be determined. NRC, in consultation with stakeholders, must consider past real-world accidents and computer simulations to establish temperature failure thresholds for cask containment and fuel cladding. The cost of extra-regulatory thermal testing is yet to be determined. The minimum cost for regulatory thermal testing of a legal-weight truck cask would likely be $3.3-3.8 million.

  15. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfenning, Andreas Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3??m. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29??m. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  16. Insensitivity of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance to non-magnetic electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Song, C. Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-11-11

    Ferromagnetic electrodes play a crucial role in magnetoresistance effect and spin injection, whereas the essential features of non-magnetic metal electrodes in spintronics are commonly ignored except for their electrical conductivity. Here, we verify that the room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) behavior in antiferromagnet-based [Pt/Co]/IrMn/AlO{sub x}/metal (metal?=?Pt, Au, Cu, Al) junctions is insensitive to the top metal electrodes. Similar out-of-plane signals are detected for different electrodes, in contrast to the varied shapes of in-plane TAMR curves which are most likely attributed to the differences in the multidomain structure of the magnetic electrode. This would add a different dimension to spintronics.

  17. Isotope effect in tunnelling ionization of neutral hydrogen molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X; Atia-Tul-Noor, A; Hu, B T; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates (O.I. Tolstikhin, H.J. Worner and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013) [1]). We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2. The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  18. Ferroelectric modulation on resonant tunneling through perovskite double-barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Ruifang; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2014-04-07

    The negative differential resistance (NDR) due to resonance tunneling is achieved at room temperature in perovskite double-barrier heterostructures composed of a 10 unit-cell-thick SrTiO{sub 3} quantum well sandwiched in two 10 unit-cell-thick LaAlO{sub 3} barriers. The NDR occurs at 1.2?V and does not change with voltage cycling. When the paraelectric SrTiO{sub 3} quantum well is replaced by a ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3}, the onset of the NDR can be modulated by polarization switching in the ultrathin BaTiO{sub 3}. A polarization pointing to the collector lowers the NDR voltage but a polarization pointing to the emitter increases it. The shift of the NDR voltage is ascribed to reversal of the extra electric field in the quantum well due to the polarization switching.

  19. Heat engine driven by three-body photon tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latella, Ivan; Rubi, J Miguel; Biehs, Svend-Age; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Near-field heat engines are devices that convert the evanescent thermal field supported by a primary source into usable mechanical energy. By analyzing the thermodynamic performance of three-body near-field heat engines, we demonstrate that the power they supply can be substantially larger than that of two-body systems, showing so their strong potential for energy harvesting. Theoretical limits for energy and entropy fluxes in three-body systems are discussed and compared with their corresponding two-body counterparts. Such considerations confirm that the thermodynamic availability in energy-conversion processes driven by three-body photon tunneling can exceed the thermodynamic availability in two-body systems.

  20. Compensation of radiation damages for SOI pixel detector via tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamada, Miho; Kurachi, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    We are developing monolithic pixel detectors based on SOI technology for high energy physics, X-ray applications and so on.To employ SOI pixel detector on such radiation environments, we have to solve effects of total ionization damages (TID) for transistors which are enclosed in oxide layer.The holes which are generated and trapped in the oxide layers after irradiation affect characteristics of near-by transistors due to its positive electric field.Annealing and radiation of ultraviolet are not realistic to remove trapped holes for a fabricated detector due to thermal resistance of components and difficulty of handling. We studied compensation of TID effects by tunneling using a high-voltage. For decrease of trapped holes, applied high-voltage to buried p-well which is under oxide layer to inject the electrons into the oxide layer.In this report, recent progress of this study is shown.

  1. Tunneling under Coherent Control by Sequences of Unitary Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajdeep Saha; Victor S. Batista

    2010-09-07

    A general coherent control scenario to suppress, or accelerate, tunneling of quantum states decaying into a continuum, is investigated. The method is based on deterministic, or stochastic, sequences of unitary pulses that affect the underlying interference phenomena responsible for quantum dynamics, without inducing decoherence, or collapsing the coherent evolution of the system. The influence of control sequences on the ensuing quantum dynamics is analyzed by using perturbation theory to first order in the control pulse fields and compared to dynamical decoupling (DD) protocols and sequences of pulses that collapse the coherent evolution and induce quantum Zeno (QZE) or quantum anti-Zeno effects (AZE). The analysis reveals a subtle interplay between coherent and incoherent phenomena and demonstrating that dynamics analogous to evolution due to QZE or AZE can be generated from stochastic sequences of unitary pulses when averaged over all possible realizations.

  2. Relativistic tunneling picture of electron-positron pair creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Wöllert; Michael Klaiber; Heiko Bauke; Christoph H. Keitel

    2015-03-19

    The common tunneling picture of electron-positron pair creation in a strong electric field is generalized to pair creation in combined crossed electric and magnetic fields. This enhanced picture, being symmetric for electrons and positrons, is formulated in a gauge-invariant and Lorentz-invariant manner for quasistatic fields. It may be used to infer qualitative features of the pair creation process. In particular, it allows for an intuitive interpretation of how the presence of a magnetic field modifies and, in particular cases, even enhances pair creation. The creation of electrons and positrons from the vacuum may be assisted by an energetic photon, which can also be incorporated into this picture of pair creation.

  3. High energy storage capacitor by embedding tunneling nano-structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holme, Timothy P; Prinz, Friedrich B; Van Stockum, Philip B

    2014-11-04

    In an All-Electron Battery (AEB), inclusions embedded in an active region between two electrodes of a capacitor provide enhanced energy storage. Electrons can tunnel to/from and/or between the inclusions, thereby increasing the charge storage density relative to a conventional capacitor. One or more barrier layers is present in an AEB to block DC current flow through the device. The AEB effect can be enhanced by using multi-layer active regions having inclusion layers with the inclusions separated by spacer layers that don't have the inclusions. The use of cylindrical geometry or wrap around electrodes and/or barrier layers in a planar geometry can enhance the basic AEB effect. Other physical effects that can be employed in connection with the AEB effect are excited state energy storage, and formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC).

  4. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  5. Solar Water Heaters | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The batch collector is a large box holding a tank and covered with a glaze that faces the sun. Water is heated in this tank, and another pipe takes the heated water from the batch...

  6. Effects of Be acceptors on the spin polarization of carriers in p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awan, I. T.; Galvão Gobato, Y.; Galeti, H. V. A.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Henini, M.

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of Be acceptors on the electroluminescence and the spin polarization in GaAs/AlAs p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes. The quantum well emission comprise two main lines separated by ?20?meV attributed to excitonic and Be-related transitions, which intensities show remarkably abrupt variations at critical voltages, particularly at the electron resonant peak where it shows a high-frequency bistability. The circular-polarization degree of the quantum-well electroluminescence also shows strong and abrupt variations at the critical bias voltages and it attains relatively large values (of ??75% at 15?T). These effects may be explored to design novel devices for spintronic applications such as a high-frequency spin-oscillators.

  7. The effect of environmental coupling on tunneling of quasiparticles in Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad H. Ansari; Frank K. Wilhelm; Urbasi Sinha; Aninda Sinha

    2013-11-07

    We study quasiparticle tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions embedded in an electromagnetic environment. We identify tunneling processes that transfer electrical charge and couple to the environment in a way similar to that of normal electrons, and processes that mix electrons and holes and are thus creating charge superpositions. The latter are sensitive to the phase difference between the superconductor and are thus limited by phase diffusion even at zero temperature. We show that the environmental coupling is suppressed in many environments, thus leading to lower quasiparticle decay rates and thus better superconductor qubit coherence than previously expected. Our approach is nonperturbative in the environmental coupling strength.

  8. Tunneling time calculations for general finite wavepackets based on the presence time formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. del Barco; M. Ortuño; V. Gasparian

    2015-05-31

    We analyze the tunneling time problem via the presence time formalism. With this method we reproduce previous results for very long wavepackets and we are able to calculate the tunneling time for general wavepackets of arbitrary shape and length. The tunneling time for a general wavepacket is equal to the average over the energy components of the standard phase time. With this approach we can also calculate the time uncertainty. We have checked that the results obtained with this approach agree extremely well with numerical simulations of the wavepacket evolution.

  9. Finite element analysis of floatation of rectangular tunnels following earthquake induced liquefaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madabhushi, S. S. C.; Madabhushi, S. P. G.

    2014-10-29

    , R., Yang, D. and Naesgaard, E. (2003). Centrifuge modeling for seismic retrofit design of an immersed tube tunnel. Journal of Physical Modelling of Geotechnics 3, No. 2, 23-32. [8] Chou, J.C., Kutter, B.L., Travasarou, T. and Chacko, J.M. (2011... during a major earthquake. Seismic behavior of tunnels and other underground structures can be studied using numerical analyses or physical testing. Cilingir and Madabhushi [1,2,3] investigated the seismic response of square tunnels using both dynamic...

  10. Characterization of aluminum oxide tunnel barriers by combining transport measurements and transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aref, T.; Averin, A.; Nguyend, H. Q.; Pekola, J. P.; Dijken, S. van; Yao, L. D.; Ferring, A.; Koberidze, M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-21

    We present two approaches for studying the uniformity of a tunnel barrier. The first approach is based on measuring single-electron and two-electron tunneling in a hybrid single-electron transistor. Our measurements indicate that the effective area of a conduction channel is about one order of magnitude larger than predicted by theoretical calculations. With the second method, transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that variations in the barrier thickness are a plausible explanation for the larger effective area and an enhancement of higher order tunneling processes.

  11. Dynamical tunneling of a Bose-Einstein condensate in periodically driven systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. K. Shrestha; J. Ni; W. K. Lam; G. S. Summy; S. Wimberger

    2013-09-13

    We report measurements of dynamical tunneling rates of a Bose-Einstein condensate across a barrier in classical phase space. The atoms are initially prepared in quantum states that extend over a classically regular island region. We focus on the specific system of quantum accelerator modes of the kicked rotor in the presence of gravity. Our experimental data is supported by numerical simulations taking into account imperfections mainly from spontaneous emission. Furthermore, we predict experimentally accessible parameter ranges over which direct tunneling could be readily observed if spontaneous emission was further suppressed. Altogether, we provide a proof-of-principle for the experimental accessibility of dynamical tunneling rates in periodically driven systems.

  12. ScanningTunneling Luminescence of Grain Boundaries in Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, M. J.; Jiang, C.-S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Noufi, R.

    2005-01-01

    At the Laboratory, photon emission in semiconductors has been mapped in the nanoscale using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In this Solar Program Review Meeting, we report on the latest results obtained in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films by this adapted STM. Scanning tunneling luminescence (STL) spectroscopy suggests that photons are emitted near the surface of CIGS. STL is excited either by (1) diffusion of tunneling electrons and subsequent recombination with available holes in CIGS or (2) impact ionization by hot electrons. Which process becomes predominant depends on the voltage applied to the STM tip. Photon mapping shows electronically active, extended defects near the surface of CIGS thin films.

  13. Article accepted for publication in: Land and Water Magazine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that flow to a waste water treatment plant. During large storm events, when the capacity of the treatment

  14. A Study of Fire Durability for a Road Tunnel: Comparing CFD and Simple Analytical Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reszka, Pedro; Steinhaus, Thomas; Biteau, Hubert; Carvel, Ricky O; Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L

    The durability of various typical tunnel sections in the event of a prescribed 100 MW fire has been assessed. Cast-iron sections, pre-cast concrete sections and in-situ concrete cut and cover sections are all considered ...

  15. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    7504, 2009 petroleum gas (LPG), gasoline, and diesel are thevehicles, while diesel and LPG fueled vehicles accounted forShing Mun Tunnel, Hong Kong LPG, gasoline, and diesel ethene

  16. Wind Tunnel Tests of Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors: March 2001--August 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosoya, N.; Peterka, J. A.; Gee, R. C.; Kearney, D.

    2008-05-01

    Conducted extensive wind-tunnel tests on parabolic trough solar collectors to determine practical wind loads applicable to structural design for stress and deformation, and local component design for concentrator reflectors.

  17. Dynamic response of flexible square tunnels: testing and validation of existing design methodologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsinidis, G.; Pitilakis, K.; Madabhushi, G.; Heron, C.

    2015-03-20

    regarding the seismic response of rectangular embedded structures and to calibrate currently available design methods. The soil–tunnel system response was recorded with an extensive instrumentation array, comprising miniature accelerometers, pressure cells...

  18. Creating deformations and tunnels in a surface using layered geometry with adaptive filtering 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Jacob Kirk

    2005-11-01

    With this thesis, I present a method for creating footprints and tunnels in a surface through the use of layered geometry. Rather than using a single geometric surface, deformations are created through the interaction of a polygonal object...

  19. Evaluation of propulsor aerodynamic performance for powered aircraft wind tunnel experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siu, Nina M

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes a methodology to convert electrical power measurements to propulsor mechanical ow power for a 1:11-scale, powered wind tunnel model of an advanced civil aircraft utilizing boundary layer ingestion ...

  20. THE QUEENS TUNNEL COMPLEX: A NEWLY DISCOVERED GRANULITE FACIES FORDHAM ORTHOGNEISS COMPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Tunnel project. The Brocks' subsequent studies of the rocks (hand-specimen petrography, thin-section petrography, whole-rock geochemistry, and zircon U- Pb dating) have all confirmed their initial correlation

  1. Demonstration of forward inter-band tunneling in GaN by polarization engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Park, Pil Sung; Rajan, Siddharth

    2011-12-05

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of GaN interband tunnel junction showing forward tunneling characteristics. We have achieved very high forward tunneling currents (153 mA/cm{sup 2} at 10 mV, and 17.7 A/cm{sup 2} peak current) in polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN heterojunction diodes grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We also report the observation of repeatable negative differential resistance in interband III-Nitride tunnel junctions, with peak-valley current ratio of 4 at room temperature. The forward current density achieved in this work meets the typical current drive requirements of a multi-junction solar cell.

  2. Structural Fluctuations, Spin, Reorganization Energy, and Tunneling Energy Control of Intramolecular Electron Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurnikova, Maria

    calculations of electronic couplings, molecular dynamics simulations of molecular geometries, and Poisson exists to interpret electron-transfer (ET) reactions and their dependence upon molecular structure.1Structural Fluctuations, Spin, Reorganization Energy, and Tunneling Energy Control

  3. An Updated Procedure for Tare and Interference Wind Tunnel Testing of Strut-Mounted Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutz, Douglas M

    2014-05-02

    Despite advances in modern computing and simulation, wind tunnel testing remains the most trusted method for determining aerodynamic vehicle behavior. Corrections are applied to accurately obtain results representative of free-air performance due...

  4. Wind Tunnel and Flight Testing of Active Flow Control on a UAV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babbar, Yogesh

    2011-08-08

    Active flow control has been extensively explored in wind tunnel studies but successful in-flight implementation of an active flow control technology still remains a challenge. This thesis presents implementation of active flow control technology...

  5. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Jerry A. (Sandia Park, NM); Sherwin, Marc E. (Rockville, MD); Drummond, Timothy J. (Tijeras, NM); Weckwerth, Mark V. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation.

  6. Common-path interference and oscillatory Zener tunneling in bilayer graphene p-n junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nandkishore, Rahul Mahajan

    Interference and tunneling are two signature quantum effects that are often perceived as the yin and yang of quantum mechanics: a particle simultaneously propagating along several distinct classical paths versus a particle ...

  7. Background Simulation Experiment Conclusion Hysteresis in the Nonlinear Tunnelling of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Background Simulation Experiment Conclusion Hysteresis in the Nonlinear Tunnelling of Light Through of Light Through a Barrier #12;Background Simulation Experiment Conclusion Outline 1 Background Nonlinear of Light Through a Barrier #12;Background Simulation Experiment Conclusion Nonlinear Optics Nonlinear

  8. Development of a Digital Controller for a Vertical Wind Tunnel (VWT) Prototype to Mitigate Ball Fluctuations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Ramon A.

    2011-08-08

    The objective of this research was to mitigate fluctuations of a levitated ping pong ball within a vertical wind tunnel (VWT) prototype. This was made possible by remodeling the VWT system with its inherent nonlinear characteristics instead...

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopic studies of SiO2 thin film supported metal nano-clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Byoung Koun

    2005-11-01

    This dissertation is focused on understanding heterogeneous metal catalysts supported on oxides using a model catalyst system of SiO2 thin film supported metal nano-clusters. The primary technique applied to this study is scanning tunneling...

  10. Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and theoretical studies of 1-halohexane monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berne, Bruce J.

    . In accordance with the higher degree of disorder observed in scanning tunneling microscopy images of 1 of the interactions governing 2D self-organization. Simple functionalized hydrocarbon molecules are known to form self

  11. Quantum Tunneling of Massive Spin-1 Particles From Non-stationary Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Sakalli; A. Övgün

    2015-07-07

    Hawking radiation (HR) is invariant under the coordinate transformation, and it must be independent of the particle type emitting from the considered black hole (BH). From this fact, we focus on the HR of massive vector (spin-1) particles tunneling from Schwarzschild BH expressed in the Kruskal-Szekeres (KS) and dynamic Lemaitre (DL) coordinates. Using the Proca equation (PE) together with Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) and WKB methods, we show that the tunneling rate, and its consequence Hawking temperature are well recovered by the quantum tunneling of the massive vector particles. This is the first example for the HR of the massive vector particles tunneling from a four dimensional BH expressed in non-stationary regular coordinates.

  12. Quantum Tunneling of Massive Spin-1 Particles From Non-stationary Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakalli, I

    2015-01-01

    Hawking radiation (HR) is invariant under the coordinate transformation, and it must be independent of the particle type emitting from the considered black hole (BH). From this fact, we focus on the HR of massive vector (spin-1) particles tunneling from Schwarzschild BH expressed in the Kruskal-Szekeres (KS) and dynamic Lemaitre (DL) coordinates. Using the Proca equation (PE) together with Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) and WKB methods, we show that the tunneling rate, and its consequence Hawking temperature are well recovered by the quantum tunneling of the massive vector particles. This is the first example for the HR of the massive vector particles tunneling from a four dimensional BH expressed in non-stationary regular coordinates.

  13. Fire modeling for Building 221-T - T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oar, D.L.

    1994-09-29

    This report was prepared by Hughes Associates, Inc. to document the results of fire models for building 221-T Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel. Backup data is contained in document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-010, Rev. 0.

  14. Investigation of the tunneling emitter bipolar transistor as spin-injector into silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Veenhuizen, Marc Julien

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis is discussed the tunneling emitter bipolar transistor as a possible spin-injector into silicon. The transistor has a metallic emitter which as a spin-injector will be a ferromagnet. Spin-polarized electrons ...

  15. Suppression criteria of parasitic mode oscillations in a gyrotron beam tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Sinha, A. K.; Singh, T. P.

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents the design criteria of the parasitic mode oscillations suppression for a periodic, ceramic, and copper loaded gyrotron beam tunnel. In such a type of beam tunnel, the suppression of parasitic mode oscillations is an important design problem. A method of beam-wave coupling coefficient and its mathematical formulation are presented. The developed design criteria are used in the beam tunnel design of a 42 GHz gyrotron to be developed for the Indian TOKAMAK system. The role of the thickness and the radius of the beam tunnel copper rings to obtain the developed design criteria are also discussed. The commercially available electromagnetic code CST and the electron trajectory code EGUN are used for the simulations.

  16. The monitoring of an existing cast iron tunnel with distributed fibre optic sensing (DFOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gue, C. Y.; Wilcock, M.; Alhaddad, M. M.; Elshafie, M. Z. E. B.; Soga, K.; Mair, R. J.

    2015-03-29

    complex, is less problematic as technology has developed. Nonetheless, the effects of tunnelling on adjacent structures remain challenging as they are not well understood; in practice, with surging demand for transport infrastructure in urban environments... the continuous gluing method less practical. Direct line of sight along the intrados surface at the tunnel crown was not possible with the flanges and existing electrical conduits in place. Continuous gluing would have required the fibre optic cable to be bent...

  17. Massive vector particles tunneling from Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Qian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the Hawking radiation of massive spin-1 particles from 4-dimensional Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. By applying the Hamilton-Jacobi ansatz and the WKB approximation to the field equations of the massive bosons in Kerr and Kerr-Newman space-time, the quantum tunneling method is successfully implemented. As a result, we obtain the tunneling rate of the emitted vector particles and recover the standard Hawking temperature of both the two black holes.

  18. Massive vector particles tunneling from Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Qian Li; Ge-Rui Chen

    2015-07-13

    In this paper, we investigate the Hawking radiation of massive spin-1 particles from 4-dimensional Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. By applying the Hamilton-Jacobi ansatz and the WKB approximation to the field equations of the massive bosons in Kerr and Kerr-Newman space-time, the quantum tunneling method is successfully implemented. As a result, we obtain the tunneling rate of the emitted vector particles and recover the standard Hawking temperature of both the two black holes.

  19. A qualitative assessment of microclimatic perturbations in a tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salve, R.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    electrical resistance probe (ERP) measurements with relativenear some of the ERPs. The ERP data were compared with datathus water saturation of) the ERP filter paper, resulting in

  20. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers and compiler options The available compilers on Hopper are PGI, Cray, Intel, GNU,...

  1. Can p-channel tunnel field-effect transistors perform as good as n-channel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhulst, A. S. Pourghaderi, M. A.; Collaert, N.; Thean, A. V.-Y.; Verreck, D.; Van de Put, M.; Groeseneken, G.; Sorée, B.

    2014-07-28

    We show that bulk semiconductor materials do not allow perfectly complementary p- and n-channel tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), due to the presence of a heavy-hole band. When tunneling in p-TFETs is oriented towards the gate-dielectric, field-induced quantum confinement results in a highest-energy subband which is heavy-hole like. In direct-bandgap IIIV materials, the most promising TFET materials, phonon-assisted tunneling to this subband degrades the subthreshold swing and leads to at least 10× smaller on-current than the desired ballistic on-current. This is demonstrated with quantum-mechanical predictions for p-TFETs with tunneling orthogonal to the gate, made out of InP, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, InAs, and a modified version of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As with an artificially increased conduction-band density-of-states. We further show that even if the phonon-assisted current would be negligible, the build-up of a heavy-hole-based inversion layer prevents efficient ballistic tunneling, especially at low supply voltages. For p-TFET, a strongly confined n-i-p or n-p-i-p configuration is therefore recommended, as well as a tensily strained line-tunneling configuration.

  2. Selective p-i-n photodetector with resonant tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mil'shtein, S.; Wilson, S.; Pillai, A.

    2014-05-15

    There are different fundamental approaches to designing selective photodetectors, where the selectivity of optical spectra is produced by a filtering aperture. However, manufacturing of multilayered filters is cumbersome for epitaxial technology. In the current study, we offer a novel approach in design of selective photodetectors. A p-i-n photodetector with superlattices in top n-layer becomes transparent for photons where h?<>E{sub ng}+E{sub n1}, the light will be absorbed, simultaneously producing high energy (hot) electrons. The designed thickness of the structure does prevent thermal relaxation of high energy electrons by thus enhancing the selectivity of the photodetector. However the most important selectivity element is the resonant tunneling which does happen only for electrons occupying E{sub n1} energy levels as they transfer to levels E{sub i1}aligned under reverse biasing.

  3. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  4. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies are used for agriculture, natural resources, salt water intrusion protection, drinking water, industry

  5. Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel #3, Stage 2: p.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    by careful pre-bid geological analysis. To determine the causes of lower than anticipated TBM performance, a detailed investigation was carried out that included analysis of operational data from the TBM data logger

  6. Large Particle Penetration During PM10 Sampling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, William; Haglund, John; Smith, Raleigh

    2014-01-01

    are required to meet specific criteria outlined in 40 CFR Part 53, Subpart D (henceforth “Subpart D”). The wind tunnel used for the present tests was originally fabricated in the early 1980s for the development and evaluation of PM10 inlets (McFarland and Ortiz... 1982, 1984). The wind tunnel has been reassembled in order to resume Subpart D testing and evalua- tion. The 0.61 £ 0.61 meter (2 £ 2 foot) square wind tunnel is comprised of three sections, each 1.22 meters (4 feet) in length, a HEPA filter doubling...

  7. Voltage-Controlled Magnetic Dynamics in Nanoscale Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alzate Vinasco, Juan Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    SWITHCHED  VIA  THERMAL   ACTIVATION  OR  PRECESSIONAL  is partially lowered, thermal activation can result in astate can fall via thermal activation. Note that the large

  8. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  9. Assessment of tunnel ground conditions for a two-year stand-by period, January 1994. UTAP report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-28

    This report summarizes observations, assessment of ground conditions, and recommendations pertaining to the Collider main ring tunnel at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC).

  10. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions using trimethyl aluminium for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, B.; DeVita, M.; Turala, A.; Kolhatkar, G.; Boucherif, A.; Jaouad, A.; Aimez, V.; Arès, R.; Wilkins, M.; Wheeldon, J. F.; Walker, A. W.; Hinzer, K.; Fafard, S.

    2013-09-27

    AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions for use in high concentration multijunction solar cells were designed and grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) using trimethyl aluminium (TMA) as the p-dopant source for the AlGaAs active layer. Controlled hole concentration up to 4?10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} was achieved through variation in growth parameters. Fabricated tunnel junctions have a peak tunneling current up to 6140 A/cm{sup 2}. These are suitable for high concentration use and outperform GaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions.

  11. Increased efficiency in multijunction solar cells through the incorporation of semimetallic ErAs nanoparticles into the tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zide, J.M.O.; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, A.; Strandwitz, N.C.; Zimmerman, J.D.; Steenblock-Smith, T.; Gossard, A.C.; Forman, A.; Ivanovskaya, A.; Stucky, G.D.

    2006-04-17

    We report the molecular beam epitaxy growth of Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs multijunction solar cells with epitaxial, semimetallic ErAs nanoparticles at the interface of the tunnel junction. The states provided by these nanoparticles reduce the bias required to pass current through the tunnel junction by three orders of magnitude, and therefore drastically reduce the voltage losses in the tunnel junction. We have measured open-circuit voltages which are 97% of the sum of the constituent cells, which result in nearly double the efficiency of our multijunction cell with a conventional tunnel junction.

  12. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  13. Pattern Alteration: Large Abdomen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-04

    A large abdomen causes the hemline on a skirt to hike in front and pulls the side seam forward. This publication gives instructions on altering patterns for a basic skirt and pants....

  14. Computerized Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    supply diversions, several hydroelectric plants and numerous environ- mental instream flow requirements. Each of these active permits is included in the datasets. Besides the commission using the WAM/WRAP modeling system in water rights permiting... actions be consistent with relevant regional plans. River authorities, water districts and other water management organizations are beginning to use the WRAP model in operational planning studies to optimize operations of their facilities...

  15. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management and development of the Nation's water resources will largely determine the quality of life - municipal, industrial, and agriculture water supplies; wastewater disposal systems; flood and drought is essential to solving emerging and future water supply, management, and quality problems. The Nation needs

  16. Tunneling time in attosecond experiments and time-energy uncertainty relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ossama Kullie

    2015-07-24

    In this work we present a theoretical model supported with a physical reasoning leading to a relation which performs an excellent estimation for the tunneling time in attosecond and strong field experiments, where we address the important case of the He-atom \\cite{Eckle:2008s,Eckle:2008}. Our tunneling time estimation is found by utilizing the time-energy uncertainty relation and represents a quantum clock. The tunneling time is also featured as the time of passage (at the exit of the tunnel) similarly to the Einstein's {\\it photon box Gedanken experiment}. Our work tackles an important study case for the theory of time in quantum mechanics and is very promising for the search for a (general) time operator in quantum mechanics. The work can be seen as a new fundamental step in dealing with the tunneling time in strong field and ultra-fast science, and is appealing for more elaborate treatments using quantum wave packet dynamics and especially for complex atoms and molecules.

  17. Effective fracture geometry obtained with large water sand ratio 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Amrendra

    2009-05-15

    100000452 ............................... 58 4-21 Comparison of Power law Model with Traditional Model: Well 100000452 ........ 59 4-22 Effect of SRV on EUR........................................................................................ 60...

  18. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Roberrt C [DRI; Drollinger, Harold [DRI

    2013-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16a Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U16a Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U16a Tunnel historic landscape be included in the Nevada National Security Site monitoring program and monitored on a regular basis.

  19. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, robert C; Drollinger, Harold; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2013-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16a Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U16a Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U16a Tunnel historic landscape be included in the Nevada National Security Site monitoring program and monitored on a regular basis.

  20. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  1. Dark Matter Hawking Radiation? Dark Spinors Tunnelling in String Theory Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalcanti, R T

    2015-01-01

    The Hawking radiation spectrum of Kerr-Sen axion-dilaton black holes is derived, in the context of dark spinors tunnelling across the horizon. Since a black hole has a well defined temperature, it should radiate in principle all the standard model particles, similar to a black body at that temperature. We investigate the tunnelling of mass dimension one spin-1/2 dark fermions, that are beyond the standard model and are prime candidates to the dark matter. Their interactions with the standard model matter and gauge fields are suppressed by at least one power of unification scale, being restricted just to the Higgs field and to the graviton likewise. The tunnelling method for the emission and absorption of mass dimension one particles across the event horizon of Kerr-Sen axion-dilaton black holes is shown here to provide further evidence for the universality of black hole radiation, further encompassing particles beyond the standard model.

  2. Dark Matter Hawking Radiation? Dark Spinors Tunnelling in String Theory Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. T. Cavalcanti; Roldao da Rocha

    2015-07-14

    The Hawking radiation spectrum of Kerr-Sen axion-dilaton black holes is derived, in the context of dark spinors tunnelling across the horizon. Since a black hole has a well defined temperature, it should radiate in principle all the standard model particles, similar to a black body at that temperature. We investigate the tunnelling of mass dimension one spin-1/2 dark fermions, that are beyond the standard model and are prime candidates to the dark matter. Their interactions with the standard model matter and gauge fields are suppressed by at least one power of unification scale, being restricted just to the Higgs field and to the graviton likewise. The tunnelling method for the emission and absorption of mass dimension one particles across the event horizon of Kerr-Sen axion-dilaton black holes is shown here to provide further evidence for the universality of black hole radiation, further encompassing particles beyond the standard model.

  3. International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences 45 (2008) 11951210 Consolidation settlements above deep tunnels in fractured crystalline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    2008-01-01

    settlements above deep tunnels in fractured crystalline rock: Part 1--Investigations above the Gotthard highway tunnel C. Zangerla,b,Ã, K.F. Evansa , E. Eberhardta,c , S. Loewa a Engineering Geology, Swiss Management, Grabenweg 3, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria c Geological Engineering/Earth and Ocean Sciences

  4. International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences 45 (2008) 12111225 Consolidation settlements above deep tunnels in fractured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    2008-01-01

    settlements above deep tunnels in fractured crystalline rock: Part 2--Numerical analysis of the Gotthard highway tunnel case study C. Zangerla,b,Ã, E. Eberhardta,c , K.F. Evansa , S. Loewa a Engineering Geology Hazard Management, Innsbruck, Austria c Geological Engineering/Earth and Ocean Sciences, University

  5. Mechanisms of Molecular Manipulation with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope at Room Temperature: Chlorobenzene=Si111-7 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Mats

    of negative (or positive) ion resonances of the chemisorbed molecule by the tunneling electrons (or holes- scale structures which can be employed to trap electrons in ``textbook'' quantum boxes [2Mechanisms of Molecular Manipulation with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope at Room Temperature

  6. Non-Hermitian scattering theory: Resonant tunneling probability amplitude in a quantum dot Hadas Barkay, Edvardas Narevicius, and Nimrod Moiseyev*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narevicius, Edvardas

    properties of quantum dots, phenomena such as tunneling of electrons must be characterized. Phase, in a manner that enabled them to control the potential of the electrons trapped in it by varying the plungerNon-Hermitian scattering theory: Resonant tunneling probability amplitude in a quantum dot Hadas

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 45, NO. 6, JUNE 1998 1361 Degradation of Thin Tunnel Gate Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 45, NO. 6, JUNE 1998 1361 Degradation of Thin Tunnel. Schroder, Fellow, IEEE Abstract-- The degradation of thin tunnel gate oxide under constant Fowler charge trapping is usually dominant at low QQQinjinjinj followed by negative charge trapping at high

  8. PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 43, NUMBER 6 15 FEBRUARY 1991-II Nonlinear feedback oscillations in resonant tunneling through double barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presilla, Carlo

    ) We analyze the dynamical evolution of the resonant tunneling of an ensemble of electrons through the dynamics of RT of ballistic electrons in the presence of the potential created by the charge trapped within in resonant tunneling through double barriers C. Presilla Scuola del Dottorato di Ricerca in Fisica dell

  9. A Novel Si-Tunnel FET based SRAM Design for Ultra Low-Power 0.3V VDD Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    A Novel Si-Tunnel FET based SRAM Design for Ultra Low-Power 0.3V VDD Applications J. Singh, K-Band Tunnel Field Effect Transistors (TFETs) in SRAMs at ultra low supply voltages. The uni design using Si- TFETs for reliable operation with low leakage at ultra low voltages. We also demonstrate

  10. On the Selection of Optimal Diverse AS-Paths for Inter-Domain IP/(G)MPLS Tunnel Provisioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rougier, Jean-Louis

    On the Selection of Optimal Diverse AS-Paths for Inter-Domain IP/(G)MPLS Tunnel Provisioning of diverse AS paths can be computed, in order to proactively increase the success rate of tunnel set these services beyond domain boundaries, particularly for critical inter-AS VPNs, TV transport or voice gateways

  11. Theory of Graphene-Insulator-Graphene Tunnel Junctions S. C. de la Barrera, Qin Gao, and R. M. Feenstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    to vertical graphene-insulator-graphene (GIG) tunneling structures. The first such report dealt with coupled electrodes, the single-particle tunneling characteristics of GIG devices can be highly nonlinear.3 The reason by Britnell et al. from GIG junctions did not display any NDR.4 Indeed, their theoretical description

  12. Instructions for MicroCFD 2D Virtual Wind Tunnel Version 1.9 Professional Edition 2015 MicroCFD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Axel

    , and the one-to-one mapping between flow cell and pixel will be lost. 4. A 96 DPI setting should only be used is loaded. 2. Set Tunnel Length, flow parameters, gas properties, simulation Time Step and Stop Time, or use the preset values. The Tunnel Length should be about four to five times the Model Length for slender shapes

  13. Instructions for MicroCFD 2D Virtual Wind Tunnel Version 1.9 Educational Edition 2015 MicroCFD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Axel

    -to-one mapping between flow cell and pixel will be lost. 4. A 96 DPI setting should only be used if the maximum is loaded. 2. Set Tunnel Length, flow parameters, gas properties, simulation Time Step and Stop Time, or use the preset values. The Tunnel Length should be about four to five times the Model Length for slender shapes

  14. A WIND TUNNEL INVESTIGATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF SOLAR-INDUCED WALL-HEATING ON THE FLOW REGIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savory, Eric

    -section canyon model in a wind tunnel. For reference purposes, the neutral case (no wall heating), has also been viscosity of air (m2 s-1 ) 1. Introduction The wind flow field within urban areas has been studiedA WIND TUNNEL INVESTIGATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF SOLAR-INDUCED WALL-HEATING ON THE FLOW REGIME

  15. THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF LARGE KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2007 OR10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, M. E.

    We present photometry and spectra of the large Kuiper belt object 2007 OR10. The data show significant near-infrared absorption features due to water ice. While most objects in the Kuiper belt with water ice absorption ...

  16. Negative differential resistance in GaN tunneling hot electron transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhichao; Nath, Digbijoy; Rajan, Siddharth

    2014-11-17

    Room temperature negative differential resistance is demonstrated in a unipolar GaN-based tunneling hot electron transistor. Such a device employs tunnel-injected electrons to vary the electron energy and change the fraction of reflected electrons, and shows repeatable negative differential resistance with a peak to valley current ratio of 7.2. The device was stable when biased in the negative resistance regime and tunable by changing collector bias. Good repeatability and double-sweep characteristics at room temperature show the potential of such device for high frequency oscillators based on quasi-ballistic transport.

  17. Note: Long-range scanning tunneling microscope for the study of nanostructures on insulating substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina-Mendoza, Aday J.; Rodrigo, José G.; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Island, Joshua; Burzuri, Enrique; Zant, Herre S. J. van der; Agraït, Nicolás; Condensed Matter Physics Center and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales “Nicolás Cabrera,” Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid; Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia IMDEA-Nanociencia, E-28049 Madrid

    2014-02-15

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a powerful tool for studying the electronic properties at the atomic level, however, it is of relatively small scanning range and the fact that it can only operate on conducting samples prevents its application to study heterogeneous samples consisting of conducting and insulating regions. Here we present a long-range scanning tunneling microscope capable of detecting conducting micro and nanostructures on insulating substrates using a technique based on the capacitance between the tip and the sample and performing STM studies.

  18. Multi-electron dynamics in the tunnel ionization of correlated quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollstein, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    The importance of multi-electron dynamics during the tunnel ionization of a correlated quantum system is investigated. By comparison of the solution of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE) with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles approach (TDCIS), we demonstrate the importance of a multi-electron description of the tunnel ionization process especially for weakly confined quantum systems. Within this context, we observe that adiabatic driving by an intense light field can even enhance the correlations between still trapped electrons.

  19. Applications of the Tunneling Method to Particle Decay and Radiation from Naked Singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Di Criscienzo; Luciano Vanzo; Sergio Zerbini

    2010-01-26

    Following recent literature on dS instability in presence of interactions, we study the decay of massive particles in general FRW models and the emission from naked singularities either associated with 4D charged black holes or with 2D shock waves, by means of the Hamilton--Jacobi tunneling method. It is shown that the two-dimensional semi-classical tunneling amplitude from a naked singularity computed in that way is the same as the one-loop result of quantum field theory.

  20. Reduced low frequency noise in electron beam evaporated MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Z.; Feng, J. F.; Kurt, H.; Feng, G.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-05-17

    We compare low frequency noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO barriers prepared by electron-beam evaporation with those prepared by radiofrequency sputtering, both showing a high tunneling magnetoresistance. The normalized noise parameter in the parallel state of junctions with evaporated barriers is at least one order of magnitude lower than that in junctions with sputtered barriers, and exhibits a weaker bias dependence. The lowest normalized noise is in the 10{sup -11} mum{sup 2} range. A lower density of oxygen vacancies acting as charge trap states in the evaporated MgO is responsible for the lower noise.

  1. Quantum heat engine based on photon-assisted Cooper pair tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick P. Hofer; J. -R. Souquet; Aashish A. Clerk

    2015-12-07

    We propose and analyze a simple mesoscopic quantum heat engine that exhibits both high-power and high-efficiency. The system consists of a biased Josephson junction coupled to two microwave cavities, with each cavity coupled to a thermal bath. Resonant Cooper pair tunnelling occurs with the exchange of photons between cavities, and a temperature difference between the baths can naturally lead to a current against the voltage, and hence work. As a consequence of the unique properties of Cooper-pair tunneling, the heat current is completely separated from the charge current. This combined with the strong energy-selectivity of the process leads to an extremely high efficiency.

  2. A micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a resonant tunneling light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettinari, G., E-mail: giorgio.pettinari@cnr.it [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); National Research Council (CNR), Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN-CNR), Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Balakrishnan, N.; Makarovsky, O.; Campion, R. P.; Patanè, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M. [CNISM-Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)] [CNISM-Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-09

    We report on the fabrication of a micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a GaAs/AlAs quantum well resonant tunneling p-i-n diode. The spatial position of the micrometer-size light emitting area shifts linearly with increasing applied bias, up to 30??m for a bias increment of 0.2?V. Also, the simultaneous resonant tunneling injection of both electrons and holes into the quantum well states is achieved at specific positions of the diode, thus resulting in a tenfold increase of the electroluminescence intensity.

  3. Using tevatron magnets for HE-LHC or new ring in LHC tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Two injector accelerator options for HE-LHC of p{sup +} - p{sup +} collisions at 33 TeV cms energy are briefly outlined. One option is based on the Super-SPS (S-SPS) accelerator in the SPS tunnel, and the other one is based on the LER (Low-Energy-Ring) accelerator in the LHC tunnel. Expectations of performance of the main arc accelerator magnets considered for the construction of the S-SPS and of the LER accelerators are used to tentatively devise some selected properties of these accelerators as potential injectors to HE-LHC.

  4. Estimation of potential radiation damage to electronics units in the CLIC tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patapenka, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    An electronic unit is required for each CLIC “Two Beam Module”. This study aims to estimate the potential damage due to the prompt radiation to the electronics units installed inside the CLIC Main Linac tunnel. Sets of Monte-Carlo simulations have been done to estimate damage to electronics installed at various locations inside the tunnel. Continuous and point beam losses have been considered for CLIC Main and Drive beams. Lead and iron in combination with a polyethylene layer were investigated as a possible shielding. The upper limits of the estimated quantities are presented for stand alone and shielded electronics.

  5. Tunneling of Vector Particles from Lorentzian Wormholes in 3+1 Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakalli, I

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we consider the Hawking radiation (HR) of vector (massive spin-1) particles from the traversable Lorentzian wormholes (TLWH) in 3+1 dimensions. We start by providing the Proca equations for the TLWH. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ)ans\\"{a}tz with the WKB approximation in the quantum tunneling method, we obtain the probabilities of the emission/absorption modes. Then, we derive the tunneling rate of the emitted vector particles and manage to read the standard Hawking temperature of the TLWH. The result obtained represents a negative temperature, which is also discussed.

  6. Tunnelling of scalar and Dirac particles from squashed charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Stetsko

    2014-10-08

    Thermal radiation of scalar particles and Dirac fermions from squashed charged rotating five-dimensional black holes is considered. To obtain temperature of the black holes we use the tunnelling method. In case of scalar particles we make use of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. To consider tunnelling of fermions the Dirac equation was investigated. The examination shows that radial parts of the action for scalar particles and fermions in quasi-classical limit in the vicinity of horizon are almost the same and as a consequence it gives rise to the identical expressions for the temperature in both cases.

  7. Tunneling of Vector Particles from Lorentzian Wormholes in 3+1 Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Sakalli; A. Ovgun

    2015-05-08

    In this article, we consider the Hawking radiation (HR) of vector (massive spin-1) particles from the traversable Lorentzian wormholes (TLWH) in 3+1 dimensions. We start by providing the Proca equations for the TLWH. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ)ans\\"{a}tz with the WKB approximation in the quantum tunneling method, we obtain the probabilities of the emission/absorption modes. Then, we derive the tunneling rate of the emitted vector particles and manage to read the standard Hawking temperature of the TLWH. The result obtained represents a negative temperature, which is also discussed.

  8. Monolithic interconnected module with a tunnel junction for enhanced electrical and optical performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Christopher S. (Bethel Park, PA); Wilt, David M. (Bay Village, OH)

    2000-01-01

    An improved thermophotovoltaic (TPV) n/p/n device is provided. Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMS), semiconductor devices converting infrared radiation to electricity, have been developed with improved electrical and optical performance. The structure is an n-type emitter on a p-type base with an n-type lateral conduction layer. The incorporation of a tunnel junction and the reduction in the amount of p-type material used results in negligible parasitic absorption, decreased series resistance, increased voltage and increased active area. The novel use of a tunnel junction results in the potential for a TPV device with efficiency greater than 24%.

  9. Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moninder Singh Modgil

    2002-10-02

    It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

  10. Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh-Modgil, M

    2002-01-01

    It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

  11. Effects of boron composition on tunneling magnetoresistance ratio and microstructure of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB pseudo-spin-valve magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodzuka, M.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.; Ikeda, S.; Ohno, H.; Gan, H. D.

    2012-02-15

    The effect of B concentration on the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x}/MgO/(Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x} (x = 22 and 33) pseudo-spin-valve (P-SV) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) was investigated. The TMR ratios for optimally annealed MTJs with x = 22 and 33 were 340% and 170%, respectively, at room temperature. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observation showed a weaker (001) texture in the MgO barrier in the MTJ with x = 33. The bottom electrode was not fully crystallized even with a considerable amount of B in the (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 67}B{sub 33}, while good epitaxy was observed between (001) textured MgO and (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 78}B{sub 22} electrodes.

  12. Water Dynamics at Rough Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Rosenstihl; Kerstin Kämpf; Felix Klameth; Matthias Sattig; Michael Vogel

    2014-07-21

    We use molecular dynamics computer simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to investigate the dynamics of water at interfaces of molecular roughness and low mobility. We find that, when approaching such interfaces, the structural relaxation of water, i.e., the $\\alpha$ process, slows down even when specific attractive interactions are absent. This prominent effect is accompanied by a smooth transition from Vogel to Arrhenius temperature dependence and by a growing importance of jump events. Consistently, at protein surfaces, deviations from Arrhenius behavior are weak when free water does not exist. Furthermore, in nanoporous silica, a dynamic crossover of liquid water occurs when a fraction of solid water forms near 225 K and, hence, the liquid dynamics changes from bulk-like to interface-dominated. At sufficiently low temperatures, water exhibits a quasi-universal $\\beta$ process, which is characterized by an activation energy of $E_a\\!=\\!0.5$ eV and involves anisotropic reorientation about large angles. As a consequence of its large amplitude, the faster $\\beta$ process destroys essentially all orientational correlation, rendering observation of a possible slower $\\alpha$ process difficult in standard experiments. Nevertheless, we find indications for the existence of structural relaxation down to a glass transition of interfacial water near 185 K. Hydrated proteins show a highly restricted backbone motion with an amplitude, which decreases upon cooling and vanishes at comparable temperatures, providing evidence for a high relevance of water rearrangements in the hydration shell for secondary protein relaxations.

  13. Investigation of scanning tunneling spectra on iron-based superconductor FeSe0.5Te0.5(in Chinese)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Du, Z. -Y.; Fang, D. -L.; Wang, Z. -Y.; Du, G.; Yang, X.; Yang, H.; Gu, G.; -H, Wen H.

    2015-05-05

    FeSe0.5Te0.5 single crystals with superconducting critical temperature of 13.5 K are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) measureflents in detail. STM image on the top surface shows an atomically resolved square lattice consisted by white and dark spots with a constant of about 3.73± 0.03 Å which is consistent with the lattice constant 3.78 Å. The Se and Te atoms with a height difference of about 0.35 Å are successfully identified since the sizes of the two kinds of atoms are different. The tunneling spectra show very large zero-bias conductance value and asymmetric coherent peaks in the superconducting state. Accordingmore »to the positions of coherence peaks, we determine the superconducting gap 2? = 5.5 meV, and the reduced gap 2?/kBTc = 4.9 is larger than the value predicted by the weak-coupling BCS theory. The zero-bias conductance at 1.7 K only have a decrease of about 40% compared with the normal state conductance, which may originate from some scattering and broadening mechanism in the material. This broadening effect will also make the superconducting gap determined by the distance between the coherence peaks larger than the exact gap value. The asymmetric structure of the tunneling spectra near the superconducting gap is induced by the hump on the background. This hump appears at temperature more than twice the superconducting critical temperature. This kind of hump has also been observed in other iron pnictides and needs further investigation. A possible bosonic mode outside the coherence peak with a mode energy ? of about 5.5 meV is observed in some tunneling spectra, and the ratio between the mode energy and superconducting transition temperature ?/kBTc ? 4.7 is roughly consistent with the universal ratio 4.3 in iron-based superconductors. The high-energy background of the spectra beyond the superconducting gaps shows a V-shape feature. The slopes of the differential conductance spectra at high energy are very different in the areas of Te-atom cluster and Se-atom cluster, and the difference extends to the energy of more than 300 meV. The differential conductance mapping has very little information about the quasi-particle interference of the superconducting state, which may result from the other strong scattering mechanism in the sample.« less

  14. Local tunneling characteristics near a grain boundary of a d-wave superconductor as probed by a normal-metal or a low-Tc-superconductor STM tip 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hongwei

    2005-08-29

    We studied the local single-particle tunneling characteristics [as observed with scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)] for N D and S D tunneling, where N is a normal metal, S is a s-wave superconductor, and D is a d-wave ...

  15. A Minimal Model for Large-scale Epitaxial Growth Kinetics of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    Epitaxial growth via chemical vapor deposition is considered to be the most promising way towards synthesizing large area graphene with high quality. However, it remains a big theoretical challenge to reveal growth kinetics with atomically energetic and large-scale spatial information included. Here, we propose a minimal kinetic Monte Carlo model to address such an issue on an active catalyst surface with graphene/substrate lattice mismatch, which facilitates us to perform large scale simulations of the growth kinetics over two dimensional surface with growth fronts of complex shapes. A geometry-determined large-scale growth mechanism is revealed, where the rate-dominating event is found to be $C_{1}$-attachment for concave growth front segments and $C_{5}$-attachment for others. This growth mechanism leads to an interesting time-resolved growth behavior which is well consistent with that observed in a recent scanning tunneling microscopy experiment.

  16. Grabbing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Pedro Miguel

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the ...

  17. InGaAs tunnel diodes for the calibration of semi-classical and quantum mechanical band-to-band tunneling models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smets, Quentin; Verreck, Devin; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Groeseneken, Guido; Heyns, Marc M. [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); KULeuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Verhulst, Anne S.; Rooyackers, Rita; Merckling, Clément; Simoen, Eddy; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Voon Y. [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Van De Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Universiteit Antwerpen, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-05-14

    Promising predictions are made for III-V tunnel-field-effect transistor (FET), but there is still uncertainty on the parameters used in the band-to-band tunneling models. Therefore, two simulators are calibrated in this paper; the first one uses a semi-classical tunneling model based on Kane's formalism, and the second one is a quantum mechanical simulator implemented with an envelope function formalism. The calibration is done for In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As using several p+/intrinsic/n+ diodes with different intrinsic region thicknesses. The dopant profile is determined by SIMS and capacitance-voltage measurements. Error bars are used based on statistical and systematic uncertainties in the measurement techniques. The obtained parameters are in close agreement with theoretically predicted values and validate the semi-classical and quantum mechanical models. Finally, the models are applied to predict the input characteristics of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As n- and p-lineTFET, with the n-lineTFET showing competitive performance compared to MOSFET.

  18. Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States. Assessment of Opportunities and Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, Walter; Ram, Bonnie

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the benefits of and barriers to large-scale deployment of offshore wind energy systems in U.S. waters.

  19. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  20. Sandia Energy - Leading Edge Erosion Phase II Wind Tunnel Test Begins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power ProgramLarge EddyAvailable forLaunch

  1. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  2. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  3. Does Transferring Water Present an Efficient Way of Solving Water Scarcity in China's Northeast?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markosov, Artem Igorevich

    2014-05-31

    Faced by a severe water scarcity, in 2002 the Chinese government initiated the large- scale South-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP), which was estimated at 62 billion U.S. dollars in cost and which presumably would solve China's northeast water...

  4. Variability in Labrador Sea Water formation Variabiliteit in the formatie van Labrador Zee Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    deep convection takes place. Deep convection is vertical mixing of water over a large depth is the only way in which the water in the deep ocean is exposed to the atmosphere, and the only rapid interaction between water in the deep ocean and in the surface layer. Deep convection is a typical winter

  5. Examination of the relationship of river water to occurrences of bottom water with reduced oxygen concentrations in the northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belabbassi, Leila

    2007-04-25

    and only in water depths between 10 and 60 m. Four regions in the northern Gulf show considerable differences in the occurrence of low-oxygen waters. Lowoxygen waters are observed almost exclusively in regions subject to large riverine influences...

  6. Narrow band defect luminescence from Al-doped ZnO probed by scanning tunneling cathodoluminescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Kasey

    of the optical gap and Burstein-Moss shift in CdO thin films: A consequence of extended misuse of 2-versusNarrow band defect luminescence from Al-doped ZnO probed by scanning tunneling cathodoluminescence-like opto-electronic properties Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 141917 (2011) Oxygen enhanced ferromagnetism in Cr-doped

  7. Shot noise in tunneling through a quantum dot array G. Kiesslich*; 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohls, Frank

    Shot noise in tunneling through a quantum dot array G. Kiesslich*; 1 , A. Wacker1 , E. Schæll1 , A 2003 PACS 72.70.+m, 73.40.Gk, 73.63.Kv The shot noise suppression in a sample containing a layer be qualitatively reproduced by an analy- tical expression. 1 Introduction Shot noise measurements provide

  8. Semi-epitaxial magnetic tunnel transistor: Effect of electron energy and temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayreuther, Günther

    ; published online 6 May 2005 A magnetic tunnel transistor with spin-valve metallic base and epitaxial collector leakage. © 2005 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1853892 I. INTRODUCTION The hot-electron spin-valve transistor was introduced by Monsma et al. in 1995.1 Since then, interest in hot

  9. Exciplex funnel resonances in chemical reaction dynamics: The nonadiabatic tunneling case associated with an avoided

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    Exciplex funnel resonances in chemical reaction dynamics: The nonadiabatic tunneling case mechanical calculations on a one-dimensional model of a chemical reaction with an electronically excited diabat and metastable trapping (resonances). Particular emphasis is placed on the eect of the funnel

  10. Decay of the Cosmological Constant. Equivalence of Quantum Tunneling and Thermal Activation in Two Spacetime Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres Gomberoff; Marc Henneaux; Claudio Teitelboim

    2005-01-19

    We study the decay of the cosmological constant in two spacetime dimensions through production of pairs. We show that the same nucleation process looks as quantum mechanical tunneling (instanton) to one Killing observer and as thermal activation (thermalon) to another. Thus, we find another striking example of the deep interplay between gravity, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics which becomes apparent in presence of horizons.

  11. Spontaneous emission from a two--level atom tunneling in a double--well potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Braun; John Martin

    2007-10-26

    We study a two-level atom in a double--well potential coupled to a continuum of electromagnetic modes (black body radiation in three dimensions at zero absolute temperature). Internal and external degrees of the atom couple due to recoil during emission of a photon. We provide a full analysis of the problem in the long wavelengths limit up to the border of the Lamb-Dicke regime, including a study of the internal dynamics of the atom (spontaneous emission), the tunneling motion, and the electric field of the emitted photon. The tunneling process itself may or may not decohere depending on the wavelength corresponding to the internal transition compared to the distance between the two wells of the external potential, as well as on the spontaneous emission rate compared to the tunneling frequency. Interference fringes appear in the emitted light from a tunneling atom, or an atom in a stationary coherent superposition of its center--of--mass motion, if the wavelength is comparable to the well separation, but only if the external state of the atom is post-selected.

  12. Molecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    propargylglycine unnatural functional groups 20 Å apart and an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold-terminated surfaces in which a structured -helical peptide is chemically bonded to an alkanethiol self-assembledMolecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling

  13. Axisymmetric, High-, Steady-State Plasma Torus: A "Wind-Tunnel" to Develop Whole Device Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Axisymmetric, High-, Steady-State Plasma Torus: A "Wind-Tunnel" to Develop Whole Device Models Mike College, Hanover, NH White Paper for the 2015 DOE Integrated Simulations Workshop (Topics: C, D) Motivation The development of experimentally-validated whole device models is a grand challenge of fusion

  14. Improving Tor using a TCP-over-DTLS Tunnel Joel Reardon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Ian

    Improving Tor using a TCP-over-DTLS Tunnel Joel Reardon Google Switzerland GmbH Brandschenkestrasse. Waterloo, ON, Canada iang@cs.uwaterloo.ca Abstract The Tor network gives anonymity to Internet users by re. This interference greatly contributes to Tor's notorious latency problems. Our solution is to use a TCP

  15. Mechanically-Induced Resistive Switching in Ferroelectric Tunnel C.-W. Bark,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eom, Chang Beom

    ferroelectricsmaterials with a stable polarization that can be switched by an external electric fieldhave generated considerable interest due to rich physics associated with their fundamental properties and high potential of ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJ). Conventionally, the application of an electric field above the coercive

  16. The benzene molecule as a molecular resonant-tunneling transistor M. Di Ventraa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    The benzene molecule as a molecular resonant-tunneling transistor M. Di Ventraa) and S. T of transport through a benzene-1, 4-dithiolate molecule with a third capacitive terminal gate . We find rectification was demonstrated in 1993.2 More recently, Reed et al. investigated the benzene-1, 4-dithiol rings

  17. Modelling a Car Safety Controller in Road Tunnels using Hybrid Petri Nets A. Bobbio[1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horváth, András

    Modelling a Car Safety Controller in Road Tunnels using Hybrid Petri Nets A. Bobbio[1] , M this specific issue and proposes a hybrid modeling approach based on fluid Petri nets (FPN). An FPN is used that FPN is a valid paradigm to model the dynamics of a car in a detailed way. 1 Introduction In the last

  18. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 205316 (2011) Mechanically probing coherent tunneling in a double quantum dot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clerk, Aashish

    2011-01-01

    J. Gardner,1 S. D. Bennett,2 and A. A. Clerk1 1 Department of Physics, McGill University, Montr´eal the charge-transfer line. In this regime, the presence of coherent tunneling implies that the DQD energy

  19. Quantum corrected non-thermal radiation spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subenoy Chakraborty; Subhajit Saha; Christian Corda

    2015-05-28

    Tunnelling mechanism is today considered a popular and widely used method in describing Hawking radiation. However, in relation to black hole (BH) emission, this mechanism is mostly used to obtain the Hawking temperature by comparing the probability of emission of an outgoing particle with the Boltzmann factor. On the other hand, Banerjee and Majhi reformulated the tunnelling framework deriving a black body spectrum through the density matrix for the outgoing modes for both the Bose-Einstein distribution and the Fermi-Dirac distribution. In contrast, Parikh and Wilczek introduced a correction term performing an exact calculation of the action for a tunnelling spherically symmetric particle and, as a result, the probability of emission of an outgoing particle corresponds to a non-strictly thermal radiation spectrum. Recently, one of us (C. Corda) introduced a BH effective state and was able to obtain a non-strictly black body spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism corresponding to the probability of emission of an outgoing particle found by Parikh and Wilczek. The present work introduces the quantum corrected effective temperature and the corresponding quantum corrected effective metric is written using Hawking's periodicity arguments. Thus, we obtain further corrections to the non-strictly thermal BH radiation spectrum as the final distributions take into account both the BH dynamical geometry during the emission of the particle and the quantum corrections to the semiclassical Hawking temperature.

  20. Tunneling evidence of half-metallicity in epitaxial films of ferromagnetic perovskite manganites and ferrimagnetic magnetite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Nai-Chang

    Tunneling evidence of half-metallicity in epitaxial films of ferromagnetic perovskite manganites with the perovskite manganites are discussed. © 1998 American Institute of Physics. S0021-8979 98 45811-0 Half magnetoresistance CMR in the perovskite manganites, Ln1 xMxMnO3 Ln: trivalent rare earth ions, M divalent alkaline

  1. Charged fermion tunnelling from electrically and magnetically charged rotating black hole in de Sitter space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Stetsko

    2013-06-10

    Thermal radiation of electrically charged fermions from rotating black hole with electric and magnetic charges in de Sitter space is considered. The tunnelling probabilities for outgoing and incoming particles are obtained and the Hawking temperature is calculated. The relation for the classical action for the particles in the black hole's background is also found.

  2. Realization of a four-step molecular switch in scanning tunneling microscope manipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hla, Saw-Wai

    world, plant molecules like chlorophyll-a are given special interest in the quest for green energy that all reversible switching mechanisms are initiated by a single tunneling-electron energy-a. Chlorophyll-a induces green color in plant leaves and is a key ingredient in photosynthesis, one of the most

  3. 3D Pitot Tube Measurements and Calibration in the Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3D Pitot Tube Measurements and Calibration in the Wind Tunnel Center for Measurement Standards by CFD 9 #12;Copyright 2014 ITRI Omni-type 3D pitot tube Characterization of Pitot Tubes - Design of 3D.4) % · With grid No.4: T.I.= (1.7 to 4.4) % Grid-generated turbulent flow Calibration Facilities - Turbulence

  4. Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Roland Gritto, Valeri A in the proposed nuclear waste repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A 5-km-long source line and a 3-km-long receiver line were located on top of Yucca Mountain ridge and inside the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF

  5. Dynamic Pressure Improvements to Closed-Circuit Wind Tunnels with Flow Quality Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring, Alexander

    2015-03-31

    Experiment Station Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) was limited through available power to a dynamic pressure of 120 psf. The addition of a higher power motor, construction of a new, smaller test section, diffuser liners to prevent flow separation, and increased...

  6. Shell-Tunneling Spectroscopy of the Single-Particle Energy Levels of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, and Department of Applied Physics and ERATO Mesoscopic-tunneling spectroscopy provides the single-particle energy levels of the CdSe quantum dot. The results of both types). * Corresponding author. E-mail: Daniel@phys.uu.nl. University of Utrecht. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  7. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy of mixed-anion semiconductor heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    a detailed understanding of atomic- to nanometer-scale properties of semiconductor materials and devices of semiconductor materials and devices at the atomic to nanometer scale. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling and electronic properties in semiconductor epitaxial and device structures with spatial resolution at or near

  8. Tunneling control by high-frequency driving Ilya Vorobeichik and Nimrod Moiseyev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    Tunneling control by high-frequency driving Ilya Vorobeichik and Nimrod Moiseyev Department supports this hypothesis. However, in the limit of high-frequency driving, the Kramers-Henneberger KH os laser fields 1,2 . We show that high-frequency second-order perturbation theory based on the KH frame

  9. WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    1 WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES J. J. Miau*1 were carried out to study the aerodynamic performance of three vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT) have attracted a great deal of attention, because of their potential

  10. Benchmark of aerodynamic cycling helmets using a refined wind tunnel test protocol for helmet drag research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidelko, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    The study of aerodynamics is very important in the world of cycling. Wind tunnel research is conducted on most of the equipment that is used by a rider and is a critical factor in the advancement of the sport. However, to ...

  11. Direct injection tunnel spectroscopy of a p-n junction Edward M. Likovich,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Kasey

    Direct injection tunnel spectroscopy of a p-n junction Edward M. Likovich,1 Kasey J. Russell,1,a barrier, the collector current of a direct- injection device could be larger than that of a metal-base device by roughly P PBC 1-PQM -1 400. Parasitic effects in the direct-injection device may slightly

  12. Exploiting Metal Coating of Carbon Nanotubes for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Probes Yuya MURATA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    Exploiting Metal Coating of Carbon Nanotubes for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Probes Yuya MURATA1, 2005; published July 26, 2005) By exploiting the metal coating of carbon nanotube (CNT) tips for electrical nanoprobes. A CNT glued to a W tip was uniformly coated with a thin W layer 3­6 nm thick. Using

  13. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn?? acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn?? acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for amore »single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn?? acetate. In conclusion, our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.« less

  14. Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

    2006-01-01

    rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results...

  15. Current Collapse in Tunneling Transport through Benzene M. H. Hettler,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Current Collapse in Tunneling Transport through Benzene M. H. Hettler,1 W. Wenzel,1 M. R. Wegewijs; published 20 February 2003) We investigate the electrical transport through a system of benzene coupled model for the electrons of the benzene is derived that includes general two-body interactions. After

  16. Simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast in scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, Volker; Preissner, Curt A; Hla, Saw-Wai; Wang, Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A method and system for performing simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast analysis in a scanning, tunneling microscope. The method and system also includes nanofabricated coaxial multilayer tips with a nanoscale conducting apex and a programmable in-situ nanomanipulator to fabricate these tips and also to rotate tips controllably.

  17. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  18. By Madeline Green The conflict with bottled water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Stella X.

    By Madeline Green #12;The conflict with bottled water Large corporations spend billions of dollars bottled water Convenience Purity Taste Status Symbol #12;But if you think about it... Convenience Purity Taste Status Symbol A refillable water bottle is just as easy to carry Boston tap water

  19. Interface characterization of epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shouguo; Ward, R. C. C.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Kohn, A.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, J.; Liu, H. F.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2012-01-01

    Following predictions by first-principles theory of huge tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), measured magnetoresistance (MR) ratio about 200% at room temperature (RT) have been reported in MgO-based epitaxial MTJs. Recently, MR ratio of about 600% has been reported at RT in MgO-based amorphous MTJs with core structure of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB grown by magnetron sputtering with amorphous CoFeB layers. The sputtered CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs shows a great potential application in spintronic devices. Although epitaxial structure will probably not be used in devices, it remains an excellent model system to compare theoretical calculations with experimental results and to enhance our understanding of the spin dependent tunneling. Both theoretical calculations and experimental results clearly indicate that the interfacial structure plays a crucial role on coherent tunneling across single crystalMgO barrier, especially in epitaxial MgO-based MTJs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Surface X-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectra, and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism have been used for interface characterization. However, no consistent viewpoint has been reached, and this is still an open issue. In this article, recent studies on the interface characterization in MgO-based epitaxial MTJs will be introduced, with a focus on research by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and spin dependent tunneling spectroscopy.

  20. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

  1. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    in order to reduce the water and energy wasted in hot waterhot water) and 17% if hot water energy is included. The datafrom the delivered hot water energy of 66% to provide the

  2. The Future of Global Water Stress: An Integrated Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, C. Adam

    We assess the ability of global water systems, resolved at 282 large river basins or Assessment Sub Regions (ASRs), to the meet water requirements over the coming decades under integrated projections of socioeconomic growth ...

  3. Water availability, piospheres and evolution in African ruminants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derry, Julian F; Dougill, Andy

    2006-07-21

    Water dependency has consequences for the behaviour of African large herbivores from day-to-day and season-to-season. Independently, there have been comparisons made between the water-dependencies of these species and the consequent impact...

  4. Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Joseph L.

    2001-01-11

    The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain ...

  5. SWS 5246 Water Resource Sustainability 3 credits/Spring Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ) 6 Water transfers (including flow diversion and transboundary management) 7 - 10 Hydraulic infrastructure (including canals and dams) 11-12 Water institutions (including large-scale management) 13-15 #12

  6. Water in a Crowd In many situations, form biology to geology, water occurs not as the pure bulk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water in a Crowd In many situations, form biology to geology, water occurs not as the pure bulk species, and interacting with large organic molecules. In such situations, water does not behave in the same manner as it does in the pure bulk liquid. Water dynamics are fundamental to many processes

  7. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, Alan J., E-mail: alane@ku.edu, E-mail: jwu@ku.edu; Malek, Gary A.; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Wu, Judy Z., E-mail: alane@ku.edu, E-mail: jwu@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Yu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ?1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers.

  8. Marketing water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info Marketing water savings.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9143 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Marketing water savings.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2... are partnering with federal and state agencies and universities to develop new programs or market existing ones. In North Central Texas, the city of McKin- ney and Texas AgriLife Research and Exten- sion Urban Solutions Center at Dallas recently began...

  9. Local tunneling characteristics near a grain boundary of a d-wave superconductor as probed by a normal-metal or a low-T-c-superconductor STM tip 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, HW; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2000-01-01

    We study the local single-particle tunneling characteristics [as observed with scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)] for N-D and S-D tunneling, where D is a d-wave superconductor with a {100}{110} grain boundary. The tunneling Hamiltonian method is used...

  10. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Source: http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/your_home/water_ heating/heating is a large source of energy use in California homes.heating is the third largest source of energy use in homes [

  11. Design procedures for coal mine tunnels. Open file report 1 Oct 79-31 Dec 82 (final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1983-03-31

    Although coal mine tunnels such as the main haulageways or roadways are the lifelines of coal mines, little attention has been paid to them in the United States in terms of preconstruction planning and design. This report summarizes the results of a 3-year research project aimed at improving the design procedures for coal mine tunnels. A new design approach was developed for this purpose and roof-support design charts were prepared for mine tunnels and their intersections. Analytical studies, 'base friction' model experiments, and in situ rock stress measurements were performed during this research.

  12. Grabbing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

    2012-07-16

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

  13. Templating Water Stains for Nanolithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templating Water Stains for Nanolithography Wei-Ssu Liao, Xin Chen, Jixin Chen, and Paul S. Cremer structures.11-18 For example, photolithography provides a top-down method for creating large areas of well of nearly arbitrary two-dimensional geometry on a scale below 100 nm.12 Despite its high resolution, e

  14. Stratified Steady Periodic Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-02-11

    This paper considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. We prove the existence of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed and amplitude.

  15. Universe Decay, Inflation and the Large Eigenvalue of the Cosmological Constant Seesaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael McGuigan

    2007-02-22

    We discuss implications of the large eigenvalue of the cosmological constant seesaw mechanism extending hep-th/0602112 and hep-th/0604108. While the previous papers focused on the small eigenvalue as a cosmological constant associated with the accelerating Universe, here we draw attention to the physical implications of the large eigenvalue. In particular we find that the large eigenvalue can give rise to a period of inflation terminated by Universe decay. The mechanism involves quantum tunneling and mixing and introduces parameters $\\Gamma$, the decay constant, and $\\theta$, the mixing angle. We discuss the cosmological constant seesaw mechanism in the context of various models of current interest including chain inflation, inflatonless inflation, string theory, Universe entanglement and different approaches to the hierarchy problem.

  16. Dimerization Induced Deprotonation of Water on RuO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mu, Rentao; Cantu Cantu, David; Lin, Xiao; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Wang, Zhitao; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2014-10-02

    RuO2 has proven to be indispensable as a co-catalyst in numerous systems designed for photocatalytic water splitting. In this study we have carried out a detailed mechanistic study of water behavior on the most stable RuO2 face, RuO2(110), by employing variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. We show that water monomers adsorb molecularly on Ru sites, become mobile above 238 K, diffuse along the Ru rows and form water dimers. The onset for dimer diffusion is observed at ~277 K indicating significantly higher diffusion barrier than that for monomers. More importantly, we find that water dimers deprotonate readily to form Ru-bound H3O2 and bridging OH species. The observed behavior is compared and contrasted with that observed for water on isostructural rutile TiO2(110).

  17. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    faced with the imperative that water is vital to all life onChoy* and Leon Szeptycki Water in the West Keywords: climategreen infrastructure; water; water-energy; water governance;

  18. Enabling better water management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    CASE STUDY Enabling better water management Seasonal Streamflow Forecast Service influencing water decisions Water management decisions made with confidence Using the Bureau's streamflow forecasting, ACTEW Water confidently removed temporary water restrictions after the millennium drought. Millennium drought

  19. Does water dope carbon nanotubes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Robert A.; Payne, Michael C.; Mostofi, Arash A.

    2014-10-28

    We calculate the long-range perturbation to the electronic charge density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a result of the physisorption of a water molecule. We find that the dominant effect is a charge redistribution in the CNT due to polarisation caused by the dipole moment of the water molecule. The charge redistribution is found to occur over a length-scale greater than 30 Å, highlighting the need for large-scale simulations. By comparing our fully first-principles calculations to ones in which the perturbation due to a water molecule is treated using a classical electrostatic model, we estimate that the charge transfer between CNT and water is negligible (no more than 10{sup ?4}?e per water molecule). We therefore conclude that water does not significantly dope CNTs, a conclusion that is consistent with the poor alignment of the relevant energy levels of the water molecule and CNT. Previous calculations that suggest water n-dopes CNTs are likely due to the misinterpretation of Mulliken charge partitioning in small supercells.

  20. Water at interface with proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giancarlo Franzese; Valentino Bianco; Svilen Iskrov

    2010-12-07

    Water is essential for the activity of proteins. However, the effect of the properties of water on the behavior of proteins is only partially understood. Recently, several experiments have investigated the relation between the dynamics of the hydration water and the dynamics of protein. These works have generated a large amount of data whose interpretation is debated. New experiments measure the dynamics of water at low temperature on the surface of proteins, finding a qualitative change (crossover) that might be related to the slowing down and stop of the protein's activity (protein glass transition), possibly relevant for the safe preservation of organic material at low temperature. To better understand the experimental data several scenarios have been discussed. Here, we review these experiments and discuss their interpretations in relation with the anomalous properties of water. We summarize the results for the thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled water at an interface. We consider also the effect of water on protein stability, making a step in the direction of understanding, by means of Monte Carlo simulations and theoretical calculations, how the interplay of water cooperativity and hydrogen bonds interfacial strengthening affects the protein cold denaturation.

  1. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  2. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  3. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  4. Large forging manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thamboo, Samuel V. (Latham, NY); Yang, Ling (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A process for forging large components of Alloy 718 material so that the components do not exhibit abnormal grain growth includes the steps of: a) providing a billet with an average grain size between ASTM 0 and ASTM 3; b) heating the billet to a temperature of between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; c) upsetting the billet to obtain a component part with a minimum strain of 0.125 in at least selected areas of the part; d) reheating the component part to a temperature between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; e) upsetting the component part to a final configuration such that said selected areas receive no strains between 0.01 and 0.125; f) solution treating the component part at a temperature of between 1725.degree. F. and 1750.degree. F.; and g) aging the component part over predetermined times at different temperatures. A modified process achieves abnormal grain growth in selected areas of a component where desirable.

  5. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada national Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 2 of 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation equipment, air compressors, communications equipment, mining equipment, rail lines, retention ponds to impound tunnel effluent, and storage containers. Features on the mesa above the tunnel generally relate to tunnel ventilation and cooling, borehole drilling, and data recording facilities. Feature types include concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, equipment pads, ventilation shafts, and ventilation equipment. The U12n Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U12n Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U12n Tunnel historic landscape be included in the NNSS monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations on a regular basis.

  6. Tunneling zero-bias anomaly in the quasiballistic regime A. M. Rudin, I. L. Aleiner, and L. I. Glazman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glazman, Leonid

    tunneling conduc- tance is suppressed at small biases. This effect appears to be quite universal: it shows to our knowledge. The main purpose of this paper is to show that interaction does lead to a significant

  7. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation equipment, air compressors, communications equipment, mining equipment, rail lines, retention ponds to impound tunnel effluent, and storage containers. Features on the mesa above the tunnel generally relate to tunnel ventilation and cooling, borehole drilling, and data recording facilities. Feature types include concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, equipment pads, ventilation shafts, and ventilation equipment. The U12n Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U12n Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U12n Tunnel historic landscape be included in the NNSS monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations on a regular basis.

  8. Quantitative study of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a dc SQUID: A system with two degrees of freedom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shaoxiong; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Y.; Qiu, W.; Han, Siyuan; Wang, Z.

    2002-08-01

    To test whether the theory of macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) is applicable to systems with 2 degrees of freedom, we experimentally investigated the switching current distribution of a dc SQUID. Using sample parameters determined from...

  9. Earth pressure balance (EPB) shield tunneling in Bangkok : ground response and prediction of surface settlements using artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suwansawat, Suchatvee, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    Although Earth Pressure Balance (EPB) shields have been used for several decades, very little information exists about the actual mechanisms of shield-ground interaction. The ground response mechanism induced by EPB tunneling ...

  10. Effect of unitary impurities on non-STM types of tunneling in high-T-c superconductors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, JX; Ting, CS; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2000-01-01

    Based on an extended Hubbard model, we present calculations of both the local (i.e., single-site) and spatially averaged differential tunneling conductance in d-wave superconductors containing nonmagnetic impurities in the unitary limit. Out results...

  11. Environmental Flows in Water Availability Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Hoffpauir, R.

    2013-07-18

    Report No. 440 Texas Water Resources Institute The Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 May 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1 Introduction..., and alternative variations thereof. The Brazos WAM is large and complex, providing opportunities to explore a number of issues involved in integrating environmental flow, water supply, flood control, hydropower, multiple-reservoir system operations, and other...

  12. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  13. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  14. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  15. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 2 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  16. Vacuum Tunneling in an Electroweak Model in Extra Dimensions With an External Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron J. Roy

    2009-04-14

    With the standard system for an SU(2) Higgs field in M_4 X S_1, the top and bottom component of the Higgs spinor have exactly the same coeficients for the quadratic and quadric terms. This makes the vacuum degenerate and thus there are no tunneling effects to zeroth order in radiative corrections of the vector gauge felds in the standard model with this extra dimensional geometry. However, if we include an external magnetic flux that permeates our manifold, then the top component of the Higgs spinor will have an additional term in its coefficient due to this theoretical flux with the usual charge assignments for the standard model. This extra term gives rise to two nondegenerate vacuum states for the resulting potential. We will compute the tunneling probability per unit time per unit volume between these vacuum states for the zero modes of our system as well as investigate the masses for the fields of the model using the false vacuum.

  17. Hamilton-Jacobi Tunneling Method for Dynamical Horizons in Different Coordinate Gauges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Di Criscienzo; Sean A. Hayward; Mario Nadalini; Luciano Vanzo; Sergio Zerbini

    2009-12-03

    Previous work on dynamical black hole instability is further elucidated within the Hamilton-Jacobi method for horizon tunneling and the reconstruction of the classical action by means of the null-expansion method. Everything is based on two natural requirements, namely that the tunneling rate is an observable and therefore it must be based on invariantly defined quantities, and that coordinate systems which do not cover the horizon should not be admitted. These simple observations can help to clarify some ambiguities, like the doubling of the temperature occurring in the static case when using singular coordinates, and the role, if any, of the temporal contribution of the action to the emission rate. The formalism is also applied to FRW cosmological models, where it is observed that it predicts the positivity of the temperature naturally, without further assumptions on the sign of the energy.

  18. Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Global Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Team's Water Safety Plan Assistance 1.5 million deaths occur globally every year due to a lack of clean water, inadequate sanitation, and improper hygiene (1

  19. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    they join tributaries to the Mississippi River. · The deep ground water divide is the underground boundary Deep ground water divide Racine Kenosha Walworth Waukesha Washington Ozaukee Milwaukee LAKE MICHIGANGround water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also

  20. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Wong, Phillip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, André L.; Downey, Robert J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Lou, Emil

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24–48 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3–1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: • Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. • Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. • Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. • Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. • Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and tunneling nanotubes in cancer.

  1. Magnetically amplified tunneling of the 3rd kind as a probe of minicharged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babette Döbrich; Holger Gies; Norman Neitz; Felix Karbstein

    2012-10-08

    We show that magnetic fields significantly enhance a new tunneling mechanism in quantum-field theories with photons coupling to fermionic minicharged particles. We propose a dedicated laboratory experiment of the light-shining-through-walls type that can explore a parameter regime comparable to and even beyond the best model-independent cosmological bounds. With present-day technology, such an experiment is particularly sensitive to minicharged particles with masses in and below the meV regime.

  2. Trend of tunnel magnetoresistance and variation in threshold voltage for keeping data load robustness of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction hybrid latches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohsawa, T.; Ikeda, S.; Hanyu, T.; Ohno, H.; Endoh, T.

    2014-05-07

    The robustness of data load of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction (MOS/MTJ) hybrid latches at power-on is examined by using Monte Carlo simulation with the variations in magnetoresistances for MTJs and in threshold voltages for MOSFETs involved in 90?nm technology node. Three differential pair type spin-transfer-torque-magnetic random access memory cells (4T2MTJ, 6T2MTJ, and 8T2MTJ) are compared for their successful data load at power-on. It is found that the 4T2MTJ cell has the largest pass area in the shmoo plot in TMR ratio (tunnel magnetoresistance ratio) and V{sub dd} in which a whole 256?kb cell array can be powered-on successfully. The minimum TMR ratio for the 4T2MTJ in 0.9?V?

  3. Terahertz time domain interferometry of a SIS tunnel junction and a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karadi, C [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-09-01

    The author has applied the Terahertz Time Domain Interferometric (THz-TDI) technique to probe the ultrafast dynamic response of a Superconducting-Insulating-Superconducting (SIS) tunnel junction and a Quantum Point Contact (QPC). The THz-TDI technique involves monitoring changes in the dc current induced by interfering two picosecond electrical pulses on the junction as a function of time delay between them. Measurements of the response of the Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb SIS tunnel junction from 75--200 GHz are in full agreement with the linear theory for photon-assisted tunneling. Likewise, measurements of the induced current in a QPC as a function of source-drain voltage, gate voltage, frequency, and magnetic field also show strong evidence for photon-assisted transport. These experiments together demonstrate the general applicability of the THz-TDI technique to the characterization of the dynamic response of any micron or nanometer scale device that exhibits a non-linear I-V characteristic. 133 refs., 49 figs.

  4. Optimal basis set for ab-initio calculations of energy levels in tunneling structures, using the covariance matrix of the wave functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sever Spanulescu

    2009-12-15

    The paper proposes a method to obtain the optimal basis set for solving the self consistent field (SCF) equations for large atomic systems in order to calculate the energy barriers in tunneling structures, with higher accuracy and speed. Taking into account the stochastic-like nature of the samples of all the involved wave functions for many body problems, a statistical optimization is made by considering the covariance matrix of these samples. An eigenvalues system is obtained and solved for the optimal basis set and by inspecting the rapidly decreasing eigenvalues one may seriously reduce the necessary number of vectors that insures an imposed precision. This leads to a potentially significant improvement in the speed of the SCF calculations and accuracy, as the statistical properties of a large number of wave functions in an large spatial domain may be considered. The eigenvalue problem has to be solved only few times, so that the amount of time added may be much smaller that the overall iterating SCF calculations. A simple implementation of the method is presented for a situation where the analytical solution is known, and the results are encouraging.

  5. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    8 Assess California’s Small Gas Storage Water HeaterAssess California’s Small Gas Storage Water Heater Marketassess California’s small gas storage water heater market.

  6. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos/01/2012 Page 1Water Power

  7. Using Renewable Energy to Pump Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, J.; Mecke, M.

    2004-01-01

    electricity for small communities. The most comon wind device used is the American farm and ranch windmil (Fig. 1). These windmils are common on the North American Great Plains and acros the Southwest. A windmill consists of: ?A very large fan with 15 to 40... Water Juan Enciso and Michael Mecke* Wind power Wind is often used as an energy source to operate pumps and supply water to livestock. Because of the large amount of water needed for crops, wind power is rarely used for irrigation. As larger and/or more...

  8. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  9. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,Saving Water Saves Energy James E. McMahon, Camilla Dunhamavailable products. The energy savings associated with water

  10. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    paper describing produced water from production of crudeEmerging Issues Paper: Mine Water Pollution. Dep. Environ.40. Vine G. 2010. Cooling water issues and opportunities at

  11. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01

    with Subantarctic Mode Water. J. Geophys. Res. , 116,Global Climate] Stratospheric water vapor [in “State of the18 2. Total column water

  12. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial...

  13. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    connections between water and energy, advances in knowledgeimportant nexus between water and energy. The demand fortwo reports on the water and energy nexus highlighting the

  14. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,shorter showers). Water- and energy- conserving activitiesstress imposed on limited water (and energy) supplies from

  15. Cool Storage Economic Feasibility Analysis for a Large Industrial Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fazzolari, R.; Mascorro, J. A.; Ballard, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    of Arizona Helicopter Co. Tucson, Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. Mesa. Arizona. ABSTRACT The analysis of economic feasibility for adding a cool storage facility to shift electric demand to off-peak hours for a large industrial facility is presented. DOE-2... thermal storage at McDonnell Douglas Helicopter CO. (MDH) in Mesa, Arimna [I]. MDH is a large assembly plant consisting of eleven air conditioned buildings totalling 2,000.000 square feet of diversified activities. The site has a central chilled water...

  16. Spent Fuel Transportation Package Response to the Baltimore Tunnel Fire Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Bajwa, Christopher S.

    2006-11-15

    On July 18, 2001, a freight train carrying hazardous (non-nuclear) materials derailed and caught fire while passing through the Howard Street railroad tunnel in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), one of the agencies responsible for ensuring the safe transportation of radioactive materials in the United States, undertook an investigation of the train derailment and fire to determine the possible regulatory implications of this particular event for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel by railroad. Shortly after the accident occurred, the USNRC met with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB, the U.S. agency responsible for determining the cause of transportation accidents), to discuss the details of the accident and the ensuing fire. Following these discussions, the USNRC assembled a team of experts from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine the thermal conditions that existed in the Howard Street tunnel fire and analyze the effects of this fire on various spent fuel transportation package designs. The Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) code, developed by NIST, was used to determine the thermal environment present in the Howard Street tunnel during the fire. The FDS results were used as boundary conditions in the COBRA-SFS and ANSYS® computer codes to evaluate the thermal performance of different package designs. The staff concluded that larger transportation packages resembling the HOLTEC Model No. HI STAR 100 and TransNuclear Model No. TN-68 would withstand a fire with thermal conditions similar to those that existed in the Baltimore tunnel fire event with only minor damage to peripheral components. This is due to their sizable thermal inertia and design specifications in compliance with currently imposed regulatory requirements. The staff also concluded that some components of smaller transportation packages resembling the NAC Model No. LWT, despite placement within an ISO container, could degrade. USNRC staff evaluated the radiological consequences of the package responses to the Baltimore tunnel fire. Though components in some packages heated up beyond their service temperatures, the staff determined that there would be no significant dose as a result of the fire for any of these and similar packages.

  17. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  18. Drinking Water Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26

    This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water...

  19. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28

    at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/water/ az9420.pdf. ?Drinking Water Treatment: Distillation.? Nebraska Cooperative Extension. Available at http://ianrpubs. unl.edu/water/g1493.htm. ?Electrodyalisis.? GE Infrastructure Water & Process Technologies. General...

  20. New Constructions and Proof Methods for Large Universe Attribute-Based Encryption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    New Constructions and Proof Methods for Large Universe Attribute-Based Encryption Yannis Rouselakis University of Texas at Austin jrous@cs.utexas.edu Brent Waters University of Texas at Austin bwaters@cs.utexas.edu Abstract We propose two large universe Attribute-Based Encryption constructions. In a large universe ABE