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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Modeling of large aperture third harmonic frequency conversion of high power Nd:glass laser systems  

SciTech Connect

To provide high-energy, high-power beams at short wavelengths for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments, we routinely convert the 1.053-{mu}m output of the Nova, Nd:phosphate-glass, laser system to its third-harmonic wavelength. We describe performance and conversion efficiency modeling of the 3 {times} 3 arrays potassium-dihydrogen-phosphate crystal plates used for type II/type II phase-matched harmonic conversion of Nova 0.74-m diameter beams, and an alternate type I/type II phase-matching configuration that improves the third-harmonic conversion efficiency. These arrays provide energy conversion of up to 65% and intensity conversion to 70%. 19 refs., 11 figs.

Henesian, M.A.; Wegner, P.J.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Laumann, C.W.; Lawson, J.K.; Weiland, T.L.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Use of Large Transparent Ceramics in a High Powered, Diode Pumped Solid State Laser  

SciTech Connect

The advent of large transparent ceramics is one of the key enabling technological advances that have shown that the development of very high average power compact solid state lasers is achievable. Large ceramic neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) amplifier slabs are used in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL), which has achieved world record average output powers in excess of 67 kilowatts. We will describe the attributes of using large transparent ceramics, our present system architecture and corresponding performance; as well as describe our near term future plans.

Yamamoto, R; Bhachu, B; Cutter, K; Fochs, S; Letts, S; Parks, C; Rotter, M; Soules, T

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

3

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, C.A.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, Carl A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Recent Advances in Detailed Chemical Kinetic Models for Large Hydrocarbon and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for these two primary reference fuels for diesel, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Also, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. Methyl decanoate and methyl stearate are large methyl esters that are closely related to biodiesel fuels, and kinetic models for these molecules have also been developed. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the fuel molecule size and structure on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Herbinet, O; Mehl, M

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

7

High-Power Rf Load  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high-power RF load comprises a series of very low Q resonators, or chokes [16], in a circular waveguide [10]. The sequence of chokes absorb the RF power gradually in a short distance while keeping the bandwidth relatively wide. A polarizer [12] at the input end of the load is provided to convert incoming TE.sub.10 mode signals to circularly polarized TE.sub.11 mode signals. Because the load operates in the circularly polarized mode, the energy is uniformly and efficiently absorbed and the load is more compact than a rectangular load. Using these techniques, a load having a bandwidth of 500 MHz can be produced with an average power dissipation level of 1.5 kW at X-band, and a peak power dissipation of 100 MW. The load can be made from common lossy materials, such as stainless steel, and is less than 15 cm in length. These techniques can also produce loads for use as an alternative to ordinary waveguide loads in small and medium RF accelerators, in radar systems, and in other microwave applications. The design is easily scalable to other RF frequencies and adaptable to the use of other lossy materials.

Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Vlieks, Arnold E. (Livermore, CA)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Loss Mechanisms and High Power Piezoelectric Components - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2006 ... Loss Mechanisms and High Power Piezoelectric Components ... we demonstrated high power multilayer piezoelectric transformers with Cu or...

9

CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

Plum, Michael A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

High Power RF Sources for Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes RF sources developed and under development at Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. for driving high power accelerators and colliders. The RF sources range from L-Band to W-Band and power levels from 10s of kilowatts CW to 200 MW pulsed. The configurations include standard klystrons, multiple beam klystrons, sheet beam devices, and gyroklystrons. The basic parameters are presented with a basic description of operation and applications.

Ives, Lawrence; Read, Michael; Neilson, Jeff; Borchard, Philipp; Mizuhara, Max [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., 690 Port Drive, San Mateo, CA 94404 (United States); Lawson, Wesley [Insitute for Research in Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

High-power accelerator technology and requirements  

SciTech Connect

Designs of high-power proton linear accelerators (linacs) for accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) are being actively studied at Los Alamos National Laboratory and at several other laboratories worldwide. Beam parameters cover the 100- to 300-mA range in average current and 800 to 1600 MeV in energy. While ideas for such accelerators have been discussed for decades, the technology base has recently advanced to the point that the feasibility of machines in the ATW power class is now generally conceded. Factors contributing to this advance have been the following: experience gained with medium-power research accelerators, especially the LAMPF linac at Los Alamos; major improvements in the theory and technology of high-intensity high-brightness accelerators fostered by the SDIO Neutral Particle Beam program; and development of high-power continuous-wave (cw) radio-frequency (rf) generators for high-energy colliding-beam rings. The reference ATW accelerator concept described in this paper is based on room-temperature copper accelerating cavities. Advances in superconducting niobium cavity technology have opened the possibility of application to ATW-type linacs. Useful efficiency gains could be realized, especially for lower current systems, and there may be technical advantages as well. Technology issues that need to be addressed for superconducting rf linac designs include the development of high-power rf couplers, appropriate cavity designs, and superconducting focusing elements, as well as concerns about beam damage of niobium structures and dynamic rf control with high beam currents.

Lawrence, G.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Organic nonlinear crystals and high power frequency conversion  

SciTech Connect

We are searching for a new second- and third-harmonic generators among the salts of chiral organic acids and bases. We discuss the relevant properties of crystals from this group of compounds, including their nonlinear and phasematching characteristics, linear absorption, damage threshold and crystal growth. In addition, we summarize what is known concerning other nonlinear optical properties of these crystals, such as two-photon absorption, nonlinear refractive index, and stimulated Raman thresholds. A preliminary assessment is made of the potential of these materials for use in future high power, large aperture lasers such as those used for inertial confinement fusion experiments. 14 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Velsko, S.P.; Davis, L.; Wang, F.; Monaco, S.; Eimerl, D.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

High power, high frequency, vacuum flange  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

CLIC RF High Power Production Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and generate RF power for the main linac accelerating structure. The demands on the high power production ({approx} 150 MW) and the needs to transport the 100 A drive beam for about 1 km without losses, makes the PETS design rather unique and the operation very challenging. In the coming year, an intense PETS testing program will be implemented. The target is to demonstrate the full performance of the PETS operation. The testing program overview and test results available to date are presented.

Syratchev, I.; Riddone, G.; /CERN; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

15

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect

n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for both primary reference fuels, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Additionally, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the aforementioned fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

High-Power Options for LANSCE  

SciTech Connect

The LANSCE linear accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory has a long history of successful beam operations at 800 kW. We have recently studied options for restoration of high-power operations including approaches for increasing the performance to multi-MW levels. In this paper we will discuss the results of this study including the present limitations of the existing accelerating structures at LANSCE, and the high-voltage and RF systems that drive them. Several options will be discussed and a preferred option will be presented that will enable the first in a new generation of scientific facilities for the materials community. The emphasis of this new facility is 'Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes' (MaRIE) which will be used to discover and design the advanced materials needed to meet 21st century national security and energy security challenges.

Garnett, Robert W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Water Cooling of High Power Light Emitting Diode Henrik Srensen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Cooling of High Power Light Emitting Diode Henrik Sørensen Department of Energy Technology and product lifetime. The high power Light Emitting Diodes (LED) belongs to the group of electronics

Sørensen, Henrik

18

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the researchers reported the first observation of seeding an instability of the electron beam by the laser, and they presented a physical model that shows how this occurs under the proper conditions. Such a mechanism makes it possible to control the instability onset and to exploit its gain for the generation of pulses of terahertz CSR of unprecedented power. Terahertz radiation with a wavelength from about 1 cm to about 100 microns between the microwave and the infrared would provide access to a large number of fundamental phenomena. To mention only some of them: excited electrons orbit, small molecules rotate, proteins vibrate, superconducting energy gaps resonate, and gaseous and solid-state plasmas oscillate at terahertz frequencies. But generating terahertz radiation is ordinarily a challenging task for any kind of source, including storage-ring-based synchrotron light sources. The new findings by the ALS group could represent a significant step toward satisfying the need for powerful terahertz sources.

19

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the researchers reported the first observation of seeding an instability of the electron beam by the laser, and they presented a physical model that shows how this occurs under the proper conditions. Such a mechanism makes it possible to control the instability onset and to exploit its gain for the generation of pulses of terahertz CSR of unprecedented power. Terahertz radiation with a wavelength from about 1 cm to about 100 microns between the microwave and the infrared would provide access to a large number of fundamental phenomena. To mention only some of them: excited electrons orbit, small molecules rotate, proteins vibrate, superconducting energy gaps resonate, and gaseous and solid-state plasmas oscillate at terahertz frequencies. But generating terahertz radiation is ordinarily a challenging task for any kind of source, including storage-ring-based synchrotron light sources. The new findings by the ALS group could represent a significant step toward satisfying the need for powerful terahertz sources.

20

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

22

High power linear pulsed beam annealer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

Strathman, Michael D. (Concord, CA); Sadana, Devendra K. (Berkeley, CA); True, Richard B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Improved Collectors for High Power Gyrotrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power gyrotrons are used for electron cyclotron heating, current drive and parasitic mode suppression in tokamaks for fusion energy research. These devices are crucial for successful operation of many research programs around the world, including the ITER program currently being constructed in France. Recent gyrotron failures resulted from cyclic fatigue of the copper material used to fabricated the collectors. The techniques used to collect the spent beam power is common in many gyrotrons produced around the world. There is serious concern that these tubes may also be at risk from cyclic fatigue. This program addresses the cause of the collector failure. The Phase I program successfully demonstrated feasibility of a mode of operation that eliminates the cyclic operation that caused the failure. It also demonstrated that new material can provide increased lifetime under cyclic operation that could increase the lifetime by more than on order of magnitude. The Phase II program will complete that research and develop a collector that eliminates the fatigue failures. Such a design would find application around the world.

R. Lawrence Ives, Amarjit Singh, Michael Read, Philipp Borchard, Jeff Neilson

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

The JLab high power ERL light source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made concerning the physics performance, design optimization, and operational limitations of such a first generation high power ERL light source.

G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

2005-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

High Power Performance Lithium Ion Battery - Energy Innovation Portal  

... Optimization of Acetylene Black Conductive Additive and Polyvinylidene Fluoride Composition for high Power Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Cells, The 211th ...

27

High-power semiconductor separate-confinement double heterostructure lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The review is devoted to high-power semiconductor lasers. Historical reference is presented, physical and technological foundations are considered, and the concept of high-power semiconductor lasers is formulated. Fundamental and technological reasons limiting the optical power of a semiconductor laser are determined. The results of investigations of cw and pulsed high-power semiconductor lasers are presented. Main attention is paid to inspection of the results of experimental studies of single high-power semiconductor lasers. The review is mainly based on the data obtained in the laboratory of semiconductor luminescence and injection emitters at the A.F. Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute. (review)

Tarasov, I S [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Device Fabrication Method for High Power Density Capacitors  

Device Fabrication Method for High Power Density Capacitors Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual ...

29

Diagnostics and steady-state high power operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TORE SUPRA has now been upgraded to handle high power plasmas for very long duration. It came back into operation in 2001

Clment Laviron; and the Tore Supra Team

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Available Technologies: High Power Performance Lithium Ion Battery  

Cell 1, which has the highest binder (PVDF) to acetylene black ratio, displays the most favorable discharge ASI. Lithium ion batteries with high power ...

31

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in...

32

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring...

33

New Concepts For High Power ICRF Antennas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents new concepts for Ion Cyclotron Heating antennas based on cascaded sequences of tuned radiating structures. It is shown that, in large arrays, such as the ones proposed for fusion reactors applications, these schemes offer, in principle, a number of desirable features, such as operation at power density significantly higher than currently adopted systems, at equal maximum voltage and array geometry, simple mechanical layout, suitable for water cooling, a compact impedance tuning system, passive decoupling of the array elements, single ended or balanced feed from two power sources. The antenna layout also allows the remote, real time measurement of the complex impedance of the radiating elements and the detection, location, and measurement of the complex admittance of arcs occurring anywhere in the structure, as discussed in [1].

Bosia, G. [Department of Physics University of Turin (Italy)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

34

High Frequency High Power RF Generation using a Relativistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FREQUENCY HIGH POWER RF GENERATION USING A RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON BEAM C. Jing , S. Antipov, P. Schoessow, and A. Kanareykin, Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, OH-44139 J.G. Power, M....

35

Functionalized High Voltage Spinel Composite for High Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with high working voltage and long cycle life makes it become the one of most promising cathode for high power delivery.

36

Quasi-optical mode converter for high power gyrotron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gyrotrons are microwave / millimeter wave devices capable to deliver megawatt level continuous power at a frequency range up to 170GHz. The critical design issues for a high power gyrotrons are: (1) Magnetron injection Gun (2) Cavity with proper mode ...

B. K. Shukla; Dhiraj Bora

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Innovative fuel designs for high power density pressurized water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the ways to lower the cost of nuclear energy is to increase the power density of the reactor core. Features of fuel design that enhance the potential for high power density are derived based on characteristics of ...

Feng, Dandong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Design of annular fuel for high power density BWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enabling high power density in the core of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is economically profitable for existing or new reactors. In this work, we examine the potential for increasing the power density in BWR plants by ...

Morra, Paolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(ANL) Developed in: Current Result of NP research: Spin-off of high power driver linac R&D for the FRIB project Application currently being supported by: DOE Office of Nuclear...

40

Applications of high power millimeter waves in the DIII-D fusion program  

SciTech Connect

First operation of a new generation of MW level, 110 GHz generator (gyrotron) on the DIII-D fusion experimental device has been achieved. The desire for high power, cw millimeter (mm) wave sources to support fusion research and development is just now beginning to be realized. Plasma heating and current drive with directed mm waves rely on the strong absorption achieved when the wave frequency matches the natural ``cyclotron`` frequency of electrons in a magnetic field, or its harmonics. Recent progress in fusion experiments highlights the need for control of the interior details of the hot plasma, and nun wave systems are ideally suited for this role. A brief status of fusion research is given, and the importance of mm waves in the future directions for fusion research is described. The vacuum transmission components necessary for transmitting, monitoring, and launching high power 1 10 GHz waves into a plasma have been developed at General Atomics (GA) and will be described. High power mm waves have a number of attractive technological features for fusion applications compared with other candidate plasma heating and current drive technologies. Millimeter waves can be transmitted with high power density over large distances with low losses by utilizing corrugated waveguides, so the generators can be sited remotely, facilitating maintenance and saving valuable space near the fusion device.

Freeman, R.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High Power Electrodynamics (HPE): Accelerator Operations and Technology,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTACTS CONTACTS Group Leader Bruce Carlsten Deputy Group Leader Ellen Guenette Administrator Josephine (Jo) Torres High-Power Electrodynamics (HPE) The High-Power Electrodynamics (AOT-HPE) Group applies accelerator and beam technologies to national-security-directed energy missions. AOT-HPE has three programmatic thrusts: free-electron lasers (FELs), high-power microwaves (HPM), and compact radiography. To maintain a vigorous and robust technical base for addressing DOE and DoD needs, the group's project portfolio is balanced between exploratory research, infrastructure development, and programmatic deliverables for sponsors. Funding is roughly 25% from the Lab's Directed Research and Development Program, 65% from DoD, and 10% from DOE. Technology Focus Areas AOT-HPE is the Laboratory's main vehicle for applying accelerator-based technologies to directed-energy mission needs. The group recognizes that many directed-energy missions are enabled by compact high-brightness electron accelerators and mm-wave and THz technologies.

42

Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

Nguyen-Tuong, Viet (Seaford, VA); Dylla, III, Henry Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

44

Using a Balun Transformer Combiner for High Power Microwave Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel coaxial power combiner design has been duplicated that has distinct advantages over other combiner geometries that can handle high power. This design is being applied to combine four 3 kW power supplies to obtain a 10 kW, 5 MHz system for an ICRF antenna on HSX. In the past, Wilkinson type combiners have had limited application to high power systems because of the lack of non-inductive, high power, 100 Omega balance loads. With this new design, standard 50 Omega dummy loads can be used instead for the balance load. The cost is considerably lower than lumped element combiner designs which are dominated by capacitor costs. At such a relatively low frequency, a 3-dB quarter-wave coupled-line coupler becomes impractically long, and a conventional branch-line hybrid requires 35 Omega-line, which is commercially unavailable. The balun combiner uses less transmission line than a ring hybrid and has good bandwidth characteristics even away from its best line impedance. Theoretical calculations and modeling were performed for line impedances from 65 Omega to 75 Omega. Measurements from a low-power test device show excellent agreement with theory, and construction of the high power system is underway.

Kaufman, Michael C [ORNL; Pesavento, Philip V [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Transmutation and energy-production with high power accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator-driven transmutation offers attractive new solutions to complex nuclear problems. This paper outlines the basics of the technology, summarizes the key application areas, and discusses designs of and performance issues for the high-power proton accelerators that are required.

Lawrence, G.P.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Thin liquid lithium targets for high power density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin liquid lithium targets for high power density applications: heavy ion beam strippers and beta Hilton Malmö City #12;Outline Liquid Lithium Stripper idea for FRIB Brief theory of film stability Thickness measurement results Next Steps Beta-beams 2 #12;Liquid Lithium Stripper for FRIB: Advantages

McDonald, Kirk

47

A high-power L-band RF window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June. 2001. [3] "700 MHz Window R&D at LBNL", R. Rimmer et.Testing of PEP-II RF Cavity Windows", M. Neubauer et. al. ,A HIGH-POWER L-BAND RF WINDOW* R.A. Rimmer , G. Koehler,

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Low cost high power GaSB photovoltaic cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power density and high capacity factor are important attributes of a thermophotovoltaics (TPV) system and GaSb cells are enabling for TPV systems. A TPV cogeneration unit at an off grid site will compliment solar arrays producing heat and electricity on cloudy days with the solar arrays generating electricity on sunny days. Herein

Lewis M. Fraas; Han X. Huang; Shi-Zhong Ye; She Hui; James Avery; Russell Ballantyne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Low cost high power GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power density and high capacity factor are important attributes of a TPV system and GaSb cells are enabling for TPV systems. A TPV cogeneration unit at an off grid site will compliment solar arrays producing heat and electricity on cloudy days with the solar arrays generating electricity on sunny days. Herein

Lewis M. Fraas; Han X. Huang; Shi-Zhong Ye; James Avery; Russell Ballantyne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities Tobias K be photobleached before final sample preparation. The instrument consists of high power light emitting diodes

Kaufman, Laura

51

LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

COLLECTIVE EVIDENCE FOR INVERSE COMPTON EMISSION FROM EXTERNAL PHOTONS IN HIGH-POWER BLAZARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first collective evidence that Fermi-detected jets of high kinetic power (L{sub kin}) are dominated by inverse Compton emission from upscattered external photons. Using a sample with a broad range in orientation angle, including radio galaxies and blazars, we find that very high power sources (L{sub kin} > 10{sup 45.5} erg s{sup -1}) show a significant increase in the ratio of inverse Compton to synchrotron power (Compton dominance) with decreasing orientation angle, as measured by the radio core dominance and confirmed by the distribution of superluminal speeds. This increase is consistent with beaming expectations for external Compton (EC) emission, but not for synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. For the lowest power jets (L{sub kin} < 10{sup 43.5} erg s{sup -1}), no trend between Compton and radio core dominance is found, consistent with SSC. Importantly, the EC trend is not seen for moderately high power flat spectrum radio quasars with strong external photon fields. Coupled with the evidence that jet power is linked to the jet speed, this finding suggests that external photon fields become the dominant source of seed photons in the jet comoving frame only for the faster and therefore more powerful jets.

Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanni [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Georganopoulos, Markos [Department of Physics, Joint Center for Astrophysics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Lister, Matthew L. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Power Superconducting Continuous Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions

54

Understanding High-Power Fiber-Optic Laser Beam Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Power Fiber-Optic Laser Beam Delivery High-Power Fiber-Optic Laser Beam Delivery The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. W- 31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. Boyd V. Hunter and Keng H. Leong Argonne National Laboratory Technology Development Division Laser Applications Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 207 Argonne, Illinois 60439 Carl B. Miller, James F. Golden, Robert D. Glesias and Patrick J. Laverty U. S. Laser Corporation 825 Windham Court North P. O. Box 609 Wyckoff, New Jersey 07481 March 25, 1996 Manuscript to be submitted to Journal of Laser Applications

55

High Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of switch for modulation of the Q-factor of a multi-mode storage resonator in a high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described. The operating principle of the switch is based on a sharp increase in the TE{sub 02{yields}}TE{sub 01} coupling coefficient, when an electron beam is injected into the switch cavity. The switch was tested at low power level in a compressor operated at X-band. A power gain of 19-20 in the compressed pulse with pulse duration of 40-50 ns was achieved. The proposed switch shows good prospects for use in high-power active pulse compressors.

Ivanov, O. A.; Vikharev, A. L. [Institute of Applied Physics RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603600 (Russian Federation); Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Isaev, V. A.; Lobaev, M. A. [Institute of Applied Physics RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603600 (Russian Federation); Hirshfield, J. L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

56

Towards Quantitative Simulations of High Power Proton Cyclotrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PSI operates a cyclotron based high intensity proton accelerator routinely at an average beam power of 1.3MW. With this power the facility is at the worldwide forefront of high intensity proton accelerators. The beam current is practically limited by losses at extraction and the resulting activation of accelerator components. Further intensity upgrades and new projects aiming at an even higher average beam power, are only possible if the relative losses can be lowered in proportion, thus keeping absolute losses at a constant level. Maintaining beam losses at levels allowing hands-on maintenance is a primary challenge in any high power proton machine design and operation. In consequence, predicting beam halo at these levels is a great challenge and will be addressed in this paper. High power hadron driver have being used in many disciplines of science and, a growing interest in the cyclotron technology for high power hadron drivers are being observed very recently. This report will briefly introduce OPAL, a tool for precise beam dynamics simulations including 3D space charge. One of OPAL's flavors (OPAL-cycl) is dedicated to high power cyclotron modeling and is explained in greater detail. We then explain how to obtain initial conditions for our PSI Ring cyclotron which still delivers the world record in beam power of 1.3 MW continuous wave (cw). Several crucial steps are explained necessary to be able to predict tails at the level of 3\\sigma ... 4\\sigma in the PSI Ring cyclotron. We compare our results at the extraction with measurements, obtained with a 1.18 MW cw production beam. Based on measurement data, we develop a simple linear model to predict beam sizes of the extracted beam as a function of intensities and confirm the model with simulations.

Y. J. Bi; A. Adelmann; R. Dlling; M. Humbel; W. Joho; M. Seidel; T. J. Zhang

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

High-power regenerative Nd-phosphate glass amplifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact high-power regenerative Nd-phosphate glass amplifier is described which incorporates spatial filtering and full image relay techniques. Output energies up to 1.2 J at a pulse duration of 140 +- 10 psec (FWHM) and 3 J at 900 +- 70 psec (FWHM) are achieved in a smooth nearly flattop beam intensity profile. Even with present-day technology, this system could be scaled into a terawatt regime.

Roschger, E.W.; Balmer, J.E.

1985-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Method and apparatus for tuning high power lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to high power gas lasers that are adapted to be tuned to a desired lasing wavelength through the use of a gas cell to lower the gain at a natural lasing wavelength and "seeding" the laser with a beam from a low power laser which is lasing at the desired wavelength. This tuning is accomplished with no loss of power and produces a pulse with an altered pulse shape. It is potentially applicable to all gas lasers.

Hutchinson, Donald P. (Knoxville, TN); Vandersluis, Kenneth L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1977-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

59

Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Mountain View, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measurement and modeling of mirror distortion in a high power FEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mirror heating in a high power FEL can alter the optical mode and affect the gain of the laser. This can lead to a large reduction of the laser power from ideal values. Measurements of the power and mode size in the Jefferson Lab IR Demo laser have shown clear evidence of mirror distortion at high average power leading (up to 17 kW incident on the mirrors and over 40 W absorbed per mirror). The measurements and comparisons with modeling will be presented. Both steady state and transient analyses and measurements are considered.

Benson, S.; Neil, G.; Michelle D. Shinn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - ??165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

High power variable couplers for ladder and spoke type resonators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting RF structures such as spoke resonators [1] have been developed which will accelerate very low velocity ions. This opens up the possibility for the use of these resonators in high power proton accelerators at energies as low as the output energies of typical RFQs. Most similar resonators have been used for the acceleration of ions requiring only low RF power input. In new applications such as for the Accelerator Transmutation of Nuclear Wastes (ATW) and Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), higher RF power will be required because of the larger beam currents. This paper discusses some higher power variable coupler concepts that could be used with these structures.

Spalek, G. (George); Kuzminski, J. (Jozef)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

High-power pulse modulator with ignitron discharger  

SciTech Connect

The high-power pulse modulator described here is used to produce spatial gaseous discharges and has an improved, controllable charging circuit, which permits a type ITR-4 ignitron discharger to be employed in a frequency mode as the basic commutator. The modulator is utilized in two modes: at a pulse repetition frequency of 50 Hz pulses are formed that have a duration of 25 usec and energies up to 3.5 kJ and at a frequency of 200 Hz, the pulses have a duration of -2 usec and energies up to 600 J. In all conditions the modulator operated stably with a wide range of load changes.

Anisimova, T.E.; Akkuratov, E.V.; Artemov, V.A.; Gromovenko, V.M.; Kalinin, V.P.; Nikonov, V.P.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Screening report on cell materials for high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Battery Technology Department at Argonne National Laboratory is a major participant in the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Development (ATD) program. This multi-national laboratory program is dedicated to improving lithium-ion batteries for high-power HEV and FCEV applications. As part of the FreedomCAR Partnership, this program is addressing the three key barriers for high-power lithium-ion batteries: calendar life, abuse tolerance, and cost. All three of these barriers can be addressed by the choice of materials used in the cell chemistry. To date, the ATD program has developed two high-power cell chemistries, denoted our Gen 1 and Gen 2 cell chemistries. The selection of materials for use in the Gen 2 cell chemistry was based largely on reducing material cost and extending cell calendar life, relative to our Gen 1 cell chemistry. Table 1 provides a list of the materials used in our Gen 2 cell chemistry and their projected costs, when produced in large-scale quantities. In evaluating advanced materials, we have focused our efforts on materials that are lower cost than those listed in Table 1, while simultaneously offering enhanced chemical, structural, and thermal stability. Therefore, we have focused on natural graphite anode materials (having round-edge particle morphologies), cathode materials that contain more Mn and less Co and Ni (which can be produced via low-cost processes), lower cost electrode binders and/or binders that possess superior bonding properties at lower concentrations, and lower cost salts and solvents (with superior thermal and oxidation/reduction stability) for use in the electrolyte. The purpose of this report is to document the results of screening tests that were performed on a large number of advanced low-cost materials. These materials were screened for their potential to impact positively on the calendar life, safety, and/or cost of high-power lithium-ion cell chemistries, relative to our Gen 2 cell chemistry. As part of this effort, we developed and employed a set of standard test protocols to evaluate all of the materials. After brief descriptions of the screening test methodologies and equipment, relevant data on each material are summarized in the body of this report. We have evaluated five categories of materials, and the report is organized accordingly. Results will be presented on advanced carbons for anodes, improved cathode materials, new salts and solvent systems, alternative binders, and novel separators.

Liu, J.; Kahaian, A.; Belharouak, I.; Kang, S.; Oliver, S.; Henriksen, S.; Amine, K.

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

65

Application of High Powered Lasers to Perforated Completions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Congress on Applications of Laser & Electro-Optics Congress on Applications of Laser & Electro-Optics October 13 - 16, 2003, Jacksonville, Florida Application of High Powered Lasers to Perforated Completions Zhiyue Xu, Claude B. Reed and Keng H. Leong Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 R. A. Parker Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, 6346 Secrest Street, Arvada, CO 80403 R. M. Graves, Petroleum Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 ABSTRACT As part of the process of drilling an oil or gas well, a steel production casing is often inserted to the bottom of the well and sealed with cement against the productive formation. Openings must be made through the steel casing wall and cement and into the rock formation to allow formation fluid to enter the well. Conventionally, a perforator is

66

Computer Study of Isotope Production in High Power Accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods for radionuclide production calculation in a high power proton accelerator have been developed and applied to study production of 22 isotopes by high-energy protons and neutrons. These methods are readily applicable to accelerator, and reactor, environments other than the particular model we considered and to the production of other radioactive and stable isotopes. We have also developed methods for evaluating cross sections from a wide variety of sources into a single cross section set and have produced an evaluated library covering about a third of all natural elements. These methods also are applicable to an expanded set of reactions. A 684 page detailed report on this study, with 37 tables and 264 color figures is available on the Web at http://t2.lanl.gov/publications/publications.html, or, if not accessible, in hard copy from the authors.

Van Riper, K A; Wilson, W B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

High Power SiC Modules for HEVs and PHEVs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With efforts to reduce the cost, size, and thermal management systems for the power electronics drivetrain in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), wide band gap semiconductors including silicon carbide (SiC) have been identified as possibly being a partial solution. Research on SiC power electronics has shown their higher efficiency compared to Si power electronics due to significantly lower conduction and switching losses. This paper focuses on the development of a high power module based on SiC JFETs and Schottky diodes. Characterization of a single device, a module developed using the same device, and finally an inverter built using the modules is presented. When tested at moderate load levels compared to the inverter rating, an efficiency of 98.2% was achieved by the initial prototype.

Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Zhang, Hui [ORNL; Han, Jung H [ORNL; Barlow, Fred D. [University of Idaho; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Zero-switching-loss inverters for high-power applications  

SciTech Connect

The development of zero-switching-loss inverters has attracted much interest for industrial applications. The resonant dc link inverter (RDCLI) provides a simple and robust approach for realizing switching frequencies >20 kHz in multi-kilowatt systems but impresses substantial voltage stress (-- 2.5 supply voltage) across the devices. Two alternate topologies for realizing zero switching losses in high-power converters are proposed. The actively clamped resonant dc-link inverter (ACRLI) uses the concept of a lossless active clamp to restrict voltage stresses to only 1.3-1.5 supply voltage (V/sub s/) while maintaining a mode of operation similar to the RDCLI. For applications demanding substantially superior spectral performance, the resonant pole inverter (RPI), also called the quasi-resonant current mode inverter (QRCMI), is proposed as a viable topology. Detailed analysis, simulation, and experimental results are presented to verify operation principles of both power converters.

Divan, D.M.; Skibinski, G. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

High power windows for WR650 waveguide couplers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the robust, pre-stressed planar window concept successfully tested for PEP II and LEDA, a new design for planar ceramic windows to be used with WR650 waveguide fundamental power couplers at 1300 MHz or 1500 MHz has been developed. These windows should operate in pulsed or CW mode and sustain at least 100 kW average power levels. This paper describes an overview of the simulations performed to match the ceramics in WR650 waveguides, design details, as well as the RF measurements and performance assessed by RF power tests on several high power windows manufactured at JLAB. Funding Agency: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177, and by The Office of Naval Research under contract to the Dept. of Energy.

Mircea Stirbet; Robert Rimmer; Thomas Elliott; Edward Daly; Katherine Wilson; Lynn Vogel; Haipeng Wang; Brian Carpenter; Karl Smith; Thomas Powers; Michael Drury; Robert Nichols; G. Davis

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Computer Study of Isotope Production in High Power Accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods for radionuclide production calculation in a high power proton accelerator have been developed and applied to study production of 22 isotopes by high-energy protons and neutrons. These methods are readily applicable to accelerator, and reactor, environments other than the particular model we considered and to the production of other radioactive and stable isotopes. We have also developed methods for evaluating cross sections from a wide variety of sources into a single cross section set and have produced an evaluated library covering about a third of all natural elements. These methods also are applicable to an expanded set of reactions. A 684 page detailed report on this study, with 37 tables and 264 color figures is available on the Web at http://t2.lanl.gov/publications/publications.html, or, if not accessible, in hard copy from the authors.

K. A. Van Riper; S. G. Mashnik; W. B. Wilson

1999-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

71

High power battery test methods for hybrid vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commonly used EV battery tests are not very suitable for testing hybrid vehicle batteries, which may be primarily intended to supply vehicle acceleration power. The capacity of hybrid vehicle batteries will be relatively small, they will typically operate over a restricted range of states-of-charge, and they may seldom if ever be fully recharged. Further, hybrid propulsion system designs will commonly impose a higher regeneration content than is typical for electric vehicles. New test methods have been developed for use in characterizing battery performance and life for hybrid vehicle use. The procedures described in this paper were developed from the requirements of the government-industry cooperative Partnership for A New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program; however, they are expected to have broad application to the testing of energy storage devices for hybrid vehicles. The most important performance measure for a high power battery is its pulse power capability as a function of state-of-charge for both discharge and regeneration pulses. It is also important to characterize cycle life, although the {open_quote}cycles{close_quote} involved are quite different from the conventional full-discharge, full-recharge cycle commonly used for EV batteries, This paper illustrates in detail several test profiles which have been selected for PNGV battery testing, along with some sample results and lessons learned to date from the use of these test profiles. The relationship between the PNGV energy storage requirements and these tests is described so that application of the test methods can be made to other hybrid vehicle performance requirements as well. The resulting test procedures can be used to characterize the pulse power capability of high power energy storage devices including batteries and ultracapacitors, as well as the life expectancy of such devices, for either power assist or dual mode hybrid propulsion system designs.

Hunt, G.L.; Haskins, H.; Heinrich, B.; Sutula, R.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Title The Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Publication Type Journal...

73

High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel  

SciTech Connect

We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q{sub 0} of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons.

Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device  

SciTech Connect

The project conducted under DOE contract DE?EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven?stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy? technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling?up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke? unlimited Power Take?Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Dufera, Hiz [Project Manager] [Project Manager; Montagna, Deb [Business Point of Contact] [Business Point of Contact

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of a high-power lithium-ion battery.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Safety is a key concern for a high-power energy storage system such as will be required in a hybrid vehicle. Present lithium-ion technology, which uses a carbon/graphite negative electrode, lacks inherent safety for two main reasons: (1) carbon/graphite intercalates lithium at near lithium potential, and (2) there is no end-of-charge indicator in the voltage profile that can signal the onset of catastrophic oxygen evolution from the cathode (LiCoO{sub 2}). Our approach to solving these safety/life problems is to replace the graphite/carbon negative electrode with an electrode that exhibits stronger two-phase behavior further away from lithium potential, such as Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. Cycle-life and pulse-power capability data are presented in accordance with the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) test procedures, as well as a full-scale design based on a spreadsheet model.

Jansen, A. N.

1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

76

RF coupler for high-power CW FEL photoinjector  

SciTech Connect

A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. The design presently under way is a 100-mA 2.5-cell {pi}-mode, 700-MHz, normal conducting demonstration CW RF photoinjector. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating 3 nC per bunch with an emittance at the wiggler less than 10 mm-mrad. The paper presents results for the RF coupling from ridged wave guides to hte photoinjector RF cavity. The LEDA and SNS couplers inspired this 'dog-bone' design. Electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system has been performed using both 2-D and 3-D frequency-domain calculations, and a novel time-domain approach with MicroWave Studio. These simulations were used to adjust the coupling coefficient and calculate the power-loss distribution on the coupling slot. The cooling of this slot is a rather challenging thermal management project.

Kurennoy, S. (Sergey); Young, L. M. (Lloyd M.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Discharge Physics of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering  

SciTech Connect

High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is pulsed sputtering where the peak power exceeds the time-averaged power by typically two orders of magnitude. The peak power density, averaged over the target area, can reach or exceed 107 W/m2, leading to plasma conditions that make ionization of the sputtered atoms very likely. A brief review of HIPIMS operation is given in a tutorial manner, illustrated by some original data related to the self-sputtering of niobium in argon and krypton. Emphasis is put on the current-voltage-time relationships near the threshold of self-sputtering runaway. The great variety of current pulse shapes delivers clues on the very strong gas rarefaction, self-sputtering runaway conditions, and the stopping of runaway due to the evolution of atom ionization and ion return probabilities as the gas plasma is replaced by metal plasma. The discussions are completed by considering instabilities and the special case of ?gasless? self-sputtering.

Anders, Andre

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

78

High power linear pulsed beam annealer. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high power pulsed electron beam system for annealing semiconductors is comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid and focus ring for confining the pulsed beam of electrons to a predetermined area, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube and an annular Faraday shield between the focus ring and the drift tube are maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring, thereby eliminating space charge limitations on the emission of electrons from said gun. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube. The magnetic field produced by the coil around the curved tube imparts motion to electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. It also produces a scalloped profile of the electron beam. A second drift tube spaced a predetermined distance from the curved tube is positioned with its axis aligned with the axis of the first drift tube. The second drift tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage between the cathode voltage and the curved tube voltage to decelerate the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube, maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube. The magnetic field of the second coil comprises the electron beam to the area of the semiconductor on the target holder.

Strathman, M.D.; Sadana, D.K.; True, R.B.

1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Uniform irradiation of adjustable target spots in high-power laser driver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For smoothing and shaping the on-target laser patterns flexibly in high-power laser drivers, a scheme has been developed that includes a zoom lens array and two-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). The size of the target pattern can be controlled handily by adjusting the focal length of the zoom lens array, while the profile of the pattern can be shaped by fine tuning the distance between the target and the focal plane of the principal focusing lens. High-frequency stripes inside the pattern caused by beamlet interference are wiped off by spectral dispersion. Detailed simulations indicate that SSD works somewhat differently for spots of different sizes. For small spots, SSD mainly smooths the intensity modulation of low-to-middle spatial frequency, while for large spots, SSD sweeps the fine speckle structure to reduce nonuniformity of middle-to-high frequency. Spatial spectra of the target patterns are given and their uniformity is evaluated.

Jiang Xiujuan; Li Jinghui; Li Huagang; Li Yang; Lin Zunqi

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Application of high powered lasers to drilling and completing deep walls.  

SciTech Connect

High powered laser rock drilling was studied as a revolutionary method for drilling and completing deep gas and oil wells. The objectives of this 2002 to 2003 fiscal year research were to study the concept that large diameter holes can be created by multiple overlapping small beam spots, to determine the ability of lasers to drill rock submerged to some depth in water, to demonstrate the possibilities of lasers for perforating application, and to determine the wavelength effects on rock removal. Laser technology applied to well drilling and completion operations is attractive because it has the potential to reduce drilling time, create a ceramic lining that may eliminate the need for steel casing, provide additional monitor-on-drilling laser sensors and improve well performance through improved perforation. The results from this research will help engineering design on a laser-based well drilling system.

Reed, C. B.; Xu, Z.; Parker, R. A.; Gahan, B. C.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Deeg, W.

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optimization Studies for ISOL Type High-Powered Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research studied one-step and two-step Isotope Separation on Line (ISOL) targets for future radioactive beam facilities with high driver-beam power through advanced computer simulations. As a target material uranium carbide in the form of foils was used because of increasing demand for actinide targets in rare-isotope beam facilities and because such material was under development in ISAC at TRIUMF when this project started. Simulations of effusion were performed for one-step and two step targets and the effects of target dimensions and foil matrix were studied. Diffusion simulations were limited by availability of diffusion parameters for UCx material at reduced density; however, the viability of the combined diffusion?effusion simulation methodology was demonstrated and could be used to extract physical parameters such as diffusion coefficients and effusion delay times from experimental isotope release curves. Dissipation of the heat from the isotope-producing targets is the limiting factor for high-power beam operation both for the direct and two-step targets. Detailed target models were used to simulate proton beam interactions with the targets to obtain the fission rates and power deposition distributions, which were then applied in the heat transfer calculations to study the performance of the targets. Results indicate that a direct target, with specification matching ISAC TRIUMF target, could operate in 500-MeV proton beam at beam powers up to ~40 kW, producing ~8 1013 fission/s with maximum temperature in UCx below 2200 C. Targets with larger radius allow higher beam powers and fission rates. For the target radius in the range 9-mm to 30-mm the achievable fission rate increases almost linearly with target radius, however, the effusion delay time also increases linearly with target radius.

Remec, Igor [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Ronningen, Reginald Martin [Michigan State University] [Michigan State University

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

Development of high-power gyrotrons with gradually tapered cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In high power gyrotrons, the parasitic modes coupled with the operating mode cannot be avoided in the beam-wave interaction. These parasitic modes will decrease the efficiency of the gyrotrons. The purity of the operating mode affected by different tapers should be carefully studied. The steady-state self-consistent nonlinear theory for gyrotron with gradually tapered cavity is developed in this paper. A steady-state calculation code including 'cold cavity' and 'hot cavity' is designed. By comparison, a time-domain model analysis of gyrotron operation is also studied by particle-in-cell (PIC). It is found that the tapers of gyrotron have different influences on the modes coupling between the operating mode and the parasitic modes. During the study, an example of 94 GHz gyrotron with pure operating mode TE{sub 03} has been designed. The purity of the operating mode in the optimized cavity is up to -77 dB, and in output waveguide of the cavity is up to -76 dB. At the same time, the beam-wave interaction in the designed cavity has been simulated, too. An output power of 120 kW, corresponding to 41.6% efficiency and an oscillation frequency of 94.099 GHz have been achieved with a 50 kV, 6 A helical electron beam at a guiding magnetic field of 3.5485 T. The results show that the power in spurious modes of the optimized cavity may be kept far below than that of the traditional tapered cavity.

Lei Chaojun [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); The Chinese People's Armed Police Force Academy, Langfang 065000 (China); Yu Sheng; Niu Xinjian; Liu Yinghui; Li Hongfu; Li Xiang [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Capacitive charging system for high power battery charging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes a project to design, build, demonstrate, and document a Level 3 capacitive charging system, and it will be based on the existing PEZIC prototype capacitive coupler. The capacitive coupler will be designed to transfer power at a maximum of 600 kW, and it will transfer power by electric fields. The power electronics will transfer power at 100 kW. The coupler will be designed to function with future increases in the power electronics output power and increases in the amp/hours capacity of sealed batteries. Battery charging algorithms will be programmed into the control electronics. The finished product will be a programmable battery charging system capable of transferring 100 kW via a capacitive coupler. The coupler will have a low power loss of less than 25 watts when transferring 240 kW (400 amps). This system will increase the energy efficiency of high power battery charging, and it will enhance mobility by reducing coupler failures. The system will be completely documented. An important deliverable of this project is information. The information will be distributed to the Army`s TACOM-TARDEC`s Advanced Concept Group, and it will be distributed to commercial organizations by the Society of Automotive Engineers. The information will be valuable for product research, development, and specification. The capacitive charging system produced in this project will be of commercial value for future electric vehicles. The coupler will be designed to rapid charge batteries that have a capacity of several thousand amp/hours at hundreds of volts. The charging system built here will rapid charge batteries with several hundred amp/hours capacity, depending on the charging voltage.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

An evolutionary fuel assembly design for high power density BWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An evolutionary BWR fuel assembly design was studied as a means to increase the power density of current and future BWR cores. The new assembly concept is based on replacing four traditional assemblies and large water gap ...

Karahan, Aydin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

High-power testing of PEP-II RF cavity windows  

SciTech Connect

We describe the high power testing of RF cavity windows for the PEP-II B factory. The window is designed for continuous operation at 476 MHz with up to 500 kW throughput and has been tested to full power using a modified PEP Klystron. The windows use an anti-multipactor coating on the vacuum side and the application and processing of this layer is discussed. The high power test configuration, RF processing history and high power performance are described.

Neubauer, M.; Allen, M.; Fant, K.; Hill, A.; Hoyt, M.; Judkins, J.; Schwarz, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States); Rimmer, R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Low-Cost, High-Power Laser for Analytical and Other ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Low-Cost, High-Power Laser for Analytical and Other Applications. ...

87

High-power LED driver with power-efficient LED-current-sensing technique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??x, 73 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis ECED 2007 LeungW To provide enough light output for various lighting applications, high-power (more)

Leung, Wing Yan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Development and Analysis of Prognostic Equations for Mesoscale Kinetic Energy and Mesoscale (Subgrid Scale) Fluxes for Large-Scale Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale circulations generated by landscape discontinuities (e.g., sea breezes) are likely to have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, the climate, and the weather. However, these processes are not represented in large-scale ...

Roni Avissar; Fei Chen

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Large-Scale Eddies in the Unstably Stratified Atmospheric Surface Layer. Part II: Turbulent Pressure Fluctuations and the Budgets of Heat Flux, Stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is developed for retrieving turbulent pressure fluctuations from tower measurements of velocity and temperature, through use of the equations of motion. This method is applied to a series of large-scale eddies which are defined by their ...

J. M. Wilczak; Joost A. Businger

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DESY, February 2001, TESLA Report 2001-04 Concept of the High Power e  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESY, February 2001, TESLA Report 2001-04 Concept of the High Power e± Beam Dumps for TESLA W. Bialowons, M. Maslov, M. Schmitz, V. Sytchev #12;1 Concept of the High Power e± Beam Dumps for TESLA W............................................................................................................... 19 #12;2 1 Introduction The TESLA accelerator is equipped with quite a number of extraction lines

91

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities Tobias K be photobleached before final sample preparation. The instrument consists of high power light emitting diodes for simple photobleaching pur- poses, we designed a simple but efficient lighting system using light emitting

Kaufman, Laura

92

A High Power Liquid Hydrogen Target for Parity Violation Experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parity-violating electron scattering measurements on hydrogen and deuterium, such as those underway at the Bates and CEBAF laboratories, require luminosities exceeding 10{sup 38} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, resulting in large beam power deposition into cryogenic liquid. Such targets must be able to absorb 500 watts or more with minimal change in target density. A 40 cm long liquid hydrogen target, designed to absorb 500 watts of beam power without boiling, has been developed for the SAMPLE experiment at Bates. In recent tests with 40 {micro}A of incident beam, no evidence was seen for density fluctuations in the target, at a sensitivity level of better than 1%. A summary of the target design and operational experience will be presented.

Mark, John W.

2003-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

93

Kinetic Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a minimalist kinetic model for economies. A system of agents with local trading rules display emergent demand behaviour. We examine the resulting wealth distribution to look for non-thermal behaviour. We compare and contrast this model with other similar models.

Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

High power operation of the university of Maryland coaxial gyroklystron experiment  

SciTech Connect

We report the experimental studies of high power amplification in a coaxial three-cavity X-band gyroklystron. A single-anode magnetron injection gun (MIG) is used to produce a 520 A beam of 470 keV electrons with an average ratio of perpendicular-to-parallel velocity of about one. The voltage flat top is nearly 2 {mu}s. All cavities are designed to operate in the TE{sub 011} coaxial mode near 8.6 GHz. The input cavity is driven by a 150 kW, 3 {mu}s coaxial magnetron through a single slot in the radial wall. Peak powers of 75{endash}85 MW are measured with a conversion efficiency of nearly 32{percent} and a large signal gain of about 30 dB. This performance is in good agreement with simulations and represents approximately a tri-fold increase in the peak power capability of pulsed X-band gyroklystrons. We also report on the design of a three cavity second harmonic gyroklystron which is expected to produce 100 MW at 17.14 GHz. We close with a general discussion of scaling our designs to higher frequencies. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Lawson, W.; Arjona, M.; Castle, M.; Hogan, B.; Granatstein, V.; Reiser, M. [Institute for Plasma Research and Electrical Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

High power operation of the university of Maryland coaxial gyroklystron experiment  

SciTech Connect

We report the experimental studies of high power amplification in a coaxial three-cavity X-band gyroklystron. A single-anode magnetron injection gun (MIG) is used to produce a 520 A beam of 470 keV electrons with an average ratio of perpendicular-to-parallel velocity of about one. The voltage flat top is nearly 2 {mu}s. All cavities are designed to operate in the TE{sub 011} coaxial mode near 8.6 GHz. The input cavity is driven by a 150 kW, 3 {mu}s coaxial magnetron through a single slot in the radial wall. Peak powers of 75-85 MW are measured with a conversion efficiency of nearly 32% and a large signal gain of about 30 dB. This performance is in good agreement with simulations and represents approximately a tri-fold increase in the peak power capability of pulsed X-band gyroklystrons. We also report on the design of a three cavity second harmonic gyroklystron which is expected to produce 100 MW at 17.14 GHz. We close with a general discussion of scaling our designs to higher frequencies.

Lawson, W.; Arjona, M.; Castle, M.; Hogan, B.; Granatstein, V.; Reiser, M. [Institute for Plasma Research and Electrical Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

C-Band High Power RF Generation and Extraction Using a Dielectric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C-BAND HIGH POWER RF GENERATION AND EXTRACTION USING A DIELECTRIC LOADED WAVEGUIDE* F. Gao , M. Conde, W. Gai, R. Konecny, W. Liu, J. Power, Z. Yusof ANL, Argonne, IL 60439,...

97

High Power Testing of X-Band Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

m-to-metal-to-dielectric in a region of high electric field that is expected to cause breakdown problems; and (2) high power density in the dielectric, since all the power passes...

98

NEUTRONIC AND THERMAL HYDRAULIC DESIGNS OF ANNULAR FUEL FOR HIGH POWER DENSITY BWRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a promising new fuel for high power density light water reactors, the feasibility of using annular fuel for BWR services is explored from both thermal hydraulic and neutronic points of view. Keeping the bundle size ...

Morra, P.

99

Report on High Power rf Testing of Quartz Based DLA Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 March, 2006 Report on High Power rf Testing of Quartz Based DLA Structure at NRL C. Jing, and R. Konecny Abstract: In this article, we report the experimental results of high...

100

Generation of high power single-cycle and multiple-cycle terahertz pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we present experimental methods and results of tabletop generation of high power single-cycle and frequency-tunable multiple-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses pumped with near-infrared ultrashort optical pulses ...

Chen, Zhao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Chemistry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Detection of nanosecond-scale, high power THz pulses with a field effect transistor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate detection and resolution of high power, 34 ns free electron laser pulses using a rectifying field effect transistor. The detector remains linear up to an input power of 11 {+-} 0.5 W at a pulse energy of 20 {+-} 1 {mu}J at 240 GHz. We compare its performance to a protected Schottky diode, finding a shorter intrinsic time constant. The damage threshold is estimated to be a few 100 W. The detector is, therefore, well-suited for characterizing high power THz pulses. We further demonstrate that the same detector can be used to detect low power continuous-wave THz signals with a post detection limited noise floor of 3.1 {mu}W/{radical}(Hz). Such ultrafast, high power detectors are important tools for high power and high energy THz facilities such as free electron lasers.

Preu, S. [Physics Department and Institute for Terahertz Science and Technology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Chair for Applied Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Lu, H.; Gossard, A. C. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Sherwin, M. S. [Physics Department and Institute for Terahertz Science and Technology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Charged electret deposition for the manipulation of high power microwave flashover delay times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasi-permanent charged electret is embedded into the radiation window of a high power microwave system. It was experimentally observed that the additional electrostatic field introduced by the electret alters the delay times associated with the development of plasma at the window surface, resulting from high power microwave excitation. The magnitudes of both the statistical and formative delay times are investigated in detail for different pressures. Experimental observations are related to calculated discharge parameters using known E/p dependent properties.

Stephens, J.; Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A. [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of nonlinear effects in the asymmetric catalysis of kinetic resolutions is analyzed. It is found with minimal assumptions that the kinetics of homocompetitive reactions should apply generally to kinetic resolutions involving partially resolved catalysts, and this is supported by experimental observations with the Jacobsen hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epoxides. The criterion for a nonlinear effect in asymmetric catalysis--a nonlinear correlation between the enantiomeric excess in a choral ligand and the product enantiomeric excess obtained from a reaction--is examined. The nonlinear effect idea is found to be generalizable to kinetic resolutions and other reactions by replacing consideration of the product enantiomeric excess with the quantity (k[]/k[]-1)/(k[]/k[]+1), a differential kinetic enantiomeric enhancement (DKEE). A nonlinear effect may then be defined by a nonlinear correlation between the DKEE and the chiral ligand enantiomeric excess. The application of these ideas to previously reported kinetic resolutions of sulfoxides and to nonlinear effects in the Jacobsen HKR is described. Relatively small nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions are sufficient to obtain large asymmetric amplifications. A catalyst modification in the Jacobsen HKR also allows for the development of a novel recyclable system for the iterative enhancement of optical activity.

Johnson, Derrell W.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Analysis of the mode composition of an X-band overmoded O-type Cerenkov high-power microwave oscillator  

SciTech Connect

Overmoded slow wave structures (SWSs) with large diameter are utilized in O-type Cerenkov high-power microwave (HPM) sources for their high power capacity. However, multi-modes may be output simultaneously in the overmoded O-type Cerenkov HPM sources. In order to achieve high mode purity, the mode composition of the output power should be analyzed quantitatively when the structure of this type of device is being optimized. Two accurate numerical methods of making quantitative analysis of the mode composition in particle-in-cell model are introduced in this paper. And then, the mode composition of an X-band O-type Cerenkov oscillator with overmoded SWSs (D/{lambda} Almost-Equal-To 2.7) is analyzed. The analysis indicates that appropriate selection of the parameters of overmoded SWSs and electron beam is important, as mentioned in previous reports, for realizing mode selection in beam-wave interaction. Besides, designing of the mode conversion effect, which is rarely discussed, can also affect the mode purity of output power. After adjustment of the dimensions of the tapered waveguide, which converts the combination of 'surface wave' and 'volume wave' to the 'volume wave' in the output waveguide, the percentage of total output microwave power carried by the TM{sub 01} mode is higher than 95% in the X-band overmoded Cerenkov oscillator at the diode voltage ranging from 570 kV to 750 kV.

Zhang Dian; Zhang Jun; Zhong Huihuang; Jin Zhenxing [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-Power Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

High-Power Electrodes for Lithium-Ion High-Power Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications Contact BES Home 04.27.12 High-Power Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement For novel 3-D anodes made of sheets of carbon (graphene) and silicon nanoparticles, transport studies found much shorter lithium diffusion paths throughout the electrode and fast lithiation/delithiation of the nanoparticles. Significance and Impact This anode design holds a greater charge than conventional lithium-ion anodes and charges/discharges more rapidly while maintaining mechanical stability. Research Details Electrochemical studies: 83% of theoretical capacity (3200 mAh g-1)

106

FY2001 Highlights Report for the Vehicle High-Power Energy Storage Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIGH-POWER HIGH-POWER ENERGY STORAGE 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and to Sentech, Inc., for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Highlights Report for the Vehicle High-Power Energy Storage Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

107

Space reactor/Stirling cycle systems for high power Lunar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NASA`s Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has proposed the use of high power nuclear power systems on the lunar surface as a necessary alternative to solar power. Because of the long lunar night ({approximately} 14 earth days) solar powered systems with the requisite energy storage in the form of regenerative fuel cells or batteries becomes prohibitively heavy at high power levels ({approximately} 100 kWe). At these high power levels nuclear power systems become an enabling technology for variety of missions. One way of producing power on the lunar surface is with an SP-100 class reactor coupled with Stirling power converters. In this study, analysis and characterization of the SP-100 class reactor coupled with Free Piston Stirling Power Conversion (FPSPC) system will be performed. Comparison of results with previous studies of other systems, particularly Brayton and Thermionic, are made.

Schmitz, P.D. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center Group; Mason, L.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

High power X-ray welding of metal-matrix composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10{sup 4} watts/cm{sup 2} and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

Rosenberg, Richard A. (Naperville, IL); Goeppner, George A. (Orland Park, IL); Noonan, John R. (Naperville, IL); Farrell, William J. (Flossmoor, IL); Ma, Qing (Westmont, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaluating Mesoscale NWP Models Using Kinetic Energy Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic energy spectra derived from observations in the free atmosphere possess a wavenumber dependence of k?3 for large scales, characteristic of 2D turbulence, and transition to a k?5/3 dependence in the mesoscale. Kinetic energy spectra ...

William C. Skamarock

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The Vertical Partition of Oceanic Horizontal Kinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To produce an interpretation of the surface kinetic energy as measured by altimeters, a survey is made of the vertical structure of kinetic energy profiles in a large number of globally distributed long current meter records. Although the data ...

Carl Wunsch

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Research on Control System of High Power DFIG Wind Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared with constant speed constant frequency wind turbine, variable speed constant frequency wind turbine has many advantages: higher efficiency of wind energy converting to electric power, absorbing gust energy, smoothly cutting into the network ... Keywords: wind power, DFIG, high power, LQR, variable speed constant frequency, constant power control

Li Jianlin; Xu Honghua

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Design and Implementation of a High-power Mobile Substation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a scheme design and implementation of a high-power mobile substation, which used to convert local standard AC to the requirement of electrical equipment. In this system, a three-phase AC generator is driven by a DC motor, the motor ... Keywords: AC, frequency, motor, generator, feedback, efficiency, PID

Yongtai Chen; Tuyaun Qin; Jing Tang; Li Cai

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

High power breakdown testing of a photonic band-gap accelerator structure with elliptical rods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An improved single-cell photonic band-gap (PBG) structure with an inner row of elliptical rods (PBG-E) was tested with high power at a 60 Hz repetition rate at X-band (11.424 GHz), achieving a gradient of 128??MV/m at a ...

Munroe, Brian James

115

Nano-structured anode material for high-power battery system in electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

A new MSNP-LTO anode is developed to enable a high-power battery system that provides three times more power than any existing battery system. It shows excellent cycle life and low-temperature performance, and exhibits unmatched safety characteristics.

Amine, K.; Belharouak, I.; Chen, Z.; Taison, T.; Yumoto, H.; Ota, N.; Myung, S.-T.; Sun, Y.-K. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Enerdel Lithium Power Systems); (Iwate Univ.); (Hanyang Univ.)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

116

Diagnostic Characterization of High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries For Use in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagnostic Characterization of High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries For Use in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Lithium-ion batteries are a fast-growing technology that is attractive for use in portable electronics of lithium-ion batteries for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) applications. The ATD Program is a joint effort

117

Diagnostic Characterization of High Power Lithium-Ion Batteries for Use in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagnostic Characterization of High Power Lithium-Ion Batteries for Use in Hybrid Electric Vehicles. Manuscript submitted May 15, 2000; revised manuscript received January 15, 2001. Lithium-ion batteries effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to aid the development of lithium-ion batteries for hybrid

118

Synthesis of hybrid nanowire arrays and their application as high power supercapacitor electrodesw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis of hybrid nanowire arrays and their application as high power supercapacitor electrodesw- plies.2­7 For such applications, it is extremely important to develop supercapacitors with higher power and they have been used as electrodes for supercapacitors.11­14 In spite of having ideal properties, CNT based

Ajayan, Pulickel M.

119

Highly Conductive and Porous Activated Reduced Graphene Oxide Films for High-Power Supercapacitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly Conductive and Porous Activated Reduced Graphene Oxide Films for High-Power Supercapacitors for a free-standing carbon film reported to date. A two-electrode supercapacitor using these carbon films. KEYWORDS: Graphene, flexible film, chemical activation, supercapacitors Free-standing thin film materials

120

Electrical characterization and modelling of round spiral supercapacitors for high power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical characterization and modelling of round spiral supercapacitors for high power of supercapacitors under railway and electrical traction constraints. Electrical model parameters according of supercapacitors and give precious information on its state of health. These kinds of studies need a powerful

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

A CONTINUOUS HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP OF THE HOT-DOG-COOKER TYPE  

SciTech Connect

A beam dump with partially rotating water-cooled tube arrays is proposed and studied for the dump of continuous high power density unneutralized ion beams out of the neutral beam injectors. Analyses were made of both steady and transient heat transfer characteristics.

Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Interface microstructure engineering by high power impulse magnetron sputtering for the enhancement of adhesion  

SciTech Connect

An excellent adhesion of hard coatings to steel substrates is paramount in practically all application areas. Conventional methods utilize Ar glow etching or cathodic arc discharge pretreatments that have the disadvantage of producing weak interfaces or adding droplets, respectively. One tool for interface engineering is high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS). HIPIMS is based on conventional sputtering with extremely high peak power densities reaching 3 kW cm{sup -2} at current densities of >2 A cm{sup -2}. HIPIMS of Cr and Nb was used to prepare interfaces on 304 stainless steel and M2 high speed steel (HSS). During the pretreatment, the substrates were biased to U{sub bias}=-600 V and U{sub bias}=-1000 V in the environment of a HIPIMS of Cr and Nb plasma. The bombarding flux density reached peak values of 300 mA cm{sup -2} and consisted of highly ionized metal plasma containing a high proportion of Cr{sup 1+} and Nb{sup 1+}. Pretreatments were also carried out with Ar glow discharge and filtered cathodic arc as comparison. The adhesion was evaluated for coatings consisting of a 0.3 {mu}m thick CrN base layer and a 4 {mu}m thick nanolayer stack of CrN/NbN with a period of 3.4 nm, hardness of HK{sub 0.025}=3100, and residual stress of -1.8 GPa. For HIPIMS of Cr pretreatment, the adhesion values on M2 HSS reached scratch test critical load values of L{sub C}=70 N, thus comparing well to L{sub C}=51 N for interfaces pretreated by arc discharge plasmas and to L{sub C}=25 N for Ar etching. Cross sectional transmission electron microscopy studies revealed a clean interface and large areas of epitaxial growth in the case of HIPIMS pretreatment. The HIPIMS pretreatment promoted strong registry between the orientation of the coating and polycrystalline substrate grains due to the incorporation of metal ions and the preservation of crystallinity of the substrate. Evidence and conditions for the formation of cube-on-cube epitaxy and axiotaxy on steel and {gamma}-TiAl substrates are presented.

Ehiasarian, A. P.; Wen, J. G.; Petrov, I. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 and Materials Science Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight (more)

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Plasma Kinetic Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

B. Weyssow

125

PPPL delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam pulses in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam pulses in a delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam pulses in a new Berkeley Lab accelerator March 19, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Erik Gilson with a copper-clad module and chamber for testing the units. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) Erik Gilson with a copper-clad module and chamber for testing the units. Gallery: Interior views of a plasma-source module. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) Interior views of a plasma-source module. Technician aligns plasma source with NDCX-II accelerator in background. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) Technician aligns plasma source with NDCX-II accelerator in background. Plainsboro, New Jersey - Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's

126

High-Power Plasma Switch for 11.4 GHz Microwave Pulse Compressor  

SciTech Connect

Results obtained in several experiments on active RF pulse compression at X-band using a magnicon as the high-power RF source are presented. In these experiments, microwave energy was stored in high-Q TE01 and TE02 modes of two parallel-fed resonators, and then discharged using switches activated with rapidly fired plasma discharge tubes. Designs and high-power tests of several versions of the compressor are described. In these experiments, coherent pulse superposition was demonstrated at a 59 MW level of incident power. The compressed pulses observed had powers of 5070 MW and durations of 4070 ns. Peak power gains were measured to be in the range of 7:111:1 with efficiency in the range of 5063%.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

127

Thermal And Mechanical Analysis of High-power Light-emitting Diodes with Ceramic Packages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the thermal and mechanical analysis of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with ceramic packages. Transient thermal measurements and thermo-mechanical simulation were performed to study the thermal and mechanical characteristics of ceramic packages. Thermal resistance from the junction to the ambient was decreased from 76.1 oC/W to 45.3 oC/W by replacing plastic mould to ceramic mould for LED packages. Higher level of thermo-mechanical stresses in the chip were found for LEDs with ceramic packages despite of less mismatching coefficients of thermal expansion comparing with plastic packages. The results suggest that the thermal performance of LEDs can be improved by using ceramic packages, but the mounting process of the high power LEDs with ceramic packages is critically important and should be in charge of delaminating interface layers in the packages.

J. Hu; L. Yang; M. -W. Shin

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Durability of Low Pt Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPIRE Program Kickoff SPIRE Program Kickoff Topic 3A. Cell Degradation Studies / Degradation Studies Durability of Low Pt Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density US DOE Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting DOE Award: DE-EE0000469 October 1 st , 2009 Program Objectives The objective of this program is to study and identify strategies to assure durability of fuel cells designed to meet DOE cost targets. Technical Barriers Barrier Approach Strategy A. Durability Reinforced, Stabilized Membrane MEA Partner Durability-Enhanced Electrodes Electrocatalyst/MEA Partner Optimized Operating Conditions Parametric model & experimental studies B. Cost Low Pt Loadings (0.2 mg/cm 2 ) Electrocatalyst/MEA Partner High Power Density (>1.0W/cm 2 ) Open Flowfield Stack Metallic Stack Architecture Incumbent Derivative

129

AN ASSESSMENT OF FLYWHEEL HIGH POWER ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR HYBRID VEHICLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment has been conducted for the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program to determine the state of the art of advanced flywheel high power energy storage systems to meet hybrid vehicle needs for high power energy storage and energy/power management. Flywheel systems can be implemented with either an electrical or a mechanical powertrain. The assessment elaborates upon flywheel rotor design issues of stress, materials and aspect ratio. Twelve organizations that produce flywheel systems submitted specifications for flywheel energy storage systems to meet minimum energy and power requirements for both light-duty and heavy-duty hybrid applications of interest to DOE. The most extensive experience operating flywheel high power energy storage systems in heavy-duty and light-duty hybrid vehicles is in Europe. Recent advances in Europe in a number of vehicle racing venues and also in road car advanced evaluations are discussed. As a frame of reference, nominal weight and specific power for non-energy storage components of Toyota hybrid electric vehicles are summarized. The most effective utilization of flywheels is in providing high power while providing just enough energy storage to accomplish the power assist mission effectively. Flywheels are shown to meet or exceed the USABC power related goals (discharge power, regenerative power, specific power, power density, weight and volume) for HEV and EV batteries and ultracapacitors. The greatest technical challenge facing the developer of vehicular flywheel systems remains the issue of safety and containment. Flywheel safety issues must be addressed during the design and testing phases to ensure that production flywheel systems can be operated with adequately low risk.

Hansen, James Gerald [ORNL

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

High power pulsed plasma MHD experiments. Annual report 1 Jan 81-30 Sep 82  

SciTech Connect

Results of high power pulsed plasma MHD experiments are reported. An explosively driven plasma source is used to drive a Faraday mode MHD generator with an externally applied B-field of several tesla. The highest power achieved was 6 gigawatts in a 140 kJ electrical pulse delivered to a resistive load. The experimentally observed scaling relationships of power with applied B-field and electrode area are also presented.

Baum, D.W.; Gill, S.P.; Shimmin, W.L.; Watson, J.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Photoionization of optically trapped ultracold atoms with a high-power light-emitting diode  

SciTech Connect

Photoionization of laser-cooled atoms using short pulses of a high-power light-emitting diode (LED) is demonstrated. Light pulses as short as 30 ns have been realized with the simple LED driver circuit. We measure the ionization cross section of {sup 85}Rb atoms in the first excited state, and show how this technique can be used for calibrating efficiencies of ion detector assemblies.

Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Amthor, Thomas; Weidemueller, Matthias [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Time-dependent polarization states of high power, ultrashort laser pulses during atmospheric propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate, through simulation, the evolution of polarization states during atmospheric propagation of high power, ultrashort laser pulses. A delayed rotational response model handling arbitrary, transverse polarization couples both the amplitude and phase of the polarization states. We find that, while circularly and linearly polarized pulses maintain their polarization, elliptically polarized pulses become depolarized due to energy equilibration between left and right circularly polarized states. The depolarization can be detrimental to remote radiation generation schemes and obscures time-integrated polarization measurements.

Palastro, J P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Temperature-Dependent Battery Models for High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, two battery models for a high-power lithium ion (Li-Ion) cell were compared for their use in hybrid electric vehicle simulations in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hybrid Electric Vehicle Program. Saft America developed the high-power Li-Ion cells as part of the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium/U.S. Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles programs. Based on test data, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a resistive equivalent circuit battery model for comparison with a 2-capacitance battery model from Saft. The Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR) was used to compare the predictions of the two models over two different power cycles. The two models were also compared to and validated with experimental data for a US06 driving cycle. The experimental voltages on the US06 power cycle fell between the NREL resistive model and Saft capacitance model predictions. Generally, the predictions of the two models were reasonably close to th e experimental results; the capacitance model showed slightly better performance. Both battery models of high-power Li-Ion cells could be used in ADVISOR with confidence as accurate battery behavior is maintained during vehicle simulations.

Johnson, V.H.; Pesaran, A.A. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Sack, T. (Saft America)

2001-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

134

Active high-power RF pulse compression using optically switched resonant delay lines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors present the design and a proof of principle experimental results of an optically controlled high power rf pulse compression system. The design should, in principle, handle few hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band. The system is based on the switched resonant delay line theory. It employs resonant delay lines as a means of storing rf energy. The coupling to the lines is optimized for maximum energy storage during the charging phase. To discharge the lines, a high power microwave switch increases the coupling to the lines just before the start of the output pulse. The high power microwave switch, required for this system, is realized using optical excitation of an electron-hole plasma layer on the surface of a pure silicon wafer. The switch is designed to operate in the TE{sub 01} mode in a circular waveguide to avoid the edge effects present at the interface between the silicon wafer and the supporting waveguide; thus, enhancing its power handling capability.

Tantawi, S.G.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E. [Stanford Univ., CA (US). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Zolotorev, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Surface treated natural graphite as anode material for high-power Li-ion battery applications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power application of Li-ion battery in hybrid electrical vehicles requires low cost and safe cell materials. Among the various carbon anode materials used in lithium ion batteries, natural graphite shows the most promise with advantages in performance and cost. However, natural graphite is not compatible with propylene carbonate (PC)-based electrolytes, which have a lower melting point and improved safety characteristics. The problem with it is that the molecules of propylene carbonate intercalate with Li+ into graphite, and that frequently leads to the exfoliation of the graphite matrix.

Liu, J.; Vissers, D. R.; Amine, K.; Barsukov, I. V.; Henry, F.; Doniger, J.; Chemical Engineering; Superior Graphite Co.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High power tests of dressed supconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities  

SciTech Connect

A single-cavity test cryostat is used to conduct pulsed high power RF tests of superconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities at 2 K. The cavities under test are welded inside individual helium vessels and are outfitted ('dressed') with a fundamental power coupler, higher-order mode couplers, magnetic shielding, a blade tuner, and piezoelectric tuners. The cavity performance is evaluated in terms of accelerating gradient, unloaded quality factor, and field emission, and the functionality of the auxiliary components is verified. Test results from the first set of dressed cavities are presented here.

Hocker, A.; Harms, E.R.; Lunin, A.; Sukhanov, A.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

High Power, High Voltage FETs in Linear Applications: A User's Perspective  

SciTech Connect

The specifications of the current crop of highpower, high-voltage field-effect transistors (FETs) can lure a designer into employing them in high-voltage DC equipment. Devices with extremely low on-resistance and very high power ratings are available from several manufacturers. However, our experience shows that high-voltage, linear operation of these devices at near-continuous duty can present difficult reliability challenges at stress levels well-below their published specifications. This paper chronicles the design evolution of a 600 volt, 8 ampere shunt regulator for use with megawatt-class radio transmitters, and presents a final design that has met its reliability criteria.

N. Greenough, E. Fredd, S. DePasquale

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics.

139

Plasma Kinetic Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basic and Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

B. Weyssow

140

Chapter 13. Chemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of chemical reactions. · Only gases, for which the kinetic theory of Chapter 4 is applicable, are consideredChapter 13. Chemical Kinetics #12;· Why do some chemical reactions proceed with lighting speed when the way in which molecules combine to form products? · All of these questions involve chemical kinetics

Ihee, Hyotcherl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Failure modes in high-power lithium-ion batteries for use inhybrid electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program seeks to aid the development of high-power lithium-ion batteries for hybrid electric vehicles. Nine 18650-size ATD baseline cells were tested under a variety of conditions. The cells consisted of a carbon anode, LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathode and DEC-EC-LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte, and they were engineered for high-power applications. Selected instrumental techniques such as synchrotron IR microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gas chromatography, etc. were used to characterize the anode, cathode, current collectors and electrolyte from these cells. The goal was to identify detrimental processes which lead to battery failure under a high-current cycling regime as well as during storage at elevated temperatures. The diagnostic results suggest that the following factors contribute to the cell power loss: (a) SEI deterioration and non-uniformity on the anode, (b) morphology changes, increase of impedance and phase separation on the cathode, (c) pitting corrosion on the cathode Al current collector, and (d) decomposition of the LiPF{sub 6} salt in the electrolyte at elevated temperature.

Kostecki, R.; Zhang, X.; Ross Jr., P.N.; Kong, F.; Sloop, S.; Kerr, J.B.; Striebel, K.; Cairns, E.; McLarnon, F.

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

Design and testing of high power, repetitively pulsed solid-state closing switches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Repetitively pulsed closing switches are often required in high-power physics experiments. Traditionally, ignitrons have been used for these applications. There are reasons why ignitrons have undesirable features, such as the high trigger current which causes electromagnetic interference, the arc instability and environmental concern with the mercury used in the switches. With the development of ever increasing power rating of solid-state switches, in particular thyristors, the designer has the tools to replace ignitrons with solid-state devices. Using as an example a recently designed and tested 10 kV, 80 kA high-power switch, the design philosophy for repetitively pulsed switches is developed. The parameters which impose the greatest challenge on the device, such as di/dt, temperature rise and reverse blocking voltage are investigated with respect to their capability when operating in the pulsed mode. Starting with the available device data sheet information and published results of the dependency of the number of life cycles as a function of the device temperature, it is shown how the overload capability of a device for short term pulsed applications can be exploited. The detailed design of a 2 Hz, 10{sup 8} cycle, 12.5 kV, 80 kA, 3 ms switch, with a short circuit capability of 250 kA, is presented. The paper concludes with a short summary about device limits in voltage, current amplitude and pulse length ratings for repetitively pulsed switches using available thyristors.

Boenig, H.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Schwartzenberg, J.W.; Willinger, L.J.; Piccone, D.E. [Silicon Power Corp., Malvern, PA (United States); Lopez, D.A.; Smolleck, H.A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20 deg. - 40 deg. from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Doane, J.; Olstad, R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Henderson, M. [ITER Organization, CS90 046, 13067 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW ?s-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

145

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight systems has been limited to low-power, ...

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

High-power, Ultralow-noise Semiconductor External Cavity Lasers Based on Low-confinement Optical Waveguide Gain Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the past several years, we have been developing a new class of high-power, low-noise semiconductor optical gain medium based on the slab-coupled optical waveguide (SCOW) concept. The key characteristics of the SCOW ...

Juodawlkis, Paul W.

147

High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

Interfacial electron and phonon scattering processes in high-powered nanoscale applications.  

SciTech Connect

The overarching goal of this Truman LDRD project was to explore mechanisms of thermal transport at interfaces of nanomaterials, specifically linking the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary conductance to the structures and geometries of interfaces and boundaries. Deposition, fabrication, and post possessing procedures of nanocomposites and devices can give rise to interatomic mixing around interfaces of materials leading to stresses and imperfections that could affect heat transfer. An understanding of the physics of energy carrier scattering processes and their response to interfacial disorder will elucidate the potentials of applying these novel materials to next-generation high powered nanodevices and energy conversion applications. An additional goal of this project was to use the knowledge gained from linking interfacial structure to thermal transport in order to develop avenues to control, or 'tune' the thermal transport in nanosystems.

Hopkins, Patrick E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

LEDA - A HIGH-POWER TEST BED OF INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-energy demonstration accelerator (LEDA) is an operational 6.7-MeV. 100-mA proton accelerator consisting of an injector, radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and all associated integration equipment. In order to achieve this unprecedented level of performance (670-kW of beam power) from an RFQ, a number of design innovations were required. They will highlight a number of those more significant technical advances, including those in the proton injector, the RFQ configuration, the RF klystrons, the beam stop, and the challenges of beam measurements. In addition to identifying the importance of these innovations to LEDA performance, they will summarize the plans for further testing, and the possibilities for addition of more accelerating structures, including the planned use of very-low-beta super-conducting structures. LEDA's current and upgradable configuration is appropriate for several future high-power accelerators, including those for the transmutation of radioactive waste.

J. SCHNEIDER; R. SHEFFIELD

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Precision Neutrino Oscillation Measurements using Simultaneous High-Power, Low-Energy Project-X Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first phase of the long-baseline neutrino experiment, LBNE10, will use a broadband, high-energy neutrino beam with a 10-kt liquid argon TPC at 1300 km to study neutrino oscillation. In this paper, we describe potential upgrades to LBNE10 that use Project X to produce high-intensity, low-energy neutrino beams. Simultaneous, high-power operation of 8- and 60-GeV beams with a 200-kt water Cerenkov detector would provide sensitivity to nu_mu to nu_e oscillations at the second oscillation maximum. We find that with ten years of data, it would be possible to measure sin2(2theta_13) with precision comparable to that expected from reactor antineutrino disappearance and to measure the value of the CP phase, delta_CP, with an uncertainty of (5-10) degrees. This document is submitted for inclusion in Snowmass 2013.

M. Bishai; M. Diwan; S. Kettell; J. Stewart; R. Tschirhart; B. Viren; L. Whitehead; E. Worcester

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

151

A high-power spatial filter for Thomson scattering stray light reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) is routinely used to measure electron temperature and density during plasma discharges. Avalanche photodiodes in a five-channel interference filter polychromator measure scattered light from a 6 ns, 800 mJ, 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser pulse. A low cost, high-power spatial filter was designed, tested, and added to the laser beamline in order to reduce stray laser light to levels which are acceptable for accurate Rayleigh calibration. A detailed analysis of the spatial filter design and performance is given. The spatial filter can be easily implemented in an existing Thomson scattering system without the need to disturb the vacuum chamber or significantly change the beamline. Although apertures in the spatial filter suffer substantial damage from the focused beam, with proper design they can last long enough to permit absolute calibration.

Levesque, J. P.; Litzner, K. D.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, 500 W. 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method of Fabrication of High Power Density Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O(LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

154

Measurement of beam energy spectrum and impurity content in high-power neutral beam injectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy spectrum and impurity content of a high-power neutral beam are measured by implanting the beam into high-purity silicon crystals. The depth distribution of the beam particles is then measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS); the penetration depth is a function of the incident particle energy. This is one of the few measurement techniques that can determine neutral beam energy components directly. From the results, percentages of atomic and molecular ions in the source plasma can be inferred. Use of deuterium as the source gas provides insight into the role of residual hydrogen in the ion source and accelerating grids and in the SIMS analysis. The principal impurities are carbon and oxygen. Preliminary data indicate that carbon can originate from both methane and carbon monoxide, while oxygen can come from molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide, and water. Results are given and future plans are discussed.

Langley, R.A.; Ryan, P.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Menon, M.M.; Botnick, E.M.; Magee, C.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

High-power microwave LDMOS transistors for wireless data transmission technologies (Review)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fields of the application, structure, fabrication, and packaging technology of high-power microwave LDMOS transistors and the main advantages of these devices were analyzed. Basic physical parameters and some technology factors were matched for optimum device operation. Solid-state microwave electronics has been actively developed for the last 10-15 years. Simultaneously with improvement of old devices, new devices and structures are actively being adopted and developed and new semiconductor materials are being commercialized. Microwave LDMOS technology is in demand in such fields as avionics, civil and military radars, repeaters, base stations of cellular communication systems, television and broadcasting transmitters, and transceivers for high-speed wireless computer networks (promising Wi-Fi and Wi-Max standards).

Kuznetsov, E. V., E-mail: E.Kouzntsov@tcen.ru; Shemyakin, A. V. [Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology, SMC Technological Center (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

FY2000 Highlights Report for the Vehicle High-Power Energy Storage Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2000 Highlights Report for the Vehicle High-Power Energy Storage Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Energy Management Team Raymond A. Sutula Energy Management Team Leader November 2000 This document highlights work sponsored by agencies of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency, thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

157

High-power SRS lasers - coherent summators (the way it was)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The history of the research works performed under the guidance of H.G. Basov and aimed at developing high-energy lasers - coherent summators (CSs) - based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen is reported. The work was performed jointly by researchers of FIAN [the Laboratory of Quantum Radiophysics (LQRP)] and VNIIEF. Many problems were solved as a result of these studies. Liquid nitrogen and oxygen were found to be optimal active media for high-power SRS lasers with high energy per pulse. A method for purifying these cryogenic liquids from micro- and nanoimpurities was developed, which made it possible to eliminate nonlinear loss of pump radiation and converted radiation in the active medium and ensure effective operation of SRS lasers - coherent summators (SRSL CSs) with high output energy. Cryogenic cells providing high optical homogeneity of liquid nitrogen and oxygen were developed, which ensured low (at a level of 0.1 mrad) divergence of converted radiation with high energy density. Raster focusing systems providing optimal concentration of pump radiation in the active medium were designed. These studies resulted in the development of high-power highenergy SRSL CSs with a low beam divergence, based on liquid nitrogen ({lambda}{sub S} = 1.89 {mu}m) and liquid oxygen ({lambda}{sub S} = 1.65 {mu}m), with pumping by explosively pumped iodine lasers (EPILs) ({lambda}{sub p} = 1.315 {mu}m). The characteristics of the SRSL CSs developed were record for that time (the end of 1960s and the beginning of 1970s): energy up to 2.5 kJ per 10-{mu}s pulse, beam divergence {approx}10{sup -4} rad, and beam energy density of several hundreds of J cm{sup -2}. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of n.g. basov)

Grasiuk, Arkadii Z; Zubarev, I G; Efimkov, V F; Smirnov, V G [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

An innovative demonstration of high power density in a compact MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present program was conducted by the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI). It was by its nature a high risk experimental program to demonstrate the feasibility of high power density operation in a laboratory scale combustion driven MHD generator. Maximization of specific energy was not a consideration for the present program, but the results have implications in this regard by virtue of high energy fuel used. The power density is the ratio of the electrical energy output to the internal volume of the generator channel. The MHD process is a volumetric process and the power density is therefore a direct measure of the compactness of the system. Specific energy, is the ratio of the electrical energy output to consumable energy used for its production. The two parameters are conceptually interrelated. To achieve high power density and implied commensurate low system volume and weight, it was necessary to use an energetic fuel. The high energy fuel of choice was a mixture of powdered aluminum and carbon seeded with potassium carbonate and burned with gaseous oxygen. The solid fuel was burned in a hybrid combustion scheme wherein the fuel was cast within a cylindrical combustor in analogy with a solid propellant rocket motor. Experimental data is limited to gross channel output current and voltage, magnetic field strength, fuel and oxidizer flow rates, flow train external temperatures and combustor pressure. Similarly, while instantaneous oxidizer flow rates were measured, only average fuel consumption based on pre and post test component weights and dimensions was possible. 4 refs., 60 figs., 9 tabs.

Schmidt, H.J.; Lineberry, J.T.; Chapman, J.N.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Structure and Kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Materials Science in Reduced Gravity: Structure and Kinetics ... Bias fields comprise weak interface energy sources that result from the vector...

160

Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Comprehensive Investigation of Low Angle Grain Boundary Mobility in Pure Al ... A New Treatment for the Kinetics of Isothermal Oxidation of Zinc Powders.

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161

Kinetic Energy Budget during Strong Jet Stream Activity over the Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic energy budgets are computed during a cold air outbreak in association with strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States. The period is characterized by large generation of kinetic energy due to cross-contour flow. Horizontal ...

Henry E. Fuelberg; James R. Scoggins

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H{sup +} proton beam, and injects H{sup {minus}} to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode{reg_sign} is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed.

Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.  

SciTech Connect

Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to reduce the cell winding material cost to <$10/kW, in order to allow >$10/kW for the cell and battery manufacturing costs, as well as profit for the industrial manufacturer. The material cost information is obtained directly from the industrial material suppliers, based on supplying the material quantities necessary to support an introductory market of 100,000 HEV batteries/year. Using its battery design model, ANL provides the material suppliers with estimates of the material quantities needed to meet this market, for both 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries. Also, ANL has funded a few volume-production material cost analyses, with industrial material suppliers, to obtain needed cost information. In a related project, ANL evaluates and develops low-cost advanced materials for use in high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries. [This work is the subject of one or more separate papers at this conference.] Cell chemistries are developed from the most promising low-cost materials. The performance characteristics of test cells that employ these cell chemistries are used as input to the cost model. Batteries, employing these cell chemistries, are designed to meet the FreedomCAR power, energy, weight, and volume requirements. The cost model then provides a battery-level material cost and material cost breakdown for each battery design. Two of these advanced cell chemistries show promise for significantly reducing the battery-level material costs (see Table 1), as well as enhancing calendar life and inherent safety. It is projected that these two advanced cell chemistries (A and B) could reduce the battery-level material costs by an estimated 24% and 43%, respectively. An additional cost advantage is realized with advanced chemistry B, due to the high rate capability of the 3-dimensional LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode. This means that a greater percentage of the total Ah capacity of the cell is usable and cells with reduced Ah capacity can be used. This allows for a reduction in the quantity of the anode, electrolyte, separator, and current collector materials needed f

Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

HIGH POWER TEST OF RF SEPARATOR FOR 12 GEV UPGRADE OF CEBAF AT JLAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CEBAF at JLab is in the process of an energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The existing setup of the RF separator cavities in the 5th pass will not be adequate to extract the highest energy (11 GeV) beam to any two existing halls (A, B or C) while simultaneously delivering to the new hall D in the case of the proposed 12 GeV upgrade of the machine. To restore this capability, we are exploring the possibility of extension of existing normal conducting 499 MHz TEM-type rf separator cavities. Detailed numerical studies suggest that six 2-cell normal conducting structures meet the requirements; each 2-cell structure will require up to 4 kW RF input power in contrast with the current nominal operating power of 1.0 to 2.0 kW. A high power test of 4 kW confirms that the cavity meet the requirement.

S. Ahmed, M. Wissmann, J. Mammosser, C. Hovater, M. Spata, G. Krafft, J. Delayen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development and extended operation of a high power radiation loaded heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature, high power molybdenum-lithium heat pipe has been fabricated and tested at 1500 K for 1700 hours with radiant heat rejection. Power throughput during the test was approximately 14 kW, corresponding to an axial flux density of 11 kW/cm/sup 2/ for the 1.59 cm diameter heat pipe. Radial flux density was 70 W/cm/sup 2/ over an evaporator length of 40.0 cm. Condenser length was approximately 150 cm with radiant heat rejection from the condenser to a coaxial water cooled radiation calorimeter. A plasma sprayed, high emissivity coating was used on the condenser surface to increase the radiant heat rejection during the tests. The heat pipe was operated for 514 hours at steady state conditions before being damaged during a planned shutdown for test equipment maintenance. The damage was repaired and the initial 1000 hour test period completed without further incident. After physical examination of the heat pipe at 1000 hours the test was resumed and the heat pipe operated at the same conditions for an additional 700 hours before conclusion of this test phase.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Runyan, J.R.; Martinez, H.E.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Boron-rich plasma by high power impulse magnetron sputtering of lanthanum hexaboride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron-rich plasmas have been obtained using a LaB{sub 6} target in a high power impulse sputtering (HiPIMS) system. The presence of {sup 10}B{sup +}, {sup 11}B{sup +}, Ar{sup 2+}, Ar{sup +}, La{sup 2+}, and La{sup +} and traces of La{sup 3+}, {sup 12}C{sup +}, {sup 14}N{sup +}, and {sup 16}O{sup +} have been detected using an integrated mass and energy spectrometer. Peak currents as low as 20 A were sufficient to obtain plasma dominated by {sup 11}B{sup +} from a 5 cm planar magnetron. The ion energy distribution function for boron exhibits an energetic tail extending over several 10 eV, while argon shows a pronounced peak at low energy (some eV). This is in agreement with models that consider sputtering (B, La) and gas supply (from background and 'recycling'). Strong voltage oscillations develop at high current, greatly affecting power dissipation and plasma properties.

Oks, Efim M. [State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Anders, Andre [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

RF couplers for normal-conducting photoinjector of high-power CW FEL  

SciTech Connect

A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. A preliminary design of a normal-conducting, 2.5-cell pi-mode, 700-MHz CW RF photoinjector that will be built for demonstration purposes, is completed. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating a 100-mA electron beam (3 nC per bunch at 35 MHz bunch repetition rate) to 2.7 MeV while providing an emittance below 7 mm-mrad at the wiggler. More than 1 MW of RF power will be fed into the photoinjector cavity through two ridge-loaded tapered waveguides. The waveguides are coupled to the cavity by 'dog-bone' irises cut in a thick wall. Due to CW operation of the photoinjector, the cooling of the coupler irises is a rather challenging thermal management project. This paper presents results of a detailed electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system, which has been performed to select the coupler design that minimizes the iris heating due to RF power loss in its walls.

Kurennoy, S. (Sergey)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Energy confinement experiments on Doublet III with high power neutral beam heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy confinement experiments with up to 8 MW of both hydrogen and deuterium neutral beam power were performed in deuterium plasmas with limiter and expanded boundary divertor configurations. The results of NBI-dominated experiments indicated that total stored energy W/sub T/ and energy confinement time tau/sub E/ had little or no variation with electron density anti n/sub e/ and toroidal field B/sub T/ and scaled linearly with plasma current I/sub p/. Previous studies in limiter discharges indicated a weak dependence on plasma elongation kappa. The confinement time dependence on elongation was not determined for divertor discharges, but assuming a dependence similar to that for limiter discharges both limiter and divertor data were consistent with W/sub T/ and tau/sub E/ proportional to I/sub p/..sqrt..kappa. The variation of plasma stored energy with neutral beam power was consistent with a linear relationship. The linear equation describing this relationship had a non-zero intercept which illustrated the fact that energy confinement time deteriorated with neutral beam power. The energy confinement time appears to be approaching an asymptotic value at high power, consistent with a linear functional form for stored energy. However, a power law functional form for stored energy and energy confinement time can not be ruled out.

DeBoo, J.C.; Groebner, R.J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

RF Couplers for Normal-Conducting Photoinjector of High-Power CW FEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. A preliminary design of a normal-conducting, 2.5-cell pi-mode, 700-MHz CW RF photoinjector that will be built for demonstration purposes, is completed. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating a 100-mA electron beam (3 nC per bunch at 35 MHz bunch repetition rate) to 2.7 MeV while providing an emittance below 7 mm-mrad at the wiggler. More than 1 MW of RF power will be fed into the photoinjector cavity through two ridge-loaded tapered waveguides. The waveguides are coupled to the cavity by "dog-bone" irises cut in a thick wall. Due to CW operation of the photoinjector, the cooling of the coupler irises is a rather challenging thermal management project. This paper presents results of a detailed electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system, which has been performed to select the coupler design that minimizes the iris heating due to RF power loss in its walls.

Kurennoy, Sergey; Wood, Richard L; Schultheiss, T J; Rathke, John; Young, Lloyd

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Radiation effects at a high power accelerator and applications to advanced energy sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many materials are exposed to atom-displacing radiation at high-power accelerators such as the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Beam current densities in the 800-MeV proton beam vary from 12.5 mA cm{sup {minus}2} (8 {times} 10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2}s) on graphite targets to 20-{mu}A cm{sup {minus}2} (1.3 {times} 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}s) on metal-alloy windows. High-level radiation damage results from these particle fluxes. As a consequence of secondary-particle generation in targets and windows and low-level beam losses that lead to particle interactions with structural material, various components are exposed to low-level proton fluxes, gamma radiation, and neutron fluxes of 10{sup 6}--10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}s. These include vacuum seals and vacuum chambers of stainless steel and aluminum alloys, solid-state devices for control, diagnostic, and data acquisition electronics, closed-loop cooling-water systems, and insulators. Properties of these materials are degraded by the radiation exposure. Studies of LAMPF and other accelerators, however, have produced solutions to materials problems, allowing the machines to operate for acceptable times without failure. Nevertheless, additional improvements are being investigated in order to further improve operational reliability and safety. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Sommer, W.F.; Garner, F.A.; Brown, R.D.; Wechsler, M.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

RF Distribution System for High Power Test of the SNS Cryomodule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-way waveguide RF power distribution system for testing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) multi-cavity cryomodule to investigate the collective behavior has been developed. A single klystron operating at 805MHz for 1.3 msec at 60Hz powers the 4-way waveguide splitter to deliver up to 400 kW to individual cavities. Each cavity is fed through a combination of waveguide splitters and vector modulators (VM) to provide independent magnitude and phase controls. The waveguide vector modulator consists of two quadrature hybrids and two motorized waveguide phase shifters. The phase shifters and the assembled waveguide vector modulators were individually tested and characterized for low power and high RF power in the SNS RF test facility. Precise calibrations of magnitude and phase were performed to generate the look up tables (LUTs) to provide operational references during the cryomodule test. An I-Q demodulator module was developed and utilized to measure relative phases in pulsed high RF power operation. PLC units were developed for mechanical control of the phase shifters. Initial low/high power measurements were made using LabVIEW. An operation algorithm has been implemented into EPICS control for the cryomodule test stand.

Lee, Sung-Woo [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Broyles, Michael R [ORNL; Crofford, Mark T [ORNL; Geng, Xiaosong [ORNL; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL; Phibbs, Curtis L [ORNL; Strong, William Herb [ORNL; Peglow, Robert C [ORNL; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave  

SciTech Connect

High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF{sub 6} breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF{sub 6} are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF{sub 6} breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF{sub 6} breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF{sub 6} is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

Yang Yiming; Yuan Chengwei; Qian Baoliang [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Aluminum-doped lithium nickel cobalt oxide electrodes for high-power lithium-ion batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-doped and aluminum-doped LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathodes from three industrial developers coupled with graphite anodes were made into lithium-ion cells for high-power applications. The powder morphology of the active cathode materials was examined by a scanning electron microscope. The electrochemical performance of these cells was investigated by hybrid pulse power characterization (HPPC) testing, accelerated aging, and AC impedance measurement of symmetric cells. Although all of the fresh cells are found to meet and exceed the power requirements set by PNGV, the power capability of those cells with non-doped LiNi {sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathodes fades rapidly due to the rise of the cell impedance. Al-doping is found very effective to suppress the cell impedance rise by stabilizing the charge-transfer impedance on the cathode side. The stabilization mechanism may be related to the low average oxidation state of nickel ions in the cathode. The powder morphology also plays a secondary role in determining the impedance stabilization.

Chen, C. H.; Liu, J.; Stoll, M. E.; Henriksen, G.; Vissers, D. R.; Amine, K.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Science and Technology of China

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

174

ACTIVE CATHODES FOR SUPER-HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS THROUGH SPACE CHARGE EFFECTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done during the eleventh quarter of the project. Conductivity relaxation experiments were conducted on porous La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub (3-{delta})} (LSC50) samples over a temperature range from 350 to 750 C, and over an oxygen partial pressure, p{sub O{sub 2}}, switch between 0.04 and 0.06 atm in order to determine the surface exchange coefficient, k{sub chem}. The normalized conductivity data could be fitted to a first order kinetic equation. The time constant decreased with decreasing temperature between {approx}750 and {approx}450 C, but sharply increased with decreasing temperature between 450 and 350 C. The corresponding k{sub chem} was estimated using three models: (a) A porous body model wherein it is assumed that the kinetics of surface exchange is the slowest. (b) Solution to the diffusion equation assuming the particles can be approximated as spheres. (c) Solution to the diffusion equation assuming the particles can be approximated as cylinders. The values of k{sub chem} obtained from the three models were in good agreement. In all cases, it was observed that k{sub chem} increases with decreasing temperature between 750 and 450 C, but below 450 C, it sharply decreases with further decrease in temperature.

Anil V. Virkar

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Materials cost evaluation report for high-power Li-ion batteries.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency in the partnership between the U.S. automobile industry and the federal government to develop fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) as part of the FreedomCAR Partnership. DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Office sponsors the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program--involving 5 of its national laboratories--to assist the industrial developers of high-power lithium-ion batteries to overcome the barriers of cost, calendar life, and abuse tolerance so that this technology can be rendered practical for use in HEV and FCEV applications under the FreedomCAR Partnership. In the area of cost reduction, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously extending the calendar life and enhancing the inherent safety of this electrochemical system. The material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in the production of batteries that are designed to meet the requirements of a minimum-power-assist HEV battery or a maximum-power-assist HEV battery for the FreedomCAR Partnership. Similar models will be developed for FEV batteries when the requirements for those batteries are finalized. In order to quantify the material costs relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared with the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. As can be seen from the results of this materials cost study, a cell chemistry based on the use of a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode material is lowest-cost and meets our battery-level material cost goal of <$250 for a 25-kW minimum-power-assist HEV battery. A major contributing factor is the high-rate capability of this material, which allows one to design a lower-capacity cell to meet the battery-level power and energy requirements. This reduces the quantities of the other materials needed to produce a 25-kW minimum-power-assist HEV battery. The same is true for the 40-kW maximum-power-assist HEV battery. Additionally, the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode is much more thermally and chemically stable than the LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} type cathode, which should enhance inherent safety and extend calendar life (if the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode can be stabilized against dissolution via HF attack). Therefore, we recommend that the FreedomCAR Partnership focus its research and development efforts on developing this type of low-cost high-power lithium-ion cell chemistry. Details supporting this recommendation are provided in the body of this report.

Henriksen, G. L.; Amine, K.; Liu, J.

2003-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Materials cost evaluation report for high-power Li-ion batteries.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency in the partnership between the U.S. automobile industry and the federal government to develop fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) as part of the FreedomCAR Partnership. DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Office sponsors the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program--involving 5 of its national laboratories--to assist the industrial developers of high-power lithium-ion batteries to overcome the barriers of cost, calendar life, and abuse tolerance so that this technology can be rendered practical for use in HEV and FCEV applications under the FreedomCAR Partnership. In the area of cost reduction, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously extending the calendar life and enhancing the inherent safety of this electrochemical system. The material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in the production of batteries that are designed to meet the requirements of a minimum-power-assist HEV battery or a maximum-power-assist HEV battery for the FreedomCAR Partnership. Similar models will be developed for FEV batteries when the requirements for those batteries are finalized. In order to quantify the material costs relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared with the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. As can be seen from the results of this materials cost study, a cell chemistry based on the use of a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode material is lowest-cost and meets our battery-level material cost goal of battery. A major contributing factor is the high-rate capability of this material, which allows one to design a lower-capacity cell to meet the battery-level power and energy requirements. This reduces the quantities of the other materials needed to produce a 25-kW minimum-power-assist HEV battery. The same is true for the 40-kW maximum-power-assist HEV battery. Additionally, the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode is much more thermally and chemically stable than the LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} type cathode, which should enhance inherent safety and extend calendar life (if the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode can be stabilized against dissolution via HF attack). Therefore, we recommend that the FreedomCAR Partnership focus its research and development efforts on developing this type of low-cost high-power lithium-ion cell chemistry. Details supporting this recommendation are provided in the body of this report.

Henriksen, G. L.; Amine, K.; Liu, J.

2003-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

High-power laser and arc welding of thorium-doped iridium alloys  

SciTech Connect

The arc and laser weldabilities of two Ir-0.3% W alloys containing 60 and 200 wt ppM Th have been investigated. The Ir-.03% W alloy containing 200 wt ppM Th is severely prone to hot cracking during gas tungsten-arc welding. Weld metal cracking results from the combined effects of heat-affected zone liquation cracking and solidification cracking. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the fractured surface revealed patches of low-melting eutectic. The cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and thorium content. The alloy has been welded with a continuous-wave high-power CO/sub 2/ laser system with beam power ranging from 5 to 10 kW and welding speeds of 8 to 25 mm/s. Successful laser welds without hot cracking have been obtained in this particular alloy. This is attributable to the highly concentrated heat source available in the laser beam and the refinement in fusion zone microstructure obtained during laser welding. Efforts to refine the fusion zone structure during gas tungsten-arc welding of Ir-0.3 % W alloy containing 60 wt ppM Th were partially successful. Here transverse arc oscillation during gas tungsten-arc welding refines the fusion zone structure to a certain extent. However, microstructural analysis of this alloy's laser welds indicates further refinement in the fusion zone microstructure than in that from the gas tungsten-arc process using arc oscillations. The fusion zone structure of the laser weld is a strong function of welding speed.

David, S.A.; Liu, C.T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Study of second harmonic generation by high power laser beam in magneto plasma  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the problem of nonlinear generation of second harmonic of a high power laser pulse propagating in magnetized plasma. The propagation of strong laser beam is proposed in the direction perpendicular to a relatively weak static magnetic field. The laser pulse is taken to be linearly polarized, with the orientation of its electric field that corresponds to an ordinary electromagnetic wave. Besides the standard ponderomotive nonlinearity, the appropriate wave equation also contains the nonlinearity that arises from the relativistic electron jitter velocities. During its propagation, the laser beam gets filamented on account of relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities present in the plasma. The generated plasma wave gets coupled into the filamentary structures of the pump beam. Due to the expected presence of the beam filamentation, the work has been carried out by considering modified paraxial approximation (i.e., beyond the standard paraxial approximation of a very broad beam). It is found that the power of the plasma wave is significantly affected by the magnetic field strength in the presence of both relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities. It is investigated that the second harmonic generation is also considerably modified by altering the strength of magnetic field. To see the effect of static magnetic field on the harmonic generation, a key parameter, i.e., the ratio of the cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c}=eB{sub 0}/mc over the laser frequency {omega}{sub 0} has been used, where c is the velocity of light, m and e are the mass and charge of the electron and B{sub 0} is the externally applied magnetic field.

Sharma, Prerana [Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh 465010 (India); Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm3) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the 7Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ~200oC and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of > 4 kW/cm2 and volume power density of ~ 2 MW/cm3 at a lithium flow of ~4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91- 2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF.

S. Halfon; A. Arenshtam; D. Kijel; M. Paul; D. Berkovits; I. Eliyahu; G. Feinberg; M. Friedman; N. Hazenshprung; I. Mardor; A. Nagler; G. Shimel; M. Tessler; I. Silverman

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

High-power laser and arc welding of thorium-doped iridium alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The arc and laser weldabilities of two Ir-0.3% W alloys containing 60 and 200 wt ppM Th have been investigated. The Ir-.03% W alloy containing 200 wt ppM Th is severely prone to hot cracking during gas tungsten-arc welding. Weld metal cracking results from the combined effects of heat-affected zone liquation cracking and solidification cracking. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the fractured surface revealed patches of low-melting eutectic. The cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and thorium content. The alloy has been welded with a continuous-wave high-power CO/sub 2/ laser system with beam power ranging from 5 to 10 kW and welding speeds of 8 to 25 mm/s. Successful laser welds without hot cracking have been obtained in this particular alloy. This is attributable to the highly concentrated heat source available in the laser beam and the refinement in fusion zone microstructure obtained during laser welding. Efforts to refine the fusion zone structure during gas tungsten-arc welding of Ir-0.3 % W alloy containing 60 wt ppM Th were partially successful. Here transverse arc oscillation during gas tungsten-arc welding refines the fusion zone structure to a certain extent. However, microstructural analysis of this alloy's laser welds indicates further refinement in the fusion zone microstructure than in that from the gas tungsten-arc process using arc oscillations. The fusion zone structure of the laser weld is a strong function of welding speed.

David, S.A.; Liu, C.T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

HIGH-POWER PRECISION CURRENT SUPPLY IST2-1000M FOR ELEMENTS OF MAGNETIC SYSTEMS OF ACCELERATORS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BF), a detached supply transformer and power switch. Power box PB comprises the following: - a threeHIGH-POWER PRECISION CURRENT SUPPLY IST2-1000M FOR ELEMENTS OF MAGNETIC SYSTEMS OF ACCELERATORS. These supplies are intended to power magnetic systems of accelerators, requiring high stability and low ripples

Kozak, Victor R.

183

Multisegmented Au-MnO2/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Coaxial Arrays for High-Power Supercapacitor Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multisegmented Au-MnO2/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Coaxial Arrays for High-Power SupercapacitorVised Manuscript ReceiVed: NoVember 4, 2009 The present work reports on synthesis and supercapacitor applications hybrid coaxial arrays are efficient electrodes for supercapacitor applications. Au-segmented MnO2/CNT

Ajayan, Pulickel M.

184

Analysis and Design of a High Power Density Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Machine Used for Stirling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a high power density axial flux permanent magnet linear synchronous machine and the stirling system will be introduced. This machine is a tubular axial flux permanent magnet machine. It comprises two parts: stator and mover. With the 2D finite-element ... Keywords: permanent magnet, stirling engine, linear motor

Ping Zheng; Xuhui Gan; Lin Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in piezoelectric GaInN/GaN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in piezoelectric GaInN/GaN Christian in green light emitting diodes is one of the big challenges towards all-solid- state lighting. The prime,3], and commercialization [4,5] of high brightness light emitting diodes LEDs has led to a 1.82 Billion-$/year world market

Detchprohm, Theeradetch

186

Thermodynamic and Kinetic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 11, 2012... capability of the coating and thus the achievable engine efficiency. ... Aluminide coating of steels enables more efficient power generation through ... and kinetic modeling in order to build a time and temperature dependent...

187

Thermodynamic & Kinetic Data for Sustainable Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic & Kinetic Data for Sustainable Energy. Summary: Industry needs thermodynamic and kinetic data for the ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

188

A NEW CROWBAR SYSTEM FOR THE PROTECTION OF HIGH POWER GRIDDED TUBES AND MICROWAVE DEVICES  

SciTech Connect

As part of the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) facility upgrade at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, two 8.4 MW modulator/regulator power systems were designed and constructed (Ref. 1). Each power system uses a high power tetrode to modulate and regulate the cathode voltage for two 1 MW-class 110 GHz gyrotrons (Ref. 2). A critical element in the power system is the fault energy divertor, or crowbar switch, that protects the tetrode and the gyrotrons in the event of an arc fault. Traditionally, mercury filled ignitron switches are used for this application, but it was desired to eliminate hazardous materials and improve overall switching performance. The new crowbar switch system was required to meet the following requirements: Operating voltage: -105 kVdc; Peak current (750 ms e-fold): 1.6 kA; Follow-on current: <1 kA (25 ms); Charge transfer per shot: <15 Cb; and Turn-on time: <1 {micro}s. The switch that was chosen for the new design is a low pressure deuterium filled device, called a metal-arc thyratron, manufactured by Marconi Applied Technologies (Ref. 3). In addition to the new crowbar switch assembly, improved fault signal processing circuitry was developed. This new circuitry uses fiber-optics for signal and trigger transmission and a complex programmable logic device for high speed signal and logic processing. Two generations of metal-arc thyratrons have been commissioned in the two ECH power systems constructed at DIII-D. In the first, the crowbar system performed extremely well, meeting all of the operating requirements and demonstrating its ability to protect a 36 gauge copper wire from fusing (energy let-through <10 J). However, after accumulating over 500 shots, the metal-arc thyratrons lost their ability to reliably hold-off voltage. This problem was solved by Marconi with a design modification of the thyratron electrodes. The second generation tubes were installed in the second ECH power system. The crowbar system was fully commissioned and all of the performance requirements were satisfactorily achieved. The design of the crowbar switch and the fault signal processing system and their performance will be presented in this paper.

S.G.E. PRONKO; T.E.HARRIS

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Composite Cathode for High-Power Density Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reduction of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operating temperature will play a key role in reducing the stack cost by allowing the use of low-cost metallic interconnects and new approaches to sealing, while making applications such as transportation more feasible. Reported results for anode-supported SOFCs show that cathode polarization resistance is the primary barrier to achieving high power densities at operating temperatures of 700 C and lower. This project aims to identify and develop composite cathodes that could reduce SOFC operating temperatures below 700 C. This effort focuses on study and use of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O{sub 3} (LSCF) based composite cathodes, which have arguably the best potential to substantially improve on the currently-used, (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}-Yttria-stabilized Zirconia. During this Phase I, it was successfully demonstrated that high performances can be achieved with LSCF/Gadolinium-Doped Ceria composite cathodes on Ni-based anode supported cells operating at 700 C or lower. We studied electrochemical reactions at LSCF/Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) interfaces, and observed chemical reactions between LSCF and YSZ. By using ceria electrolytes or YSZ electrolytes with ceria diffusion barrier layers, the chemical reactions between LSCF and electrolytes were prevented under cathode firing conditions necessary for the optimal adhesion of the cathodes. The protection provided by ceria layer is expected to be adequate for stable long-term cathode performances, but more testing is needed to verify this. Using ceria-based barrier layers, high performance Ni-YSZ anode supported cells have been demonstrated with maximum power densities of 0.8W/cm2 at 700 C and 1.6W/cm{sup 2} at 800 C. Ni-SDC anode supported cells with SDC electrolytes yielded >1W/cm{sup 2} at 600 C. We speculate that the power output of Ni-YSZ anode supported cell at 700 C and lower, was limited by the quality of the Ceria and Ceria YSZ interface. Improvements in the low-temperature performances are expected based on further development of barrier layer fabrication processes and optimization of cathode microstructure.

Ilwon Kim; Scott Barnett; Yi Jiang; Manoj Pillai; Nikkia McDonald; Dan Gostovic; Zhongryang Zhan; Jiang Liu

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING  

SciTech Connect

Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole coiled tube drilling offers the opportunity to dramatically cut producers' exploration risk to a level comparable to that of drilling development wells. Together, such efforts hold great promise for economically recovering a sizeable portion of the estimated remaining shallow (less than 5,000 feet subsurface) oil resource in the United States. The DOE estimates this U.S. targeted shallow resource at 218 billion barrels. Furthermore, the smaller 'footprint' of the lightweight rigs utilized for microhole drilling and the accompanying reduced drilling waste disposal volumes offer the bonus of added environmental benefits. DOE analysis shows that microhole technology has the potential to cut exploratory drilling costs by at least a third and to slash development drilling costs in half.

Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

An investigation of the resistance rise and power fade in high-power Li-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two different cell chemistries, Gen 1 and Gen 2, were subjected to accelerated aging experiments. In Gen 1 calendar-life experiments, useful cell life was strongly affected by temperature and time. Higher temperatures accelerated the degradation of cell performance. The rates of resistance increase and power fade followed simple laws based on a power of time and Arrhenius kinetics. The data have been modeled using these two concepts, and the calculated data agree well with the experimental values. The Gen 1 calendar-life resistance increase and power fade data follow (time){sup 1/2} kinetics. This may be due to solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer growth. From the cycle-life experiments, the resistance increase data also follow (time){sup 1/2} kinetics. But there is an apparent change in overall power fade mechanism going from 3% to 6% {Delta}SOC. Here, the power of time changes to a value less than 0.5, indicating that the power fade mechanism is more complex than layer growth. The Gen 2 calendar- and cycle-life experiments show the effect of cell chemistry on kinetics. The calendar-life resistance and power fade follow either linear or linear plus (time){sup 1/2} kinetics, depending on temperature. Temperature dependence for the kinetic law was also found in the cycle-life data. At 25 C, the resistance increase (and power fade) follows linear kinetics, while at 45 C, (time){sup 1/2} kinetics are found.

Bloom, I.; Jones, S. A.; Battaglia, V. S.; Polzin, E. G.; Henriksen, G. L.; Motloch, C. G.; Christophersen, J. P.; Belt, J. R.; Ho, C. D.; Wright, R. B.; Jungst, R. G.; Case, H. L.; Doughty, D. H.

2002-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

192

Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

High-power Waveguide Dampers for the Short-Pulse X-Ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-power waveguide dampers have been designed and prototyped for the Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) cavities at the Advanced Photon Source. The cavities will operate at 2.815 GHz and utilize the TM110 dipole mode. As a result, higher-order (HOM) and lower-order mode (LOM) in-vacuum dampers have been designed to satisfy the demanding broadband damping requirements in the APS storage ring. The SPX single-cell cavity consists of two WR284 waveguides for damping the HOMs and one WR284 waveguide for primarily damping the LOM where up to 2kW will be dissipated in the damping material. The damper designs and high-power experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

Waldschmidt, G J; Liu, J; Middendorf, M E; Nassiri, A; Smith, T L; Wu, G; Henry, J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Title The development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2005 Authors Striebel, Kathryn A., Joongpyo Shim, Azucena Sierra, Hui Yang, Xiangyun Song, Robert Kostecki, and Kathryn N. McCarthy Journal Journal of Power Sources Volume 146 Pagination 33-38 Keywords libob, lifepo4, lithium-ion, post-test, raman spectroscopy Abstract Pouch type LiFePO4-natural graphite lithium-ion cells were cycled at constant current with periodic pulse-power testing in several different configurations. Components were analyzed after cycling with electrochemical, Raman and TEM techniques to determine capacity fade mechanisms. The cells with carbon-coated current collectors in the cathode and LiBOB-salt electrolyte showed the best performance stability. In many cases, iron species were detected on the anodes removed from cells with both TEM and Raman spectroscopy. The LiFePO4 electrodes showed unchanged capacity suggesting that the iron is migrating in small quantities and is acting as a catalyst to destabilize the anode SEI in these cells.

195

Improved long-term electrical stability of pulsed high-power diodes using dense carbon fiber velvet cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of fibrous velvet cathodes on the electrical stability of a planar high-power diode powered by a {approx}230 kV, {approx}110 ns pulse has been investigated. The current density was on the order of {approx}123 A/cm{sup 2}. A combination of time-resolved electrical and optical diagnostics has been employed to study the basic phenomenology of the temporal and spatial evolution of the diode plasmas. Additionally, an impedance model was used to extract information about this plasma from voltage and current profiles. The results from the two diagnostics were compared. By comparison with commercial polymer velvet cathode, the dense carbon fiber velvet cathode showed superior long-term electrical stability as judged by the change in cathode turn-on field, ignition delays, diode impedance, and surface plasma characteristics during the voltage flattop, a promising result for applications where reliable operation at high power is required. Finally, it was shown that the interaction of the electron beam with the stainless steel anode did not lead to the formation of anode plasma. These results may be of interest to the high power microwave systems with cold cathodes.

Yang Jie; Shu Ting; Wang Hui [College of Opto-Electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Hunan 410073 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

High Power Testing Results of the X-band Mixed-mode RF Windows for Linear Colliders  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we summarize the high power testing results of the X-band mixed-mode RF windows at KEK and SLAC for linear colliders. The main feature of these windows is that the combination of modes on the surface of the ceramic significantly decreases the electric and magnetic fields in the junction between the ceramic and the metal. So far two types of high power windows (with the diameter of 53 mm and 64 mm) have been fabricated. A high power model of the smaller type window was fabricated and tested in a resonant ring at KEK. A maximum circulating power of 81 MW with 300 ns duration or 66 MW with 700 ns duration was achieved. Light emission was observed for a power level of over 10 MW. Later, both windows were shipped to SLAC for even higher power testing using combined power from two klystrons. The first window (53 mm diameter) achieved a transmitted power of 80 MW with 1.5 microsec duration at 30 Hz repetition. It was not destroyed during the testing. The testing of the second window was carried out next to the small type and achieved 62 MW with 1.5 microsec duration with 10 Hz repetition. The final results of both windows are presented in this report.

Loewen, Roderick J

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Wave Theory / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

D. Van Eester; E. Lerche

198

Observation of high-power millimeter wave emission from a virtual cathode  

SciTech Connect

Intense bursts of mm wave power have been observed in microwave generation experiments with a relativistic electron beam (REB) virtual cathode oscillator. In this device an electron beam is injected into a drift space at a current above the space-charge-limit, and a potential develops downstream which is large enough to reflect electrons back to the source region. Two mechanisms can give rise to microwave oscillations in a virtual cathode device: electrons reflexing between the real and virtual cathodes, and oscillations in the amplitude and position of the virtual cathode. Typically both mechanisms are present, but in the present experiments reflexing has been shown to be dominant.

Davis, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Sherwood, E.G.; Stringfield, R.M.; Thode, L.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Analysis, design, and experiments of a high-power-factor electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

A charge pump power-factor-correction (CPPFC) converter is first derived, and its unity power factor condition is then reviewed. A single-stage power-factor-correction electronic ballast using the charge pump concept is analyzed. The design criteria are derived to optimize the electronic ballast based on the steady-state analysis. Constant lamp power operations associated with its control are also discussed. Large signal simulation and experimental results verify the theoretical analysis. It is shown that the designed electronic ballast has 0.995 power factor and 5% total harmonic distortion (THD) with lamp power variation within {+-}15% when the line input voltage changes {+-}10%.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yamauchi, T. [Matsushita Electric Works, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

Vn, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

P. Vn

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Power Beamed Photon Sails: New Capabilities Resulting From Recent Maturation Of Key Solar Sail And High Power Laser Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This paper revisits some content in the First International Symposium on Beamed Energy Propulsion in 2002 related to the concept of propellantless in-space propulsion utilizing an external high energy laser to provide momentum to an ultralightweight (gossamer) spacecraft. The design and construction of the NanoSail-D solar sail demonstration spacecraft has demonstrated in space flight hardware the concept of small, very light--yet capable--spacecraft. The results of the Joint High Power Solid State Laser (JHPSSL) have also increased the effectiveness and reduced the cost of an entry level laser source. This paper identifies the impact from improved system parameters on current mission applications.

Montgomery, Edward E. IV [United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

The development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cycling performance of low-cost LiFePO4-based high-power lithium-ion cells was investigated and the components were analyzed after cycling to determine capacity fade mechanisms. Pouch type LiFePO4/natural graphite cells were assembled and evaluated by constant C/2 cycling, pulse-power and impedance measurements. From post-test electrochemical analysis after cycling, active materials, LiFePO4 and natural graphite, showed no degradation structurally or electrochemically. The main reasons for the capacity fade of cell were lithium inventory loss by side reaction and possible lithium deposition on the anode.

Shim, Joongpyo; Sierra, Azucena; Striebel, Kathryn A.

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

204

Analysis and experimental results of a single-stage high-power-factor electronic ballast based on flyback converter  

SciTech Connect

A new single-stage high-power-factor electronic ballast based on a flyback converter is presented in this paper. The ballast is able to supply a fluorescent lamp assuring a high-input power factor for the utility line. Other features are lamp power regulation against line voltage variations and low lamp current crest factor, both assuring long lamp life. The ballast is analyzed at steady-state operation, and design equations and characteristics are obtained. Also, a procedure for the ballast design is presented. Finally, simulation and experimental results from a laboratory prototype are shown.

Calleja, A.J.; Alonso, J.M.; Lopez, E.; Ribas, J.; Martinez, J.A.; Rico-Secades, M.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

An investigation of the impedance rise and power fade in high-power, Li-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two different cell chemistries, Gen 1 and Gen 2, were subjected to accelerated aging experiments. In Gen 1 calendar life experiments, useful cell life was strongly affected by temperature and time. Higher temperature accelerated cell performance degradation. The rates of impedance increase and power fade followed simple laws based on a power of time and Arrhenius kinetics. The data have been modeled using these two concepts, and the calculated data agree well with the experimental values. The Gen 1 calendar life increase and power fade data follow (time){sup 1/2} kinetics. This may be due to solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer growth. From the cycle life experiments, the impedance increase data follow (time){sup 1/2} kinetics also, there is an apparent change in overall power fade mechanism, from 3% to 6% {Delta}SOC. Here, the power of time changes to a value less than 0.5 indicating that the power fade mechanism is due to factors more complex than just SEI layer growth. The Gen 2 calendar and cycle life experiments show the effect of cell chemistry on kinetics. The calendar life impedance data follow either ''linear'' or (time){sup 1/2} plus linear kinetics, depending on time and temperature.

Bloom, I.; Jones, S. A.; Battaglia, V. S.; Polzin, E. G.; Henriksen, G. L.; Motloch, C. G.; Christophersen, J. P.; Belt, J. R.; Ho, C. D.; Wright, R. B.; Jungst, R. G.; Case, H. L.; Doughty, D. H.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array  

SciTech Connect

A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fundamental Studies and Development of III-N Visible LEDs for High-Power Solid-State Lighting Applications  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this program is to understand in a fundamental way the impact of strain, defects, polarization, and Stokes loss in relation to unique device structures upon the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and efficiency droop (ED) of III-nitride (III-N) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and to employ this understanding in the design and growth of high-efficiency LEDs capable of highly-reliable, high-current, high-power operation. This knowledge will be the basis for our advanced device epitaxial designs that lead to improved device performance. The primary approach we will employ is to exploit new scientific and engineering knowledge generated through the application of a set of unique advanced growth and characterization tools to develop new concepts in strain-, polarization-, and carrier dynamics-engineered and low-defect materials and device designs having reduced dislocations and improved carrier collection followed by efficient photon generation. We studied the effects of crystalline defect, polarizations, hole transport, electron-spillover, electron blocking layer, underlying layer below the multiplequantum- well active region, and developed high-efficiency and efficiency-droop-mitigated blue LEDs with a new LED epitaxial structures. We believe new LEDs developed in this program will make a breakthrough in the development of high-efficiency high-power visible III-N LEDs from violet to green spectral region.

Dupuis, Russell

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

Microscopy and spectroscopy of lithium nickel oxide based particles used in high-power lithium-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Structural and electronic investigations were conducted on lithium nickel oxide-based particles used in positive electrodes of 18650-type high-power Li-ion cells. K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed trivalent Ni and Co ions in the bulk LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} powder used to prepare the high power electrode laminates. Using oxygen K-edge XAS, high resolution electron microscopy, nanoprobe diffraction, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we identified a <5 nm thick modified layer on the surface of the oxide particles, which results from the loss of Ni and Li ordering in the layered R{bar 3}m structure. This structural change was accompanied by oxygen loss and a lowering of the Ni- and Co-oxidation states in the surface layer. Growth of this surface layer may contribute to the impedance rise observed during accelerated aging of these Li-ion cells.

Abraham, D. P.; Twesten, R. D.; Balasubramanian, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Fischer, D.; McBreen, J.; Petrov, I.; Amine, K.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Illinois; BNL; NIST

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Low-cost flexible packaging for high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Batteries with various types of chemistries are typically sold in rigid hermetically sealed containers that, at the simplest level, must contain the electrolyte while keeping out the exterior atmosphere. However, such rigid containers can have limitations in packaging situations where the form of the battery is important, such as in hand-held electronics like personal digital assistants (PDAs), laptops, and cell phones. Other limitations exist as well. At least one of the electrode leads must be insulated from the metal can, which necessitates the inclusion of an insulated metal feed-through in the containment hardware. Another limitation may be in hardware and assembly cost, such as exists for the lithium-ion batteries that are being developed for use in electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The large size (typically 10-100 Ah) of these batteries usually results in electric beam or laser welding of the metal cap to the metal can. The non-aqueous electrolyte used in these batteries are usually based on flammable solvents and therefore require the incorporation of a safety rupture vent to relieve pressure in the event of overcharging or overheating. Both of these features add cost to the battery. Flexible packaging provides an alternative to the rigid container. A common example of this is the multi-layered laminates used in the food packaging industry, such as for vacuum-sealed coffee bags. However, flexible packaging for batteries does not come without concerns. One of the main concerns is the slow egress of the electrolyte solvent through the face of the inner laminate layer and at the sealant edge. Also, moisture and air could enter from the outside via the same method. These exchanges may be acceptable for brief periods of time, but for the long lifetimes required for batteries in electric/hybrid electric vehicles, batteries in remote locations, and those in satellites, these exchanges are unacceptable. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with several industrial partners, is working on low-cost flexible packaging as an alternative to the packaging currently being used for lithium-ion batteries [1,2]. This program is funded by the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. (It was originally funded under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, or PNGV, Program, which had as one of its mandates to develop a power-assist hybrid electric vehicle with triple the fuel economy of a typical sedan.) The goal in this packaging effort is to reduce the cost associated with the packaging of each cell several-fold to less than $1 per cell ({approx} 50 cells are required per battery, 1 battery per vehicle), while maintaining the integrity of the cell contents for a 15-year lifetime. Even though the battery chemistry of main interest is the lithium-ion system, the methodology used to develop the most appropriate laminate structure will be very similar for other battery chemistries.

Jansen, A. N.; Amine, K.; Henriksen, G. L.

2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

211

Kinetics of coal pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA)); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA)); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Amber Kinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Amber Kinetics Product Start-up company developing a novel flywheel energy storage system with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. References Amber...

213

2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Foro Energy: High Power Lasers - Long Distances (Performer Video)  

SciTech Connect

The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video from Foro Energy are Joel Moxley, Founder and CEO, Mark Zediker, Founder and CTO, and Paul Deutch, President and COO. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy, also appears briefly in this video to praise the accomplishment of a high powered laser that can transmit that power long distances for faster and more powerful drilling of geothermal, oil, and gas wells.

None Available

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Numerical investigation of the physical model of a high-power electromagnetic wave in a magnetically insulated transmission line  

SciTech Connect

An efficient numerical code for simulating the propagation of a high-power electromagnetic pulse in a vacuum transmission line is required to study the physical phenomena occurring in such a line, to analyze the operation of present-day megavolt generators at an {approx}10-TW power level, and to design such new devices. The main physical theoretical principles are presented, and the stability of flows in the near-threshold region at the boundary of the regime of magnetic self-insulation is investigated based on one-dimensional telegraph equations with electron losses. Numerical (difference) methods-specifically, a method of characteristics and a finite-difference scheme-are described and their properties and effectiveness are compared by analyzing the high-frequency modes.

Samokhin, A. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Means and method for characterizing high power, ultra short laser pulses in a real time, on line manner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra short (<10 ps), high power laser pulse is temporally characterized by a system that uses a physical measurement of a wavefront that has been altered in a known manner. The system includes a first reflection switch to remove a portion of a pulse from a beam of pulses, then includes a second reflection switch, operating in a mode that is opposite to the first reflection switch, to slice off a portion of that removed portion. The sliced portion is then directed to a measuring device for physical measurement. The two reflection switches are arranged with respect to each other and with respect to the beam of ultra short pulses such that physical measurement of the sliced portion is related to the temporal measurement of the ultra short pulse by a geometric or trigonometric relationship. The reflection switches are operated by a control pulse that is directed to impinge on each of the reflection switches at a 90.degree. angle of incidence.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems  

SciTech Connect

In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

Guo, Jiquan; /SLAC

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development of Novel Density Functionals for Thermochemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functional for the exploration of reaction mechanisms is proposed. This new functional, denoted BMK (Boese-Martin for Kinetics), has an accuracy in the 2 kcal/mol range for transition state barriers but, unlike previous attempts at such a functional, this improved accuracy does not come at the expense of equilibrium properties. This makes it a general-purpose functional whose domain of applicability has been extended to transition states, rather than a specialized functional for kinetics. The improvement in BMK rests on the inclusion of the kinetic energy density together with a large value of the exact exchange mixing coefficient. For this functional, the kinetic energy density appears to correct `back' the excess exact exchange mixing for ground-state properties, possibly simulating variable exchange.

Boese, A D; Martin, Jan M. L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

5, 86898714, 2005 The Kinetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Note: Simulating chemical systems in Fortran90 and Matlab with the Kinetic PreProcessor KPP-2.1 A estimation techniques, and variational chemical data assimilation applications require the development of ef- ficient tools for the computational simulation of chemical kinetics systems. From a numerical point

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

219

Thermodynamics and Kinetics Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Staff (06/28/2013). Thermodynamic & Kinetic Data for Sustainable Energy (10/05/2012). Thermodynamics and Kinetics Group (07/06/2013 ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

Design and 3D simulation of a two-cavity wide-gap relativistic klystron amplifier with high power injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, an S-band two-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) loaded with washers/rods structure is designed and investigated for high power injection application. Influences of the washers/rods structure on the high frequency characteristics and the basic operation of the amplifier are presented. Generally, the rod structure has great impacts on the space-charge potential depression and the resonant frequency of the cavities. Nevertheless, if only the resonant frequency is tuned to the desired operation frequency, effects of the rod size on the basic operation of the amplifier are expected to be very weak. The 3-dimension (3-D) PIC simulation results show an output power of 0.98 GW corresponding to an efficiency of 33% for the WKA, with a 594 keV, 5 kA electron beam guided by an external magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. Moreover, if a conductive plane is placed near the output gap, such as the electron collector, the beam potential energy can be further released, and the RF power can be increased to about 1.07 GW with the conversion efficiency of about 36%.

Bai Xianchen; Yang Jianhua; Zhang Jiande [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Characterization of the Li(Si)/CoS(2) couple for a high-voltage, high-power thermal battery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to determined the capabilities of a thermal battery with high-voltage and high-power requirements, a detailed characterization of the candidate LiSi/LiCl-LiBr-LiF/CoS{sub 2} electrochemical couple was conducted. The rate capability of this system was investigated using 0.75 inch-dia. and 1.25 inch-dia. single and multiple cells under isothermal conditions, where the cells were regularly pulsed at increasingly higher currents. Limitations of the electronic loads and power supplies necessitated using batteries to obtain the desired maximum current densities possible for this system. Both 1.25 inch-dia. and 3 inch-dia. stacks were used with the number of cells ranging from 5 to 20. Initial tests involved 1.25 inch-dia. cells, where current densities in excess of 15 A/cm{sup 2} (>200 W/cm{sup 2}) were attained with 20-cell batteries during 1-s pulses. In subsequent follow-up tests with 3 inch-dia., 10-cell batteries, ten 400-A 1-s pulses were delivered over an operating period often minutes. These tests formed the foundation for subsequent full-sized battery tests with 125 cells with this chemistry.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

High power testing of the 402.5 MHZ and 805 MHZ RF windows for the spallation neutron source accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Hisorically, Radio Frequency (RF) windows have been a common point of failure in input power couplers; therefore, reliable RF windows are critical to the success of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. The normal conducting part of the SNS accelerator requires six RF windows at 402.5 MHz and eight RF windows at 805 MHz[l]. Each RF window will transmit up to 180 kW of average power and 2.5 MW peak power at 60 Hz with 1.2 millisecond pulses. The RF windows, designed and manufactured by Thales, were tested at the full average power for 4 hours to ensure no problems with the high average power and then tested to an effective forward power level of 10 MW by testing at 2.5 MW forward power into a short and varying the phase of the standing wave. The sliding short was moved from 0 to 180 degrees to ensure no arcing or breakdown problems occur in any part of the window. This paper discusses the results of the high power testing of both the 402.5 MHz and the 805 MHz RF windows. Problems encountered during testing and the solutions for these problems are discussed.

Cummings, K. A. (Karen Ann); De Baca, J. M. (John M.); Harrison, J. S. (John S.); Rodriguez, M. B. (Manuelita B.); Torrez, P. A. (Phillip A.); Warner, D. K. (David K.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hazard Analysis for the High Power Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Experiments at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE).  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Target/Blanket and Materials Engineering Demonstration and Development (ED and D) Project has undertaken a major program of high-power materials irradiation at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Accelerator. Five experiments have been installed in the Target A-6 area, immediately before the Isotope Production facility and the LANSCE bearnstop, where they will take a 1.0-mAmp-proton beam for up to 10 months. This operation is classed as a Nuclear Category (cat)-3 activity, since enough radionuclides buildup in the path of tie beam to exceed cat-3 threshold quantities. In the process of analyzing this buildup, it was realized that a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) could result in oxidation and subsequent vaporization of certain tungsten elements contained in our experiments. If this process occurs in the presence of steam, breakup of the water molecule would also provide a potentially explosive source of hydrogen, causing maximum release of radioactive aerosols to the surrounding environment. This process can occur in a matter of seconds. Such a release would result in potentially unacceptable dose to the public at the LANSCE site boundary, 800 meters from the A-6 area.

Waters, L.S.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

Diagnostic evaluation of power fade phenomena and calendar lifereduction in high-power lithium-ion batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-power Li-ion cells with graphite anodes and LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} cathodes that were cycled and stored at elevated temperatures showed a significant impedance rise and capacity fade, which were associated primarily with the LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} cathode. A combination of electrochemical, physical, and chemical diagnostic techniques, including Raman, SEM, and current-sensing AFM, was used to characterize the cathodes from these cells in order to produce a clear picture of the mechanism for cell degradation. Systematic Raman mapping of 50 x 80 {mu}m areas at 0.9 {mu}m spatial resolution produced semi-quantitative composition maps of cathode surfaces. Raman microscopy surface composition maps and SEM images of cathodes from tested cells revealed that cell cycling or storage at elevated temperatures led to significant changes in the LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}/elemental-carbon surface concentration ratio. The loss of conductive carbon correlated with the power and capacity fade of the tested cathodes and the loss of surface electronic conductivity.

Kostecki, Robert; McLarnon, Frank

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Means and method for characterizing high power, ultra short laser pulses in a real time, on line manner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra short (<10 ps), high power laser pulse is temporally characterized by a system that uses a physical measurement of a wavefront that has been altered in a known manner. The system includes a first reflection switch to remove a portion of a pulse from a beam of pulses, then includes a second reflection switch, operating in a mode that is opposite to the first reflection switch, to slice off a portion of that removed portion. The sliced portion is then directed to a measuring device for physical measurement. The two reflection switches are arranged with respect to each other and with respect to the beam of ultra short pulses such that physical measurement of the sliced portion is related to the temporal measurement of the ultra short pulse by a geometric or trigonometric relationship. The reflection switches are operated by a control pulse that is directed to impinge on each of the reflection switches at a 90[degree] angle of incidence. 8 figures.

Veligdan, J.T.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

226

Physics of Plasma-Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID)and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS): A Comparison  

SciTech Connect

The emerging technology of High Power Impulse MagnetronSputtering (HIPIMS) has much in common with the more establishedtechnology of Plasma Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID):both use pulsed plasmas, the pulsed sheath periodically evolves andcollapses, the plasma-sheath system interacts with the pulse-drivingpower supply, the plasma parameters are affected by the power dissipated,surface atoms are sputtered and secondary electrons are emitted, etc.Therefore, both fields of science and technology could learn from eachother, which has not been fully explored. On the other hand, there aresignificant differences, too. Most importantly, the operation of HIPIMSheavilyrelies on the presence of a strong magnetic field, confiningelectrons and causing their ExB drift, which is closed for typicalmagnetron configurations. Second, at the high peak power levels used forHIPIMS, 1 kW/cm2 or greater averaged over the target area, the sputteredmaterial greatly affects plasma generation. For PBIID, in contrast,plasma generation and ion processing of the surface (ion implantation,etching, and deposition) are considered rela-tively independentprocesses. Third, secondary electron emission is generally considered anuisance for PBIID, especially at high voltages, whereas it is a criticalingredient to the operation of HIPIMS. Fourth, the voltages in PBIID areoften higher than in HIPIMS. For the first three reasons listed above,modelling of PBIID seems to be easier and could give some guidance forfuture HIPIMS models, which, clearly, will be more involved.

Anders, Andre

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Impact of Alternative Fuels on Combustion Kinetics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research targets the development of detailed kinetic models to quantitatively characterize the impact of alternative fuels on the performance of Navy turbines and diesel engines. Such impacts include kinetic properties such as cetane number, flame speed, and emissions as well as physical properties such as the impact of boiling point distributions on fuel vaporization and mixing. The primary focus will be Fischer-Tropsch liquids made from natural gas, coal or biomass. The models will include both the effects of operation with these alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional petroleum-based fuels. The team will develop the requisite kinetic rules for specific reaction types and incorporate these into detailed kinetic mechanisms to predict the combustion performance of neat alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional fuels. Reduced kinetic models will be then developed to allow solution of the coupled kinetics/transport problems. This is a collaboration between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CSM/LLNL team plans to build on the substantial progress made in recent years in developing accurate detailed chemical mechanisms for the oxidation and pyrolysis of conventional fuels. Particular emphasis will be placed upon reactions of the isoalkanes and the daughter radicals, especially tertiary radicals, formed by abstraction from the isoalkanes. The various components of the program are described. We have been developing the kinetic models for two iso-dodecane molecules, using the same kinetic modeling formalisms that were developed for the gasoline and diesel primary reference fuels. These mechanisms, and the thermochemical and transport coefficient submodels for them, are very close to completion at the time of this report, and we expect them to be available for kinetic simulations early in the coming year. They will provide a basis for prediction and selection of desirable F-T molecules for use in jet engine simulations, where we should be able to predict the ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics of proposed fuel components. These mechanisms include the reactions and chemical species needed to describe high temperature phenomena such as shock tube ignition and flammability behavior, and they will also include low temperature kinetics to describe other ignition phenomena such as compression ignition and knocking. During the past years, our hydrocarbon kinetics modeling group at LLNL has focused a great deal on fuels typical of gasoline and diesel fuel. About 10 years ago, we developed kinetic models for the fuel octane primary reference fuels, n-heptane [1] and iso-octane [2], which have 7 and 8 carbon atoms and are therefore representative of typical gasoline fuels. N-heptane represents the low limit of knock resistance with an octane number of 0, while iso-octane is very knock resistant with an octane number of 100. High knock resistance in iso-octane was attributed largely to the large fraction of primary C-H bonds in the molecule, including 15 of the 18 C-H bonds, and the high bond energy of these primary bonds plays a large role in this knock resistance. In contrast, in the much more ignitable n-heptane, 10 of its 16 C-H bonds are much less strongly bound secondary C-H bonds, leading to its very low octane number. All of these factors, as well as a similarly complex kinetic description of the equally important role of the transition state rings that transfer H atoms within the reacting fuel molecules, were quantified and collected into large kinetic reaction mechanisms that are used by many researchers in the fuel chemistry world.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Kinetic ballooning-interchange modes in tandem mirrors  

SciTech Connect

A hybrid fluid-gyrokinetic derivation of the kinetic modifications to the ballooning-interchange eigenmode equation is presented which removes the large and small wave frequency restrictions of Tang and Catto. The derivation employs a long-thin ordering and an eikonal ansatz, but otherwise allows arbitrary asymmetry, beta, pressure anisotropy, and unperturbed parallel and perpendicular electrostatic field.

Lee, X.S.; Catto, P.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Inflation by purely kinetic coupled gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a purely kinetic coupled scalar-tensor gravity. We use FRW metric and obtain the modified Friedmann equations subject to an effective perfect fluid including energy density $\\rho_{\\phi}=\\rho_{g}+\\rho_{_G}$ and pressure $p_{\\phi}=p_{g}+p_{_G}$, where $(\\rho_{g}, p_{g})$ and $(\\rho_{_G}, p_{_G})$ define the perfect fluids corresponding to the coupling of scalar field dynamics with metric and Einstein tensors, respectively. We find that the inflation can occur in this model provided that $p_{_G}=-\\rho_{_G}$. We define Hubble slow-role parameters and find that the Hubble slow-role regime means $\\rho_{_{g}}\\ll\\rho_{_{G}}$. It turns out that the energy is not conserved for the scalar field and its kinetic energy is growing exponentially during inflation. It is proposed that this energy may be supplied by the quantum fluctuations of vacuum. This rapid transfer of energy density from vacuum to the scalar field may solve the cosmological constant problem. When $\\rho_{_{g}}$ becomes sufficiently large, the Hubble parameter starts decreasing and $\\rho_{_{g}}$ becomes comparable with $\\rho_{_{G}}$, hence the slow-role approximation is violated, and the inflation is ended. The large energy density of the scalar field may be transformed, partly into the matter, and partly into the radiation, and the universe experiences a reheating phase. At late times, the kinetic energy of the scalar field decreases as $a^{-6}$ and the remnant energy density of the scalar field may become a source of dark matter. Also, we study the cosmological perturbations during the inflation and obtain the behaviors of perturbations inside and outside the horizon. These results are in agreement with those obtained in common inflationary scenarios.

F. Darabi; A. Parsiya

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

230

Metal reduction kinetics in Shewanella  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Metal reduction kinetics have been studied in cultures of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria which include the Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Estimation of system parameters from time-series data faces obstructions in ...

Raman Lall; Julie Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| under AEC Contract A T (30-1)-3780 " ■ ' Annual Report (1970) Principal In-vestigator: Martin Karpins Institution: Harvard University The research performed under this contract can best be sunmarized under several headings. (a) Alkali-Halideg Alkali-Halide (MX^ M*X*) Exchange Reactions. This project is being continued. A careful study of certain

232

Performance Evaluation of a Multi-Port DC-DC Current Source Converter for High Power Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the ever-growing developments of sustainable energy sources such as fuel cells, photovoltaics, and other distributed generation, the need for a reliable power conversion system that interfaces these sources is in great demand. In order to provide the highest degree of flexibility in a truly distributed network, it is desired to not only interface multiple sources, but to also interface multiple loads. Modern multi-port converters use high frequency transformers to deliver the different power levels, which add to the size and complexity of the system. The different topological variations of the proposed multi-port dc-dc converter have the potential to solve these problems. This thesis proposes a unique dc-dc current source converter for multi-port power conversion. The presented work will explain the proposed multi-port dc-dc converter's operating characteristics, control algorithms, design and a proof of application. The converter will be evaluated to determine its functionality and applicability. Also, it will be shown that our converter has advantages over modern multi-port converters in its ease of scalability from kW to MW, low cost, high power density and adaption to countless combinations of multiple sources. Finally we will present modeling and simulation of the proposed converter using the PSIM software. This research will show that this new converter topology is unstable without feedback control. If the operating point is moved, one of the source ports of the multiport converter becomes unstable and dies off supplying very little or no power to the load while the remaining source port supplies all of the power the load demands. In order to prevent this and add stability to the converter a simple yet unique control method was implemented. This control method allowed for the load power demanded to be shared between the two sources as well as regulate the load voltage about its desired value.

Yancey, Billy Ferrall

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

January 28, 2011 Kinetic Isotope Effects Predicted Correctly for a Mass Ratio of 36  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

January 28, 2011 Kinetic Isotope Effects Predicted Correctly for a Mass, and it has chemical properties very similar to a hydrogen atom, but very large), and the dynamics was thermally averaged to yield temperature-dependent chemical reaction rate

Truhlar, Donald G

234

Conference 5739, SPIE International Symposium Integrated Optoelectronic Devices, 22-27 Jan 2005, San Jose, CA Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, San Jose, CA Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in piezoelectric Ga in green light emitting diodes is one of the big challenges towards all-solid- state lighting. The prime,3], and commercialization [4,5] of high brightness light emitting diodes LEDs has led to a 1.82 Billion-$/year world market

Wetzel, Christian M.

235

Plasma outflow from a corrugated trap in the kinetic regime  

SciTech Connect

The problem of stationary plasma outflow from an open corrugated trap in the kinetic regime is considered with allowance for pair collisions in the framework of a kinetic equation with the Landau collision integral. The distribution function is studied in the limit of small-scale corrugation and a large mirror ratio. In considering a single corrugation cell, a correction for the distribution function is calculated analytically. An equation describing variations of the distribution function along the system is derived and used to study the problem of plasma outflow into vacuum.

Skovorodin, D. I.; Beklemishev, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Phase-field Model for Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics and Thermodynamic and Kinetic Models of Irradiated Fe-Cr Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructure evolution kinetics in irradiated materials has strongly spatial correlation. For example, void and second phases prefer to nucleate and grow at pre-existing defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and cracks. Inhomogeneous microstructure evolution results in inhomogeneity of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. Therefore, the simulation capability for predicting three dimensional (3-D) microstructure evolution kinetics and its subsequent impact on material properties and performance is crucial for scientific design of advanced nuclear materials and optimal operation conditions in order to reduce uncertainty in operational and safety margins. Very recently the meso-scale phase-field (PF) method has been used to predict gas bubble evolution, void swelling, void lattice formation and void migration in irradiated materials,. Although most results of phase-field simulations are qualitative due to the lake of accurate thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects, possible missing of important kinetic properties and processes, and the capability of current codes and computers for large time and length scale modeling, the simulations demonstrate that PF method is a promising simulation tool for predicting 3-D heterogeneous microstructure and property evolution, and providing microstructure evolution kinetics for higher scale level simulations of microstructure and property evolution such as mean field methods. This report consists of two parts. In part I, we will present a new phase-field model for predicting interstitial loop growth kinetics in irradiated materials. The effect of defect (vacancy/interstitial) generation, diffusion and recombination, sink strength, long-range elastic interaction, inhomogeneous and anisotropic mobility on microstructure evolution kinetics is taken into account in the model. The model is used to study the effect of elastic interaction on interstitial loop growth kinetics, the interstitial flux, and sink strength of interstitial loop for interstitials. In part II, we present a generic phase field model and discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in phase-field models including the reaction kinetics of radiation defects and local free energy of irradiated materials. In particular, a two-sublattice thermodynamic model is suggested to describe the local free energy of alloys with irradiated defects. Fe-Cr alloy is taken as an example to explain the required thermodynamic and kinetic properties for quantitative phase-field modeling. Finally the great challenges in phase-field modeling will be discussed.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Low-Temperature Fluorination of Soft-Templated Mesoporous Carbons for a High-Power Lithium/Carbon Fluoride Battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soft-templated mesoporous carbons and activated mesoporous carbons were fluorinated using elemental fluorine between room temperature and 235 C. The mesoporous carbons were prepared via self-assembly synthesis of phloroglucinol formaldehyde as a carbon precursor in the presence of triblock ethylene oxide propylene oxide ethylene oxide copolymer BASF Pluronic F127 as the template. The F/C ratios ranged from 0.15 to 0.75 according to gravimetric, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Materials have mesopore diameters up to 11 nm and specific surface areas as high as 850 m2 g 1 after fluorination as calculated from nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 196 C. Furthermore, the materials exhibit higher discharge potentials and energy and power densities as well as faster reaction kinetics under high current densities than commercial carbon fluorides with similar fluorine contents when tested as cathodes for Li/CFx batteries.

Fulvio, Pasquale F [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Adcock, Jamie [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Kinetics of silica polymerization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The polymerization of silicic acid in geothermal brine-like aqueous solutions to produce amorphous silica in colloidal form has been studied experimentally and theoretically. A large amount of high quality experimental data has been generated over the temperature rang 23 to 100{sup 0}C. Wide ranges of dissolved silica concentration, pH, and sodium chloride concentration were covered. The catalytic effects of fluoride and the reaction inhibiting effects of aluminum and boron were studied also. Two basic processes have been separately studied: the formation of new colloidal particles by the homogeneous nucleation process and the deposition of dissolved silica on pre-existing colloidal particles. A rigorous theory of the formation of colloidal particles of amorphous silica by homogeneous nucleation was developed. This theory employs the Lothe-Pound formalism, and is embodied in the computer code SILNUC which quantitatively models the homogeneous nucleation and growth of colloidal silica particles in more than enough detail for practical application. The theory and code were extensively used in planning the experimental work and analyzing the data produced. The code is now complete and running in its final form. It is capable of reproducing most of the experimental results to within experimental error. It is also capable of extrapolation to experimentally inaccessible conditions, i.e., high temperatures, rapidly varying temperature and pH, etc.

Weres, O.; Yee, A.; Tsao, L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

240

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators  

SciTech Connect

REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houstons innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to todays superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Post-processing of polymer foam tissue scaffolds with high power ultrasound: a route to increased pore interconnectivity, pore size and fluid transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We expose thick polymer foam tissue scaffolds to high power ultrasound and study its effect on the openness of the pore architecture and fluid transport through the scaffold. Our analysis is supported by measurements of fluid uptake during insonification and imaging of the scaffold microstructure via x-ray computed tomography, scanning electron microscopy and acoustic microscopy. The ultrasonic treatment is found to increase the mean pore size by over 10%. More striking is the improvement in fluid uptake: for scaffolds with only 40% water uptake via standard immersion techniques, we can routinely achieve full saturation of the scaffold over approximately one hour of exposure. These desirable modifications occur with no loss of scaffold integrity and negligible mass loss, and are optimized when the ultrasound treatment is coupled to a pre-wetting stage with ethanol. Our findings suggest that high power ultrasound is a highly targetted and efficient means to promote pore interconnectivity and fluid transport in...

Watson, N J; Reinwald, Y; White, L J; Ghaemmaghami, A M; Morgan, S P; Rose, F R A J; Povey, M J W; Parker, N G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Post-processing of polymer foam tissue scaffolds with high power ultrasound: a route to increased pore interconnectivity, pore size and fluid transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We expose thick polymer foam tissue scaffolds to high power ultrasound and study its effect on the openness of the pore architecture and fluid transport through the scaffold. Our analysis is supported by measurements of fluid uptake during insonification and imaging of the scaffold microstructure via x-ray computed tomography, scanning electron microscopy and acoustic microscopy. The ultrasonic treatment is found to increase the mean pore size by over 10%. More striking is the improvement in fluid uptake: for scaffolds with only 40% water uptake via standard immersion techniques, we can routinely achieve full saturation of the scaffold over approximately one hour of exposure. These desirable modifications occur with no loss of scaffold integrity and negligible mass loss, and are optimized when the ultrasound treatment is coupled to a pre-wetting stage with ethanol. Our findings suggest that high power ultrasound is a highly targetted and efficient means to promote pore interconnectivity and fluid transport in thick foam tissue scaffolds.

N J Watson; R K Johal; Y Reinwald; L J White; A M Ghaemmaghami; S P Morgan; F R A J Rose; M J W Povey; N G Parker

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

244

Excitation of guided ELF-VLF waves through modification of the F{sub 2} ionospheric layer by high-power radio waves  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of controlled excitation of ELF-VLF electromagnetic waves through modification of the F{sub 2} ionospheric layer by high-power high-frequency emission is demonstrated in a natural experiment by using the Sura midlatitude heating facility. The excited low-frequency waves can be used to explore the near-Earth space and stimulate the excitation of a magnetospheric maser.

Markov, G. A.; Belov, A. S.; Komrakov, G. P. [Lobachevsky State University (Russian Federation); Parrot, M. [Environmental Physics and Chemistry Laboratory (France)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Kinetic Wave Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kinetic Wave Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Kinetic Wave Power Address 2861 N Tupelo St Place Midland Zip 48642 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 989-839-9757...

246

Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach ... chemical reaction rates will increase exponentially and environmental attack...

247

Kinetics of Nano Ti Carbides Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Steel Product Metallurgy and Applications. Presentation Title, Kinetics of Nano...

248

Modeling & Characterization of Harvestable Kinetic Energy for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gov 301.975-5479. Modeling & Characterization of Harvestable Kinetic Energy for Wearable Medical Sensors. RF-enabled ...

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

Propagation of radiation in fluctuating multiscale plasmas. I. Kinetic theory  

SciTech Connect

A theory for propagation of radiation in a large scale plasma with small scale fluctuations is developed using a kinetic description in terms of the probability distribution function of the radiation in space, time, and wavevector space. Large scale effects associated with spatial variations in the plasma density and refractive index of the plasma wave modes and small scale effects such as scattering of radiation by density clumps in fluctuating plasma, spontaneous emission, damping, and mode conversion are included in a multiscale kinetic description of the radiation. Expressions for the Stokes parameters in terms of the probability distribution function of the radiation are used to enable radiation properties such as intensity and polarization to be calculated.

Tyshetskiy, Yu.; Pal Singh, Kunwar; Thirunavukarasu, A.; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, Iver H. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nonlinear evolution of the magnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: from fluid to kinetic modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nonlinear evolution of collisionless plasmas is typically a multi-scale process where the energy is injected at large, fluid scales and dissipated at small, kinetic scales. Accurately modelling the global evolution requires to take into account the main micro-scale physical processes of interest. This is why comparison of different plasma models is today an imperative task aiming at understanding cross-scale processes in plasmas. We report here the first comparative study of the evolution of a magnetized shear flow, through a variety of different plasma models by using magnetohydrodynamic, Hall-MHD, two-fluid, hybrid kinetic and full kinetic codes. Kinetic relaxation effects are discussed to emphasize the need for kinetic equilibriums to study the dynamics of collisionless plasmas in non trivial configurations. Discrepancies between models are studied both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime of the magnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, to highlight the effects of small scale processes on the nonl...

Henri, P; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F; Rossi, C; Faganello, M; ebek, O; Trvn?ek, P M; Hellinger, P; Frederiksen, J T; Nordlund, ; Markidis, S; Keppens, R; Lapenta, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Kinetic effects on robustness of electron magnetohydrodynamic structures  

SciTech Connect

Following recent remarkable progress in the development of high-power short-pulse lasers, exploration is ongoing into hitherto unknown phenomena at fast time scales of electrons, the understanding of which is becoming crucial. For a simplified description of such phenomena, the Electron Magnetohydrodynamics (EMHDs) fluid description is often adopted. For the possibility of electron transport in high-density plasma, exact solutions of the EMHD model in the form of electron vortex currents, together with their associated magnetic fields, have been considered. However, the fluid EMHD model does not incorporate kinetic effects. Here, the finite Larmor radius effects owing to a finite electron temperature on the robustness of the exact EMHD structures are investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that larger EMHD vortex structures can sustain themselves for long periods, even in high temperature plasma; however, sustaining structures at higher temperatures tends to be difficult. With increasing temperature, electrons with finite Larmor radii become disengaged from the localized region. It is also shown that structures localized in smaller regions are more difficult to sustain. A quantitative criterion in terms of the structure size and Larmor radius has been established by simulations over a wide range of parameters. Finally, we conclude that a structure, larger than about eight times the typical Larmor radius at r=R, could form and exist even under the effects of finite electron temperature.

Hata, M. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Sakagami, H. [Fundamental Physics Simulation Research Division, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Das, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fundamental diagrams for kinetic equations of traffic flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the ability of some recently introduced discrete kinetic models of vehicular traffic to catch, in their large time behavior, typical features of theoretical fundamental diagrams. Specifically, we address the so-called "spatially homogeneous problem" and, in the representative case of an exploratory model, we study the qualitative properties of its solutions for a generic number of discrete microstates. This includes, in particular, asymptotic trends and equilibria, whence fundamental diagrams originate.

Luisa Fermo; Andrea Tosin

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

On fast reactor kinetics studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A. [Nuclear Safety Inst. of the Russian Academy of Sciences IBRAE (Russian Federation); Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Kinetically Dominated FRII Radio Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of FR II objects that are kinetically dominated, the jet kinetic luminosity, $Q$, is larger than the total thermal luminosity (IR to X-ray) of the accretion flow, $L_{bol}$, is of profound theoretical interest. Such objects are not expected in most theoretical models of the central engine of radio loud AGN. Thus, establishing such a class of objects is an important diagnostic for filtering through the myriad of theoretical possibilities. This paper attempts to establish a class of quasars that have existed in a state of kinetic dominance, $R(t)\\equiv Q(t)/L_{bol}(t)>1$, at some epoch, $t$. It is argued that the 10 quasars in this article with a long term time average $Q(t)$, $\\bar{Q}$, that exceed $L_{Edd}$ are likely to have satisfied the condition $R(t)>1$ either presently or in the past based on the rarity of $L_{bol}>L_{Edd}$ quasars. Finally, the existence of these sources is discussed in the context of the theory of the central engine.

Brian Punsly

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

255

Modification of {Delta}{sup Prime} by magnetic feedback and kinetic effects  

SciTech Connect

Two possible ways of modifying the linear tearing mode index, by active magnetic feedback and by drift kinetic effects of deeply trapped particles, are analytically investigated. Magnetic feedback schemes, studied in this work, are found generally stabilizing for {Delta}{sup Prime }. The drift kinetic effects from both thermal particles and hot ions tend to reduce the power of the large solution from the outer region. This generally leads to a destabilization of {Delta} Prime for the toroidal analytic equilibria considered here.

Liu Yueqiang; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Stepping and crowding: statistical kinetics from an exclusion process perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerisation (RNA polymerases, ribosomes,...) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics is still to be understood. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend the current statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of co-moving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions.

Luca Ciandrini; M. Carmen Romano; A. Parmeggiani

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

Plasmadynamics and ionization kinetics of thermionic energy conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To reduce the plasma arc-drop, thermionic energy conversion is studied with both analytical and numerical tools. Simplifications are made in both the plasmadynamic and ionization-recombination theories. These are applied to a scheme proposed presently using laser irradiation to enhance the ionization kinetics of the thermionic plasma and thereby reduce the arc-drop. It is also predicted that it is possible to generate the required laser light from a thermionic-type cesium plasma. The analysis takes advantage of theoretical simplifications derived for the ionization-recombination kinetics. It is shown that large laser ionization enhancements can occur and that collisional cesium recombination lasing is expected. To complement the kinetic theory, a numerical method is developed to solve the thermionic plasma dynamics. To combine the analysis of ionization-recombination kinetics with the plasma dynamics of thermionic conversion, a finite difference computer program is constructed. It is capable of solving for both unsteady and steady thermionic converter behavior including possible laser ionization enhancement or atomic recombination lasing. A proposal to improve thermionic converter performance using laser radiation is considered. In this proposed scheme, laser radiation impinging on a thermionic plasma enhances the ionization process thereby raising the plasma density and reducing the plasma arc-drop. A source for such radiation may possibly be a cesium recombination laser operating in a different thermionic converter. The possibility of this being an energy efficient process is discussed. (WHK)

Lawless, J.L. Jr.; Lam, S.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Establishing a connection between high-power pulsars and very-high-energy gamma-ray sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray wave band, pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) represent to date the most populous class of Galactic sources. Nevertheless, the details of the energy conversion mechanisms in the vicinity of pulsars are not well understood, nor is it known which pulsars are able to drive PWNe and emit high-energy radiation. In this paper we present a systematic study of a connection between pulsars and VHE gamma-ray sources based on a deep survey of the inner Galactic plane conducted with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). We find clear evidence that pulsars with large spin-down energy flux are associated with VHE gamma-ray sources. This implies that these pulsars emit on the order of 1% of their spin-down energy as TeV gamma-rays.

Carrigan, S; Hofmann, W; Kosack, K; Lohse, T; Reimer, O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Decommissioning and safety issues of liquid-mercury waste generated from high power spallation sources with particle accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large spallation sources are intended to be constructed in Europe (EURISOL nuclear physics facility and ESS-European Spallation Source). These facilities accumulate more than 20 metric tons of irradiated mercury in the target, which has to be treated as highly radioactive and chemo-toxic waste. Because solids are the only appropriate (immobile) form for this radiotoxic and toxic type of waste solidification is required for irradiated mercury. Our irradiation experimental studies on mercury waste revealed that mercury sulfide is a reasonable solid for disposal and shows larger stability in assumed accidents with water ingress in a repository compared to amalgams. For preparation of mercury sulfide a wet process is more suitable than a dry one. It is easier to perform under hot cell conditions and allows complete Hg-conversion. Embedding HgS in a cementitious matrix increases its stability.

Chiriki, S; Odoj, R; Moormann, R; Hinssen, H. K; Bukaemskiy, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Analytical Solutions to the Stochastic Kinetic Equation for Liquid and Ice Particle Size Spectra. Part I: Small-Size Fraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetic equation of stochastic condensation for cloud drop size spectra is extended to account for crystalline clouds and also to include the accretionaggregation process. The size spectra are separated into small and large size fractions ...

Vitaly I. Khvorostyanov; Judith A. Curry

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage Demo - Ed Chiao, Amber Kinetics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

amber_kinetics amber_kinetics DOE Peer Review September 2012 Ed Chiao, CEO amber_kinetics Amber Kinetics: Our Flywheel History Start-up launched in 2009, Stanford University Cleantech Entrepreneurship class Established a technology licensing & flywheel development partnership with LLNL; Amber Kinetics identified new material & lower-cost rotor designs for commercialization Awarded a Smart Grid Energy Storage Demonstration grant award for flywheels Awarded a matching grant for development & demonstration of flywheel technology Stanford University Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy California Energy Commission World-class institutions | innovative, deep flywheel technology owned by Amber Amber Kinetics, Inc. - Confidential and Proprietary, All Rights Reserved

262

Microreactor for fast chemical kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemical reaction process in a T-shaped microchannel is studied experimentally through the reaction of Ca++ with a fluorescent tracer, Calcium-green. For thin channels (10 um), diffusion of species is found to behave in a way independent of the thickness direction. In such a situation, simulations of a two-dimensional reaction-diffusion model agree remarkably well with the experimental measurements. The comparison of experiments and simulations is used to measure the chemical kinetic constant, which we find to be k=3.2 x 10^5 dm^3/(mol s). Applications of the analysis to faster reactions and to micro-titration are also discussed.

Baroud, C N; Menetrier, L; Tabeling, P; Baroud, Charles N.; Okkels, Fridolin; Menetrier, Laure; Tabeling, Patrick

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Shale oil cracking. 1. Kinetics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to determine kinetics for thermal cracking of shale oil vapor over shale. Cracking temperatures of 504 to 610/sup 0/C and residence times of 2 to 11 seconds were used. A first-order Arrhenius rate expression and stoichiometry were obtained. Also observed were changes in the oil quality. Cracking decreased the H/C ratio, increased the nitrogen content, and decreased the pour point of the oil. Gas-phase oil cracking is contrasted to liquid-phase oil coking as a loss mechanism in oil-shale retorting.

Burnham, A.K.; Taylor, J.R.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of negative electrodes from high-power lithium-ion cells showing various levels of power fade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-power lithium-ion cells for transportation applications are being developed and studied at Argonne National Laboratory. The current generation of cells containing LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}-based cathodes, graphite-based anodes, and LiPF6-based electrolytes show loss of capacity and power during accelerated testing at elevated temperatures. Negative electrode samples harvested from some cells that showed varying degrees of power and capacity fade were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The samples exhibited a surface film on the graphite, which was thicker on samples from cells that showed higher fade. Furthermore, solvent-based compounds were dominant on samples from low power fade cells, whereas LiPF{sub 6}-based products were dominant on samples from high power fade cells. The effect of sample rinsing and air exposure is discussed. Mechanisms are proposed to explain the formation of compounds suggested by the XPS data.

Herstedt, Marie; Abraham, Daniel P.; Kerr, John B.

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electrical performance characteristics of high power converters for space power applications. Final report, 1 January 1988-30 September 1989  

SciTech Connect

The first goal of this project was to investigate various converters that would be suitable for processing electric power derived from a nuclear reactor. The implementation is indicated of a 20 kHz system that includes a source converter, a ballast converter, and a fixed frequency converter for generating the 20 kHz output. This system can be converted to dc simply by removing the fixed frequency converter. This present study emphasized the design and testing of the source and ballast converters. A push-pull current-fed (PPCF) design was selected for the source converter, and a 2.7 kW version of this was implemented using three 900 watt modules in parallel. The characteristic equation for two converters in parallel was derived, but this analysis did not yield any experimental methods for measuring relative stability. The three source modules were first tested individually and then in parallel as a 2.7 kW system. All tests proved to be satisfactory; the system was stable; efficiency and regulation were acceptable; and the system was fault tolerant. The design of a ballast-load converter, which was operated as a shunt regulator, was investigated. The proposed power circuit is suitable for use with BJTs because proportional base drive is easily implemented. A control circuit which minimizes switching frequency ripple and automatically bypasses a faulty shunt section was developed. A nonlinear state-space-averaged model of the shunt regulator was developed and shown to produce an accurate incremental (small-signal) dynamic model, even though the usual state-space-averaging assumptions were not met. The nonlinear model was also shown to be useful for large-signal dynamic simulation using PSpice.

Stuart, T.A.; King, R.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Propagation of radiation in fluctuating multiscale plasmas. II. Kinetic simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical algorithm is developed and tested that implements the kinetic treatment of electromagnetic radiation propagating through plasmas whose properties have small scale fluctuations, which was developed in a companion paper. This method incorporates the effects of refraction, damping, mode structure, and other aspects of large-scale propagation of electromagnetic waves on the distribution function of quanta in position and wave vector, with small-scale effects of nonuniformities, including scattering and mode conversion approximated as causing drift and diffusion in wave vector. Numerical solution of the kinetic equation yields the distribution function of radiation quanta in space, time, and wave vector. Simulations verify the convergence, accuracy, and speed of the methods used to treat each term in the equation. The simulations also illustrate the main physical effects and place the results in a form that can be used in future applications.

Pal Singh, Kunwar; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, Iver H.; Tyshetskiy, Yu. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Nanocrystallization Reactions and Kinetics, Chemical Partitioning ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary nanocrystallization reactions and kinetics will be discussed for selected FeCo-based ... Search of Half-Metallic Heusler Alloys and their Applications to...

269

Investigating Grain Boundary Structure-Kinetic Property ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Grain boundary energy landscapes contain all the information that is required to describe the kinetic behavior of grain boundaries (GBs).

270

Aluminium Dissolution Kinetics in Caustic Media  

uti?, V. and Stumm, W. (1984) Effect of organic acids and fluoride on the dissolution kinetics of hydrous alumina. A model study using the rotating disk

271

Thermodynamic and Kinetic Simulation and Experimental Results ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the use of thermodynamic and kinetic modeling software, NETL has designed a systematic method that has been successfully developed to design an...

272

Metal versus rare-gas ion irradiation during Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N film growth by hybrid high power pulsed magnetron/dc magnetron co-sputtering using synchronized pulsed substrate bias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metastable NaCl-structure Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N is employed as a model system to probe the effects of metal versus rare-gas ion irradiation during film growth using reactive high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) of Al and dc magnetron sputtering of Ti. The alloy film composition is chosen to be x = 0.61, near the kinetic solubility limit at the growth temperature of 500 Degree-Sign C. Three sets of experiments are carried out: a -60 V substrate bias is applied either continuously, in synchronous with the full HIPIMS pulse, or in synchronous only with the metal-rich-plasma portion of the HIPIMS pulse. Alloy films grown under continuous dc bias exhibit a thickness-invariant small-grain, two-phase nanostructure (wurtzite AlN and cubic Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N) with random orientation, due primarily to intense Ar{sup +} irradiation leading to Ar incorporation (0.2 at. %), high compressive stress (-4.6 GPa), and material loss by resputtering. Synchronizing the bias with the full HIPIMS pulse results in films that exhibit much lower stress levels (-1.8 GPa) with no measureable Ar incorporation, larger grains elongated in the growth direction, a very small volume fraction of wurtzite AlN, and random orientation. By synchronizing the bias with the metal-plasma phase of the HIPIMS pulses, energetic Ar{sup +} ion bombardment is greatly reduced in favor of irradiation predominantly by Al{sup +} ions. The resulting films are single phase with a dense competitive columnar structure, strong 111 orientation, no measureable trapped Ar concentration, and even lower stress (-0.9 GPa). Thus, switching from Ar{sup +} to Al{sup +} bombardment, while maintaining the same integrated incident ion/metal ratio, eliminates phase separation, minimizes renucleation during growth, and reduces the high concentration of residual point defects, which give rise to compressive stress.

Greczynski, Grzegorz; Lu Jun; Jensen, Jens; Petrov, Ivan; Greene, Joseph E.; Bolz, Stephan; Koelker, Werner; Schiffers, Christoph; Lemmer, Oliver; Hultman, Lars [Department of Physics (IFM), Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Department of Physics (IFM), Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden) and Materials Science Department and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics (IFM), Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Materials Science Department and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) and Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); CemeCon AG, Adenauerstr. 20 A4, D-52146 Wurselen (Germany); Department of Physics (IFM), Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

ERNSTMORITZARNDTUNIVERSITAT Absolute number density and kinetic analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasma-chemical reactions. Therefore, from the analysis of their kinetics, one can learn more about of the technical applications, many plasma­chemical processes within the discharges as well as mechanisms determines all electron induced plasma-chemical processes and hence influences the kinetics of species

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

274

Kinetics of Enzymatic Depolymerization of Guar Galactomannan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used as a rheology modifier in many of its applications, previous kinetic studies have been limitedKinetics of Enzymatic Depolymerization of Guar Galactomannan Shamsheer Mahammad, Robert K. Prud'homme, George W. Roberts,*, and Saad A. Khan*, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North

Khan, Saad A.

275

Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

Burnham, A.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Time-resolved x-ray imaging of high-power laser-irradiated under-dense silica aerogels and agar foams  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of experiments in which a high-power laser was used to irradiate low density (4 - 9 mg/cm{sup 3}) silica aerogel and agar foam targets. The laser-solid interaction and energy transport through the material were monitored with time-resolved imaging diagnostics, and the data show the production and propagation of an x-ray emission front in the plasma. The emission-front trajectory data are found to be in significant disagreement with detailed simulations, which predict a much more rapid heating of the cold material, and the data suggest that this discrepancy is not explainable by target inhomogeneities. Evidence suggests that energy transport into the cold material may be dominated by thermal conduction; however, no completely satisfactory explanation for the discrepancies is identified, and further experimental and theoretical research is necessary in order to resolve this important problem in laser-plasma interaction physics.

Koch, J.A.; Estabrook, K.G.; Bauer, J.D. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Testing and Implementation Progress on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linear Accelerator (Linac) High-Power S-band Switching System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An S-band linear accelerator is the source of particles and the front end of the Advanced Photon Source injector. In addition, it supports a low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) and drives a free-electron laser (FEL). A waveguide-switching and distribution system is now under construction. The system configuration was revised to be consistent with the recent change to electron-only operation. There are now six modulator-klystron subsystems, two of which are being configured to act as hot spares for two S-band transmitters each, so that no single failure will prevent injector operation. The two subsystems are also used to support additional LEUTL capabilities and off-line testing. Design considerations for the waveguide-switching subsystem, topology selection, control and protection provisions, high-power test results, and current status are described

Grelick, A E; Berg, S; Dohan, D A; Goeppner, G A; Kang, Y W; Nassiri, A; Pasky, S; Pile, G; Smith, T; Stein, S J

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Large-Eddy Simulation: How Large is Large Enough?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The length scale evolution of various quantities in a clear convective boundary layer (CBL), a stratocumulus-topped boundary layer, and three radiatively cooled (smoke cloud) convective boundary layers are studied by means of large-eddy ...

Stephan R. de Roode; Peter G. Duynkerke; Harm J. J. Jonker

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect

The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Large-Eddy Simulation of Langmuir Turbulence in Pure Wind Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scaling of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and its vertical component (VKE) in the upper ocean boundary layer, forced by realistic wind stress and surface waves including the effects of Langmuir circulations, is investigated using large-eddy ...

Ramsey R. Harcourt; Eric A. DAsaro

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Quantum instanton evaluation of the kinetic isotope effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general quantum-mechanical method for computing kinetic isotope effects is presented. The method is based on the quantum instanton approximation for the rate constant and on the path integral Metropolis Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Boltzmann operator matrix elements. It computes the kinetic isotope effect directly, using a thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of the isotope, thus avoiding the more computationally expensive process of computing the individual rate constants. The method is more accurate than variational transition-state theories or the semiclassical instanton method since it does not assume a single reaction path and does not use a semiclassical approximation of the Boltzmann operator. While the general Monte-Carlo implementation makes the method accessible to systems with a large number of atoms, we present numerical results for the Eckart barrier and for the collinear and full three-dimensional isotope variants of the hydrogen exchange reaction H+H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}+H. In all seven test cases, for temperatures between 250 K and 600 K, the error of the quantum instanton approximation for the kinetic isotope effects is less than {approx}10%.

Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.; Castillo, Jesus F.; Aoiz, F.Javier

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Advanced quasi-steady state approximation for chemical kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational feasibility of turbulent reacting flows hinges on the reduction of large chemical kinetics systems to smaller more manageable reaction sets. Recently, several sophisticated reduction techniques have been developed but they continue to be computationally prohibitive for practical three-dimensional unsteady computations. For such applications, the classical quasi-steady state assumption (QSSA), despite serious shortcomings, continues to be popular due to its conceptual clarity and computational simplicity. Starting from invariant manifold description, we develop an advanced quasi-steady state assumption which (i) is independent of the choice of the retained (slow) species; (ii) possesses much improved physical and mathematical characteristics; and (iii) can be specialized for any objective function.

Girimaji, Sharath

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

High power regenerative laser amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

Miller, John L. (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Dublin, CA); Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

High power regenerative laser amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

285

High power gas transport laser  

SciTech Connect

Continuous wave output power from a gas transport laser is substantially increased by disposing a plurality of parallel cylindrically tubular cathodes in the main stream transversely of the direction of gas flow and spaced above a coextensive segmented anode in the opposite wall of the channel. Ballast resistors are connected between the cathodes, respectively, and the power supply to optimize the uniform arcless distribution of current passing between each cathode and the anode. Continuous output power greater than 3 kW is achieved with this electrode configuration.

Fahlen, T.S.; Kirk, R.F.

1978-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Model simplification of chemical kinetic systems under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the impact of uncertainty on the reduction and simplification of chemical kinetics mechanisms. Chemical kinetics simulations of complex fuels are very computationally expensive, especially when ...

Coles, Thomas Michael Kyte

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Kinetic description of rotating Tokamak plasmas with anisotropic temperatures in the collisionless regime  

SciTech Connect

A largely unsolved theoretical issue in controlled fusion research is the consistent kinetic treatment of slowly-time varying plasma states occurring in collisionless and magnetized axisymmetric plasmas. The phenomenology may include finite pressure anisotropies as well as strong toroidal and poloidal differential rotation, characteristic of Tokamak plasmas. Despite the fact that physical phenomena occurring in fusion plasmas depend fundamentally on the microscopic particle phase-space dynamics, their consistent kinetic treatment remains still essentially unchallenged to date. The goal of this paper is to address the problem within the framework of Vlasov-Maxwell description. The gyrokinetic treatment of charged particles dynamics is adopted for the construction of asymptotic solutions for the quasi-stationary species kinetic distribution functions. These are expressed in terms of the particle exact and adiabatic invariants. The theory relies on a perturbative approach, which permits to construct asymptotic analytical solutions of the Vlasov-Maxwell system. In this way, both diamagnetic and energy corrections are included consistently into the theory. In particular, by imposing suitable kinetic constraints, the existence of generalized bi-Maxwellian asymptotic kinetic equilibria is pointed out. The theory applies for toroidal rotation velocity of the order of the ion thermal speed. These solutions satisfy identically also the constraints imposed by the Maxwell equations, i.e., quasi-neutrality and Ampere's law. As a result, it is shown that, in the presence of nonuniform fluid and EM fields, these kinetic equilibria can sustain simultaneously toroidal differential rotation, quasi-stationary finite poloidal flows and temperature anisotropy.

Cremaschini, Claudio [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) and INFN, Trieste (Italy); Tessarotto, Massimo [Department of Mathematics and Informatics, University of Trieste (Italy)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Large orders in strong-field QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the issue of large-order expansions in strong-field QED. Our approach is based on the one-loop effective action encoded in the associated photon polarisation tensor. We concentrate on the simple case of crossed fields aiming at possible applications of high-power lasers to measure vacuum birefringence. A simple next-to-leading order derivative expansion reveals that the indices of refraction increase with frequency. This signals normal dispersion in the small-frequency regime where the derivative expansion makes sense. To gain information beyond that regime we determine the factorial growth of the derivative expansion coefficients evaluating the first 80 orders by means of computer algebra. From this we can infer a nonperturbative imaginary part for the indices of refraction indicating absorption (pair production) as soon as energy and intensity become (super)critical. These results compare favourably with an analytic evaluation of the polarisation tensor asymptotics. Kramers-Kronig relations finally allow for a nonperturbative definition of the real parts as well and show that absorption goes hand in hand with anomalous dispersion for sufficiently large frequencies and fields.

Thomas Heinzl; Oliver Schroeder

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

AER NY Kinetics LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ogdensburg Kinetic Energy Project This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved...

292

Rainfall Kinetic Energy in Eastern Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall kinetic energy is a commonly used climatic parameter for the prediction of soil erosion by water. Such a parameter is difficult to measure and is usually estimated from relationships established between rainfall energy and rainfall ...

Colin John Rosewell

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Kinetic Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Kinetic Energy LLC Place Texas Utility Id 56210 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861...

294

Kinetic Energy and the Equivalence Principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the general theory of relativity, kinetic energy contributes to gravitational mass. Surprisingly, the observational evidence for this prediction does not seem to be discussed in the literature. I reanalyze existing experimental data to test the equivalence principle for the kinetic energy of atomic electrons, and show that fairly strong limits on possible violations can be obtained. I discuss the relationship of this result to the occasional claim that ``light falls with twice the acceleration of ordinary matter.''

S. Carlip

1999-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Progress in Chemical Kinetic Modeling for Surrogate Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasoline, diesel, and other alternative transportation fuels contain hundreds to thousands of compounds. It is currently not possible to represent all these compounds in detailed chemical kinetic models. Instead, these fuels are represented by surrogate fuel models which contain a limited number of representative compounds. We have been extending the list of compounds for detailed chemical models that are available for use in fuel surrogate models. Detailed models for components with larger and more complicated fuel molecular structures are now available. These advancements are allowing a more accurate representation of practical and alternative fuels. We have developed detailed chemical kinetic models for fuels with higher molecular weight fuel molecules such as n-hexadecane (C16). Also, we can consider more complicated fuel molecular structures like cyclic alkanes and aromatics that are found in practical fuels. For alternative fuels, the capability to model large biodiesel fuels that have ester structures is becoming available. These newly addressed cyclic and ester structures in fuels profoundly affect the reaction rate of the fuel predicted by the model. Finally, these surrogate fuel models contain large numbers of species and reactions and must be reduced for use in multi-dimensional models for spark-ignition, HCCI and diesel engines.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

296

A general kinetic model: Kinetics and atomic-scale mechanisms of feldspar dissolution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a general kinetic model and its application to feldspar dissolution. In the framework of Monte Carlo methods, the model simulates the stochastic (more)

Zhang, Li

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Multiplexed Chemical Kinetic Photoionization Mass Spectrometer: A New Approach To Isomer-resolved Chemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instruments applied to analysis of complex chemical mixturesrelies on chemical separation (by chromatography) into pureThe multiplexed chemical kinetic photoionization mass

Osborne, David L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Large displacement spherical joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves - Part III: Inhomogeneous Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

P. U. Lamalle

300

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves - Part I: Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

P. U. Lamalle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Kinetics of PBX9404 Aging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PBX 9404 is an early formulation of HMX from which we can learn about the effects of aging in the weapons stockpile. Of particular interest is the presence of 3% nitrocellulose in PBX 9404 as an energetic binder. Nitrocellulose is used pervasively in smokeless gunpowders and was formerly used extensively in the film and art preservation industries. It is well known that nitrocellulose decomposes autocatalytically, and stabilizers, such as the diphenylamine used in PBX 9404, are used to retard its decomposition. Even so, its lifetime is still limited, and the reactions eventually leading to catastrophic autocatalysis are still not understood well despite years of work. In addition to reducing the available energy in the explosive, degradation of nitrocellulose affects the mechanical properties of the pressed PBX 9404 parts by the associated reduction in molecular weight, which reduces the strength of the binder. A structural formula for a monomer of the nitrocellulose used in PBX 9404 is shown. The initial nitration level is 2.3 of 3.0 possible sites, and they have different reactivities. Degradation of nitrocellulose affects many properties. As an aid in examining historical chemical analysis data, several measures of degradation are given for the simple replacement of a nitro group with a hydrogen. The weight percent of nitrocellulose remaining for an initial concentration of 3% as used in PBX 9404 is also given. Of course, the real degradation reaction is more complicated, including chain scission and crosslinking reactions giving other gas species. During the course of this work, we spent considerable time addressing the question, ''Why is PBX 9404 blue?'' There was actually considerable controversy in the color evolution with aging, and the situation was clarified by Ben Richardson at Pantex. Workers there assured us that PBX 9404 starts with an ivory color. Drying the prill prior to pressing turns it a mottled blue, and well-preserved prill samples retain a blue color decades after formulation. Subsequently, heat and light both send it through a progression of colors from grayish blue, blue-green, green, brown, dirty yellow, mottled tan, and eventually pale tan. The progression is accelerated by oxygen and possibly moisture, as has been shown in several accelerated aging studies. The precise compounds causing the color evolution are uncertain, but they are undoubtedly a progression of quinoidal, nitroso, and nitrated DPA compounds. For example, paranitroso DPA is deep blue. Unfortunately, the location of various nitrated DPAs, which ranged from yellow to orange to red to brown and which were used by Pantex as analytical standards in the 1970s, is not currently known. While the color change is indicative of aging, it is by no means a quantitative measure of the extent of nitrocellulose degradation. Inspection of the literature yielded a variety of kinetic models, and the activation energy typically ranges from 25-35 kcal/mol for T<100 C. This literature qualitatively predicts times for 30% decomposition ranging from a few days at 100 C to 1-2 years at 50 C to 50 years at room temperature. To develop a quantitative model, we used the data of Leider and Seaton, which were collected at conditions most closely matching stockpile conditions for any data set we had available. They used PBX 9404 heated as pressed pellets in closed vessels at temperatures ranging from 50 to 100 C for times up to three years, and they report mass loss, gas yield and composition, and chemical analysis of the residual solid by methods used in stockpile surveillance. Initial kinetic analysis of the weight of remaining nitrocellulose as measured by liquid chromatography and the loss of nitrate esters by a colorimetric technique gave an activation energy of 27 kcal/mol. However, the reaction is complex due to the different stability of the three nitroester positions, and this complexity required either parallel first-order reactions or an nth-order reaction (n=3.6), which is mathematically equivalent to a Gamma distribution of frequency factors

Burnham, A K; Fried, L E

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

302

Linearized gyro-kinetic equation  

SciTech Connect

An ordering of the linearized Fokker-Planck equation is performed in which gyroradius corrections are retained to lowest order and the radial dependence appropriate for sheared magnetic fields is treated without resorting to a WKB technique. This description is shown to be necessary to obtain the proper radial dependence when the product of the poloidal wavenumber and the gyroradius is large (k rho much greater than 1). A like particle collision operator valid for arbitrary k rho also has been derived. In addition, neoclassical, drift, finite $beta$ (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure), and unperturbed toroidal electric field modifications are treated. (auth)

Catto, P.J.; Tsang, K.T.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flowfields, the predictions from continuum formulation, such as the Navier-Stokes equations lose accuracy. For the high speed diatomic molecular flow in the transitional regime, the inaccuracies are partially ... Keywords: Gas-kinetic method, Hypersonic and rarefied flows, Multiple temperature kinetic model

Kun Xu; Xin He; Chunpei Cai

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Philips Color Kinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Color Kinetics Color Kinetics Jump to: navigation, search Name Philips Color Kinetics Address 3 Burlington Woods Drive, 4th Floor Place Burlington, Massachusetts Zip 01803 Sector Efficiency Product LED lighting systems Website http://www.colorkinetics.com/ Coordinates 42.5005723°, -71.2042619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5005723,"lon":-71.2042619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

306

Chemical kinetic modelling of hydrocarbon ignition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon ignition is discussed with reference to a range of experimental configurations, including shock tubes, detonations, pulse combustors, static reactors, stirred reactors and internal combustion engines. Important conditions of temperature, pressure or other factors are examined to determine the main chemical reaction sequences responsible for chain branching and ignition, and kinetic factors which can alter the rate of ignition are identified. Hydrocarbon ignition usually involves complex interactions between physical and chemical factors, and it therefore is a suitable and often productive subject for computer simulations. In most of the studies to be discussed below, the focus of the attention is placed on the chemical features of the system. The other physical parts of each application are generally included in the form of initial or boundary conditions to the chemical kinetic parts of the problem, as appropriate for each type of application being addressed.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Marinov, N.M.

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

A comparison of the point kinetics equations with the QUANDRY analytic nodal diffusion method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The point kinetics equations were incorporated into QUANDRY, a nuclear reactor analysis computer program which uses the analytic nodal method to solve the neutron diffusion equation. Both the point kinetics equations, solved using the IMSL MATH/LIBRARY subroutine DIVPAG, and the analytic nodal method were coupled to the WIGL thermal-hydraulic model. The Langenbuch-Maurer-Werner (LMW) model was adapted for use as a test core. The QUANDRY model was used to generate point kinetics parameters. equations. The two neutronics methods were then compared for a range of typical transients encountered in a light water nuclear reactor core. The temperature reactivity coefficients found for the modified LMW core and used with point kinetics were shown to be grossly inaccurate, but the rod worth curve generated using QUANDRY only slightly overestimated the amount of reactivity inserted by rod movement. While the small rod worth errors caused point kinetics to give poor approximations for high rates of reactivity insertions of over one dollar, these large amounts and insertion rates are well above those found during most operational transients in commercial reactors.

Velasquez, Arthur

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating the behavior of porous media  

SciTech Connect

In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. Assuming validity of the mostaccurate kinetic reaction model that is currently available, the use ofthe equilibrium reaction model often appears to be justified andpreferred for simulating the behavior of gas hydrates, given that thecomputational demands for the kinetic reaction model far exceed those forthe equilibrium reaction model.

Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

309

Model Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing  

SciTech Connect

New Abelian vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by {epsilon} {approx}< 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.

Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

310

CONSERVATIVE CASCADE OF KINETIC ENERGY IN COMPRESSIBLE TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect

The physical nature of compressible turbulence is of fundamental importance in a variety of astrophysical settings. We investigate the question: 'At what scales does the mechanism of pressure-dilatation operate?' and present the first direct evidence that mean kinetic energy cascades conservatively beyond a transitional 'conversion' scale range despite not being an invariant of the dynamics. We use high-resolution 1024{sup 3} subsonic and transonic simulations. The key quantity we measure is the pressure-dilatation cospectrum, E{sup PD}(k), where we show that it decays at a rate faster than k{sup -1} in wavenumber in at least the subsonic and transonic regimes. This is sufficient to imply that mean pressure-dilatation acts primarily at large scales and that kinetic and internal energy budgets statistically decouple beyond a transitional scale range. However, we observe that small-scale dynamics remains highly compressible locally in space and that the statistical decoupling in the energy budgets is unrelated to the existence of a subsonic scale range. Our results suggest that an extension of Kolmogorov's inertial-range theory to compressible turbulence is possible.

Aluie, Hussein; Li Shengtai; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The conservative cascade of kinetic energy in compressible turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical nature of compressible turbulence is of fundamental importance in a variety of astrophysical settings. We present the first direct evidence that mean kinetic energy cascades conservatively beyond a transitional "conversion" scale-range despite not being an invariant of the compressible flow dynamics. We use high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of compressible hydrodynamic turbulence on $512^3$ and $1024^3$ grids. We probe regimes of forced steady-state isothermal flows and of unforced decaying ideal gas flows. The key quantity we measure is pressure dilatation cospectrum, $E^{PD}(k)$, where we provide the first numerical evidence that it decays at a rate faster than $k^{-1}$ as a function of wavenumber. This is sufficient to imply that mean pressure dilatation acts primarily at large-scales and that kinetic and internal energy budgets statistically decouple beyond a transitional scale-range. Our results suggest that an extension of Kolmogorov's inertial-range theory to compressible turbulence is possible.

Hussein Aluie; Shengtai Li; Hui Li

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

The conservative cascade of kinetic energy in compressible turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical nature of compressible turbulence is of fundamental importance in a variety of astrophysical settings. We present the first direct evidence that mean kinetic energy cascades conservatively beyond a transitional "conversion" scale-range despite not being an invariant of the compressible flow dynamics. We use high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of compressible hydrodynamic turbulence on $512^3$ and $1024^3$ grids. We probe regimes of forced steady-state isothermal flows and of unforced decaying ideal gas flows. The key quantity we measure is pressure dilatation cospectrum, $E^{PD}(k)$, where we provide the first numerical evidence that it decays at a rate faster than $k^{-1}$ as a function of wavenumber. This is sufficient to imply that mean pressure dilatation acts primarily at large-scales and that kinetic and internal energy budgets statistically decouple beyond a transitional scale-range. Our results suggest that an extension of Kolmogorov's inertial-range theory to compressible turbu...

Aluie, Hussein; Li, Hui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Meet with Large Businesses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meet with Large Businesses Meet with Large Businesses and learn about upcoming acquisitions! * Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) * National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) * Small Business Administration (SBA) * U.S. Department of Energy / Energy, Efficiency, and Renewable Energy (EERE) * U.S. Department of Energy / Golden Field Office (GFO) * Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) * Colorado Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC)

314

Modeling and discretization errors in large eddy simulations of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic channel flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We assess the performances of three different subgrid scale models in large eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent channel flows. Two regimes are considered: hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (i.e. in the presence of a uniform wall-normal magnetic field). ... Keywords: Channel flow, Finite-volume method, Hydrodynamic, Kinetic energy budget, Large eddy simulation, Magnetohydrodynamic, Spectral method

A. Vir; D. Krasnov; T. Boeck; B. Knaepen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources  

SciTech Connect

Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

Alton, Gerald D. (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fundamental kinetic modeling of the catalytic reforming process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a fundamental kinetic model for the catalytic reforming process has been developed. The complex network of elementary steps and molecular reactions occurring in catalytic reforming has been generated through a computer algorithm characterizing the various species by vectors and Boolean relation matrices. The algorithm is based on the fundamental chemistry occurring on both acid and metal sites of the catalyst. Rates are expressed for each of the elementary steps involved in the transformation of the intermediates. The Hougen-Watson approach is used to express the rates of the molecular reactions occurring on the metal sites of the catalyst. The single event approach is used to account for the effect of structure of reactant and activated complex on the rate coefficients of the elementary steps occurring on the acid sites. This approach recognizes that even if the number of elementary steps is very large they belong to a very limited number of types, and therefore it is possible to express the kinetics of elementary steps by a reduced number of parameters. In addition, the single event approach leads to rate coefficients that are independent of the feedstock, due to their fundamental chemical nature. The total number of parameters at isothermal conditions is 45. To estimate these parameters, an objective function based upon the sum of squares of the residuals was minimized through the Marquardt algorithm. Intraparticle mass transport limitations and deactivation of the catalyst by coke formation are considered in the model. Both the Wilke and the Stefan-Maxwell approaches were used to calculate the concentration gradients inside of the particle. The heterogeneous kinetic model was applied in the simulation of the process for typical industrial conditions for both axial and radial flow fixed bed reactors. The influence of the main process variables on the octane number and reformate volume was investigated and optimal conditions were obtained. Additional aspects studied with the kinetic model are the reduction of aromatics, mainly benzene. The results from the simulations agree with the typical performance found in the industrial process.

Sotelo-Boyas, Rogelio

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Optimization of a kinetic laser-plasma interaction code for large parallel systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we simulate the interaction between intense laser radiation and a fully ionized plasma by solving a Vlasov-Maxwell system using the "Particle-In-Cell" (PIC) method. This method provides a very detailed description of the plasma dynamics, ... Keywords: PIC method, high-performance computing, parallel sparse solver

Olivier Coulaud; Michal Dussere; Pascal Hnon; Erik Lefebvre; Jean Roman

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

THE KINETICS AND STABILITY OF FAST REACTORS WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS OF NONLINEARITIES (thesis)  

SciTech Connect

The dynamic behavior of a fast reactor, when the neutron flux is considered as a function of time, is considered. The kinetics of a fast reactor can be grouped into three distinct areas of interest; the first being the normal operating conditions where all the changes are brought about in a slow manner. and the resulting flux changes being small in comparison with the steady stuff flux. Since the available reactivity and the power density of most large thermal reactors is so small, and the heat capacity is so large, nothing but small deviations from design conditions would occur before the control rods were inserted. Thus reactor kinetics traditionally has meant linear kinetics, which in the mathematical interpretation leads to linearized kinetic equations. The second area is where there is much stronger coupling between reactivity and geometrical changes in the core. A fast reactor has a much higher power density than a thermal reactor and geometrical changes will therefore be more effective on reactivity. A fast reactor needs a greater total amount of U-235 because the fission cross section of U-235 is several hundred times smaller at neutron energies of the order of 0.1 Mev as compared to thermal energies. A fast reactor will always be smaller than a thermal reactor assuming the same power production. Stability and the influence of non linearities are discussed. (A.C.)

Sandmeier, H.A.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Comparison of point kinetics, improved quasistatic and theta method as space-time kinetics solvers in DONJON-3 simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To ensure the safety of nuclear reactors, we have to simulate accurately their normal operation and also accident cases. To perform transient calculations, coupled neutronic and fhermo-hydraulic codes are used. This article compares three neutronic solvers. The first one is the point kinetic approach where the flux shape is constant during all the transient. For the second method (the improved quasistatic method), the flux shape is constant but only during small time steps. Finally, we used the theta approach where both flux and precursors distributions vary with time and space. Transients of Lost Of Coolant Accident in CANDU-6 reactors have been simulated with DONJON and the outputs of a thermalhydraulic system code. Results show that the point kinetics is inappropriate for transient with large distortion of the flux shape. Improved quasistatic and theta methods give relatively similar results. However, the improved quasistatic approach is less stable and a little bit more sensitive on time-step and spatial discretization than the theta method is. (authors)

Chambon, R.; Marleau, G. [Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, 2500 chemin de la Polytechnique, Montreal, QC H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy: Reservoirs, Sources,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The coupling of the generation of different energy forms in the dynamics (in either balanced or wave motions are almost nonexistent in the ocean. www.annualreviews.org · Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy 255 Annu.Rev.Fluid processes? Are the seemingly different dynamical ranges coupled? 2. THE OCEANIC ENERGY BUDGET We begin

Ferrari, Raffaele

322

Thermodynamics and Kinetics of a Brownian Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamics and Kinetics of a Brownian Motor R. Dean Astumian Nonequilibrium fluctuations particle separation and the design of molecular motors and pumps. A small particle in a liquid is subject in conjunction with an- isotropy to drive a motor in the context of a "ratchet and pawl" device shrunk to micro

Linke, Heiner

323

KINETICS, STABILITY, AND CONTROL. A Selected Bibliography  

SciTech Connect

References to 529 articles on nuclear reactor control, kinetics, and stability published before autumn 1962 are included. Emphasis is on calculations and theory since the references serve as an aid in analyzing the dynamic behavior of SNAP reactor systems. (D.C.W.)

Johnson, R.L.

1963-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Reaction kinetics for remodeling oil shale retorting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from recent laboratory kinetic studies at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) on gasification, pyrolysis, and mineral reactions in oil shale are presented. The specific pyrolysis reactions investigated include the decomposition of kerogen, the evolution of oil, hydrogen and C/sub 2/ plus C/sub 3/ hydrocarbons and the formation of a carbonaceous residue. Data describing the evolution of H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ during secondary pyrolysis of the carbonaceous residue are also presented. The mineral reaction kinetics discussed include the decomposition and/or reaction (with silica or silicates) of calcite, dolomite, dawsonite and nahcolite. Rate equations describing the effects of CO/sub 2/ and steam on the reactions of calcite and dolomite are presented. Finally, kinetics describing gasification of the carbonaceous residue by CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O are examined. The above kinetic data are summarized in a set of rate expressions that can be used in numerical modeling of oil shale retorting. The rate equations are general enough for modeling both in-situ and surface retorting processes.

Campbell, J.H.; Burnham, A.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron  

SciTech Connect

Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Combined Ideal and Kinetic Effects on Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes  

SciTech Connect

A theory of Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes (RSAEs) is developed for reversed magnetic field shear plasmas when the safety factor minimum, qmin, is at or above a rational value. The modes we study are known sometimes as either the bottom of the frequency sweep or the down sweeping RSAEs. We show that the ideal MHD theory is not compatible with the eigenmode solution in the reversed shear plasma with qmin above integer values. Corrected by special analytic FLR condition MHD dispersion of these modes nevertheless can be developed. Large radial scale part of the analytic RSAE solution can be obtained from ideal MHD and expressed in terms of the Legendre functions. The kinetic equation with FLR effects for the eigenmode is solved numerically and agrees with the analytic solutions. Properties of RSAEs and their potential implications for plasma diagnostics are discussed.

N.N. Gorelenkov, G.J. Kramer, and R. Nazikian

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

Propagation of Chaos for a Thermostated Kinetic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a system of N point particles moving on a d-dimensional torus. Each particle is subject to a uniform field E and random speed conserving collisions. This model is a variant of the Drude-Lorentz model of electrical conduction. In order to avoid heating by the external field, the particles also interact with a Gaussian thermostat which keeps the total kinetic energy of the system constant. The thermostat induces a mean-field type of interaction between the particles. Here we prove that, starting from a product measure, in the large N limit, the one particle velocity distribution satisfies a self consistent Vlasov-Boltzmann equation.. This is a consequence of "propagation of chaos", which we also prove for this model.

F. Bonetto; E. A. Carlen; R. Esposito; J. L. Lebowitz; R. Marra

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogen Combustion Limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic model is used to explore the flammability and detonability of hydrogen mixtures. In the case of flammability, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrogen is coupled to the CHEMKIN Premix code to compute premixed, laminar flame speeds. The detailed chemical kinetic model reproduces flame speeds in the literature over a range of equivalence ratios, pressures and reactant temperatures. A series of calculation were performed to assess the key parameters determining the flammability of hydrogen mixtures. Increased reactant temperature was found to greatly increase the flame speed and the flammability of the mixture. The effect of added diluents was assessed. Addition of water and carbon dioxide were found to reduce the flame speed and thus the flammability of a hydrogen mixture approximately equally well and much more than the addition of nitrogen. The detailed chemical kinetic model was used to explore the detonability of hydrogen mixtures. A Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) detonation model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was used to model the detonation. The effectiveness on different diluents was assessed in reducing the detonability of a hydrogen mixture. Carbon dioxide was found to be most effective in reducing the detonability followed by water and nitrogen. The chemical action of chemical inhibitors on reducing the flammability of hydrogen mixtures is discussed. Bromine and organophosphorus inhibitors act through catalytic cycles that recombine H and OH radicals in the flame. The reduction in H and OH radicals reduces chain branching in the flame through the H + O{sub 2} = OH + O chain branching reaction. The reduction in chain branching and radical production reduces the flame speed and thus the flammability of the hydrogen mixture.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Large-Scale Hydropower  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Large-scale hydropower plants are generally developed to produce electricity for government or electric utility projects. These plants are more than 30 MW in size, and there is more than 80,000 MW...

331

Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer of a Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell Title Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer...

332

Kinetic Isotope Effects for the Reactions of Muonic Helium and Muonium with H2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The neutral muonic helium atom may be regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of ~4.1 amu (4.1H), because the negative muon screens one proton charge. We report the reaction rate of 4.1H with 1H2 to produce 4.1H1H + 1H at 295 to 500 K. The experimental rate constants are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical dynamics calculations carried out on an accurate Born-Huang potential energy surface and with previously measured rate constants of 0.11H (where 0.11H is shorthand for muonium). Kinetic isotope effects can be compared for the unprecedentedly large mass ratio of 36. The agreement with accurate quantum dynamics is quantitative at 500 K, and variational transition state theory is used to interpret the extremely low (large inverse) kinetic isotope effects in the 10-4 to 10-2 range.

Fleming, Donald G.; Arseneau, Donald J.; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H.; Mielke, Steven L.; Schatz, George C.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Peterson, Kirk A.; Truhlar, Donald G.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

Kinetic Controls on Cu and Pb Sorption by Ferrihydrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nd ed.; Cambridge University Press: New York, 1993. (51) Sparks, D. L. Kinetics of Soil Chemical Processes; Academic Press: New York, 1989. (52) Espenson, J. H. Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms, 2Kinetic Controls on Cu and Pb Sorption by Ferrihydrite A N D R E A S C . S C H E I N O

Sparks, Donald L.

334

Kinetic and stationary point-set embeddability for plane graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a kinetic version of point-set embeddability. Given a plane graph G(V,E) where |V|=n, and a set P of n moving points where the trajectory of each point is an algebraic function of constant ... Keywords: kinetic algorithm, kinetic graph drawing, plane graph, point-set embeddability

Zahed Rahmati; Sue H. Whitesides; Valerie King

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement performance has not been considered adequately in pavement design. Part of the reason is that the process of asphalt oxidation in pavement is not well understood. This work focused on understanding the asphalt oxidation kinetics and on developing pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation and hardening in pavement under environmental conditions. A number of asphalts were studied in laboratory condition. Based on kinetics data, a fast-rate ? constant-rate asphalt oxidation kinetics model was developed to describe the early nonlinear fast-rate aging period and the later constant-rate period of asphalt oxidation. Furthermore, reaction kinetics parameters for the fast-rate and constant-rate reactions were empirically correlated, leading to a simplified model. And the experimental effort and time to obtain these kinetics parameters were significantly reduced. Furthermore, to investigate the mechanism of asphalt oxidation, two antioxidants were studied on their effectiveness. Asphalt oxidation was not significantly affected. It was found that evaluation of antioxidant effectiveness based on viscosity only is not reliable. The asphalt oxidation kinetics model was incorporated into the pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation in pavement. The pavement oxidation model mimics the oxidation process of asphalt in real mixture at pavement temperatures. A new parameter, diffusion depth, defined the oxygen diffusion region in the mastic. A field calibration factor accounted for the factors not considered in the model such as the effect of small aggregate particles on oxygen diffusion. Carbonyl area and viscosity of binders recovered from field cores of three pavements in Texas were measured and were used for model calibration and validation. Results demonstrated that the proposed model estimates carbonyl growth over time in pavement, layer-by-layer, quite well. Finally, this work can be useful for incorporating asphalt oxidation into a pavement design method that can predict pavement performance with time and for making strategic decisions such as optimal time for maintenance treatments.

Jin, Xin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Convective cell generation by kinetic Alfven wave turbulence in the auroral ionosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modulation of convective cells by kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence is investigated. The interaction is governed by a nonlinear dispersion relation for the convective cells. It is shown that KAW turbulence is disrupted by excitation of the large-scale convective motion through a resonant instability. Application of the results to the auroral ionosphere shows that cross-scale coupling of the KAW turbulence and convective cells plays an important role in the evolution of ionospheric plasma turbulence.

Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences 210008, Nanjing (China); Yu, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Lu, J. Y. [National Center for Space Weather, China Meteorology Administration 100081, Beijing (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

ET Kinetics of Bifunctional Redox Protein Maquettes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetics of Bifunctional Redox Protein Maquettes Kinetics of Bifunctional Redox Protein Maquettes Mitchell W. Mutz, James F. Wishart and George L. McLendon Adv. Chem Ser. 254, Ch. 10, pp. 145-159 Abstract: We prepared three bifunctional redox protein maquettes based on 12-, 16-, and 20-mer three-helix bundles. In each case, the helix was capped with a Co(III) tris-bipyridyl electron acceptor and also functionalized with a C-terminal viologen (1-ethyl-1'-ethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium) donor. Electron transfer (ET) was initiated by pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis and followed spectrometrically to determined average, concentration-independent, first-order rates for the 16-mer and 20-mer maquettes. For the 16-mer bundle, the alpha-helical content was adjusted by the addition of urea or trifluoroethanol to solutions containing the metalloprotein. This

338

Kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive general kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation that describe certain features of the morphogenesis of biological colonies (like bacteria, amoebae, endothelial cells or social insects). Starting from a stochastic model defined in terms of N coupled Langevin equations, we derive a nonlinear mean field Fokker-Planck equation governing the evolution of the distribution function of the system in phase space. By taking the successive moments of this kinetic equation and using a local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations involving a damping term. In the limit of small frictions, we obtain a hyperbolic model describing the formation of network patterns (filaments) and in the limit of strong frictions we obtain a parabolic model which is a generalization of the standard Keller-Segel model describing the formation of clusters (clumps). Our approach connects and generalizes several models introduced in the chemotactic literature. We discuss the anal...

Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Auxiliary power supply with kinetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect

Alternating current is supplied to an auxiliary load on a from a power supply comprised of a dc-energized inverter and a synchronous machine coupled to the inverter. The inverter supplies the alternating current requirements of the load up to the normal steady state load current magnitude. The synchronous machine stores kinetic energy when the load current load does not exceed its normal steady state magnitude, and converts kinetic energy into electrical energy to supply the load current requirements in excess of its normal steady-state load magnitude and to supply load current whenever the dc source inverter connection is interrupted. Frequency and amplitude of load voltage are regulated by operator commands through control apparatus coupled to the inverter and the synchronous machine.

Plunkett, A.B.; Turnbull, F.G.

1982-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Analysis on kinetic chemotaxis models using a functional analytic approach Analysis on kinetic chemotaxis models using a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are applicable at the molecular level. Copyright # 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: kinetic stability of that system are undergoing constant change. This chemical example of replicator kinetic stability is akin in circumstance may dramatically affect the kinetic stability of physical, chemical and biological, systems. So

Hille, Sander

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341

React. Kinet.Catal.Lett., Vol.9, No. 4,377-381 (1978) WHAT IS ESSENTIAL TO EXOTIC KINETIC BEHAVIOR?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6= 10'. I = 1 I=I 378 #12;TOTH: EXOTIC KINETIC BEHAVIOR? COROLLARIES Immediate application). REFERENCES 1. M. Feinberg: Mathamatical Aspects of Mass Action Kinetics. Chapter 1 of Chemical Reactor Theory-London-New York 1972. 3. J. T6th, P. ~rdi: Models, Problems and Applications of Formal Reaction Kinetics (in

Tóth, János

342

MEASUREMENTS, ERRORS, AND NEGATIVE KINETIC ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of errors in measurement yields new insight into the penetration of quantum particles into classically forbidden regions. In addition to physical values, realistic measurements yield unphysical values which, we show, can form a consistent pattern. An experiment to isolate a particle in a classically forbidden region obtains negative values for its kinetic energy. These values realize the concept of a weak value, discussed in previous works. 0

Yakir Aharonov; Sandu Popescu; Daniel Rohrlich; Lev Vaidman

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Chemical kinetics models for semiconductor processing  

SciTech Connect

Chemical reactions in the gas-phase and on surfaces are important in the deposition and etching of materials for microelectronic applications. A general software framework for describing homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics utilizing the Chemkin suite of codes is presented. Experimental, theoretical and modeling approaches to developing chemical reaction mechanisms are discussed. A number of TCAD application modules for simulating the chemically reacting flow in deposition and etching reactors have been developed and are also described.

Coltrin, M.E.; Creighton, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Houf, W.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Kee, R.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

On the Effect of Ocean Waves on the Kinetic Energy Balance and Consequences for the Inertial Dissipation Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For large wind speed (in practice >15 m s?1) observations of the surface stress by means of the inertial dissipation technique are so close to the surface that effects of growing ocean waves on the turbulent kinetic energy budget should be taken ...

Peter A. E. M. Janssen

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

An Application of Chemical Kinetic Theory and Methodology to Characterize the Ice Nucleating Properties of Aerosols Used for Weather Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic theory and methodology is applied to examine the ice nucleating properties of silver iodide (AgI) and silver iodide-silver chloride (AgI-AgCl) aerosols in a large cloud chamber held at water saturation. This approach uses ...

Paul J. DeMott; William G. Finnegan; Lewis O. Grant

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Rhodopsin kinetics in the cat retina  

SciTech Connect

The bleaching and regeneration of rhodopsin in the living cat retina was studied by means of fundus reflectometry. Bleaching was effected by continuous light exposures of 1 min or 20 min, and the changes in retinal absorbance were measured at 29 wavelengths. For all of the conditions studied (fractional bleaches of from 65 to 100%), the regeneration of rhodopsin to its prebleach levels required greater than 60 min in darkness. After the 1-min exposures, the difference spectra recorded during the first 10 min of dark adaptation were dominated by photoproduct absorption, and rhodopsin regeneration kinetics were obscured by these intermediate processes. Extending the bleaching duration to 20 min gave the products of photolysis an opportunity to dissipate, and it was possible to follow the regenerative process over its full time-course. It was not possible, however, to fit these data with the simple exponential function predicted by first-order reaction kinetics. Other possible mechanisms were considered and are presented in the text. Nevertheless, the kinetics of regeneration compared favorably with the temporal changes in log sensitivity determined electrophysiologically by other investigators. Based on the bleaching curve for cat rhodopsin, the photosensitivity was determined and found to approximate closely the value obtained for human rhodopsin; i.e., the energy Ec required to bleach 1-e-1 of the available rhodopsin was 7.09 log scotopic troland-seconds (corrected for the optics of the cat eye), as compared with approximately 7.0 in man.

Ripps, H.; Mehaffey, L.; Siegel, I.M.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

Howes, G G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

G. G. Howes

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

349

Large Occlusion Stereo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for solving the stereo matching problem in the presence of large occlusion is presented. A data structurethe disparity space imageis defined to facilitate the description of the effects of occlusion on the stereo matching process ... Keywords: disparity-space, dynamic-programming stereo, occlusion, stereo

Aaron F. Bobick; Stephen S. Intille

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Composting Large Animal Carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how to build and maintain a compost pile, tools you will need, and how to use the finished compost.

Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating gas hydrate behavior in porous media  

SciTech Connect

In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. The use of the equilibriumreaction model often appears to be justified and preferred for simulatingthe behavior of gas hydrates, given that the computational demands forthe kinetic reaction model far exceed those for the equilibrium reactionmodel.

Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

352

Simplified jet-A kinetic mechanism for combustor application  

SciTech Connect

Successful modeling of combustion and emissions in gas turbine engine combustors requires an adequate description of the reaction mechanism. For hydrocarbon oxidation, detailed mechanisms are only available for the simplest types of hydrocarbons such as methane, ethane, acetylene, and propane. These detailed mechanisms contain a large number of chemical species participating simultaneously in many elementary kinetic steps. Current computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models must include fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, chemical reactions, and complicated boundary geometries. To simulate these conditions a very sophisticated computer model is required, which requires large computer memory capacity and long run times. Therefore, gas turbine combustion modeling has frequently been simplified by using global reaction mechanisms, which can predict only the quantities of interest: heat release rates, flame temperature, and emissions. Jet fuels are wide-boiling-range hydrocarbons with ranges extending through those of gasoline and kerosene. These fuels are chemically complex, often containing more than 300 components. Jet fuel typically can be characterized as containing 70 vol pct paraffin compounds and 25 vol pct aromatic compounds. A five-step Jet-A fuel mechanism which involves pyrolysis and subsequent oxidation of paraffin and aromatic compounds is presented here. This mechanism is verified by comparing with Jet-A fuel ignition delay time experimental data, and species concentrations obtained from flametube experiments. This five-step mechanism appears to be better than the current one- and two-step mechanisms.

Lee, Chiming; Kundu, K.; Ghorashi, B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A KINETIC MODEL OF SOLAR WIND GENERATION BY OBLIQUE ION-CYCLOTRON WAVES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast solar wind is generated by extended perpendicular ion heating in coronal holes, but the kinetic mechanism responsible for this heating has not been determined. One long-standing possibility is the resonant-cyclotron dissipation of ion-cyclotron waves, replenished from a turbulent cascade of interacting counter-propagating Alfven waves. We present results of a kinetic model for proton heating by the quasilinear resonant-cyclotron wave-particle interaction in a coronal hole. The resonant wave spectrum is taken as a power law in wavenumber, uniformly distributed in propagation direction between 0 deg. and 60 deg. with respect to the large-scale radial magnetic field. We obtain the steady-state solution of the kinetic guiding-center equation for the proton distribution in an expanding coronal hole, including the effects of large-scale forces of gravity, charge-separation electric field, Alfven wave ponderomotive force, and mirror force, along with the small-scale scattering from the wave dissipation. We find that plausible wave intensities can yield reasonable flow speeds and temperatures in the heliocentric radial range between 2 and 6 solar radii. We address the claim in earlier work that dissipation of parallel-propagating ion-cyclotron waves cannot provide enough acceleration and show that claim to be incorrect. We find that the combined action of the large-scale forces and the resonant-cyclotron scattering produces proton distribution functions with a characteristic structure: compressed in the sunward half of velocity space with a high-density shell separate from the origin, and relatively expanded in the anti-sunward half of velocity space. We suggest that qualitatively similar proton distributions would result from the kinetic evolution of any sufficiently effective perpendicular heating mechanism operating in an expanding coronal hole.

Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

354

Implicit Large Eddy Simulation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Implicit Implicit Large Eddy Simulation (ILES) for High Reynolds Number Flows Len Margolin Applied Physics Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaborators: 1. Bill Rider (LANL) 2. Piotr Smolarkiewicz (NCAR) 3. Andrzej Wysogrodski (NCAR) 4. Fernando Grinstein (NRL) len@lanl.gov 1 Implicit Large Eddy Simulation Outline: * What is ILES? * What are its advantages? * Historical perspective * Why does it work? * Some examples len@lanl.gov 2 What is ILES ILES is the direct application of a fluid solver to a high Reynolds number fluid flow with no explicit turbulence model. · The truncation terms of the algorithm serve as an effective model of the effects of the unresolved scales. · Fluid solvers based on Nonoscillatory Finite Volume (NFV) approximations work effectively for ILES. · Fluid solvers based on pseudospectral methods, leapfrog methods, advective form methods, etc. do not work

355

Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

356

Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G. Park

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

357

Effects of adsorbed water vapor on the Wheeler kinetic rate constant and kinetic adsorption capacity for activated carbon adsorbents  

SciTech Connect

Activated carbon plays a key role reducing organic vapor emissions to the environment from synthetic chemical manufacturing, pesticide manufacturing, in odor control, for removal of contaminant vapors during remediation of hazardous waste sites, and as an adsorption matrix for collection of organic vapors from ambient air in occupational and environmental settings to assess exposure. The Wheeler dynamic adsorption model has been evaluated under laboratory conditions and has shown potential for predicting activated carbon bed penetration. Water vapor is a normal constituent of ambient air that is present at concentrations 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than the concentrations of potentially toxic air contaminants. Many investigations have shown that adsorbed water vapor can reduce the breakthrough-time of activated charcoal beds. The effect of adsorbed water vapor on the predictive power of the Wheeler model has not been evaluated. The research evaluated the effect of water vapor adsorbed on activated charcoal on the subsequent adsorption of four air contaminants, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethylene, and 1-propanol. The adsorbent used in this research had a large surface area, 1200 m[sup 2]/g and that 95% of the surface area was associated with micropores (pores with diameters less than 2 micrometers). Kinetic adsorption capacities for all four adsorbates were not affected by the presence of water vapor except for some observed enhancement. The kinetic trial data suggest that the primary effect of adsorbed water vapor was to reduce the effective pore radius of the smaller mesopores thus restricting pore diffusion. This results in an increase in the critical bed capacity with shorter breakthrough times for adsorbent beds.

Hall, T.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Evolution of ultrashort laser pulse in large amplitude plasma waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The propagation and evolution of an ultrashort laser pulse in a large amplitude plasma wave are investigated based on the photon kinetic theory. The photon number distribution function for a laser pulse in the phase space is analytically obtained by solving the photon kinetic equation in the background plasma wave. And then, the behavior of the laser pulse can be described by combining the single photon dynamics and the photon number distribution function. The evolutions of the photon number density in the coordinate and frequency domain space are discussed, and broadening or compressing of the laser pulse is also displayed in this paper. In particular, the frequency shift of the entire laser pulse is analyzed, which reflects a way of energy transformation between the laser pulse and the plasma wave.

Bu Zhigang [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Ji Peiyong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); The Shanghai Key Lab of Astrophysics, Shanghai 200234 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Kinetics of Anionic Surfactant Anoxic Degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biodegradation kinetics of Geropon TC-42 (trademark) by an acclimated culture was investigated in anoxic batch reactors to determine biokinetic coefficients to be implemented in two biofilm mathematical models. Geropon TC-42 (trademark) is the surfactant commonly used in space habitation. The two biofilm models differ in that one assumes a constant biofilm density and the other allows biofilm density changes based on space occupancy theory. Extant kinetic analysis of a mixed microbial culture using Geropon TC-42 (trademark) as sole carbon source was used to determine cell yield, specific growth rate, and the half-saturation constant for S0/X0 ratios of 4, 12.5, and 34.5. To estimate cell yield, linear regression analysis was performed on data obtained from three sets of simultaneous batch experiments for three S0/X0 ratios. The regressions showed non-zero intercepts, suggesting that cell multiplication is not possible at low substrate concentrations. Non-linear least-squares analysis of the integrated equation was used to estimate the specific growth rate and the half-saturation constant. Net specific growth rate dependence on substrate concentration indicates a self-inhibitory effect of Geropon TC-42 (trademark). The flow rate and the ratio of the concentrations of surfactant to nitrate were the factors that most affected the simulations. Higher flow rates resulted in a shorter hydraulic retention time, shorter startup periods, and faster approach to a steady-state biofilm. At steady-state, higher flow resulted in lower surfactant removal. Higher influent surfactant/nitrate concentration ratios caused a longer startup period, supported more surfactant utilization, and biofilm growth. Both models correlate to the empirical data. A model assuming constant biofilm density is computationally simpler and easier to implement. Therefore, a suitable anoxic packed bed reactor for the removal of the surfactant Geropon TC-42 (trademark) can be designed by using the estimated kinetic values and a model assuming constant biofilm density.

Camacho, Julianna G.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

SPECTRUM OF KINETIC-ALFVEN TURBULENCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study of strong kinetic-Alfven turbulence at scales smaller than the ion gyroscale is presented, and a phenomenological model is proposed that argues that magnetic and density fluctuations are concentrated mostly in two-dimensional structures, which leads to their Fourier energy spectra E(k ){proportional_to}k {sup -8/3} , where k is the wavevector component normal to the strong background magnetic field. The results may provide an explanation for recent observations of magnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind at sub-proton scales.

Boldyrev, Stanislav; Perez, Jean Carlos [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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361

The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0.76. Silicone rubber based DEB getters hydride at a much lower rate, have little dependence on reaction extent, have a higher kinetic order in pressure (0.87), and have a lower activation energy. The kinetics of the reaction as a function of hydrogen pressure, stoichiometry, and temperature for hydrogen and deuterium near ambient temperature (0 to 75 C) for pressures near or below 100 Pa over a wide range (in some cases, the complete) hydrogenation range are presented along with multi-dimensional rate models.

Powell, G. L.

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

Kinetics of the processes, plasma parameters, and output characteristics of a UV emitter operating on XeI molecules and iodine molecules and atoms  

SciTech Connect

A kinetic model of the processes occurring in the plasma of a high-power low-pressure gas-discharge lamp is presented, and the output characteristics of the lamp are described. The lamp is excited by a longitudinal glow discharge and emits the I{sub 2}(D Prime -A Prime ) 342-nm and XeI(B-X) 253-nm bands and the 206.2-nm spectral line of atomic iodine. When the emitter operates in a sealed-off mode on the p(He): p(Xe): p(I{sub 2}) = 400: 120: (100-200) Pa mixture, the fractions of the UV radiation power of iodine atoms, exciplex molecules of xenon iodide, and iodine molecules comprise 55, 10, and 35%, respectively. At the optimal partial pressure, the maximum total radiation power of the lamp reaches 37 W, the energy efficiency being about 15%.

Shuaibov, A. K.; Grabovaya, I. A.; Minya, A. I.; Homoki, Z. T. [Uzhgorod National University (Ukraine); Kalyuzhnaya, A. G.; Shchedrin, A. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Improved Structure and Fabrication of Large High-Power Kinetic Hydropower System Rotors -Year 2 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B5.1 Date: 03172011...

364

CX-005428: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Improved Structure and Fabrication of Large High-Power Kinetic Hydropower System Rotors -Year 2 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B5.1 Date: 03172011 Location(s):...

365

Large scale dynamics of the Persistent Turning Walker model of fish behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers a new model of individual displacement, based on fish motion, the so-called Persistent Turning Walker (PTW) model, which involves an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process on the curvature of the particle trajectory. The goal is to show that its large time and space scale dynamics is of diffusive type, and to provide an analytic expression of the diffusion coefficient. Two methods are investigated. In the first one, we compute the large time asymptotics of the variance of the individual stochastic trajectories. The second method is based on a diffusion approximation of the kinetic formulation of these stochastic trajectories. The kinetic model is a Fokker-Planck type equation posed in an extended phase-space involving the curvature among the kinetic variables. We show that both methods lead to the same value of the diffusion constant. We present some numerical simulations to illustrate the theoretical results.

Pierre Degond; Sbastien Motsch

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

367

Kinetic Alfven Waves at the Magnetopause--Mode Conversion, Transport and Formation of LLBL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity [Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D {approx} 109m2/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (Bwave/B0 > 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity [Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D {approx} 10{sup 9}m{sup 2}/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (B{sub wave}/B{sub 0} > 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.

Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nonlinear interaction and parametric instability of kinetic Alfven waves in multicomponent plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear couplings among kinetic Alfven waves are investigated for a three-component plasma consisting of electrons, protons, and heavy ions. The parametric instability is investigated, and the growth rate is obtained. In the kinetic regime, the growth rate for the parallel decay instability increases with the heavy ion content, but the growth rate for the reverse decay is independent of the latter since the perpendicular wavelength is much larger than the ion gyroradius. It decreases with the heavy ion content when the perpendicular wavelength is of the order of the ion gyroradius. It is also found that in the short perpendicular wavelength limit, the growth rate is only weakly affected by the heavy ions. On the other hand, in the inertial regime, for both parallel and reverse decay cases, the growth rate decreases as the number of heavy ions becomes large.

Zhao, J. S.; Yang, L. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Lu, J. Y. [College of Mathematics and Statistics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); National Center for Space Weather, China Meteorology Administration, Beijing 100081 (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The turbulent spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy and its exchange is investigated in the framework of an K-{epsilon} model in a magnetized plasma column. The kinetic energy is transferred from the turbulence into the zonal flow around the shear layer. The Reynolds stress profile adjusts to the shear layer, which results in a transport of mean kinetic energy from the region around the shear layer into the shear layer.

Manz, P.; Xu, M.; Fedorczak, N.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization,University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type of hydrocarbon), via reaction with ozone, a key pollutant in the troposphere. Although there has been much indirect evidence supporting Criegee's mechanism, breakthrough research done at the ALS by chemists from Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Manchester, and Bristol University has for the first time directly measured reaction rates for so-called "Criegee intermediates," elusive molecules formed at intermediate stages of ozonolysis. The surprising results may have important implications for subjects ranging from advanced engine design to air quality and climate modeling.

371

PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates  

SciTech Connect

The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Kinetics of zeolite dealumination in steam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zeolite dealumination is a well known phenomenon that contributes to the deactivation or activation of catalysts in several different applications. The most obvious effect is in acid catalysis where dealumination under reaction conditions removes the Broensted sites, thus deactivating the catalyst. The authors are interested in the use of cation exchanged zeolites as selective reduction catalysts for removal of NO{sub x} from exhaust streams, particularly from automotive exhaust. In this case, copper exchanged ZSM-5 has been shown to be an effective catalyst for the generic reaction of NO{sub x} with hydrocarbons. However, high temperature and steam in combustion exhaust causes dealumination and consequent migration of copper out of the zeolite structure resulting in rapid deactivation of the catalyst. Dealumination of zeolites has been reported by many authors in uncountable papers and cannot be reviewed here. However, to the authors` knowledge there are no reports on the kinetics of dealumination under varying conditions of temperature and steam. By measuring the kinetics of dealumination with different zeolites and exchange cations they expect to develop working models of the dealumination process that will allow control of zeolite deactivation. This manuscript is a description of the basic techniques used and a progress report on the very beginning of this study.

Hughes, C.D.; Labouriau, A.; Crawford, S.N.; Romero, R.; Quirin, J.; Earl, W.L.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermo -Dynamic & -Kinetic Modeling to Quantify the Evolution of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermo-kinetic model is applied on various chemical compositions of type ... Application of the Phase-Field Model to Four-Phase Reactions in Ternary Alloys.

374

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme Scale PI Name: William Tang PI Email: tang@pppl.gov Institution: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Allocation...

375

A Kinetic Monte Carlo Model for Material Aging: Simulations of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we develop a kinetic Monte Carlo framework aiming at ... A Controlled Stress Energy Minimization Method for Coarse-grained Atomistic Simulation.

376

Thermal Stabilization of Nanocrystalline Grain Size by Kinetic and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk will review both kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms and ... Basic Criteria for Formation of Growth Twins in High Stacking Fault Energy Metals.

377

Kinetics of Supercritical Water Reformation of Ethanol to H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... Description Kinetics of the supercritical water reformation of ethanol was experimentally studied in a tubular reactor made of Inconel 625 alloy.

378

Kinetic characterization of enhanced lipase activity on oil bodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

reaction kinetics of oil bodies versus oil emulsions as sub- strates for lipolytic ... of hydrolysis for the oil body system was comparatively very low due to a brief...

379

Defect Chemistry and Kinetics of Electrons in Ion Conducting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Defect Chemistry and Kinetics of Electrons in Ion Conducting Materials Recent Results and Applications. Author(s), Hans D. Wiemhfer.

380

The Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Dissolution of Coarse Particles ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the kinetics of dissolution of Nb-rich and Nb2C particles in .... The Influence of Specimen Fabrication Method on the Measured Tensile...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

novelmeasurementsofchemicaldynamicsforclusters,Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at theUniversity of California Chemical Sciences Division,

Leone, Stephen R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the Growth of Algae. Author(s), Chunfang Zi, Kai Huang, Lianyun Liu, Xiaohui...

383

An Integrated CALPHAD Tool for Modeling Precipitation Kinetics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, An Integrated CALPHAD Tool for Modeling Precipitation Kinetics and Accelerating Materials Design. Author(s), Qing Chen, Herng-Jeng Jou,...

384

Oxygen Exchange Kinetics on SOFC Cathode Materials: Importance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxygen Exchange Kinetics on SOFC Cathode Materials: Importance of Ionic and Electronic Carriers. Author(s), Rotraut Merkle, Lei Wang,

385

Kinetic Modeling of Esterification of Ethylene Glycol with Acetic Acid  

SciTech Connect

The reaction kinetics of the esterification of ethylene glycol with acetic acid in the presence of cation exchange resin has been studied and kinetic models based on empirical and Langmuir approach has been developed. The Langmuir based model involving eight kinetic parameters fits experimental data much better compared to empirical model involving four kinetic parameters. The effect of temperature and catalyst loading on the reaction system has been analyzed. Further, the activation energy and frequency factor of the rate constants for Langmuir based model has been estimated.

Yadav, Vishnu P.; Maity, Sunil K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailiram-502205, Andhra Pradesh (India); Mukherjee, Rudra Palash [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India); Bantraj, Kandi [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela-769008, Orissa (India)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

3.205 Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laws of thermodynamics applied to materials and materials processes. Solution theory. Equilibrium diagrams. Overview of fluid transport processes. Kinetics of processes that occur in materials, including diffusion, phase ...

Allen, Samuel M.

387

Kinetics, Transport, and Structure in Hard and Soft Materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 25, 2007 ... REVIEWED BY: Stephen Rankin, associate professor, University of Kentucky. In his book Kinetics, Transport, and Structure in Hard and Soft...

388

Particle Size Distribution Model for Leaching Kinetics of Alumina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Particle Size Distribution Model for Leaching Kinetics of Alumina. Author(s), Li Bao, Ting-an Zhang, Weimin Long, Anh V Nguyen, Guozhi Lv,...

389

Complex (dusty) plasmas-kinetic studies of strong coupling phenomena  

SciTech Connect

'Dusty plasmas' can be found almost everywhere-in the interstellar medium, in star and planet formation, in the solar system in the Earth's atmosphere, and in the laboratory. In astrophysical plasmas, the dust component accounts for only about 1% of the mass, nevertheless this component has a profound influence on the thermodynamics, the chemistry, and the dynamics. Important physical processes are charging, sputtering, cooling, light absorption, and radiation pressure, connecting electromagnetic forces to gravity. Surface chemistry is another important aspect. In the laboratory, there is great interest in industrial processes (e.g., etching, vapor deposition) and-at the fundamental level-in the physics of strong coupling phenomena. Here, the dust (or microparticles) are the dominant component of the multi-species plasma. The particles can be observed in real time and space, individually resolved at all relevant length and time scales. This provides an unprecedented means for studying self-organisation processes in many-particle systems, including the onset of cooperative phenomena. Due to the comparatively large mass of the microparticles (10{sup -12}to10{sup -9}g), precision experiments are performed on the ISS. The following topics will be discussed: Phase transitions, phase separation, electrorheology, flow phenomena including the onset of turbulence at the kinetic level.

Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Thomas, Hubertus M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Large forging manufacturing process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for forging large components of Alloy 718 material so that the components do not exhibit abnormal grain growth includes the steps of: a) providing a billet with an average grain size between ASTM 0 and ASTM 3; b) heating the billet to a temperature of between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; c) upsetting the billet to obtain a component part with a minimum strain of 0.125 in at least selected areas of the part; d) reheating the component part to a temperature between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; e) upsetting the component part to a final configuration such that said selected areas receive no strains between 0.01 and 0.125; f) solution treating the component part at a temperature of between 1725.degree. F. and 1750.degree. F.; and g) aging the component part over predetermined times at different temperatures. A modified process achieves abnormal grain growth in selected areas of a component where desirable.

Thamboo, Samuel V. (Latham, NY); Yang, Ling (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Chemical Kinetic Model of Transcriptional Elongation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A chemical kinetic model of the elongation dynamics of RNA polymerase along a DNA sequence is introduced. The proposed model governs the discrete movement of the RNA polymerase along a DNA template, with no consideration given to elastic effects. The model's novel concept is a ``look-ahead'' feature, in which nucleotides bind reversibly to the DNA prior to being incorporated covalently into the nascent RNA chain. Results are presented for specific DNA sequences that have been used in single-molecule experiments of the random walk of RNA polymerase along DNA. By replicating the data analysis algorithm from the experimental procedure, the model produces velocity histograms, enabling direct comparison with these published results.

Yujiro Richard Yamada; Charles S. Peskin

2006-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Kinetics driving high-density chlorine plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple fluid model was developed in order to investigate the driving kinetics of neutral and charged species in high-density chlorine plasmas. It was found that the dissociation degree of Cl{sub 2} molecules is directly linked to the power balance of the discharge which controls the electron density. The model was also used to identify those reactions that could be neglected in the particle balance of charged species and those that must be included. Our results further indicate that diffusion losses need to be considered up to a pressure that depends on magnetic-field intensity and reactor aspect ratio. Finally, it is shown that the dominant charged carriers are linked to the dissociation level of Cl{sub 2} molecules.

Stafford, L.; Margot, J.; Vidal, F.; Chaker, M.; Giroux, K.; Poirier, J.-S.; Quintal-Leonard, A.; Saussac, J. [Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals  

SciTech Connect

Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ?10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

Nesbitt, David J. [Research/Professor

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Kinetic Energy Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Kinetic Energy Systems Place Ocala, Florida Zip 34476 Sector Hydro Product Designs and develops tidal generators. Has notably patented the KESC Tidal Generator which is based on free flow hydrodynamics. Coordinates 29.187525°, -82.140394° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.187525,"lon":-82.140394,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

ON THE EMERGENCE OF BIOLOGICAL COMPLEXITY: LIFE AS A KINETIC STATE OF MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, whereas for replicating chemical systems selection is effectively kinetic. Building on an extension. Keywords: biological complexification, chemical evolution, kinetic stability, kinetic state of matter that are kinetically more stable. So though all chemical reactions are governed by a combination of kinetic

Pross, Addy

397

Extracting biochemical reaction kinetics from time series data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We consider the problem of inferring kinetic mechanisms for biochemical reactions from time series data. Using a priori knowledge about the structure of chemical reaction kinetics we develop global nonlinear models which use elementary reactions as a basis set, and discuss model construction using top-down and bottom-up approaches. 1

Edmund J. Crampin; Patrick E. Mcsharry; Santiago Schnell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Computing realizations of reaction kinetic networks with given properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineering­chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, and fluid mechanics­are developed in the second CHEME 3900 Chemical Kinetics and Reactor Design CHEME 4320 Chemical Engineering Laboratory CHEME 4620UndergradUate degree Program as a chemical engineer you'll work with chemical change and chemical

Gorban, Alexander N.

399

Kinetics of Diuron Adsorption onto Activated Carbon Fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted on the adsorption kinetics of diuron from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon fiber. The results showed that the formation of hydrogen bonds between diuron and water, and temperature variations may possibly affect the adsorption ... Keywords: activated carbon fiber, diuron adsorption, kinetic models, hydrogen bonds

Jianhua Xu; Yabing Sun; Zhenyu Li; Jingwei Feng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models of more predictive and more accurate detailed chemical kinetic models for the combustion of fuels that the combustion of liquid fuels will remain the main source of energy for transportation for the next 50 years.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Pyrolysis kinetics for western and eastern oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil yield and kinetic results are reviewed for Western (Colorado Mahogany zone) and Eastern (Sunbury and Ohio (Cleveland member)) oil shales for conditions ranging from those encountered in in-situ processing to those in fluidized-bed retorting. The authors briefly summarize kinetic models for the pyrolysis reactions. Oil yields from Eastern shale are much more sensitive to pyrolysis conditions than Western shale.

Burnham, A.K.; Coburn, T.T.; Richardson, J.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Nonlinear adaptive control for bioreactors with unknown kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a control problem for a single bioreaction occurring in a continuous and well-mixed bioreactor, assuming that the bioreaction's kinetics is not represented by a validated model. We develop a nonlinear controller and prove the global asymptotic ... Keywords: Continuous bioprocesses, Nonlinear adaptive control, Unknown kinetics, Wastewater treatment

Ludovic Mailleret; Olivier Bernard; Jean-Philippe Steyer

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Reconciling competing models: a case study of wine fermentation kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical models of wine fermentation kinetics promise early diagnosis of stuck or sluggish winemaking processes as well as better matching of industrial yeast strains to specific vineyards. The economic impact of these challenges is significant: ... Keywords: combined and refined model, fermentation problems, mechanistic kinetic models, statistical comparison with experimental data, wine fermentation

Rodrigo Assar; Felipe A. Vargas; David J. Sherman

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Solubilty and growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of silver nitrate in ethanol was determined at various temperatures. The growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol were then determined using initial derivaties of temperature and desupersaturation in a mixed-batch crystallizer. For ... Keywords: ethanol, growth kinetics, initial derivatives, silver nitrate, solubility

M. Manteghian; A. Ebrahimi

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics  

SciTech Connect

Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. The injected CO{sub 2} is expected to react with the host rocks and these reactions can potentially alter the porosity, permeability, and mechanical properties of the host or cap rocks. Reactions can also result in precipitation of carbonate-containing minerals that favorably and permanently trap CO{sub 2} underground. Many numerical models have been used to predict these reactions for the carbon sequestration program. However, a firm experimental basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO{sub 2} injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation of silicate dissolution rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In this four year research grant (three years plus a one year no cost extension), seven (7) laboratory experiments of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions were carried out. An experimental design allowed the collection of water samples during experiments in situ and thus prevented back reactions. Analysis of the in situ samples delineated the temporal evolution of aqueous chemistry because of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions. The solid products of the experiments were retrieved at the end of the experimental run, and analyzed with a suite of advanced analytical and electron microscopic techniques (i.e., atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)). As a result, the research project probably has produced one of the best data sets for CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions in terms of both aqueous solution chemistry and solid characterization. Three experiments were performed using the Navajo sandstone. Navajo sandstone is geologically equivalent to the Nugget sandstone, which is a target formation for a regional partnership injection project. Our experiments provided the experimental data on the potential CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions that are likely to occur in the aquifer. Geochemical modeling was performed to interpret the experimental results. Our single mineral (feldspar) experiments addressed a basic research need. i.e., the coupled nature of dissolution and precipitation reactions, which has universal implication to the reaction kinetics as it applied to CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our whole rock experiments (Navajo sandstone) addressed the applied research component, e.g., reacting Navajo sandstone with brine and CO{sub 2} has direct relevance on the activities of a number of regional partnerships. The following are the major findings from this project: (1) The project generated a large amount of experimental data that is central to evaluating CO{sub 2}-water-rock interactions and providing ground truth to predictive models, which have been used and will inevitably be increasingly more used in carbon sequestration. (2) Results from the feldspar experiments demonstrated stronger coupling between dissolution and precipitation reactions. We show that the partial equilibrium assumption did not hold in the feldspar hydrolysis experiments (Zhu and Lu, submitted, Appendix A-2). The precipitation of clay minerals influenced dissolution of primary silicate in a much stronger way as previously envisioned. Therefore, our experimental data indicated a much more complex chemical kinetics as it has been applied to carbon sequestration program in terms of preliminary predictive models of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions. Adopting this complexity (strong coupling) may influence estimates of mineral trapping and porosity/permeability for geological carbon sequestration. In general, our knowledge of the coupling of different reactions is poor, and we must consider the uncertainties resultin

Chen Zhu

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium (as pertechnetate anion, TcO.sub.4.sup.-). The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Kinetic electrocaloric effect and giant net cooling of lead-free ferroelectric refrigerants  

SciTech Connect

The electrocaloric effect of BaTiO{sub 3} multilayer thick film structure was investigated by direct measurement using differential scanning calorimeter. The samples show a giant electrocaloric effect of 0.89 J/g under E=176 kV/cm, which also depends on the varying rate of applied field, following a general power-law relation. Based on the large net-cooling (0.37 J/g) resulting from the difference in the varying rates of rising and falling fields, the kinetic electrocaloric effect provides a solution for the design of refrigeration cycle in ferroelectric microrefrigerator.

Bai Yang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Environmental Fracture, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng Guangping; Shi Sanqiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

Stefano Orsino

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Building Survey Information Database of Buildings over 100 Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems research project, one of six research elements in the Integrated Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design of Small Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated

410

Coalescence kinetics in surfactant stabilized emulsions: Evolution equations from direct numerical simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice Boltzmann simulations were used to study the coalescence kinetics in emulsions with amphiphilic surfactant, under neutrally buoyant conditions, and with a significant kinematic viscosity contrast between the phases (emulating water in oil emulsions). The 3D simulation domain was large enough (256 3rd power -- 10 7th power grid points) to obtain good statistics with droplet numbers ranging from a few thousand at early times to a few hundred near equilibrium. Increased surfactant contents slowed down the coalescence rate between droplets due to the Gibbs-Marangoni effect, and the coalescence was driven by a quasi-turbulent velocity field. The kinetic energy decayed at a relatively slow rate at early times, due to conversion of interfacial energy to kinetic energy in the flow during coalescence. Phenomenological, coupled differential equations for the mean droplet diameter D(t) and the number density nd(t) were obtained from the simulation data and from film draining theories. Local (in time) power law exponents for the growth of the mean diameter (and for the concomitant decrease of nd) were established in terms of the instantaneous values of the kinetic energy, coalescence probability, Gibbs elasticity, and interfacial area. The model studies indicated that true power laws for the growth of the droplet size and decrease of the number of droplets with time may not be justified, since the exponents derived using the phenomenological model were time dependent. In contrast to earlier simulation results for symmetric blends with surfactant, we found no evidence for stretched logarithmic scaling of the formD -- [ln (ct)]a for the morphology length, or exponential scalings associated with arrested growth, on the basis of the phenomenological model.

R. Skartlien; E. Sollum; A. Akselsen; P. Meakin; B. Grimes; J. Sjoblom

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evidence of critical balance in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical simulation of kinetic plasma turbulence is performed to assess the applicability of critical balance to kinetic, dissipation scale turbulence. The analysis is performed in the frequency domain to obviate complications inherent in performing a local analysis of turbulence. A theoretical model of dissipation scale critical balance is constructed and compared to simulation results, and excellent agreement is found. This result constitutes the first evidence of critical balance in a kinetic turbulence simulation and provides evidence of an anisotropic turbulence cascade extending into the dissipation range. We also perform an Eulerian frequency analysis of the simulation data and compare it to the results of a previous study of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations.

TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the kinetics of interaction of gaseous hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide at temperatures 300-700 degrees. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory adsorption apparatus modified and adapted for work with corrosive hydrogen fluoride. Calcium oxide samples in granulated form and deposited on gamma-alumina were used in the experiments. Kinetic curves representing variations of the degree of conversion of the solid samples with time are shown. The influence of retardation dure to diffusion was observed in the experiments. The influence of diffusion control on the reaction rate was also observed in a study of the reaction kinetics on supported layers of calcium oxide.

Kossaya, A.M.; Belyakov, B.P.; Kuchma, Z.V.; Sandrozd, M.K.; Vasil'eva, V.G.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Production of high power femtosecond terahertz radiation  

SciTech Connect

The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum is attracting interest for a broad range of applications ranging from diagnosing electron beams to biological imaging. Most sources of short pulse THz radiation utilize excitation of biased semiconductors or electro-optic crystals by high peak power lasers. For example, this was done by using an un-doped InAs wafer irradiated by a femtosecond free-electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Microwatt levels of THz radiation were detected when excited with FEL pulses at 1.06 mm wavelength and 10W average power. Recently substantially higher powers of femtosecond THz pulses produced by synchrotron emission were extracted from the electron beamline. Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20W, a world record in this wavelength range by a factor of 10,000. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. Potential applications of this exciting new source include driving new non-linear phenomena, performing pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, and studying molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor band gaps, electronic scattering, collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves), and spintronics.

Neil, George R.; Carr, G.L.; Gubeli III, Joseph F.; Jordan, K.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Shinn, Michelle; Tani, Masahiko; Williams, G.P.; Zhang, X.-C.

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

414

Technology development for high power induction accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

415

OPTICONDISTOR: High Power Optically Isolated Transistor  

Nonproliferation. Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. Organizations. Organizations. Global Security. National Ignition ...

416

Interaction of high power microwave with plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental proposal to investigate the physics of interaction of extremely intense (eEem/m?c ? 1) microwave in an overdense plasma is discussed. The output from a VIRCATOR (2 -- 10 GHz, ? 1 -- 3 GW) based pulse (?30 ns) powered ...

V. P. Anitha; Amita Das; Y. C. Saxena; Anurag Shyam; P. K. Kaw

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

High power fast ramping power supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

418

High Power Converters for Efficient Transmission Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Single Valve Double Valve Quadruple Valve ... Includes 14 x 250 MVA 1-phase converter ... Serves 80 x 5 MW offshore wind turbine generators ...

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

High Power Co-Axial SRF Coupler  

SciTech Connect

There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Two-thirds of these designs are coaxial couplers using disk or cylindrical ceramics in various combinations and configurations. While it is well known that dielectric losses go down by several orders of magnitude at cryogenic temperatures, it not well known that the thermal conductivity also goes down, and it is the ratio of thermal conductivity to loss tangent (SRF ceramic Quality Factor) and ceramic volume which will determine the heat load of any given design. We describe a novel robust co-axial SRF coupler design which uses compressed window technology. This technology will allow the use of highly thermally conductive materials for cryogenic windows. The mechanical designs will fit into standard-sized ConFlat flanges for ease of assembly. Two windows will be used in a coaxial line. The distance between the windows is adjusted to cancel their reflections so that the same window can be used in many different applications at various frequencies.

M.L. Neubauer, R.A. Rimmer

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

High Power Lasers... Another approach to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Laboratory Washington, DC #12;2 Main points of the talk Fusion Energy based on lasers and direct employees, (900 PhDs + 400 MSc) · $800 M /year budget ·Field sites: · Washington DC (Main site) · Stennis (Hibachi) Amplifier Window Electron Beam Cathode Pulsed Power System Energy + ( Kr+ F2) ( KrF)* + F Kr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large high-power kinetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Improved Spatial Filter for high power Lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new pinhole architecture incorporates features intended to reduce the rate of plasma generation in a spatial filter for high-energy laser pulse beams. An elongated pinhole aperture is provided in an apertured body for rejecting off-axis rays of the laser pulse beam. The internal surface of the elongated aperture has a diameter which progressively tapers from a larger entrance cross-sectional area at an inlet to a smaller output cross-sectional area at an outlet. The tapered internal surface causes off-axis rays to be refracted in a low density plasma layer that forms on the internal surface or specularly reflected at grazing incidence from the internal surface. Off-axis rays of the high-energy pulse beam are rejected by this design. The external surface of the apertured body adjacent to the larger entrance cross-sectional area at the inlet to the elongated aperture is angled obliquely with respect to the to direction of the path of the high-energy laser pulse beam to backscatter off-axis rays away from the high-energy pulse beam. The aperture is formed as a truncated cone or alternatively with a tapered square cross-section. The internal surface of the aperture is coated with an ablative material, preferably high-density material which can be deposited with an exploding wire.

Estabrook, Kent G.; Celliers, Peter M.; Murray, James E.; DaSilva, Luiz; MacGowan, Brian J.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Drake, Robert P.; Afeyan, Bedros

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

High power radio frequency attenuation device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

Kerns, Quentin A. (Bloomingdale, IL); Miller, Harold W. (Winfield, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

High power semiconductor laser diode arrays  

SciTech Connect

The cw optical power obtainable from semiconductor laser diodes has been extended to unprecedented levels in recent years through the use of multistripe arrays. By spreading out the optical power with more than 100 stripes, single-facet, cw output in exces of 5 Watts has been demonstrated, and 500 mW cw is now commercially available. Recent improvements to array performance include: arrays up to 1 cm wide that generates quasi-cw (150 usec pulse) output in excesss of 11 Watts, and a novel device structure which produces up to 215 mW cw in a single diffraction limited lobe.

Cross, P.S.

1986-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

James R. Boyce

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

High Power Target Design and Operational Considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remote handling is a major driving requirement). #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department systems: ­ Mercury loop operation. ­ Remote handling. · Nuclear data. #12;4 Managed by UT and Status Update Remote Handling System from SNS · SNS system ­ Robotic bridge crane ­ 20 ton capacity

McDonald, Kirk

426

GaN High Power Devices  

SciTech Connect

A brief review is given of recent progress in fabrication of high voltage GaN and AlGaN rectifiers, GaN/AlGaN heterojunction bipolar transistors, GaN heterostructure and metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. Improvements in epitaxial layer quality and in fabrication techniques have led to significant advances in device performance.

PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; ZHANG,A.P.; DANG,G.; CAO,X.A.; LEE,K.P.; CHO,H.; GILA,B.P.; JOHNSON,J.W.; MONIER,C.; ABERNATHY,C.R.; HAN,JUNG; BACA,ALBERT G.; CHYI,J.-I.; LEE,C.-M.; NEE,T.-E.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHI,G.C.; CHU,S.N.G.

2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

High Power Laser Calibrations at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to SI units through electrical substitution measurements ... cooperation with interested industries, professional organizations ... serve as a vehicle for final ...

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Available Technologies: Improvements to High Power Impulse ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Semiconductors, superconductors; Flat panel displays for computers, cell phones, PDAs ; Tools and automotive parts

429

INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL KINETICS OF FREE RADICALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mNAL PERFORMANCE REPORT mNAL PERFORMANCE REPORT for INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL KINETICS OF FREE RADICALS DE-FG05-85ER13439 1-AUG-1985 to 31-JUL-1994 Robert F. Curl and Graham P. Glass Principal Investigators Introduction This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study (by infrared absorption spectroscopy) of the chemical kinetic behavior of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. The work typically progressed from the detection and analysis of the infrared spectrum of combustion radical to the utilization of the infrared spectrum thus obtained in the investigation of chemical kinetics of the radical species. The methodology employed was infrared kinetic spectroscopy. In this technique the radical is produced by UV flash photolysis using an excimer laser and then

430

Application of Ice Nucleation Kinetics in Orographic Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice nucleation by silver iodide-sodium iodide aerosol particles has been characterized in the Colorado State University isothermal cloud chamber using the techniques of chemical kinetics. Two separate mechanisms of condensation-freezing ice ...

Rochelle R. Blumenstein; Robert M. Rauber; Lewis O. Grant; William G. Finnegan

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients  

SciTech Connect

Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

Houshmandyar, Saeid [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of nanocrystalline film deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A full diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm is used to model nanocrystalline film deposition, and study the mechanisms of grain nucleation and microstructure formation in such films. The major finding of this work is ...

Ruan, Shiyun

433

Kinetic modeling and automated optimization in microreactor systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimization, kinetic investigation, or scale-up of a reaction often requires significant time and materials. Silicon microreactor systems have been shown advantageous for studying chemical reactions due to their small ...

Moore, Jason Stuart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Review Crystal Gateway Marriott, Crystal City, VA May 18, 2006 Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Anter El-Azab Tel: 850-410-6655, E-mail...

435

Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget Profiles Derived from Doppler Sodar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler sodar wind measurements made in light wind conditions in September 1979 near a power plant in Turbigo, Italy, are used to derive terms in the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget. Measurements on five days are grouped into two classes: ...

Gary K. Greenhut; Giangiuseppe Mastrantonio

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Reversibility and Non-reversibility in Stochastic Chemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical problems with mean field and local type interaction related to stochastic chemical kinetics,are considered. Our main concern various definitions of reversibility, their corollaries (Boltzmann type equations, fluctuations, Onsager relations, etc.) and emergence of irreversibility.

Malyshev, V A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Evaluation of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation Rate Inside ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Inferring the vertical variation of the mean turbulent kinetic energy ..... the times at which a threshold-crossings occurs are defined by the indicator function .... of noise infection and noise intensity, introducing a threshold Tc significantly...

438

The Mesoscale Kinetic Energy Spectrum of a Baroclinic Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric mesoscale kinetic energy spectrum is investigated through numerical simulations of an idealized baroclinic wave life cycle, from linear instability to mature nonlinear evolution and with high horizontal and vertical resolution (?x ...

Michael L. Waite; Chris Snyder

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Momentum and Kinetic Energy Budgets of Simulated Supercell Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of numerical simulations of severe thunderstorms with rotating updrafts and supercell characteristics are analyzed to determine their sources, sinks, and transports of momentum and kinetic energy. Two simulations are used, one ...

Douglas K. Lilly; Brian F. Jewett

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Estimates of Kinetic Energy Dissipation under Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dissipation of kinetic energy at the surface of natural water bodies has important consequences for many Physical and biochemical processes including wave dynamics, gas transfer, mixing of nutrients and pollutants, and photosynthetic ...

E.A. Terray; M.A. Donelan; Y.C. Agrawal; W.M. Drennan; K.K. Kahma; A.J. Williams; P.A. Hwang; S.A. Kitaigorodskii

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

The Track Integrated Kinetic Energy of Atlantic Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the concept of track integrated kinetic energy (TIKE) is introduced as a measure of seasonal Atlantic tropical cyclone activity and applied to seasonal variability in the Atlantic. It is similar in concept to the more commonly used ...

V. Misra; S. DiNapoli; M. Powell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Kinetic model reduction using integer and semi-infinite programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work an optimization-based approach to kinetic model reduction was studied with a view to generating reduced-model libaries for reacting-flow simulations. A linear integer formulation of the reaction elimination ...

Bhattacharjee, Binita, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Sources of Eddy Kinetic Energy in the Labrador Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments with a suite of North Atlantic general circulation models are used to examine the sources of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Labrador Sea. A high-resolution model version (112) quantitatively reproduces the observed signature. A ...

Carsten Eden; Claus Bning

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Determining Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation from Batchelor Curve Fitting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is presented for obtaining the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation by fitting the theoretical Batchelor spectrum to the temperature gradient spectrum at high wavenumbers. The algorithm is relatively robust in selecting the ...

David A. Luketina; Jrg Imberger

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Automated generation of kinetic chemical mechanisms using rewriting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several software systems have been developed recently for the automated generation of combustion reactions kinetic mechanisms using different representations of species and reactions and different generation algorithms. In parallel, several software ...

Olivier Bournez; Guy-Marie Cme; Valrie Conraud; Hlne Kirchner; Liliana Ib?nescu

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fundamental kinetic modeling of the catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, a fundamental kinetic model for the catalytic reforming process has been developed. The complex network of elementary steps and molecular reactions occurring in catalytic reforming has been generated through a computer algorithm characterizing ...

Rogelio Sotelo-Boyas / Gilbert F. Froment; Rayford G. Anthony

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

LLNL researchers develop first kinetic model of plasma focus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13013device 01302013 LLNL researchers develop first kinetic model of plasma focus device Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Deuterium ion...

448

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7700 RPM - Spin testing accelerates rotor to: 530 ms and 11,000 RPM - Rotor stores 10 kWh of kinetic energy @ 11,000 RPM (2x more than design speed) - All testing conducted in...

449

Solar wind plasma : kinetic properties and micro-instabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The kinetic properties of ions in the solar wind plasma are studied. Observations of solar wind +H and +2He by the Faraday Cup instrument component of the Solar Wind Experiment on the Wind spacecraft show that these ions ...

Kasper, Justin Christophe, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Kinetic Energy Transfer between Internal Gravity Waves and Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a reliable method for distinguishing the mean, wave and turbulence fields when internal waves with changing amplitude perturb the turbulent boundary layer. By integrating the component wave and turbulence kinetic energy budgets ...

J. J. Finnigan

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

An Improved Equilibrium-Kinetics Speciation Algorithm For Redox Reactions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Equilibrium-Kinetics Speciation Algorithm For Redox Reactions Improved Equilibrium-Kinetics Speciation Algorithm For Redox Reactions In Variably Saturated Subsurface Flow Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Improved Equilibrium-Kinetics Speciation Algorithm For Redox Reactions In Variably Saturated Subsurface Flow Systems Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Reactive chemical transport occurs in a variety of geochemical environments, and over a broad range of space and time scales. Efficiency of the chemical speciation and water-rock-gas interaction calculations is important for modeling field-scale multidimensional reactive transport problems. An improved efficient model, REACT, for simulating water-rock-gas interaction under equilibrium and kinetic conditions, has been developed.

452

Topobo : a 3-D constructive assembly system with kinetic memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce Topobo, a 3-D constructive assembly system em- bedded with kinetic memory, the ability to record and playback physical motion. Unique among modeling systems is Topobo's coincident physical input and output ...

Raffle, Hayes Solos, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Defect aggregation kinetics in calcium fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defects in solid materials are responsible for many of their most interesting and critical properties. The authors have developed a site-selective laser technique that allows us to monitor the aggregation of rare earth ion defects in solids on the microscopic scale. This excitation absorption laser method enables us to derive kinetic rate information and thermodynamic parameters for the distribution of defects in solids. For doped materials, various types of defects arise when the dopant ions have ionic charges that differ from the charges of host crystal ions. In model systems such as alkaline earth fluorides doped with trivalent rare earth ions, some defect sites consist of a single dopant ion, while others consist of clusters of dopant cations and interstitial anions. Heat treatment of doped samples leads to a distribution of the various types of defect sites that is characteristic of the temperature and length of heat treatment and the total dopant ion concentration. The results from a study of the formation of trivalent europium ion defect aggregates in calcium fluoride indicate that our method successfully monitors changes in individual site concentrations resulting from heat treatment. The results of this study are consistent with the formation of negatively charged dimer and trimer defects in Eu{sup 3+}:CaF{sub 2} crystals from isolated europium ion and (Eu:F{sub i}) single pair defects. In addition, he presents evidence for rapid equilibrium between the isolated ion and the single pair. Other work presented in this thesis includes the development of a high-temperature fluorine oxidation apparatus that was used to convert divalent europium ions to the trivalent state in calcium fluoride single crystals. This apparatus was also used to increase the superconducting {Tc}'s of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} through modification of copper-oxygen oxidation states.

Cirillo, K.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen  

SciTech Connect

We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

455

Kinetic effects on ballooning modes in mirror machines  

SciTech Connect

A general procedure for examining the influence of kinetic effects on the stability of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes in mirror machines is presented. In particular, the basic kinetic ballooning mode equation for a nonaxisymmetric, arbitrary beta system with anisotropic pressure is derived. Considering a long-thin equilibrium typical of the tandem mirror, it is shown that this governing eigenmode equation reduces to a simple form independent of wave-particle resonant effects.

Tang, W.M.; Catto, P.J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

HCCI in a CFR engine: experiments and detailed kinetic modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Single cylinder engine experiments and chemical kinetic modeling have been performed to study the effect of variations in fuel, equivalence ratio, and intake charge temperature on the start of combustion and the heat release rate. Neat propane and a fuel blend of 15% dimethyl-ether in methane have been studied. The results demonstrate the role of these parameters on the start of combustion, efficiency, imep, and emissions. Single zone kinetic modeling results show the trends consistent with the experimental results.