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1

The Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fully from the space available in...the machine construction. The superconducting...for a single sector, the whole...therefore, as the heating increases...was made, a sector was powered...is a slight heating during ramp...Collider. | The construction of the Large...the limited space available in...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Large Hadron Collider - At Discover's Horizon | Online Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Large Hadron Collider The Large Hadron Collider The U.S. at the Large Hadron Collider LHC: The Guide Theories tested LHC Experiments The ATLAS Experiment The CMS Experiment The...

3

Director's colloquium March 18 large hadron collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

talk about the most complex scientific instrument ever built-the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). March 10, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in...

4

Brookhaven and the Large Hadron Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brookhaven & the Large Hadron Collider Brookhaven & the Large Hadron Collider Home News Brookhaven & ATLAS ATLAS ATLAS Calorimeter ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Construction Computing Upgrades RHIC & LHC Education LHC tunnel ATLAS detector ATLAS detector RACF BNL built superconducting magnets Brookhaven & the LHC The world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland, powers unprecedented explorations of the deepest mysteries of the universe. In addition to serving as the U.S. host laboratory for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, Brookhaven National Lab plays multiple roles in this international collaboration, from construction and project management to data storage and distribution. ATLAS rendering Brookhaven and ATLAS Brookhaven physicists and engineers are participating in one of the most

5

Genesis of the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and beyond the discovery of the Higgs boson. organised and edited by John...and beyond the discovery of the Higgs boson . This paper describes the scientific...projects. Large Hadron Collider|Higgs boson|CERN| 1. Beginnings and background...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Large Hadron Electron Collider Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the Large Hadron Electron Collider, the LHeC, is being prepared, to which an introduction was given for the plenary panel discussion on the future of deep inelastic scattering held at DIS09. This is briefly summarised here. The CDR will comprise designs of the ep/eA collider, based on ring and linear electron accelerators, of the interaction region, designed for simultaneous $ep$ and $pp$ operation, of a new, modular detector, and it will present basics on the physics motivation for a high luminous Tera scale electron-nucleon collider as a complement to the LHC.

Max Klein

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

7

Taking the 'Large' out of Large Hadron Collider: Computational Breakthrough  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home » News & Publications » News » Science News » Taking the 'Large' out of Large Hadron Collider Taking the 'Large' out of Large Hadron Collider Computational breakthrough hastens modeling of 'tabletop accelerators' August 9, 2010 | Tags: Accelerator Science Contact: Margie Wylie | mwylie@lbl.gov | 510-486-7421 mori1 This 3D simulation shows how laser pulses create plasma wakes that propel electrons forward, much as a surfer is propelled forward by an ocean wave. Laser wakefield acceleration promises electron accelerators that are thousands of times more powerful than, yet a fraction the size of, conventional radio frequency devices. Particle accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN are the big rock stars of high-energy physics-really big. The LHC cost nearly

8

Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36'000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m3 static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for non-isothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressors. T...

Lebrun, P

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m/sup 3/ static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for nonisothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressor...

Lebrun, P

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

First Beam for Large Hadron Collider | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Beam for Large Hadron Collider Beam for Large Hadron Collider First Beam for Large Hadron Collider September 10, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - An international collaboration of scientists today sent the first beam of protons zooming at nearly the speed of light around the world's most powerful particle accelerator-the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)-located at the CERN laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) invested a total $531 million in the construction of the accelerator and its detectors, which scientists believe could help unlock extraordinary discoveries about the nature of the physical universe. Celebrations across the U.S. and around the world mark the LHC's first circulating beam, an occasion more than 15 years in the making. An

11

June 30, 2008: US portion of Large Hadron Collider completed  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

June 30, 2008The Department and the National Science Foundation announce that the U.S. contribution to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been completed on budget and ahead of schedule. The LHC,...

12

The Very Large Hadron Collider: The farthest energy frontier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Very Large Hadron Collider (or Eloisatron) represents what may well be the final step on the energy frontier of accelerator-based high energy physics. While an extremely high luminosity proton collider at 100-200 TeV center of mass energy can probably be built in one step with LHC technology, that machine would cost more than what is presently politically acceptable. This talk summarizes the strategies of collider design including staged deployment, comparison with electron-positron colliders, opportunities for major innovation, and the technical challenges of reducing costs to manageable proportions. It also presents the priorities for relevant R and D for the next few years.

Barletta, William A.

2001-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

Transverse beams stability studies at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A charged particle beam travelling at the speed of light produces large electromagnetic wake fields which, through interactions with its surroundings, act back on the particles in the beam. This coupled system may become unstable, resulting in a deterioration of the beam quality. Such effects play a major role in most existing storage rings, as they limit the maximum performance achievable. In a collider, the presence of a second beam significantly changes the dynamics, as the electromagnetic interactions of the two beams on each other are usually very strong and may, also, limit the collider performances. This thesis treats the coherent stability of the two beams in a circular collider, including the effects of the electromagnetic wake fields and of the beam-beam interactions, with particular emphasis on CERN's Large Hadron Collider. As opposed to other colliders, this machine features a large number of bunches per beam each experiencing multiple long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions. Existing models...

Buffat, Xavier; Pieloni, Tatiana

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Department of Energy assessment of the Large Hadron Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the conclusions of the committee that assessed the cost estimate for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This proton-proton collider will be built at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics near Geneva, Switzerland. The committee found the accelerator-project cost estimate of 2.3 billion in 1995 Swiss francs, or about $2 billion US, to be adequate and reasonable. The planned project completion date of 2005 also appears achievable, assuming the resources are available when needed. The cost estimate was made using established European accounting procedures. In particular, the cost estimate does not include R and D, prototyping and testing, spare parts, and most of the engineering labor. Also excluded are costs for decommissioning the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) that now occupies the tunnel, modifications to the injector system, the experimental areas, preoperations costs, and CERN manpower. All these items are assumed by CERN to be included in the normal annual operations budget rather than the construction budget. Finally, contingency is built into the base estimate, in contrast to Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that explicitly identify contingency. The committee`s charge, given by Dr. James F. Decker, Deputy Directory of the DOE Office of Energy Research, was to understand the basis for the LHC cost estimate, identify uncertainties, and judge the overall validity of the estimate, proposed schedule, and related issues. The committee met at CERN April 22--26, 1996. The assessment was based on the October 1995 LHC Conceptual Design Report or ``Yellow Book,`` cost estimates and formal presentations made by the CERN staff, site inspection, detailed discussions with LHC technical experts, and the committee members` considerable experience.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Large hadron collider (LHC) project quality assurance plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LHC Quality Assurance Plan is a set of operating principles, requirements, and practices used to support Berkeley Lab's participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project. The LHC/QAP is intended to achieve reliable, safe, and quality performance in the LHC project activities. The LHC/QAP is also designed to fulfill the following objectives: (1) The LHC/QAP is Berkeley Lab's QA program document that describes the elements necessary to integrate quality assurance, safety management, and conduct of operations into the Berkeley Lab's portion of the LHC operations. (2) The LHC/QAP provides the framework for Berkeley Lab LHC Project administrators, managers, supervisors, and staff to plan, manage, perform, and assess their Laboratory work. (3) The LHC/QAP is the compliance document that conforms to the requirements of the Laboratory's Work Smart Standards for quality assurance (DOE O 414.1, 10 CFR 830.120), facility operations (DOE O 5480.19), and safety management (DOE P 450.4).

Gullo, Lisa; Karpenko, Victor; Robinson, Kem; Turner, William; Wong, Otis

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Neutrino experiments and the Large Hadron Collider: friends across 14 orders of magnitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores some of the questions that connect the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and neutrino experiments. What is the origin of mass? What is the meaning of flavor? Is there direct evidence of new forces or particles? ...

Conrad, Janet

17

Phenomenology of the minimal $B-L$ Model: the Higgs sector at the Large Hadron Collider and future Linear Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Thesis is devoted to the study of the phenomenology of the Higgs sector of the minimal $B-L$ extension of the Standard Model at present and future colliders. Firstly, the motivations that call for the minimal $B-L$ extension are summarised. In addition, the model is analysed in its salient parts. Moreover, a detailed review of the phenomenological allowed Higgs sector parameter space is given. Finally, a complete survey of the distinctive Higgs boson signatures of the model at both the Large Hadron Collider and the future linear colliders is presented.

Giovanni Marco Pruna

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

18

Recognizing Critical Behavior amidst Minijets at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transition from quarks to hadrons in a heavy-ion collision at high energy is usually studied in two different contexts that involve very different transverse scales: local and non-local. Models that are concerned with the $p_T$ spectra and azimuthal anisotropy belong to the former, i.e., hadronization at a local point in $(\\eta,\\phi)$ space, such as the recombination model. The non-local problem has to do with quark-hadron phase transition where collective behavior through near-neighbor interaction can generate patterns of varying sizes in the $(\\eta,\\phi)$ space. The two types of problems are put together in this paper both as brief reviews separately and to discuss how they are related to each other. In particular, we ask how minijets produced at LHC can affect the investigation of multiplicity fluctuations as signals of critical behavior. It is suggested that the existing data from LHC have sufficient multiplicities in small $p_T$ intervals to make feasible the observation of distinctive features of clustering of soft particles, as well as voids, that characterize the critical behavior at phase transition from quarks to hadrons, without any ambiguity posed by the clustering of jet particles.

Rudolph C. Hwa

2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

Recognizing Critical Behavior amidst Minijets at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transition from quarks to hadrons in a heavy-ion collision at high energy is usually studied in two different contexts that involve very different transverse scales: local and non-local. Models that are concerned with the $p_T$ spectra and azimuthal anisotropy belong to the former, i.e., hadronization at a local point in $(\\eta,\\phi)$ space, such as the recombination model. The non-local problem has to do with quark-hadron phase transition where collective behavior through near-neighbor interaction can generate patterns of varying sizes in the $(\\eta,\\phi)$ space. The two types of problems are put together in this paper both as brief reviews separately and to discuss how they are related to each other. In particular, we ask how minijets produced at LHC can affect the investigation of multiplicity fluctuations as signals of critical behavior. It is suggested that the existing data from LHC have sufficient multiplicities in small $p_T$ intervals to make feasible the observation of distinctive features of cl...

Hwa, Rudolph C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Exotic hadrons at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this proceeding, an overview of the recent progress of the exotic hadrons studies at hadron colliders is presented, including the experimental measurement results from CMS, LHCb, CDF and D0. The talk covers the physics properties study of X(3872); the search for Y(4140) state etc; the recent result of Z(4430); and also the extended study to bottomonium sector.

Ye Chen

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Search for Supersymmetry Using Weak Boson Fusion Processes in Proton-Proton Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2012, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (LHC) collided protons at an unprecedented center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. With data corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb^(?1), the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration is studying...

Flanagan, Will

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

Addendum to Distinguishing Spins in Decay Chains at the Large Hadron Collider.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 06 06 21 2v 1 2 0 Ju n 20 06 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - PAPER VERSION CavendishHEP06/15 Addendum to Distinguishing Spins in Decay Chains at the Large Hadron Collider? Christiana Athanasiou1, Christopher G. Lester2... mass distributions of the three observable two-body combinations: dileptons (mll), quark- or antiquark-jet plus positive lepton (mjl+), and jet plus negative lepton (mjl?).1 If P (m|S) represents the normalized probability distribution of any one...

Athanasiou, Christiana; Lester, Christopher G; Smillie, Jennifer M; Webber, Bryan R

23

Betatron squeeze optimisation at the Large Hadron Collider based on first year of operation data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to achieve the high luminosity expected from the Large Hadron Collider, the beta function at the interaction points must be minimised. As the aperture in the surroundings of the interaction points become smaller and smaller with decreasing beta function at the interaction point, the latter is kept higher during injection and energy ramp and reduced before the production of collision, by the means of the betatron squeeze. This operation as shown to be very critical in previous colliders, however, good performances were achieved early during the commissioning of the machine allowing to optimise this operation along the year. Firstly, a systematic fill by fill analysis of the beam parameters is performed in order to point out, understand and solve potential issues, allowing, in particular, to minimise the beam losses during the operation. Secondly, simulations of beam parameters based on the strength of the magnets extracted from the control system are introduced and validated with measurements. The sim...

Buffat, Xavier; Redaelli, Stefano

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Test of relativistic gravity for propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated 'antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s^2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

Franklin Felber

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

25

CMSSM, naturalness and the "fine-tuning price" of the Very Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The absence of supersymmetry or other new physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has lead many to question naturalness arguments. With Bayesian statistics, we argue that natural models are most probable and that naturalness is not merely an aesthetic principle. We calculate a probabilistic measure of naturalness, the Bayesian evidence, for the Standard Model (SM) with and without quadratic divergences, confirming that the SM with quadratic divergences is improbable. We calculate the Bayesian evidence for the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with naturalness priors in three cases: with only the $M_Z$ measurement; with the $M_Z$ measurement and LHC measurements; and with the $M_Z$ measurement, $m_h$ measurement and a hypothetical null result from a $\\sqrt{s}=100\\,\\text{TeV}$ Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with $3000/\\text{fb}$. The "fine-tuning price" of the VLHC given LHC results would be $\\sim400$, which is slightly less than that of the LHC results given the electroweak scale ($\\sim500$).

Andrew Fowlie

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cryogenic safety aspect of the low -$\\beta$ magnest systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The low-{beta} magnet systems are located in the LHC insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process and will allow proton collisions at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 34}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Large radiation dose deposited at the proximity of the beam collisions dictate stringent requirements for the design and operation of the systems. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in the winter of 2010 and permitted to validate this system safe operation. This paper presents the analysis used to qualify and quantify the safe operation of the low-{beta} magnet systems in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the first years of operation.

Darve, C.; /Fermilab

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Exergy Analysis of the Cryogenic Helium Distribution System for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN features the worlds largest helium cryogenic system, spreading over the 26.7 km circumference of the superconducting accelerator. With a total equivalent capacity of 145 kW at 4.5 K including 18 kW at 1.8 K, the LHC refrigerators produce an unprecedented exergetic load, which must be distributed efficiently to the magnets in the tunnel over the 3.3 km length of each of the eight independent sectors of the machine. We recall the main features of the LHC cryogenic helium distribution system at different temperature levels and present its exergy analysis, thus enabling to qualify second-principle efficiency and identify main remaining sources of irreversibility..

Claudet, S; Tavian, L; Wagner, U; 10.1063/1.3422294

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

EXERGY ANALYSIS OF THE CRYOGENIC HELIUM DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM FOR THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER (LHC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN features the world's largest helium cryogenic system, spreading over the 26.7 km circumference of the superconducting accelerator. With a total equivalent capacity of 145 kW at 4.5 K including 18 kW at 1.8 K, the LHC refrigerators produce an unprecedented exergetic load, which must be distributed efficiently to the magnets in the tunnel over the 3.3 km length of each of the eight independent sectors of the machine. We recall the main features of the LHC cryogenic helium distribution system at different temperature levels and present its exergy analysis, thus enabling to qualify second-principle efficiency and identify main remaining sources of irreversibility.

Claudet, S.; Lebrun, Ph.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva, 23 (Switzerland)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

29

Looking for hints of a reconstructible seesaw model at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the production of heavy neutrinos at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through the dominant s-channel production mode as well as the vector boson fusion (VBF) process. We consider the TeV scale minimal linear seesaw model containing two heavy singlets with opposite lepton number. This model is fully reconstructible from oscillation data apart from an overall normalization constant which can be constrained from meta-stability of the electroweak vacuum and bounds coming from lepton flavor violation (LFV) searches. Dirac nature of heavy neutrinos in this model implies suppression of the conventional same-sign-dilepton signal at the LHC. We analyze the collider signatures with tri-lepton final state and missing transverse energy as well as VBF type signals which are characterized by two additional forward tagged jets. Our investigation reveals that due to stringent constraints on light-heavy mixing coming from LFV and meta-stability bounds, the model can be explored only for light to moderate mass range of...

Bambhaniya, Gulab; Khan, Subrata; Konar, Partha; Mondal, Tanmoy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Looking for hints of a reconstructible seesaw model at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the production of heavy neutrinos at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through the dominant s-channel production mode as well as the vector boson fusion (VBF) process. We consider the TeV scale minimal linear seesaw model containing two heavy singlets with opposite lepton number. This model is fully reconstructible from oscillation data apart from an overall normalization constant which can be constrained from meta-stability of the electroweak vacuum and bounds coming from lepton flavor violation (LFV) searches. Dirac nature of heavy neutrinos in this model implies suppression of the conventional same-sign-dilepton signal at the LHC. We analyze the collider signatures with tri-lepton final state and missing transverse energy as well as VBF type signals which are characterized by two additional forward tagged jets. Our investigation reveals that due to stringent constraints on light-heavy mixing coming from LFV and meta-stability bounds, the model can be explored only for light to moderate mass range of heavy neutrinos. We also note that in case of a positive signal, flavor counting of the final tri-lepton channel can give information about the mass hierarchy of the light neutrinos.

Gulab Bambhaniya; Srubabati Goswami; Subrata Khan; Partha Konar; Tanmoy Mondal

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

31

Next generation Higgs bosons: Theory, constraints, and discovery prospects at the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle physics model building within the context of string theory suggests that further copies of the Higgs boson sector may be expected. Concerns regarding tree-level flavor-changing neutral currents are easiest to allay if little or no couplings of next generation Higgs bosons to standard model fermions are allowed. We detail the resulting general Higgs potential and mass spectroscopy in both a standard model extension and a supersymmetric extension. We present the important experimental constraints from meson-meson mixing, loop-induced b?s? decays, and LEP2 direct production limits. We investigate the energy range of the valid perturbation theory of these ideas. In the supersymmetric context we present a class of examples that marginally aids the fine-tuning problem for parameter space where the lightest Higgs boson mass is greater than the standard model limit of 114GeV. Finally, we study collider physics signatures generic to next generation Higgs bosons, with special emphasis on Ah?hhZ?4b+2l signal events, and describe the capability of discovery at the Large Hadron Collider.

Rick S. Gupta and James D. Wells

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Physics requirements for the design of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...at the high-energy frontier: the...Hadron Collider are discovery experiments...responsible for dark matter; what...itself at the 1TeV energy scale. Supersymmetry...candidate for dark matter. An as...also allow the discovery of whatever Nature...store at the LHC energies. There could...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Signals of an invisibly decaying Higgs in a scalar dark matter scenario: a study for the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the collider phenomenology of a singlet Majoron model with softly broken lepton number. Lepton number is spontaneously broken when the real part of a new singlet scalar develops vacuum expectation value. With the additional soft terms violating lepton numbers, the imaginary part of this singlet scalar becomes a massive pseudo-Majoron which can account for the dark matter. In presence of the coupling of the pseudo-Majoron with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs, the SM Higgs mostly decays into a pair of pseudo-Majorons, giving rise to missing transverse energy signals at a hadron collider. Since the Higgs visible decay branching fractions get reduced in presence of this invisible decay mode, the bounds on the SM Higgs mass from the LEP and Tevatron experiments get diluted and the invisible decay channel of the Higgs become important for the discovery of low mass Higgs at the Large Hadron Collider.

Kirtiman Ghosh; Biswarup Mukhopadhyaya; Utpal Sarkar

2011-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

Reliability of the Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out....

Guaglio, G; Santoni, C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Production of b-quark jets at the large Hadron Collider in the parton-reggeization approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inclusive hadroproduction of b-quark jets and bb-bar-quark dijets at the Large Hadron Collider is considered by using the hypothesis of gluon Reggeization in t-channel exchanges at high energies. Experimental data obtained by the ATLAS Collaboration are described well within all of the presented kinematical regions for single b-quark jets and bb-bar-quark dijets without resort to any free parameters.

Saleev, V. A., E-mail: saleev@samsu.ru; Shipilova, A. V., E-mail: alexshipilova@samsu.ru [Samara State University (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hadron collider physics at UCR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Same-sign trileptons and four leptons as signatures of new physics at the Large Hadron Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We point out that same-sign multilepton events, not given due attention yet for new physics search, can be extremely useful at the Large Hadron Collider. After showing the easy reducibility of the standard model backgrounds, we demonstrate the viability of same-sign trilepton signals for R-parity breaking supersymmetry, at both 7 and 14 TeV. We find that same-sign four-leptons, too, can have appreciable rates. Same-sign trileptons are also expected, for example, in Little Higgs theories with T-parity broken by anomaly terms.

Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup [Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad - 211 019 (India); Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata-700 032 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Satyanarayan [Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad - 211 019 (India)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Bulk matter physics and its future at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements at low transverse momentum will be performed at the LHC for studying particle production mechanisms in $pp$ and heavy-ion collisions. Some of the experimental capabilities for bulk matter physics are presented, focusing on tracking elements and particle identification. In order to anticipate the study of baryon production for both colliding systems at multi-TeV energies, measurements for identified species and recent model extrapolations are discussed. Several mechanisms are expected to compete for hadro-production in the low momentum region. For this reason, experimental observables that could be used for investigating multi-parton interactions and help understanding the "underlying event" content in the first $pp$ collisions at the LHC are also mentioned.

B. Hippolyte

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The employment of superconducting magnets, in the high energies colliders, opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standar...

Guaglio, Gianluca; Santoni, C

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sources of machine-induced background in the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One source of experimental background in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particles entering the detectors from the machine. These particles are created in cascades, caused by upstream interactions of beam protons with residual gas molecules or collimators. We estimate the losses on the collimators with SixTrack and simulate the showers with FLUKA and MARS to obtain the flux and distribution of particles entering the ATLAS and CMS detectors. We consider some machine configurations used in the first LHC run, with focus on 3.5 TeV operation as in 2011. Results from FLUKA and MARS are compared and a very good agreement is found. An analysis of logged LHC data provides, for different processes, absolute beam loss rates, which are used together with further simulations of vacuum conditions to normalize the results to rates of particles entering the detectors. We assess the relative importance of background from elastic and inelastic beam-gas interactions, and the leakage out of the LHC collimation system, and show that beam-gas interactions are the dominating source of machine-induced background for the studied machine scenarios. Our results serve as a starting point for the experiments to perform further simulations in order to estimate the resulting signals in the detectors.

Bruce, R.; et al.,

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems which contribute to the final SIL value are the dump system the interlock system the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration.

G. Guaglio; B. Dehning; C. Santoni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Thermal Performance of the Supporting System for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Superconducting Magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The LHC collider will be composed of approximately 1700 main ring superconducting magnets cooled to 1.9 K in pressurised superfluid helium and supported within their cryostats on low heat in-leak column-type supports. The precise positioning of the heavy magnets and the stringent thermal budgets imposed by the machine cryogenic system, require a sound thermo-mechanical design of the support system. Each support is composed of a main tubular thin-walled structure in glass-fibre reinforced epoxy resin, with its top part interfaced to the magnet at 1.9 K and its bottom part mounted onto the cryostat vacuum vessel at 293 K. In order to reduce the conduction heat in-leak at 1.9 K, each support mounts two heat intercepts at intermediate locations on the column, both actively cooled by cryogenic lines carrying helium gas at 4.5-10 K and 50-65 K. The need to assess the thermal performance of the supports has lead to setting up a dedicated test set-up for precision heat load measurements on prototype supports. This pa...

Castoldi, M; Parma, Vittorio; Vandoni, Giovanna

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade.

Tollestrup, A.V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362MJ, sufficient to melt 500kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440GeV while it has the same bunch structure as the LHC beam, except that it has only up to 288 bunches. Beam focal spot sizes of ?=0.1, 0.2, and 0.5mm have been considered. The phenomenon of significant hydrodynamic tunneling due to the hydrodynamic effects is also expected for the experiments.

N. A. Tahir, J. Blanco Sancho, A. Shutov, R. Schmidt, and A. R. Piriz

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...were the dream of accelerator builders in the late...radiation. Indeed, many accelerator physicists doubted that...beams at that time. The accelerator physicists learned how...directions in the single vacuum chamber of the SPS...mediators of the weak nuclear force responsible for...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Top quark studies at hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a protonantiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of ? s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a protonproton collider at a center- of-mass energy of ? s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

Jabeen, Shabnam

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hadron colliders (SSC/LHC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nominal SSC and LHC designs should operate conservatively at luminosities up to 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This luminosity is dictated by the event rates that can be handled by the detectors. However, this limit is event dependent (e.g. it does not take much of a detector to detect the event pp {yields} elephant; all one needs is extremely high luminosity). As such, it is useful to explore the possibility of going beyond the 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} level. Such exploration will also improve the accelerator physics understanding of pp collider designs. If the detector limitations are removed, the first accelerator limits occur when the luminosity is at the level of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. These accelerator limits will first be reviewed. The authors will then continue on to explore even higher luminosity as the ultimate limit of pp colliders. Accelerator technologies needed to achieve this ultimate luminosity as well as the R and D needed to reach it are discussed.

Chao, A.W. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Palmer, R.B. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States); Evans, L.; Gareyte, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Siemann, R.H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Weak Boson Emission in Hadron Collider Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(alpha) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, t-bar t, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel.

U. Baur

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

50

B Physics Theory for Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A short overview of theoretical methods for B physics at hadron colliders is presented. The main emphasis is on the theory of two-body hadronic B decays, which provide a rich field of investigation in particular for the Tevatron and the LHC. The subject holds both interesting theoretical challenges as well as many opportunities for flavor studies and new physics tests. A brief review of the current status and recent developments is given. A few additional topics in B physics are also mentioned.

G. Buchalla

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

51

Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of superconducting magnets to large-scale particle accelerators was successfully demonstrated with the completion of the Tevatron at Fermilab in 1983. This machine, utilizing dipole magnets operating at 4.5 T, has been operating successfully for the past 12 years. This success was followed a few years later by HERA, an electron-proton collider that uses superconducting quadrupoles and dipoles of a design similar to those in the Tevatron. The next major project was the ill-fated SSC, which was cancelled in 1993. However, the SSC R&D effort did succeed in demonstrating the reliable operation of dipole magnets up to 6.6 T. The LHC, now under construction, pushes the ductile superconductor, NbTi, to its limit in dipoles designed to operate at fields of 8.6 T at 1.8 K. Several recent studies have addressed the issues involved in taking the next step beyond the LHC. The Division of Particles and Fields Workshop on Future Hadron Facilities in the U.S., held at Indiana U. in 1994, examined two possible facilities--a 2-TeV on 2-TeV collider and a 30-Tev on 30-Tev collider. The participants arrived at the following conclusions with regard to superconducting magnets: (1) Superconducting magnets are the enabling technology for high energy colliders. As such, the highest priority for the future of hadron facilities in the U.S. is the reassembly of a U.S. superconducting magnet R&D program. (2) emphasis on conductor development and new magnet designs; and (3) goals of such a program might be (a) the development of a 9-10 Tesla magnet based on NbTi technology; (b) the development of high quality quadrupoles with gradients in the range 250-300 T/m; and (c) initiation of R&D activities aimed at moving beyond the existing technology as appears to be required for the development of a magnet operating at 12-15 Tesla. In order to reach fields above 10 T, magnet designers must turn to new materials with higher critical fields than that of NbTi. Several candidate conductors exist; unfortunately, all of these new materials are brittle, and thus pose new challenges to the magnet designers. At the same time that the forces on the magnet windings are increasing due to the higher Lorentz force associated with the higher magnetic fields, the conductor tensile strain must be limited to less than about 0.5% to prevent damage to the brittle superconducting material. Also, coil fabrication methods must be changed. If the superconductor is in the reacted, or brittle, state, the coil winding procedure must be modified to prevent overstraining. If the alternative wind and react approach is used, new insulating materials must be used that can survive the high temperature reactions (650 to 800 C) necessary to form the superconducting compounds. The issues associated with high-field dipole magnets have been discussed at a number of workshops, including those at DESY in 1991 and LBL in 1992. These workshops were extremely useful in defining the problems and focusing the attention of both materials and magnet experts on high-field dipole magnets; however, since neither set of proceedings was published, the information is not readily available. More recently, a workshop was held in Erice, Italy, under the sponsorship of the Ettore Maiorana Center for Scientific Culture. This international workshop was attended by 20 scientists from Europe, Japan, and the U.S., and the summary of that work, which represents the most recent and thorough assessment of the status of high-field magnets for accelerator magnets, is presented.

Scanlan, R.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Dell'Orco, D.; McInturff, A.D.; Asner, A.; Collings, E.W.; Dahl, P.F.; Desportes, H.; Devred, A.; Garre, R.; Gregory, E.; Hassenzahl, W.; Lamm, M.; Larbalestier, D.; Leory, D.; McIntyre, P.; Miller, J.; Shintomi, T.; ten Kate, H.; Wipf, S.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 044910 (2010) Production of exotic atoms at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

one of the ions in the collider ("bound-free" pair production). In particular the process of pair several insights in the production mechanism which have not been explored in the literature. OurPHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 044910 (2010) Production of exotic atoms at energies available at the CERN

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

53

THEORETICAL PROGRESS FOR THE ASSOCIATED PRODUCTION OF A HIGGS BOSON WITH HEAVY QUARKS AT HADRON COLLIDERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of t{bar t} or b{bar b} quarks plays a very important role at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. The theoretical prediction of the corresponding cross sections has been improved by including the complete next-to-leading order QCD corrections. After a brief introduction, we review the results obtained for both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider.

DAWSON,S.JACKSON,C.B.ORR,L.H.REINA,L.WACKEROTH,D.

2003-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

Trilepton Higgs boson signal at hadron colliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most Higgs boson searches pursued at hadron colliders require Yukawa interactions either in the production or the decay of a Higgs boson. We propose a trilepton Higgs boson search based only upon the gauge interactions of the Higgs boson. This strategy can be utilized successfully for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson as well as nonstandard Higgs bosons which break electroweak symmetry but have little to do with fermion mass generation. The trileptons come from Wh production followed by Wh?WWW(*)?3l decays. A SM Higgs trilepton signal would be difficult to detect at the Fermilab Tevatron collider: with 100 fb-1 of data, only a 3? signal above background can be achieved after cuts if 140 GeVHiggs boson mass in the range 140185 (125200) GeV. Prospects for a trilepton Higgs boson discovery are greatly improved for models with nonstandard Higgs boson sectors where a Higgs boson couples preferentially to vector bosons rather than to fermions.

Howard Baer and James D. Wells

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Gluon Fusion Contribution to $VHj$ Production at Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the associated production of an electroweak vector boson and the Higgs boson with a jet via gluon-gluon fusion. At the leading order, these processes occur at one-loop level. The amplitudes of these one-loop processes are gauge invariant and finite. Therefore, their contributions towards the corresponding hadronic cross sections and kinematic distributions can be calculated separately. We present results for the Large Hadron Collider and its discussed upgrades. We find that the gluon-gluon one-loop process gives dominant contribution to the $\\gamma H j$ production. We observe a destructive interference effect in the $gg\\to Z H j$ amplitude. We also find that in the high transverse momentum and central rapidity region, the $ZHj$ production cross section via gluon-gluon fusion becomes comparable to the cross section contributions coming from quark-quark and quark-gluon channels.

Agrawal, Pankaj

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Discovery Mass Reach for Excited Quarks at Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If quarks are composite particles then excited states are expected. We estimate the discovery mass reach as a function of integrated luminosity for excited quarks decaying to dijets at the Tevatron, LHC, and a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). At the Tevatron the mass reach is 0.94 TeV for Run II (2 fb^-1) and 1.1 TeV for TeV33 (30 fb^-1). At the LHC the mass reach is 6.3 TeV for 100 fb^-1. At a VLHC with a center of mass energy, sqrt(s), of 50 TeV (200 TeV) the mass reach is 25 TeV (78 TeV) for an integrated luminosity of 10^4 fb^-1. However, an excited quark with a mass of 25 TeV would be discovered at a hadron collider with sqrt(s)=100 TeV and an integrated luminosity of 13 fb^-1, illustrating a physics example where a factor of 2 in machine energy is worth a factor of 1000 in luminosity.

Robert M. Harris

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

Precise Predictions for Z + 4 Jets at Hadron Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the cross section for production of a Z boson in association with four jets at the Large Hadron Collider, at next-to-leading order in the QCD coupling. When the Z decays to neutrinos, this process is a key irreducible background to many searches for new physics. Its computation has been made feasible through the development of the on-shell approach to perturbative quantum field theory. We present the total cross section for pp collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV, after folding in the decay of the Z boson, or virtual photon, to a charged-lepton pair. We also provide distributions of the transverse momenta of the four jets, and we compare cross sections and distributions to the corresponding ones for the production of a W boson with accompanying jets.

Ita, H.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

58

Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

59

Proceedings of the workshop on triggering, data acquisition and computing for high energy, high luminosity, hadron-hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings address issues in triggering, data acquisition, and off-line computing for high energy/high luminosity hadron-hadron colliders, including physics signatures; analog triggers; data filtering/acquisition and processing; networking; and special spectrometers and instrumentation.

Cox, B.; Fenner, R.; Hale, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Beam physics in future electron hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy electron-hadron collisions could support a rich research programme in particle and nuclear physics. Several future projects are being proposed around the world, in particular eRHIC at BNL, MEIC at TJNAF in the US, and LHeC at CERN in Europe. This paper will highlight some of the accelerator physics issues, and describe related technical developments and challenges for these machines. In particular, optics design and beam dynamics studies are discussed, including longitudinal phase space manipulation, coherent synchrotron radiation, beam-beam kink instability, ion effects, as well as mitigation measures for beam break up and for space-charge induced emittance growth, all of which could limit the machine performance. Finally, first steps are presented towards an LHeC R&D facility, which should investigate relevant beam-physics processes.

Valloni, A; Klein, M; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A New Boson with a Mass of 125 GeV Observed with the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...comprises three different types of gas-ionization detectors that enable muon momenta...and the other into hadrons. A natural process to calibrate the analysis...and Technology, and National Natural Science Foundation of China...Research Promotion Foundation, Cyprus; the Ministry of Education...

The CMS Collaboration

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

63

Precision Studies of Hadronic and Electro-Weak Interactions for Collider Physics. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was directed toward developing precision computational tools for proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, focusing primarily on electroweak boson production and electroweak radiative corrections. The programs developed under this project carried the name HERWIRI, for High Energy Radiation With Infra-Red Improvements, and are the first steps in an ongoing program to develop a set of hadronic event generators based on combined QCD and QED exponentiation. HERWIRI1 applied these improvements to the hadronic shower, while HERWIRI2 will apply the electroweak corrections from the program KKMC developed for electron-positron scattering to a hadronic event generator, including exponentiated initial and final state radiation together with first-order electroweak corrections to the hard process. Some progress was also made on developing differential reduction techniques for hypergeometric functions, for application to the computation of Feynman diagrams.

Yost, Scott A [The Citadel, Charleston, SC (United States)] [The Citadel, Charleston, SC (United States)

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

64

ZZ production at hadron colliders in NNLO QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first calculation of next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections to the inclusive production of ZZ pairs at hadron colliders. Numerical results are presented for pp collisions with centre-of-mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) ranging from 7 to 14 TeV. The NNLO corrections increase the NLO result by an amount varying from $11\\%$ to $17\\%$ as $\\sqrt{s}$ goes from 7 to 14 TeV. The loop-induced gluon fusion contribution provides about $60\\%$ of the total NNLO effect. When going from NLO to NNLO the scale uncertainties do not decrease and remain at the $\\pm 3\\%$ level.

F. Cascioli; T. Gehrmann; M. Grazzini; S. Kallweit; P. Maierhfer; A. von Manteuffel; S. Pozzorini; D. Rathlev; L. Tancredi; E. Weihs

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

ZZ production at hadron colliders in NNLO QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first calculation of next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections to the inclusive production of ZZ pairs at hadron colliders. Numerical results are presented for pp collisions with centre-of-mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) ranging from 7 to 14 TeV. The NNLO corrections increase the NLO result by an amount varying from $11\\%$ to $17\\%$ as $\\sqrt{s}$ goes from 7 to 14 TeV. The loop-induced gluon fusion contribution provides about $60\\%$ of the total NNLO effect. When going from NLO to NNLO the scale uncertainties do not decrease and remain at the $\\pm 3\\%$ level.

Cascioli, F; Grazzini, M; Kallweit, S; Maierhfer, P; von Manteuffel, A; Pozzorini, S; Rathlev, D; Tancredi, L; Weihs, E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Large Hadron Collider, a personal recollection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......package was the construction of two 2.6km-long...profits fully from the space available in the...collaboration in the machine construction. The superconducting...seven of the eight sectors had been successfully...18), so as the heating increases, the...dipole chains of Sectors 67 and 78 during......

Lyndon Evans

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Large Hadron Collider commissioning and first operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...systems [4], including the collimation system [5], are crucial in the...finalizing the protection. The collimation system [5] is part of the machine...machine. The hierarchy of the collimation system (primary, secondary and tertiary...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

DOE's Office of Science Launches Website for U.S. Role at Large Hadron  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Launches Website for U.S. Role at Large Launches Website for U.S. Role at Large Hadron Collider DOE's Office of Science Launches Website for U.S. Role at Large Hadron Collider September 12, 2007 - 2:32pm Addthis U.S. scientists join international colleagues to explore universe's mysteries at world's largest scientific experiments WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science today launched a new website to tell the story of the U.S. role in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a particle accelerator that will begin operating in Europe, near Geneva, Switzerland, next year. Hundreds of physicists, engineers and students from the United States are joining with colleagues from around the globe in the largest and most complex scientific experiments ever built. The LHC experiments will address some of the most

69

On CP violation and the measurement of the dimuon charge asymmetry at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B factories measure the CP violation parameter of B^0 Bbar^0 mixing and decay. Hadron colliders measure the dimuon charge asymmetry of an admixture of B hadrons. In this note we discuss a subtle point on how the CP violation parameter of B^0_s Bbar^0_s mixing and decay can be extracted from these measurements.

B. Hoeneisen

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

70

Detection of invisible particles at hadron collider experiments through the magnetic spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of invisible particles plays great importance in high energy physics. Large part of interesting electroweak processes include production of neutrinos, while many new physics scenarios predict the existence of similarly weakly-interacting particles. In events with associated production of invisible particles and hadronic jets, the measurement of the imbalance in transverse momentum of the final state particles is the major leverage to reject the otherwise dominant source of backgrounds in hadron colliders, i.e. the generic production of many jets by QCD interactions. Here we discuss a novel technique which utilizes the information derived from the spectrometer, eventually coupled with the more straightforward calorimeter information, to infer the passage of invisible particles. We check the validity of this technique in data and Monte Carlo simulations in a broad range of topologies, starting from the simplest, with two jets in the final state, to the ones with very large jet multiplicities. We also suggest a new way, based on the same approach, to measure the yields and model the kinematics of the QCD multijet background in invisible particles plus jets signatures. The results are derived using data collected with the CDF II detector; we argue that the application to LHC experiments is straightforward.

Marco Bentivegna; Qiuguang Liu; Fabrizio Margaroli; Karolos Potamianos

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Effects of invisible particle emission on global inclusive variables at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the effects of invisible particle emission in conjunction with QCD initial state radiation (ISR) on quantities designed to probe the mass scale of new physics at hadron colliders, which involve longitudinal as well as transverse final-state momenta. This is an extension of our previous treatment, arXiv:0903.2013, of the effects of ISR on global inclusive variables. We present resummed results on the visible invariant mass distribution and compare them to parton-level Monte Carlo results for top quark and gluino pair-production at the LHC. There is good agreement as long as the visible pseudorapidity interval is large enough (eta ~ 3). The effect of invisible particle emission is small in the case of top pair production but substantial for gluino pair production. This is due mainly to the larger mass of the intermediate particles in gluino decay (squarks rather than W-bosons). We also show Monte Carlo modelling of the effects of hadronization and the underlying event. The effect of the underlying event is large but may be approximately universal.

Andreas Papaefstathiou; Bryan Webber

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

72

Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Searching for New Physics (2/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This is the second lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This second lecture discusses techniques important for analyses searching for new physics using the CDF B_s --> mu+ mu- search as a specific example. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

Low-cost hadron colliders at Fermilab: A discussion paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New more economic approaches are required to continue the dramatic exponential rise in collider energies as represented by the well known Livingston plot. The old idea of low cost, low field iron dominated magnets in a small diameter pipe may become feasible in the next decade with dramatic recent advances in technology: (1) advanced tunneling technologies for small diameter, non human accessible tunnels, (2) accurate remote guidance systems for tunnel survey and boring machine steering, (3) high T{sub c} superconductors operating at liquid N{sub 2} or liquid H{sub 2} temperatures, (4) industrial applications of remote manipulation and robotics, (5) digitally multiplexed electronics to minimize cables, (6) achievement of high luminosities in p-p and p-{anti P} colliders. The goal of this paper is to stimulate continuing discussions on approaches to this new collider and to identify critical areas needing calculations, construction of models, proof of principle experiments, and full scale prototypes in order to determine feasibility and arrive at cost estimates.

Foster, G.W.; Malamud, E.

1996-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

2014 8 22 4:00PM-5:00PM Title: "Exploration of the Higgs boson and the Physics case for the Large Hadron Electron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 8 22 4:00PM-5:00PM Title: "Exploration of the Higgs boson and the Physics case for the Large Hadron Electron Collider" Abstract: With the discovery of a Higgs boson at the Large Hadron) Prof. Mellado is an expert on the Higgs boson ­ a sub-atomic particle that is thought to give matter

Wang, Yayu

75

Construction of block-coil high-field model dipoles for future hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A family of high-field dipoles is being developed at Texas A&M University, as part of the program to improve the cost-effectiveness of superconducting magnet technology for future hadron colliders. The TAMU technology employs stress management, flux-plate control of persistent-current multipoles, conductor optimization using mixed-strand cable, and metal-filled bladders to provide pre-load and surface compliance. Construction details and status of the latest model dipole will be presented.

Blackburn, Raymond; Elliott, Tim; Henchel, William; McInturff, Al; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdior

2002-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Making Measurements (3/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This is the third lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This third lecture discusses techniques important for analyses making a measurement (e.g. determining a cross section or a particle property such as its mass or lifetime) using some CDF top-quark analyses as specific examples. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Large Hadron Collider: lessons learned and summary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1984 to 2011 Since 1984, the mystery of dark matter has been deepened by the discovery of dark energy, but otherwise not much has happened...the next section; -the very important discovery at LEP that there are only three light neutrinos...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...LHC centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV and with 11...7TeV centre-of-mass energy and assuming about 101...probing the nature of dark matter. The LHC discovery reach for SUSY particles...7TeV centre-of-mass energy. The discovery reach...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Establishing the Mirage Mediation Model at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), (v) ni (modular weights of matter fields and Higgs fields), (vi) la (specifying how the visible sector is constructed). I assumed ? > 0, since positive ? is favored from the muon g 2 experiment [15]. Grand Unification implies matter... theory knowledge from Kuver. I want to extend my gratitude to the colleagues and the department faculty and staff for making my time at Texas A&M University a great experience Finally, thanks to my mother and father for their encouragement. iv TABLE...

Wang, Kechen

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...are known to have problems for high energy will be repaired or replaced. In addition, the Proton Synchroton (PS) and Super Proton Synchroton (SPS) consolidation and upgrade work will be carried out. -During this shutdown, the collimation...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Large Hadron Collider: lessons learned and summary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...deficiencies of the Standard Model: -the origin...particular non-standard scenario, but models...machine, with a review foreseen in 1997...proposal and long-term plan for CERN, for presentation...physics beyond the Standard ModelPhil. Trans...changed little. I will review the evolution of...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Large Hadron Collider - At Discover's Horizon | Slides and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as they contain important information regarding permission to use imagery. The posters and postcards may not be sold. The user may only change the areas of text as...

83

Exploring higher dimensional black holes at the large hadron collider.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of extra dimensions. Throughout, we have used the ATLAS fast simulation software [20] to give a description of a typical detector and we have used the full simulation [21] to verify the main results. 2. Black hole production and decay In the black hole... evolution from present energies is questionable. Also, comparison to Standard Model pro- cesses in the trans-Planckian regime would be difficult since perturbative physics would be suppressed. 4.2 The first stages of decay CHARYBDIS does not model...

Harris, Chris M; Palmer, M J; Parker, Michael A; Richardson, P

84

Large hadron collider (LHC) project quality assurance plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management, and conduct of operations into the Berkeleymanagement, and conduct of operations. For involved unitsassurance, safety, and conduct of operations are implemented

Gullo, Lisa; Karpenko, Victor; Robinson, Kem; Turner, William; Wong, Otis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dijet Searches for Supersymmetry at the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present several strategies for searching for supersymmetry in dijet channels, using the two leading jets momenta alone rather than the full missing transverse energy. Preliminary investigations suggest that signal-to-background ratios of at least 45 should be achievable at the LHC, with discovery possible for squarks as heavy as ?1.7??TeV.

Lisa Randall and David Tucker-Smith

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

The technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...through the greater part of a physics coast), a second technical...of the possible observation of physics beyond the standard model. To...and M Tigner (eds). 1998 Handbook of accelerator physics and engineering, Singapore...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Large Hadron Collider - At Discover's Horizon | Slides and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lecture at your institution, contact the appropriate people there to help with local logistics. Other venue ideas are museums, community centers, libraries, clubs and...

88

The Large Hadron Collider - At Discover's Horizon | Slides and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

photos selected by the Press Office for use by journalists) Full CERN Photo database US LHC Images Fermilab Visual Media Services (photos from Fermilab and the Tevatron)...

89

The Large Hadron Collider - At Discover's Horizon | Slides and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

available) Powerpoint templates and example presentations (four designs available) LHC video and images Tips to get started Publicity Work with your institution's press...

90

The Large Hadron Collider - At Discover's Horizon | Virtual LHC...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Virtual LHC Lectures These past lectures might give you a better idea of how to plan your upcoming LHC presentation. After you give your lecture, if a video of your presentation or...

91

Physics Reach at Future Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics reach at future colliders is discussed, with focus on the Higgs sector. First we present the Standard Model and some results obtained at the existing high-energy hadron collider, Tevatron, together with the corresponding expectations for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which starts operating in 2008. Then we discuss important low energy measurements: the anomalous magnetic moment for muon and the leptonic B-decay together with b{yields}s{gamma}. Finally the potential of the planned e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) and its possible option Photon Linear Collider (PLC), e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma}, is shortly presented.

Krawczyk, Maria [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoz-dota 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ion Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

Fischer, W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Independent measurement of the top quark mass and the light- and bottom-jet energy scales at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for the simultaneous determination of the energy scales for b-quark jets and light jets, the jet energy resolution, and the top quark mass at hadron colliders is presented. The method exploits the unique kinematics of events with top-antitop pair production, where one of the top quarks involves a leptonic and one a hadronic W boson decay. The paper shows a feasibility study of how this simultaneous measurement can be performed at the upcoming LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS.

Frank Fiedler

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

94

NNLO QCD corrections to Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of the Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion can be used to test the trilinear Higgs self-coupling and the $VVHH$ $(V=Z,W)$ quartic gauge interactions. In this paper we present the calculations of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections to the SM Higgs boson pair production via vector boson fusion at hadron colliders with the center-of-mass energy of $14~{\\rm TeV}$, $33~{\\rm TeV}$ and $100~{\\rm TeV}$ by using the structure function approach, and study the residual uncertainties from the factorization/renormalization scale, parton distribution functions and $\\alpha_s$ on the total cross section. We also provide the distributions of transverse momenta, rapidities, invariant mass and azimuthal angle separations of final products. We observe a considerable quantitative reduction in the scale uncertainty due to the NNLO QCD corrections, and find that the total cross section is sensitive to the trilinear Higgs self-coupling.

Liu-Sheng, Ling; Wen-Gan, Ma; Lei, Guo; Wei-Hua, Li; Xiao-Zhou, Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

NNLO QCD corrections to Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of the Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion can be used to test the trilinear Higgs self-coupling and the $VVHH$ $(V=Z,W)$ quartic gauge interactions. In this paper we present the calculations of the next-to-next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the SM Higgs boson pair production via vector boson fusion at hadron colliders with the center-of-mass energy of $14$, $33$, and $100 {\\rm TeV}$ by using the structure function approach, and study the residual uncertainties from the factorization/renormalization scale, parton distribution functions and $\\alpha_s$ on the total cross section. We also provide the distributions of transverse momenta, rapidities, invariant mass and azimuthal angle separations of final Higgs bosons. We observe a considerable quantitative reduction in the scale uncertainty due to the next-to-next-to-leading-order QCD corrections, and find that the total cross section is sensitive to the trilinear Higgs self-coupling.

Ling Liu-Sheng; Zhang Ren-You; Ma Wen-Gan; Guo Lei; Li Wei-Hua; Li Xiao-Zhou

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Dark matter at colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that colliders can impose strong constraints on dark matter. We take an effective field theory approach where dark matter couples to quarks and gluons through high dimensional operators. We discuss limits on interactions of dark matter and hadronic matter from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For spin-independent scattering, the LHC limits are stronger than those from direct detection experiments for light WIMPs. For spin-dependent scattering, the LHC sets better limits over much of parameter space.

Yu Haibo [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Les Houches guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

Dobbs, Matt A.; Frixione, Stefano; Laenen, Eric; Tollefson, Kirsten

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Les Houches Guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

Dobbs, M.A

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

99

Prospects for Electroweakino Discovery at a 100 TeV Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the prospects of discovering split Supersymmetry at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider through the direct production of electroweakino next-to-lightest-supersymmetric-particles (NLSPs). We focus on signatures with multi-lepton and missing energy: $3\\ell$, opposite-sign dileptons and same-sign dileptons. We perform a comprehensive study of different electroweakino spectra. A 100 TeV collider with 3000/fb data is expected to exclude Higgsino thermal dark matter candidates with $m_{\\rm{LSP}}\\sim 1 $ TeV if Wino NLSPs are lighter than about 3.2 TeV. The $3\\ell$ search usually offers the highest mass reach, which varies in the range of (2-4) TeV depending on scenarios. In particular, scenarios with light Higgsinos have generically simplified parameter dependences. We also demonstrate that, at a 100 TeV collider, lepton collimation becomes a crucial issue for NLSPs heavier than about 2.5 TeV. We finally compare our results with the discovery prospects of gluino pair productions and deduce which ...

Gori, Stefania; Wang, Lian-Tao; Wells, James D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Prospects for Electroweakino Discovery at a 100 TeV Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the prospects of discovering split Supersymmetry at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider through the direct production of electroweakino next-to-lightest-supersymmetric-particles (NLSPs). We focus on signatures with multi-lepton and missing energy: $3\\ell$, opposite-sign dileptons and same-sign dileptons. We perform a comprehensive study of different electroweakino spectra. A 100 TeV collider with 3000/fb data is expected to exclude Higgsino thermal dark matter candidates with $m_{\\rm{LSP}}\\sim 1 $ TeV if Wino NLSPs are lighter than about 3.2 TeV. The $3\\ell$ search usually offers the highest mass reach, which varies in the range of (2-4) TeV depending on scenarios. In particular, scenarios with light Higgsinos have generically simplified parameter dependences. We also demonstrate that, at a 100 TeV collider, lepton collimation becomes a crucial issue for NLSPs heavier than about 2.5 TeV. We finally compare our results with the discovery prospects of gluino pair productions and deduce which SUSY breaking model can be discovered first by electroweakino searches.

Stefania Gori; Sunghoon Jung; Lian-Tao Wang; James D. Wells

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

STAR Coll

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hydrodynamic flow in heavy-ion collisions with large hadronic viscosity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the (2+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic code vish2+1 with a temperature-dependent specific shear viscosity ({eta}/s)(T), we present a detailed study of the influence of a large hadronic shear viscosity and its corresponding relaxation time {tau}{sub {pi}} on the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow of hadrons produced in 200A GeV Au+Au collisions. Although theory, in principle, predicts a well-defined relation {tau}{sub {pi}T}={kappa}(T)x({eta}/s)(T), the precise form of {kappa}(T) for the matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is not known. For the popular choice {kappa}=3 the hadron spectra are found to be insensitive to a significant rise of {eta}/s in the hadronic stage, whereas their differential elliptic flow v{sub 2}(p{sub T}) is strongly suppressed by large hadronic viscosity. The large viscous effects on v{sub 2} are strongly reduced if (as theoretically expected) {kappa}(T) is allowed to grow with decreasing temperature in the hadronic stage. This implies that, until reliable calculations of {kappa}(T) become available, an extraction of the hadronic shear viscosity from a comparison between vish2+1 and a microscopic hadron cascade or experimental data requires a simultaneous fit of ({eta}/s)(T) and {kappa}(T).

Shen Chun; Heinz, Ulrich [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1117 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

A posteriori inclusion of parton density functions in NLO QCD final-state calculations at hadron colliders: The APPLGRID Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method to facilitate the consistent inclusion of cross-section measurements based on complex final-states from HERA, TEVATRON and the LHC in proton parton density function (PDF) fits has been developed. This can be used to increase the sensitivity of LHC data to deviations from Standard Model predictions. The method stores perturbative coefficients of NLO QCD calculations of final-state observables measured in hadron colliders in look-up tables. This allows the posteriori inclusion of parton density functions (PDFs), and of the strong coupling, as well as the a posteriori variation of the renormalisation and factorisation scales in cross-section calculations. The main novelties in comparison to original work on the subject are the use of higher-order interpolation, which substantially improves the trade-off between accuracy and memory use, and a CPU and computer memory optimised way to construct and store the look-up table using modern software tools. It is demonstrated that a sufficient accuracy on the cross-section calculation can be achieved with reasonably small look-up table size by using the examples of jet production and electro-weak boson (Z, W) production in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV at the LHC. The use of this technique in PDF fitting is demonstrated in a PDF-fit to HERA data and simulated LHC jet cross-sections as well as in a study of the jet cross-section uncertainties at various centre-of-mass energies.

Tancredi Carli; Dan Clements; Amanda Cooper-Sarkar; Claire Gwenlan; Gavin P. Salam; Frank Siegert; Pavel Starovoitov; Mark Sutton

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Phenomenology of the minimal B ? L Model: the Higgs sector at the Large Hadron Collider and future linear colliders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis is devoted to the study of the phenomenology of the Higgs sector of the minimal B ?L extension of the Standard Model at (more)

Pruna, Giovanni Marco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Linear Collider LHC Subpanel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Subpanel on the Linear Collider and the Large Hadron Subpanel on the Linear Collider and the Large Hadron Collider High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Charges/Reports Subpanel on the Linear Collider and the Large Hadron Collider Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Joseph Lykken (FNAL) Co-Chair James Siegrist (LBNL) Co-Chair Jonathan Bagger (JHU) Barry Barish (Caltech) Neil Calder (SLAC) Jonathan Feng (UC Irvine) Fred Gilman (Carnegie Mellon) JoAnne Hewett (SLAC) John Huth (Harvard) Judy Jackson (Fermilab) Young-Kee Kim (Chicago) Rocky Kolb (Fermilab) Joe Lykken (Fermilab) Konstantin Matchev (Florida) Hitoshi Murayama (UC Berkeley) Jim Siegrist (UC Berkeley) Paris Sphicas (CERN/Athens)

106

The data acquisition and reduction challenge at the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...special: it was the best event out of about 1000 others that occurred in the same 10ms. Perhaps the event contains a Higgs boson, or the long decay chain of two supersymmetric particles. Whatever it may turn out to be, it is by now, along with...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider experiments (ATLAS and CMS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and beyond the discovery of the Higgs boson. organised and edited by John...and beyond the discovery of the Higgs boson . This review article introduces...which independently discovered the Higgs boson, showing how generic features...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Minimum Bias Measurements with the ATLAS Detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

background in the experimental cavern 1 . Reconstruction inand photons in the cavern. CHAPTER 4. INNER DETECTORthe ATLAS experimental cavern are also shown here. APPENDIX

Leyton, Michael A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Charged Higgs boson in the $W^\\pm$ Higgs channel at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In light of the recent discovery of a neutral Higgs boson, $H_{\\rm obs}$, with a mass near 125 GeV, we reassess the LHC discovery potential of a charged Higgs boson, $H^\\pm$, in the $W^\\pm H_{\\rm obs}$ decay channel. This decay channel can be particularly important for a $H^\\pm$ heavier than the top quark, when it is produced through the $pp \\rightarrow tH^\\pm$ process. The knowledge of the mass of $H_{\\rm obs}$ provides an additional handle in the kinematic selection when reconstructing a Breit-Wigner resonance in the $H_{\\rm obs} \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$ decay channel. We consider some extensions of the Standard Model Higgs sector, with and without supersymmetry, and perform a dedicated signal-to-background analysis to test the scope of this channel for the LHC running at design energy (14 TeV), for 300/fb (standard) and 3000/fb (high) integrated luminosities. We find that, while this channel does not show much promise for a supersymmetric $H^\\pm$ state, significant portions of the parameter spaces of several ...

Enberg, Rikard; Moretti, Stefano; Munir, Shoaib; Wouda, Glenn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...real tools to plan and monitor...comprehensive reviews were invented...boards Resources review boards (RRBs...model based on standard commercial practice...CERN model. Standard peer-review processes for...with respect to plan (further details...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increase of beam energy and beam intensity together with the use of super conducting magnets opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems which contribute to the final SIL value are the dump system the interlock system the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data has been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis spaces from the components data to the system configuration.

G. Guaglio; B. Dehning; C. Santoni

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The cosmic muon flux in the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Many ATLAS analyses study events with muons in them including those searching for the Higgs boson and new physics. Cosmics muons, however, can also occasionally (more)

Hill, Ewan Chin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Large Hadron Collider Probe of Supersymmetric Neutrinoless Double-Beta-Decay Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the minimal supersymmetric extension to the standard model, a nonzero lepton number violating coupling ?111? predicts both neutrinoless double-beta-decay and resonant single slepton production at the LHC. We show that, in this case, if neutrinoless double beta decay is discovered in the next generation of experiments, there exist good prospects to observe single slepton production at the LHC. Neutrinoless double beta decay could otherwise result from a different source (such as a nonzero Majorana neutrino mass). Resonant single slepton production at the LHC can therefore discriminate between the ?111? neutrinoless double-beta-decay mechanism and others.

B. C. Allanach; C. H. Kom; H. Ps

2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Large Hadron Collider Redux: Hoping for a Long, Hard Slog  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...particles receive a boost from oscillating electric fields within them (see diagram...were ramping up the current in a string of 154 of the machine's 1232...capture the beam with the oscillating electric fields produced in the...

Adrian Cho

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Design of a Large Booster Ring for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the current design of the large booster ring for the Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab. The booster ring takes 3 GeV protons or ions of equivalent rigidity from a pre-booster ring, and accelerates them to 20 GeV for protons or equivalent energy for light to heavy ions before sending them to the ion collider ring. The present design calls for a figure-8 shape of the ring for superior preservation of ion polarization. The ring is made of warm magnets and shares a tunnel with the two collider rings. Acceleration is achieved by warm RF systems. The linear optics has been designed with the transition energy above the highest beam energy in the ring so crossing of transition energy will be avoided. Preliminary beam dynamics studies including chromaticity compensation are presented in this paper.

Edward Nissen, Todd Satogata, Yuhong Zhang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Rare b hadron decays at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the completion of Run~I of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, particle physics has entered a new era. The production of unprecedented numbers of heavy-flavoured hadrons in high energy proton-proton collisions allows detailed studies of flavour-changing processes. The increasingly precise measurements allow to probe the Standard Model with a new level of accuracy. Rare $b$ hadron decays provide some of the most promising approaches for such tests, since there are several observables which can be cleanly interpreted from a theoretical viewpoint. In this article, the status and prospects in this field are reviewed, with a focus on precision measurements and null tests.

Blake, T; Hiller, G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

NLO QCD CORRECTIONS TO HADRONIC HIGGS PRODUCTION WITH HEAVY QUARKS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of t{bar t} or b{bar b} quarks plays a very important role at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. The theoretical prediction of the corresponding cross sections has been improved by including the complete next-to-leading order QCD corrections. After a brief description of the most relevant technical aspects of the calculation, we review the results obtained for both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider.

DAWSON,S.; JACKSON,C.; ORR,L.; REINA,L.; WACHEROTH,D.

2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the top quark associated with $?$ production via model-independent flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the top quark associated with $\\gamma$ production induced by model-independent $tq\\gamma$ and $tqg$ flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) couplings at hadron colliders, respectively. We also consider the mixing effects between the $tq\\gamma$ and $tqg$ FCNC couplings for this process. Our results show that, for the $tq\\gamma$ couplings, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 50% and 40% at the Tevatron and LHC, respectively. Including the contributions from the $tq\\gamma$, $tqg$ FCNC couplings and their mixing effects, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 50% for the $tu\\gamma$ and $tug$ FCNC couplings, and by about the 80% for the $tc\\gamma$ and $tcg$ FCNC couplings at the LHC, respectively. Moreover, the NLO corrections reduce the dependence of the total cross section on the renormalization and factorization scale significantly. We also evaluate the NLO corrections for several important kinematic distributions.

Yue Zhang; Bo Hua Li; Chong Sheng Li; Jun Gao; Hua Xing Zhu

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

119

Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H to to lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron Decay Modes with the ATLAS Detector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this proceeding, a search for a Higgs boson in the H to ? + ? ? decay mode, where both taus decay hadronically or one decay hadronically and one leptonically. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collision collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV during 2011, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 f b ? 1 . No significant excess is observed in the Higgs boson mass range of 100150 GeV. The observed (expected) limits on the cross-section times branching ratio for H to ? + ? ? at m H = 125 GeV are 6.2(5.9) and 6.3(6.5) for lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron decay modes, respectively.

Yuki Sakurai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Report on the analysis of the large propagation velocities observed in the full-length SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Very large propagation velocities have been observed in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 17-m dipoles: from 75 m/s to 225 m/s, depending on the current. These velocities are much larger than those predicted by the classical conduction theory of normal zone propagation. A plausible explanation for such rapid propagation is hydrodynamic mechanism called thermal hydraulic quenchback (THQ) that has been proposed by Luongo et al. This report supplies an approximate analytic theory of THQ, which is used to analyze the data taken on the SSC 17-m dipoles. It is concluded that THQ in the helium in the interstices of the cable can explain the large propagation velocities observed. Additional experiments are proposed to test the hydrodynamic explanation. 17 refs., 5 figs.

Dresner, L.; Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

From the Proton Synchroton to the Large Hadron Collider - 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The seminars will be held in the Main Auditorium with transmission to : Council Chamber, IT Auditorium, Prvessin BE Auditorium , Kjell Johnssen Auditorium in Building 30, Room 40-S2-A01, and via webcast. Confirmed Speakers include: Prof. Jack Steinberger, Dr. Guenther Plass, Prof. Emilio Picasso, Dr. Steve Myers, Prof. Carlo Rubbia, Prof. Burton Richter, Dr. Lyndon Evans, Prof. Rolf-Dieter Heuer, Prof. Leon Lederman, Prof. Jim Cronin, Prof. Sheldon Glashow, Prof. Jerome Friedman, Prof. Frank Wilczek, Prof. Martinus Veltman, Prof. Gerardus 't Hooft, Prof. David Gross, Prof. Samuel Ting, Prof. Steven Weinberg (via teleconference) --- Contact: Directorate.Office@cern.ch

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

122

From the Proton Synchroton to the Large Hadron Collider - 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The seminars will be held in the Main Auditorium with transmission to : Council Chamber, IT Auditorium, Prvessin BE Auditorium , Kjell Johnssen Auditorium in Building 30, Room 40-S2-A01, and via webcast. Confirmed Speakers include: Prof. Jack Steinberger, Dr. Guenther Plass, Prof. Emilio Picasso, Dr. Steve Myers, Prof. Carlo Rubbia, Prof. Burton Richter, Dr. Lyndon Evans, Prof. Rolf-Dieter Heuer, Prof. Leon Lederman, Prof. Jim Cronin, Prof. Sheldon Glashow, Prof. Jerome Friedman, Prof. Frank Wilczek, Prof. Martinus Veltman, Prof. Gerardus 't Hooft, Prof. David Gross, Prof. Samuel Ting, Prof. Steven Weinberg (via teleconference) --- Contact: Directorate.Office@cern.ch

None

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Large Hadron Collider CERN is the European Particle Physics Laboratory and was founded in 1954 to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was assembled underground in a cavern the size of the nave of Westminster Abbey. CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) CMS

124

A Silicon Strip Detector for the Phase II High Luminosity Upgrade of the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the work carried out in the testing of the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade electronic systems in the future strips tracker after 2023, to be installed for operations in the HL-LHC period. The high luminosity and number of interactions per crossing that will happen after the HL-LHC starts require a complete replacement of the ATLAS tracker. The systems that have been defined for the Phase-II Upgrade will be designed to cope with that increased radiation and have the right granularity to maintain the performance with higher pile-up. In this thesis I present results on single modules and larger structures comprising multiple modules. In the context of the current ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker studies, I present an analysis of the data taken by the detector from the beginning of operation in 2010 until the first Long Shut-down in 2013. The analysis consists of an energy loss study in the Semiconductor Tracker, a task the detector was not designed to perform. However, the availability of the Time-over-Th...

Garca-Argos, Carlos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

High Energy Colliders as Tools to Understand the Early Universe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmological observations have reached a new era of precision, and reveal many interesting and puzzling features of the Universe. I will briefly review two of the most exciting mysteries: the nature of the dark components of the Universe, and the origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. I will argue that our best hope of unraveling these questions will need to combine information from the heavens with measurements in the lab at high energy particle accelerators. The end of run II of the Tevatron, the up-coming Large Hadron Collider and proposed International Linear Collider all have great potential to help us answer these questions in the near future.

Tait, Tim (ANL) [ANL

2008-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

126

Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley; ,

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

127

Constraining the Eq. of State of Super-Hadronic Matter from Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The equation of state of QCD matter for temperatures near and above the quark-hadron transition (165 MeV) is inferred within a Bayesian framework through the comparison of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and from the Large Hadron Collider to theoretical models. State-of- the-art statistical techniques are applied to simultaneously analyze multiple classes of observables while varying 14 independent model parameters. The resulting posterior distribution over possible equations of state is consistent with results from lattice gauge theory.

Scott Pratt; Evan Sangaline; Paul Sorensen; Hui Wang

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at root S(NN) = 200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p(T). We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; deToledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Fermilab and the Higgs Boson | Large  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fermilab and the Higgs Boson Fermilab and the Higgs Boson In this Section: Fermilab and the Higgs Boson Tevatron Experiments: CDF and DZero Large Hadron Collider Experiments: CMS Large Hadron Collider Experiments: CMS On July 4, 2012, scientists on the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider announced the discovery of the Higgs boson. Fermilab was heavily involved in both the construction of the LHC – designing magnets that focus the particle beams into a collision – and the science conducted with the accelerator that led to the Higgs discovery. Scientists from the United States, including 100 Fermilab employees, make up approximately a third of the CMS collaboration, one of the two main experiments operating on the LHC. Fermilab serves as the hub for U.S. researchers working on the international experiment. Fermilab is home to

130

Energy Dependent Growth of Nucleon and Inclusive Charged Hadron Distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Color Glass Condensate formalism, charged hadron p_{T} distributions in p+p collisions are studied by considering an energy-dependent broadening of nucleon's density distribution. Then, in the Glasma flux tube picture, the n-particle multiplicity distributions at different pseudo-rapidity ranges are investigated. Both of the theoretical results show good agreement with the recent experimental data from ALICE and CMS at \\sqrt{s}=0.9, 2.36, 7 TeV. The predictive results for p_{T} and multiplicity distributions in p+p and p+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider are also given in this paper.

Wang, Hongmin; Sun, Xian-Jing

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

132

The pressure of strong coupling lattice QCD with heavy quarks, the hadron resonance gas model and the large N limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we calculate the pressure of pure lattice Yang-Mills theories and lattice QCD with heavy quarks by means of strong coupling expansions. Dynamical fermions are introduced with a hopping parameter expansion, which also allows for the incorporation of finite quark chemical potential. We show that in leading orders the results are in full agreement with expectations from the hadron resonance gas model, thus validating it with a first principles calculation. For pure Yang-Mills theories we obtain the corresponding ideal glueball gas, in QCD with heavy quarks our result equals that of an ideal gas of mesons and baryons. Another finding is that the Yang-Mills pressure in the large N limit is of order $\\sim N^0$ to the calculated orders, when the inverse 't Hooft coupling is used as expansion parameter. This property is expected in the confined phase, where our calculations take place.

Jens Langelage; Owe Philipsen

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

133

A variable for measuring masses at hadron colliders when missing energy is expected; mT2: the truth behind the glamour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMSB-like points discussed in section 4.2. The hadronic branching ratios can be found in [10]. m?+1 #7;M?1 Point (GeV) (MeV) ?+1 ? ?01 e+?e ?+1 ? ?01 +? SPS-300 165 886 17.0% 15.9% SPS-250 159 1798 21.9% 21.5% A-250 101 766 15.4% 13.9% A-200 97 1603... natural way. Readers who would prefer a top down description of mT 2, i.e. a description which starts with a definition and then works towards its consequences, are directed to skip to section 3 where this approach is taken. The concrete example which...

Barr, Alan; Lester, Christopher G; Stephens, Phil

134

Large-Area Plasma-Panel Radiation Detectors for Nuclear Medicine Imaging to Homeland Security and the Super Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new radiation sensor derived from plasma panel display technology is introduced. It has the capability to detect ionizing and non-ionizing radiation over a wide energy range and the potential for use in many applications. The principle of operation is described and some early results presented.

Friedman, Peter S; Chapman, J Wehrley; Levin, Daniel S; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing; Benhammou, Yan; Etzion, Erez; Moshe, M Ben; Silver, Yiftah; Beene, James R; Varner, Robert L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Comparison of discovery limits for extra Z bosons at future colliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study and compare the discovery potential for heavy neutral gauge bosons (Z) at various e+e- and pp(-) colliders that are planned or have been proposed. Typical discovery limits are for the Fermilab Tevatron ?1 TeV, Di-Tevatron ?2 TeV, CERN LHC ?4 TeV, LSGNA (a 60 TeV pp collider) ?13 TeV while the e+e- discovery limits are 210 ?s with the large variation reflecting the model dependence of the limits. While both types of colliders have comparable discovery limits the hadron colliders are generally less dependent on the specific Z model and provide more robust limits since the signal has little background. In contrast, discovery limits for e+e- limits are more model dependent and, because they are based on indirect inferences of deviations from standard model predictions, they are more sensitive to systematic errors.

Stephen Godfrey

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Interference of thermal photons from quark and hadronic phases in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore intensity correlations for thermal photons having K{sub T}{<=}2 GeV/c for central collisions of heavy nuclei at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider energies. These photons get competing contributions from the quark and hadronic phases. This competition gives rise to a unique structure, especially in the outward correlation function, owing to the interference between the photons from the two sources. The temporal separation of the two sources provides the lifetime of the system and their strengths provide the relative contribution of the two phases. The results are found to be quite sensitive to the quark-hadron phase transition temperature and the formation time of the plasma.

Srivastava, Dinesh Kumar; Chatterjee, Rupa [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

QCD Signatures of Narrow Graviton Resonances in Hadron Colliders J. Bijnens a , P. Eerola b , M. Maul a , A. M ansson a , T. Sjostrand a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(b) (d) (a) (c) FIG. 1. Signal and Standard Model background processes for the graviton resonance to the concept of Large Extra Dimensions [2], where a continuous spectrum of Kaluza-Klein states is predicted

Lunds Universitet,

138

Future Hadron Physics at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Today, hadron physics research occurs at Fermilab as parts of broader experimental programs. This is very likely to be the case in the future. Thus, much of this presentation focuses on our vision of that future - a future aimed at making Fermilab the host laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Given the uncertainties associated with the ILC - the level of needed R&D, the ILC costs, and the timing - Fermilab is also preparing for other program choices. I will describe these latter efforts, efforts focused on a Proton Driver to increase the numbers of protons available for experiments. As examples of the hadron physics which will be coming from Fermilab, I summarize three experiments: MIPP/E907 which is running currently, and MINER A and Drell-Yan/E906 which are scheduled for future running periods. Hadron physics coming from the Tevatron Collider program will be summarized by Arthur Maciel in another talk at Hadron05.

Jeffrey A. Appel

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

139

The International Large Detector: Letter of Intent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC. The ILC will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV. The ILC has an ambitious physics program, which will extend and complement that of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hallmark of physics at the ILC is precision. The clean initial state and the comparatively benign environment of a lepton collider are ideally suited to high precision measurements. To take full advantage of the physics potential of ILC places great demands on the detector performance. The design of ILD is driven by these requirements. Excellent calorimetry and tracking are combined to obtain the best possible overall event reconstruction, including the capability to reconstruct individual particles within jets for particle ow calorimetry. This requires excellent spatial resolution for all detector systems. A highly granular calorimeter system is combined with a central tracker which st...

Abe, Toshinori; Abramowicz, Halina; Adamus, Marek; Adeva, Bernardo; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Alabau Pons, Carmen; Albrecht, Hartwig; Andricek, Ladislav; Anduze, Marc; Aplin, Steve J.; Arai, Yasuo; Asano, Masaki; Attie, David; Attree, Derek J.; Burger, Jochen; Bailey, David; Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Ball, Markus; Ballin, James; Barbi, Mauricio; Barlow, Roger; Bartels, Christoph; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassignana, Daniela; Bates, Richard; Baudot, Jerome; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Jeannine; Beckmann, Moritz; Bedjidian, Marc; Behnke, Ties; Belkadhi, Khaled; Bellerive, Alain; Bentvelsen, Stan; Bergauer, Thomas; Berggren, C.Mikael U.; Bergholz, Matthias; Bernreuther, Werner; Besancon, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biebel, Otmar; Bilki, Burak; Blair, Grahame; Blumlein, Johannes; Bo, Li; Boisvert, Veronique; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Boos, Eduard; Boudry, Vincent; Bouquet, Bernard; Bouvier, Joel; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Brient, Jean-Claude; Brock, Ian; Brogna, Andrea; Buchholz, Peter; Buesser, Karsten; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Buzulutskov, A.F.; Caccia, Massimo; Caiazza, Stefano; Calcaterra, Alessandro; Caldwell, Allen; Callier, Stephane L.C.; Calvo Alamillo, Enrique; Campbell, Michael; Campbell, Alan J.; Cappellini, Chiara; Carloganu, Cristina; Castro, Nuno; Castro Carballo, Maria Elena; Chadeeva, Marina; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chang, Paoti; Charpy, Alexandre; Chen, Xun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Hongfang; Cheon, Byunggu; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, B.C.; Christen, Sandra; Ciborowski, Jacek; Ciobanu, Catalin; Claus, Gilles; Clerc, Catherine; Coca, Cornelia; Colas, Paul; Colijn, Auke; Colledani, Claude; Combaret, Christophe; Cornat, Remi; Cornebise, Patrick; Corriveau, Francois; Cvach, Jaroslav; Czakon, Michal; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Da Silva, Wilfrid; Dadoun, Olivier; Dam, Mogens; Damerell, Chris; Danilov, Mikhail; Daniluk, Witold; Daubard, Guillaume; David, Dorte; David, Jacques; De Boer, Wim; De Groot, Nicolo; De Jong, Sijbrand; De Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De Masi, Rita; De Roeck, Albert; Decotigny, David; Dehmelt, Klaus; Delagnes, Eric; Deng, Zhi; Desch, Klaus; Dieguez, Angel; Diener, Ralf; Dima, Mihai-Octavian; Dissertori, Gunther; Dixit, Madhu S.; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris A.; Dollan, Ralph; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doublet, Philippe; Doyle, Tony; Doziere, Guy; Dragicevic, Marko; Drasal, Zbynek; Drugakov, Vladimir; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Dulucq, Frederic; Dumitru, Laurentiu Alexandru; Dzahini, Daniel; Eberl, Helmut; Eckerlin, Guenter; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eigen, Gerald; Eklund, Lars; Elsen, Eckhard; Elsener, Konrad; Emeliantchik, Igor; Engels, Jan; Evrard, Christophe; Fabbri, Riccardo; Faber, Gerard; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Feege, Nils; Feng, Cunfeng; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Garcia, Marcos; Filthaut, Frank; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischer, Manfred; Fleta, Celeste; Fleury, Julien L.; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Foster, Brian; Fourches, Nicolas; Fouz, Mary-Cruz; Frank, Sebastian; Frey, Ariane; Frotin, Mickael; Fujii, Hirofumi; Fujii, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Junpei; Fujita, Yowichi; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gaddi, Andrea; Gaede, Frank; Galkin, Alexei; Galkin, Valery; Gallas, Abraham; Gallin-Martel, Laurent; Gamba, Diego; Gao, Yuanning; Garrido Beltran, Lluis; Garutti, Erika; Gastaldi, Franck; Gaur, Bakul; Gay, Pascal; Gellrich, Andreas; Genat, Jean-Francois; Gentile, Simonetta; Gerwig, Hubert; Gibbons, Lawrence; Ginina, Elena; Giraud, Julien; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Gladilin, Leonid; Goldstein, Joel; Gonzalez Sanchez, Francisco Javier; Gournaris, Filimon; Greenshaw, Tim; Greenwood, Z.D.; Grefe, Christian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Philippe; Grondin, Denis; Grunewald, Martin; Grzelak, Grzegorz; Gurtu, Atul; Haas, Tobias; Haensel, Stephan; Hajdu, Csaba; Hallermann, Lea; Han, Liang; Hansen, Peter H.; Hara, Takanori; Harder, Kristian; Hartin, Anthony; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harz, Martin; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hauschild, Michael; He, Qing; Hedberg, Vincent; Hedin, David; Heinze, Isa; Helebrant, Christian; Henschel, Hans; Hensel, Carsten; Hertenberger, Ralf; Herve, Alain; Higuchi, Takeo; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hironori, Kazurayama; Hlucha, Hana; Hommels, Bart; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horvath, Dezso; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Wei-Shu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Huang, Xingtao; Huppert, Jean Francois; Ide, Yasuhiro; Idzik, Marek; Iglesias Escudero, Carmen; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Igonkina, Olga; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Ikuno, Toshinori; Imbault, Didier; Imhof, Andreas; Imhoff, Marc; Ingbir, Ronen; Inoue, Eiji

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Collider constraints on interactions of dark energy with the Standard Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study models in which a light scalar dark energy particle couples to the gauge fields of the electroweak force, the photon, Z and W bosons. Our analysis applies to a large class of interacting dark energy models, including those in which the dark energy mass can be adjusted to evade fifth-force bounds by the so-called chameleon mechanism. We conclude that--with the usual choice of Higgs sector--electroweak precision observables are screened from the indirect effects of dark energy, making such corrections effectively unobservable at present-day colliders, and limiting the dark energy discovery potential of any future International Linear Collider. We show that a similar screening effect applies to processes mediated by flavour-changing neutral currents, which can be traced to the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani mechanism. However, Higgs boson production at the Large Hadron Collider via weak boson fusion may receive observable corrections.

Philippe Brax; Clare Burrage; Anne-Christine Davis; David Seery; Amanda Weltman

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Search for Diphoton Events with Large Missing Transverse Energy in 6.3 fb-1 of ppbar Collisions using the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider between 2002 and 2010, and correspond to 6.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The observed missing transverse energy distribution is well described by the Standard Model prediction, and 95% C.L. limits are derived on two realizations of theories beyond the Standard Model. In a gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario, the breaking scale {Lambda} is excluded for {Lambda} < 124 TeV. In a universal extra dimension model including gravitational decays, the compactification radius R{sub c} is excluded for R{sub c}{sup -1} < 477 GeV.

Cooke, Mark Stephen; /Columbia U.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Measurement of the Oscillation Frequency of B_s Mesons in the Hadronic Decay Mode B_s-> pi D_s(phi pi)X$ with the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard model (SM) of particle physics is a theory, describing three out of four fundamental forces. In this model the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix describes the transformation between the mass and weak eigenstates of quarks. The matrix properties can be visualized as triangles in the complex plane. A precise measurement of all triangle parameters can be used to verify the validity of the SM. The least precisely measured parameter of the triangle is related to the CKM element |V{sub td}|, accessible through the mixing frequency (oscillation) of neutral B mesons, where mixing is the transition of a neutral meson into its anti-particle and vice versa. It is possible to calculate the CKM element |V{sub td}| and a related element |V{sub ts}| by measuring the mass differences {Delta}m{sub d} ({Delta}m{sub s}) between neutral B{sub d} and {bar B}{sub d} (B{sub s} and {bar B}{sub s}) meson mass eigenstates. This measurement is accomplished by tagging the initial and final state of decaying B mesons and determining their lifetime. Currently the Fermilab Tevatron Collider (providing p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV) is the only place, where B{sub s} oscillations can be studied. The first selection of the 'golden', fully hadronic decay mode B{sub s} {yields} {pi}D{sub s}({phi}{pi})X at D0 is presented in this thesis. All data, taken between April 2002 and August 2007 with the D0 detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of {integral} Ldt = 2.8 fb{sup -1} is used. The oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s} and the ratio |V{sub td}|/|V{sub ts}| are determined as {Delta}m{sub s} = (16.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.5}(stat){sub -0.3}{sup +0.4}(sys)) ps{sup -1}, |V{sub td}|/|V{sub ts}| = 0.213{sub -0.003}{sup +0.004}(exp) {+-} 0.008(theor). These results are consistent with the standard model expectations and no evidence for new physics is observable.

Weber, Gernot August; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameters are given of muon colliders with center of mass energies of 1.5 and 3 TeV. Pion production is from protons on a mercury target. Capture, decay, and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling reduces the emittances until the trains are merged into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in 6 dimensions is then applied, followed by final transverse cooling in 50 T solenoids. After acceleration the muons enter the collider ring. Ongoing R&D is discussed.

Palmer, R.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

144

EIS-0138: Superconducting Super Collider  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider, a large proton accelerator, at each of seven alternative locations.

145

A New Boson with a Mass of 125 GeV Observed with the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Demiragli A. Demiyanov L. Demortier D. Denegri G. Denis M. Deniz D. D'Enterria L.G. Denton P. Depasse A. Dermenev V. Dero G...Science and Technology and the World Class University program of NRF, Republic of Korea; the Lithuanian Academy of Sciences; the...

The CMS Collaboration

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

A New Boson with a Mass of 125 GeV Observed with the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Remington D. Renker M. Renz S. Reucroft M.A. Reyes-Santos J.M. Reymond P.Q. Ribeiro P.M. Ribeiro Cipriano J...Robles P. Robmann S. Rocker M. Rodenburg M. Rodozov T. Rodrigo J. Rodrigues Antunes J.L. Rodriguez A.Y. Rodriguez-Marrero...

The CMS Collaboration

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

Charmless Hadronic B Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report recent measurements for the branching fractions of charmless hadronic B decays obtained from data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

Burke, James P.; /Liverpool U.

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

148

Hadronic Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the theory of hadronic atoms in QCD+QED. The non-relativistic effective Lagrangian approach, used to describe this type of bound states, is illustrated with the case of pi+pi- atoms. In addition, we discuss the evaluation of isospin-breaking corrections to hadronic atom observables by invoking chiral perturbation theory.

J. Gasser; V. E. Lyubovitskij; A. Rusetsky

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

Strange particle production in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been made of neutral strange baryons and pseudoscalar mesons produced in hadronic decays of the weak gauge boson V. The experiment was performed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, which has the unique capability of colliding highly polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons. Overall production rates and spectra of the K{sup 0} and the {Lambda}{sup 0} (+{Lambda}{sup 0}) were measured and compared with other experiments as well as with Quantum Chromodynamics calculations. The combination of the small, stable beam spots produced by the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) and the precision vertexing capabilities of the SLC Large Detector (SLD) permitted the separation of the hadronic events into three quark flavor-enriched samples. An unfolding was performed to obtain flavor-pure samples, and for the first time measurements were made of K{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} (+{Lambda}{sup 0}) production rates and spectra in uds, c, and b quark events at the Z{sup 0} pole. This measurement revealed significant production differences. Utilizing the large quark production asymmetry due to the polarized electron beam, high-purity quark and antiquark jet samples were obtained. The first measurement of production differences of the {Lambda}{sup 0} baryon in quark and antiquark jets was performed, which provided clear evidence for a leading particle effect at high momenta.

Baird, K.G. III

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A N. V. Mokhov et al. , Muon Collider Interaction RegionR. B. Palmer et al. , Muon Colliders, in the 9th AdvancedB. Palmer and R. Fernow, Muon Collider Final Cooling in 30

Zisman, Michael S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle. managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle 07/07 Brookhaven National Laboratory Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multipurpose research institution located on a 5,300-acre site on Long Island, New York. Six Nobel Prize-winning discoveries have been made at Brookhaven Lab. The Laboratory operates large-scale scientific facilities and performs research in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, applied science, and

152

Future hadron physics at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, hadron physics research occurs at Fermilab as parts of broader experimental programs. This is very likely to be the case in the future. Thus, much of this presentation focuses on our vision of that future--a future aimed at making Fermilab the host laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Given the uncertainties associated with the ILC--the level of needed R&D, the ILC costs, and the timing--Fermilab is also preparing for other program choices. I will describe these latter efforts, efforts focused on a Proton Driver to increase the numbers of protons available for experiments. As examples of the hadron physics which will be coming from Fermilab, I summarize three experiments: MIPP/E907 which is running currently, and MINERvA and Drell-Yan/E906 which are scheduled for future running periods. Hadron physics coming from the Tevatron Collider program will be summarized by Arthur Maciel in another talk at Hadron05.

Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

High energy physics - The large and the small  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Sixth International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, I was invited to give this talk to the students and researchers of Field Theory mainly about LHC - The Large Hadron Collider and results. I will try to summarize the main daily life of the high energy physics and give an idea about the experiments and the expectations for the near future. I will comment the present results and the prospects to LHC/CMS.

Santoro, Alberto [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup 1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (cooling). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

Zisman, Michael S.

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Validation of Geant4 Hadronic Generators versus Thin Target Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GEANT4 toolkit is widely used for simulation of high energy physics (HEP) experiments, in particular, those at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The requirements of robustness, stability and quality of simulation for the LHC are demanding. This requires an accurate description of hadronic interactions for a wide range of targets over a large energy range, from stopped particle reactions to low energy nuclear interactions to interactions at the TeV energy scale. This is achieved within the Geant4 toolkit by combining a number of models, each of which are valid within a certain energy domain. Comparison of these models to thin target data over a large energy range indicates the strengths and weaknesses of the model descriptions and the energy range over which each model is valid. Software has been developed to handle the large number of validation tests required to provide the feedback needed to improve the models. An automated process for carrying out the validation and storing/displaying the results is being developed and will be discussed.

Banerjee, S.; /Fermilab; Folger, G.; /CERN; Ivanchenko, A.; /CERN /CENBG, Gradignan; Ivanchenko, V.N.; /CERN /NeurOK, Moscow /Metz U.; Kossov, M.; /CERN; Quesada, J.M.; /Seville U.; Schalicke, A.; /DESY, Zeuthen; Uzhinsky, V.; /CERN; Wenzel, H.; /Fermilab; Wright, D.H.; /SLAC; Yarba, J.; /Fermilab

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Quirky Collider Signals of Folded Supersymmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the collider signals associated with scalar quirks ('squirks') in folded supersymmetric models. As opposed to regular superpartners in supersymmetric models these particles are uncolored, but are instead charged under a new confining group, leading to radically different collider signals. Due to the new strong dynamics, squirks that are pair produced do not hadronize separately, but rather form a highly excited bound state. The excited 'squirkonium' loses energy to radiation before annihilating back into Standard Model particles. We calculate the branching fractions into various channels for this process, which is prompt on collider time-scales. The most promising annihilation channel for discovery is W+photon which dominates for squirkonium near its ground state. We demonstrate the feasibility of the LHC search, showing that the mass peak is visible above the SM continuum background and estimate the discovery reach.

Burdman, Gustavo; Chacko, Z.; Goh, Hock-Seng; Harnik, Roni; Krenke, Christopher A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Photo of LINAC The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory where physicists are exploring the most fundamental forces and properties of matter and the early universe. RHIC accelerates beams of particles (e.g., the nuclei of heavy atoms such as gold) to nearly the speed of light, and smashes them together to recreate a state of matter thought to have existed immediately after the Big Bang some 13.8 billion years ago. STAR and PHENIX, two large detectors located around the 2.4-mile-circumference accelerator, take "snapshots" of these collisions to reveal a glimpse of the basic constituents of visible matter, quarks and gluons. Understanding matter at

158

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory search U.S. Department of Energy logo Home RHIC Science News Images Videos For Scientists Björn Schenke 490th Brookhaven Lecture, 12/18 Join Björn Schenke of Brookhaven Lab's Physics Department for the 490th Brookhaven Lecture, titled 'The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions,' on Wednesday, Dec. 18, at 4 p.m. in Berkner Hall. droplets Tiny Drops of Hot Quark Soup-How Small Can They Be? New analyses indicate that collisions of small particles with large gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider may be serving up miniscule servings of hot quark-gluon plasma. RHIC Physics RHIC is the first machine in the world capable of colliding ions as heavy as gold. The Spin Puzzle RHIC is the world's only machine capable of colliding beams of polarized

159

The Muon Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11] D. Summers et al. , Muon Acceleration to 750 GeV in theThe muon collider M. S. Zisman * Lawrence Berkeley Nationalnew type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator

Zisman, Michael S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Muon Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11] D. Summers et al. , Muon Acceleration to 750 GeV in theThe muon collider M. S. Zisman * Lawrence Berkeley Nationalnew type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator

Zisman, Michael S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Muon collider gains momentum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , US scientists staked their claim in a daring new venture: the world's first muon collider. The collider could overtake two more-mature concepts, each of which plan to ... expected to achieve. They are now trying to rally enthusiasm for a collider that smashes muons, a particle that is about 200 times more massive than the electron. ...

Eric Hand

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

162

Measurement of the radiation field surrounding the Collider Detector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present here the first direct and detailed measurements of the spatial distribution of the ionizing radiation surrounding a hadron collider experiment. Using data from two different exposures we measure the effect of additional shielding on the radiation field around the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Employing a simple model we parameterize the ionizing radiation field surrounding the detector.

K. Kordas et al.

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

Photon collider Higgs factories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

V. I. Telnov

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Rare exclusive hadronic W decays in a t-tbar environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large cross section for t-tbar production at the LHC and at any future hadron collider provides a high-statistics and relatively clean environment for a study of W boson properties: after tagging on a leptonic decay of one of the Ws and the two b-jets, an additional W still remains in the event. We study the prospect of making the first exclusive hadronic decay of a fundamental boson of the standard model, using the decay modes W to pi gamma and W to pi pi pi, and other related decays. By using strong isolation criteria, which we impose by searching for jets with a single particle constituent, we show that the three particle hadronic W decays have potential to be measured at the LHC. The possibility of measuring an involved spectrum of decay products could considerably expand our knowledge of how the W decays, and experimental techniques acquired in making these measurements would be useful for application to future measurements of exclusive hadronic Higgs boson decays.

Michelangelo Mangano; Tom Melia

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rare exclusive hadronic W decays in a t-tbar environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large cross section for t-tbar production at the LHC and at any future hadron collider provides a high-statistics and relatively clean environment for a study of W boson properties: after tagging on a leptonic decay of one of the Ws and the two b-jets, an additional W still remains in the event. We study the prospect of making the first exclusive hadronic decay of a fundamental boson of the standard model, using the decay modes W to pi gamma and W to pi pi pi, and other related decays. By using strong isolation criteria, which we impose by searching for jets with a single particle constituent, we show that the three particle hadronic W decays have potential to be measured at the LHC. The possibility of measuring an involved spectrum of decay products could considerably expand our knowledge of how the W decays, and experimental techniques acquired in making these measurements would be useful for application to future measurements of exclusive hadronic Higgs boson decays.

Mangano, Michelangelo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Effects of Shower Partons on Soft and Semihard hadrons Produced in Pb-Pb Collisions at 2.76 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of all identified hadrons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is studied with emphasis on the $p_T$ distributions up to 20 GeV/c in central collisions. In the framework of the recombination model we find that the shower partons (due to the fragmentation of semihard partons) play an important role in the formation of hadrons in the low- and intermediate-$p_T$ regions. Parameters that control the energy loss of minijets are determined by fitting the upper half of the $p_T$ range of the pion distribution. The resultant soft shower partons are then found to dominate over the thermal partons in the non-strange sector, but not in the strange sector. Since the data on the $p_T$ spectra of all observed hadrons are well reproduced, there is no way out of the implication that any alternative dynamical model on particle production would be incomplete if it does not consider the effects of minijets even at very low $p_T$. Hydrodynamics that relies on rapid equilibration without accounting for the delayed thermalization effects of the hard and semihard partons copiously produced at LHC is an example of such models. The difference between the densities of shower partons produced at LHC and at BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) is quantified and discussed.

Lilin Zhu; Rudolph C. Hwa

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

167

Exotic collider signals from the complete phase diagram of minimal universal extra dimensions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Minimal universal extra dimensions (mUED) is often thought to predict that the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) is the Kaluza-Klein gauge boson B1, leading to conventional missing energy signals at colliders and weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. In fact, the implications of mUED are far richer: the B1, charged Higgs boson H1, and graviton G1 are all possible LKPs, leading to many different phases with distinct signatures. Considering the complete phase diagram, we find predictions for charged or neutral particles with decay lengths of microns to tens of meters; WIMP, superWIMP, or charged relic particles; metastable particles with lifetimes of the order of or in excess of the age of the Universe; and scenarios combining two or more of these phenomena. In the cosmologically preferred region, the Higgs boson mass is between 180 and 245GeV, the LKP mass is between 810 and 1400GeV, and the maximal splitting between first Kaluza-Klein modes is less than 320GeV. This region predicts a variety of exotic collider signals, such as slow charged particles, displaced vertices, tracks with nonvanishing impact parameters, track kinks, and even vanishing charged tracks, all of which provide early discovery possibilities at the Large Hadron Collider.

Jose A. R. Cembranos; Jonathan L. Feng; Louis E. Strigari

2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

168

SLAC linear collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief description of the proposed SLAC Linear Collider is given. This machine would investigate the possibilities and limitations of Linear Colliders while at the same time producing thousands of Z/sup 0/ particles per day for the study of the weak interactions.

Hollebeek, R.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Papers on Muon Colliders  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnets for Muon Collider and Neutrino Storage Ring Magnets for Muon Collider and Neutrino Storage Ring (and Open Midplane Dipole for LARP): R. Gupta, et al., "High Field HTS Solenoid for a Muon Collider – Demonstrations, Challenges and Strategies, MT23, July 2013", presented at MT23, (talk) R. Weggel et al., "Open Midplane Dipoles for Muon Collider", 2011 Particle Accelerator Conference, New York (POSTER).. R. Gupta, M. Anerella, A. Ghosh, H. Kirk, R. Palmer, S. Plate, W. Sampson, Y. Shiroyanagi, P. Wanderer, B. Brandt, D. Cline, A. Garren, J. Kolonko, R. Scanlan, R. Weggel, "High field HTS R&D solenoid for muon collider", 2010 Applied Superconductivity Conference, Washington, DC, August 2010 >> Y. Shiroyanagi, W. Sampson, A. Ghosh, R. Gupta, "The Construction and

170

Search for hadronic resonance in multijet final states with the CDF detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis describes a search for a new hadronic resonance in 3.2 fb{sup -1} of data using the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The Fermilab Tevatron accelerator collides beams of protons and antiprotons at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. A unique approach is presented to extract multijet resonances from the large QCD background. Although the search is model independent, a pair produced supersymmetric gluino decaying through R-parity violation into three partons each is used to test our sensitivity to new physics. We measure these partons as jets, and require a minimum of six jets in an event. We make use of the kinematic features and correlations and use an ensemble of jet combinations to distinguish signal from multijet QCD backgrounds. Our background estimates also include all-hadronic t{bar t} decays that have a signature similar to signal. We observe no significant excess in an invariant mass range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2} and place 95% C.L. limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} {tilde g}{tilde g} {yields} 3jets + 3jets) as a function of gluino invariant mass.

Seitz, Claudia; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

muon Collider Notes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muon Collider Notes Muon Collider Notes MC-001 D. Neuffer, "Colliding Muon Beams at 90 GeV" Fermilab Note FN-319, July 1979. MC-002 D. Neuffer, "Principles and Applications of Muon Cooling" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 481, 1983. MC-003 V.V. Parkhomchuk and A.N. Skrinsky, "Ionization Cooling: Physics and Applications" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 485, 1983. MC-004 E.A. Perevedentsev and A.N. Skrinsky, "On the Proton Klystron" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 508, 1983. MC-005 D. Neuffer, "Principles and Applications of Muon Cooling" Particle Accelerators, Vol. 14, p. 75, 1983. MC-006 D. Neuffer, "Multi-TeV Muon Colliders" Proc. of the Advanced

172

International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

Elsen, Eckhard; /DESY; Harrison, Mike; /Brookhaven; Hesla, Leah; /Fermilab; Ross, Marc; /Fermilab; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; /Paris, IN2P3; Takahashi, Rika; /KEK, Tsukuba; Walker, Nicholas; /DESY; Warmbein, Barbara; /DESY; Yamamoto, Akira; /KEK, Tsukuba; Yokoya, Kaoru; /KEK, Tsukuba; Zhang, Min; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

Towards a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi TeV Muon Collider is required for the full coverage of Terascale physics. The physics potential for a Muon Collider at {approx}3 TeV and integrated luminosity of 1 ab{sup -1} is outstanding. Particularly strong cases can be made if the new physics is SUSY or new strong dynamics. Furthermore, a staged Muon Collider can provide a Neutrino Factory to fully disentangle neutrino physics. If a narrow s-channel resonance state exists in the multi-TeV region, the physics program at a Muon Collider could begin with less than 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} luminosity. Detailed studies of the physics case for a 1.5-4 TeV Muon Collider are just beginning. The goals of such studies are to: (1) identify benchmark physics processes; (2) study the physics dependence on beam parameters; (3) estimate detector backgrounds; and (4) compare the physics potential of a Muon Collider with those of the ILC, CLIC and upgrades to the LHC.

Eichten, E.; /Fermilab

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Vector- and Scalar-Bilepton Pair Production in Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the double-charged vector-bilepton pair production and double-charged scalar-bilepton pair production {\\it via} $p + p \\longrightarrow Y^{++} + Y^{--} + X$ and $p + p \\longrightarrow S_1^{++} + S_1^{--} + X$, where $Y$ and $S_1$ are vector and scalar bileptons respectively, in the framework of the minimal version of the 3-3-1 model. We compute the photon, $Z$, and $Z^\\prime$ s-channel contributions for the elementary process of bilepton scalar pair production, and to keep the correct unitarity behavior for the elementary $q \\bar q$ interaction, we include the exotic quark t-channel contribution in the vector-bilepton pair production calculation. We explore a mass range for $Z^\\prime$ and we fix the exotic quark mass within the experimental bounds. In this model, the vector-bilepton mass is directly related to $M_{Z^\\prime}$ and we consider scalar mass values around the vector-bilepton mass. We show that the total cross section for vector-bilepton production is 3 orders of magnitude larger than for scalar pair production for $\\sqrt s= 7$ TeV and 14 TeV and we obtain the number of events for the proposed LHC luminosities as a function of the bilepton mass. In addition we present some invariant mass and transverse momentum distributions. When comparing these distributions we observe quite different behavior providing the determination of the bilepton nature. We conclude that one can disentangle the production rates and that the LHC can be capable of detecting these predicted particles as a signal for new physics.

E. Ramirez Barreto; Y. A. Coutinho; J. S Borges

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nuclear shadowing and prompt photons at relativistic hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of prompt photons at high energies provides a direct probe of the dynamics of the strong interactions. In particular, one expect that it could be used to constrain the behavior of the nuclear gluon distribution in $pA$ and $AA$ collisions. In this letter we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of prompt photons and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear ratios $R_{pA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (pA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ and $R_{AA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (AA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A^2 {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ at RHIC and LHC energies. We demonstrate that the study of these observables can be useful to determine the magnitude of the shadowing and antishadowing effects in the nuclear gluon distribution.

C. Brenner Mariotto; V. P. Goncalves

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Production of W and Z bosons at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The article summarizes the main recent measurements related to production of the W and Z bosons at the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. The results of the measurements are compared to the standard model predictions.

A. Savin

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Hadron Collider Physics XII 511 June 1997, Stony Brook, NY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that cover different ranges of pseudorapidity, out to j = 4:2. D0 features a uniform design of depleted uranium and liquid argon calorimetry. The segmentation in j \\Gamma OE is 0:1 \\Theta 0:1, but the third

Fermilab

178

Muon Front End for a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muon Front End for a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Chris Rogers, ASTeC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory 15th January 2013 #12;High Energy Muon Facilities Growing interest in large, high energy muon facilities Neutrino Factory -> neutrino oscillations and Muon Collider -> energy frontier or Higgs factory

McDonald, Kirk

179

Measurement of the cross section and angular correlations for associated production of a Z boson with b hadrons in pp collisions at s? = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corrections to Zbb production with massive bottom quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron, Phys. Rev. D 78 (2008) 074014 [arXiv:0806.0808] [INSPIRE]. [13] F. Febres Cordero, L. Reina and D. Wackeroth, W- and Z-boson production with a massive bottom-quark pair... at the Large Hadron Collider, Phys. Rev. D 80 (2009) 034015 [arXiv:0906.1923] [INSPIRE]. [14] R. Frederix et al., W and Z/?? boson production in association with a bottom-antibottom pair, JHEP 09 (2011) 061 [arXiv:1106.6019] [INSPIRE]. [15] S. Frixione and B...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenney, R. P. III; Murray, Michael J.; Noonan, Danny; Sanders, Stephen J.; Stringer, Robert W.; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

Review of heavy ion collider proposals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we review proposals for heavy-ion colliders generated during the last few years for several national laboratories. The proposals span over a large range of energy and luminosity to accommodate the experimental needs of both the nuclear and the high-energy physicists. We report also briefly efforts in the same field happening in Europe.

Ruggiero, A.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Applying Effective Theories to Collider Phenomenology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theories to Collider Phenomenology by Grigol GagikovichTheories to Collider Phenomenology Copyright 2010 by GrigolTheories to Collider Phenomenology by Grigol Gagikovich

Ovanesyan, Grigol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Exotic Leptons and Black Holes at Future Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Standard Model of particle physics has been remarkably successful in describing present experimental results. However, it is assumed to be only a low-energy effective theory which will break down at higher energy scales, theoretically motivated to be around 1 TeV. There are a variety of proposed models of new physics beyond the Standard Model, most notably supersymmetric and extra dimension models. New charged and neutral heavy leptons are a feature of a number of theories of new physics, including the `intermediate scale' class of supersymmetric models. Using a time-of-flight technique to detect the charged leptons at the Large Hadron Collider, the discovery range (in the particular scenario studied in the first part of this thesis) is found to extend up to masses of 950 GeV. Extra dimension models, particularly those with large extra dimensions, allow the possible experimental production of black holes. The remainder of the thesis describes some theoretical results and computational tools necessary to model the production and decay of these miniature black holes at future particle colliders. The grey-body factors which describe the Hawking radiation emitted by higher-dimensional black holes are calculated numerically for the first time and then incorporated in a Monte Carlo black hole event generator; this can be used to model black hole production and decay at next-generation colliders. It is hoped that this generator will allow more detailed examination of black hole signatures and help to devise a method for extracting the number of extra dimensions present in nature.

Christopher M. Harris

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

Zisman, Michael S

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

184

Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the worlds first polarized electron-proton collider, and the worlds first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of energies as more exclusive scattering probabilities are small, and any integrated detector/interaction region design needs to provide uniform coverage to detect spectator and diffractive products. This is because e-p and even more e-A colliders have a large fraction of their science related to what happens to the nucleon or ion beams. As a result, the philosophy of integration of complex detectors into an extended interaction region faces challenging constraints. Designs feature crossing angles between the protons or heavy ions during collisions with electrons, to remove potential problems for the detector induced by synchrotron radiation. Designs allocate quite some detector space before the final-focus ion quads, at the cost of luminosity, given that uniform detection coverage is a must for deep exclusive and diffractive processes. The integrated EIC detector/interaction region design at JLab focused on establishing full acceptance for such processes over a wide range of proton energies (20-100 GeV) with well achievable interaction region magnets. The detector design at BNL uses the higher ion beam energies to achieve good detection efficiency for instance for protons following a DVCS reaction, for proton beam energies starting from 100 GeV. Following a recommendation of the 2007 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort, the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics (DOE/NP) has allocated accelerator R&D funds to lay the foundation for a polarized EIC. BNL, in association with JLab and DOE/NP, has also established a generic detector R&D program to address the scientific requirements for measurements at a future EIC.

Rolf Ent

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Are multiple parton interactions important at high energies? New types of hadrons production processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hadrons interaction at high energies is carried out by one color gluon exchange. All quarks and gluons contained in colliding hadrons take part in interaction and production of particles. The contribution of multiple parton interactions is negligible. Multiple hadrons production at high energies occurs only in three types of processes. The first process is hadrons production in gluon string, the second is hadrons production in two quark strings and the third is hadrons production in three quark strings. In proton-proton interaction production of only gluon string and two quark strings is possible. In proton-antiproton interaction production of gluon string, two quark strings and three quark strings is possible. Therefore multiplicity distributions in proton-proton and proton-antiproton interactions are different.

V. A. Abramovsky

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Overview of results from the Fermilab fixed target and collider experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present a review of recent QCD related results from Fermilab fixed target and collider experiments. Topics covered range from structure functions through W/Z production, heavy quark production and jet angular distributions. We also include the current state of knowledge about leptoquark pair production in hadronic collisions.

Montgomery, H.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

arXiv:acc-phys/9602001v112Feb1996 MUON COLLIDERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, A. Garren3,7 , M. Green3 , S. Kahn1 , H. Kirk1 , Y. Y. Lee1 , F. Mills5 , N. Mokhov5 , G. Morgan1 on upgrades of the FERMILAB machines would also be possible (see second Ref. [4]). Hadron collider energies are limited by their size and technical constraints on bending magnetic fields. At very high energies it would

Wurtele, Jonathan

188

Collider-Accelerator Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RHIC Tunnel and Magnets RHIC Tunnel and Magnets RHIC Tunnel and Magnets AGS Tunnel and Magnets NSRL Beamline RF Kicker Snake 200-MeV LINAC AGS Cold Snake Magnet About the Collider-Accelerator Department The mission of the Collider-Accelerator Department is to develop, improve and operate the suite of particle / heavy ion accelerators used to carry out the program of accelerator-based experiments at BNL; to support the experimental program including design, construction and operation of the beam transports to the experiments plus support of detector and research needs of the experiments; to design and construct new accelerator facilities in support of the BNL and national missions. The C-A Department supports an international user community of over 1500 scientists. The department performs all these functions in an environmentally responsible and safe manner under a rigorous conduct of operations approach.

189

muon_collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

muon_collider muon_collider muon_collider FridayMeetings MCTFmeetings MondayMeetings prstab texput.log #prstab.tex# last.kumac prstab.ps arxiv.tar.gz prstab.tar.gz referee_response_II.pdf prstab.pdf prstab.aux prstab.dvi prstab.end prstab.log prstab.tex prstab.tex~ accel-010307-f03.eps accel-010307-f28.eps old conclusions.tex higgsfact.tex introduction.tex mice.tex neufact.tex physics.tex prstab.tex r_and_d.tex authors_merged.tex buncher.tex temp.prt last.kumacold ringfig.eps MICE-fig.ps chgr_norm.ps chgr_merit.ps temp.csh temp.prt~ xupdn-a-model-view-iron5.eps site1-Layout1.eps rla2.eps phaserot.eps mole-hill.eps intoap.eps emit.eps cavity.eps allcount.eps MICE-88MHz-cooling.eps changes hh_ha_susy_rtsscan.eps letter_plots.eps scott33.eps scott32b.eps scott32a.eps MICE-200MHz-long.eps MICE-resolution.eps dipole_fields.eps

190

Hadron supercolliders: The 1-TeV scale and beyond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greater understanding of the connection between the weak and electromagnetic interactions is central to progress in elementary-particle physics. A definitive exploration of the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking will require collisions between fundamental constituents at energies on the order of 1 TeV. This goal drives the design of high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders that will be commissioned during the next decade, but by no means completely defines their scientific potential. These three lectures are devoted to a review of the standard-model issues that motivated an experimental assault on the 1-TeV scale, an introduction to the machines and the experimental environment they will present, and a survey of possibilities for measurement and discovery with a multi-TeV hadron collider. 72 refs., 29 figs.

Quigg, C.

1990-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

Neutrino alternatives for missing energy events at colliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If the dark matter consists of a weakly interacting massive particle, it can be produced and studied at future collider experiments like those at the LHC. The production of collider-stable weakly interacting massive particles is characterized by hard scattering events with large missing transverse energy. Here we emphasize and discuss the fact that the discovery of events inconsistent with the standard model with large missing transverse energy need not point to the existence of new, collider-stable particles. We explore an alternative explanation where the only sources of missing transverse energy are standard model neutrinos. We present concrete examples of such scenarios, focusing on supersymmetric models with R-parity violation. We also discuss means of differentiating neutrino missing energy signals from the production of new collider-stable particles. These include both model-dependent signals, such as particle tags and flavor counts, as well as model-independent tests that attempt to measure the missing particle mass.

Spencer Chang and Andr de Gouva

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Muon colliders and neutrino factories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

Geer, S.; /Fermilab

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Colliding neutrino beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From several neutrino oscillation experiments, we understand now that neutrinos have mass. However, we really don't know what mechanism is responsible for producing this neutrino mass. Current or planned neutrino experiments utilize neutrino beams and long-baseline detectors to explore flavor mixing but do not address the question of the origin of neutrino mass. In order to answer that question, neutrino interactions need to be explored at much higher energies. This paper outlines a program to explore neutrinos and their interactions with various particles through a series of experiments involving colliding neutrino beams.

Reinhard Schwienhorst

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

194

Colliding Nuclei at High Energy  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Physicist Peter Steinberg explains what happens when atomic nucleii travelling at close to the speed of light smash together in Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

Brookhaven Lab

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

195

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

breakthrough accelerator could collide electrons with heavy ions or protons at nearly the speed of light to create "snapshots" of the force binding all visible matter. Accelerator...

196

Critical issues for high-brightness heavy-ion beams -- prioritized  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Ignition Facility (NIF) will provide motivation toobtaining funding for the NIF, the Large Hadron Collider (

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

LHC's backers in Congress prepare to take on critics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... involvement of the United States in the construction of Europe's planned Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

COLIN MACILWAIN

1994-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hadronic sizes and observables in high-energy scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The functional dependence of the high-energy observables of total cross section and slope parameter on the sizes of the colliding hadrons predicted by the model of the stochastic vacuum and the corresponding relations used in the geometric model of Povh and H\\"ufner are confronted with the experimental data. The existence of a universal term in the expression for the slope, due purely to vacuum effects, independent of the energy and of the particular hadronic system, is investigated. Accounting for the two independent correlation functions of the QCD vacuum, we improve the simple and consistent description given by the model of the stochastic vacuum to the high-energy pp and pbar-p data, with a new determination of parameters of non-perturbative QCD. The increase of the hadronic radii with the energy accounts for the energy dependence of the observables.

Erasmo Ferreira; Flvio Pereira

1997-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

199

Muon Collider Overview: Progress and Future Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL LABORATORY Muon Collider Overview: Progress andCBP Note-263 BNL- 65627 Muon Collider Overview: Progress and9] 5 REFERENCES [1] Status of the Muon Collider Research and

Palmer, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Muon Collider design status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Muon Collider (MC) - proposed by G.I. Budker and A.N. Skrinsky a few decades ago - is now considered as the most exciting option for the energy frontier machine in the post-LHC era. A national Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) is being formed in the USA with the ultimate goal of building a MC at the Fermilab site with c.o.m. energy in the range 1.5-3 TeV and luminosity of {approx} 1.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. As the first step on the way to MC it envisages construction of a Neutrino Factory (NF) for high-precision neutrino experiments. The baseline scheme of the NF-MC complex is presented and possible options for its main components are discussed.

Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Brookhaven National Laboratory The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) An Exciting Beginning and a Compelling Future At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory, physicists are exploring the most fundamental forces and properties of matter and the early universe, with important implications for our understanding of the world around us. Operated with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), was designed to recreate a state of matter thought to have existed immediately after the Big Bang some 13 billion years ago, and to investigate how the proton gets its spin and intrinsic magnetism from its quark and gluon constituents. Large detectors located

202

LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

A New Slant on Hadron Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rather than regarding the restriction of current lattice QCD simulations to quark masses that are 5--10 times larger than those observed, we note that this presents a wonderful opportunity to deepen our understanding of QCD. Just as it has been possible to learn a great deal about QCD by treating $N_c$ as a variable, so the study of hadron properties as a function of quark mass is leading us to a much deeper appreciation of hadron structure. As examples we cite recent progress in using the chiral properties of QCD to connect hadron masses, magnetic moments, charge radii and structure functions calculated at large quark masses within lattice QCD with the values observed physically.

Detmold, W; Melnitchouk, W; Thomas, A W; Wright, S V

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Fermilab | Muon Collider | How Does a Muon Collider Work?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A muon collider complex would comprise several machines and many different A muon collider complex would comprise several machines and many different components. Scientists across the world are developing and testing them. View full graphic How Does a Muon Collider Work? A muon collider complex would comprise several machines and many different components. Scientists across the world are developing and testing them. Proton accelerator To create lots of muons, scientists use a high-intensity proton accelerator that steers protons into a target. The collisions create short-lived particles called pions. Within 50 meters the pions decay into muons and neutral particles called neutrinos. The muons have an energy of about 200 MeV. Capture cavities Magnets guide the muons into and through a set of radiofrequency cavities. The electric field inside the cavities increases the energy of slow muons

205

Highlights from COMPASS in hadron spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since Quantum Choromdynamics allows for gluon self-coupling, quarks and gluons cannot be observed as free particles, but only their bound states, the hadrons. This so-called confinement phenomenon is responsible for $98\\%$ of the mass in the visible universe. The measurement of the hadron excitation spectra therefore gives valuable input for theory and phenomenology to quantitatively understand this phenomenon. One simple model to describe hadrons is the Constituent Quark Model (CQM), which knows two types of hadrons: mesons, consisting of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which are made out of three quarks. More advanced models, which are inspired by QCD as well as calculations within Lattice QCD predict the existence of other types of hadrons, which may be e.g. described solely by gluonic excitations (glueballs) or mixed quark and gluon excitations (hybrids). In order to search for such states, the COMPASS experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN has collected large data sets, which allow to ...

Krinner, Fabian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Viscosity of hadron matter within relativistic mean-field based model with scaled hadron masses and couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shear ($\\eta$) and bulk ($\\zeta$) viscosities are calculated in a quasiparticle relaxation time approximation for a hadron matter described within the relativistic mean-field based model with scaled hadron masses and couplings. Comparison with results of other models is presented. We demonstrate that a small value of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio required for explaining a large elliptic flow observed at RHIC may be reached in the hadron phase. Large values of the bulk viscosity are noted in case of the baryon enriched matter.

A. S. Khvorostukhin; V. D. Toneev; D. N. Voskresensky

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

208

[New technology for linear colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

McIntyre, P.M.

1992-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

Stable massive particles at colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.; ,

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

RHIC | Electron-Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particle accelerator could collide electrons with heavy ions or protons at nearly the speed of light to create rapid-fire, high-resolution "snapshots" of the force binding all...

211

Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

Harrison, M.

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hadronic scattering of charmed mesons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scattering cross sections of charm mesons with hadrons such as the pion, rho meson, and nucleon are studied in an effective Lagrangian. In heavy ion collisions, rescattering of produced charm mesons by hadrons affects the invariant mass spectra...

Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming; Zhang, B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Stabilizing Hadron Resonance Gas Models against Future Discoveries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the stability of hadron resonance gas models by extending them to take care of undiscovered resonances through the Hagedorn formula. We find that the influence of unknown resonances on thermodynamics is large but bounded. Hadron resonance gases are internally consistent up to a temperature higher than the cross over temperature in QCD; but by examining quark number susceptibilities we find that their region of applicability seems to end even below the QCD cross over. We model the decays of resonances and investigate the ratios of particle yields in heavy-ion collisions. We find that observables such as hydrodynamics and hadron yield ratios change little upon extending the model. As a result, heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC are insensitive to a possible exponential rise in the hadronic density of states, thus increasing the stability of the predictions of hadron resonance gas models.

S. Chatterjee; R. M. Godbole; Sourendu Gupta

2009-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

214

Broader Impacts of the International Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale scientific endeavors such as the International Linear Collider Project can have a lasting impact on education and outreach to our society. The ILC will provide a discovery platform for frontier physical science and it will also provide a discovery platform for broader impacts and social science. The importance of Broader Impacts of Science in general and the ILC in particular are described. Additionally, a synopsis of education and outreach activities carried out as an integral part of the Snowmass ILC Workshop is provided.

Bardeen, M.; Ruchti, R.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Rare hadronic B decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rare hadronic B-meson decays allow us to study CP violation. The class of B decays final states containing two vector mesons provides a rich set of angular correlation observables to study. This article reviews some of the recent experimental results from the BaBar and Belle collaborations.

A. J. Bevan

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

216

2780 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2011 Jetlike Emission From Colliding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attractive applications in the field of X-ray lasers, pulsed-laser deposition (PLD), extreme ultraviolet Colliding Laser-Produced Plasmas Sivanandan S. Harilal, Mathew P. Polek, and Ahmed Hassanein, Member, IEEE Abstract--We report a large jetlike collimated emission feature from colliding laser-produced plasmas (LPPs

Harilal, S. S.

217

Challenges in future linear colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e-e+ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e-e+ linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the Future Linear Collider (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomic and political challenges, likely necessitating continued development of international collaboration among parties involved in accelerator-based physics.

Swapan Chattopadhyay; Kaoru Yokoya

2002-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Nuclear Physics and Hadron Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hadron therapy uses light charged particles beams (mainly proton and {sup 12}C ions) to irradiate tumors. These beams present a ballistic advantage with a maximum energy deposition at the end of the path. A large dose can be delivered inside a deep tumor while the surrounding healthy tissues are preserved. There is an obvious advantage in using these beams but the beam control has to be achieved and all the physical processes leading to the energy deposition have to be fully under control. This treatment protocol requires accurate control devices and a good knowledge of the physical processes occurring all along the path of the projectile in human tissues. In this report, we will present one example of a beam monitor for the proton therapy. We will also present the experimental program which has been initiated to obtain fundamental data on the nuclear fragmentation process.

Braunn, B. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 Caen (France); CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SPhN, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Colin, J.; Courtois, C.; Cussol, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Labalme, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 Caen (France)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

219

Charmed hadron production at low transverse momentum in Au+Au collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report measurements of charmed hadron production from hadronic ($D^{0}\\rightarrow K\\pi$) and semileptonic ($\\mu$ and $e$) decays in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Analysis of the spectra indicates that charmed hadrons have a different radial flow pattern from light or multi-strange hadrons. Charm cross sections at mid-rapidity are extracted by combining the three independent measurements, covering the transverse momentum range that contributes to $\\sim$90% of the integrated cross section. The cross sections scale with number of binary collisions of the initial nucleons, a signature of charm production exclusively at the initial impact of colliding heavy ions. The implications for charm quark interaction and thermalization in the strongly interacting matter are discussed.

B. I. Abelev

2008-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

220

Imaging Pion Showers with the CALICE Analogue Hadron Calorimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CALICE collaboration investigates different technology options for highly granular calorimeters for detectors at a future electron-positron collider. One of the devices constructed and tested by the collaboration is a 1m^3 prototype for an imaging scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter for hadrons with analogue readout (AHCAL). The light from 7608 small scintillator cells is detected with silicon photomultipliers. The AHCAL has been successfully operated during electron and hadron test-beam measurements at DESY, CERN, and Fermilab since 2005. The collected data allow for evaluating the novel technologies employed. In addition, these data provide a valuable basis for validating pion cascade simulations. This paper presents the current status of comparisons between the AHCAL data and predictions from different Monte Carlo models implemented in GEANT4. The comparisons cover the total visible energy, longitudinal and radial shower profiles, and the shower substructure. Furthermore, this paper discusses a sof...

Feege, Nils

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Comparison of photon colliders based on e-e- and e+e- beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At photon colliders gamma-gamma, gamma-electron high energy photons are produced by Compton scattering of laser light off the high energy electrons (or positrons) at a linear collider. At first sight, photon colliders based on e-e- or e+e- primary beams have similar properties and therefore for convenience one can use e+e- beams both for e+e- and gamma-gamma modes of operation. Below we compare these options and show that e-e- beams are much better (mandatory) because in the e+e- case low energy background gamma-gamma to hadrons is much higher and e+e- annihilation reactions present a very serious background for gamma-gamma processes.

V. I. Telnov

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6, 27/05/99 6, 27/05/99 Tolerances of Random RF Jitters in X-Band Main Linacs May 27, 1999 Kiyoshi KUBO KEK Tsukuba, Japan Abstract: Tracking simulations have been performed for the main linacs of an X-band linear collider. We discuss the choice of phase of the accelerating field relative to the bunches. The tolerances of the phase and the amplitude errors are studied. Tolerances of Random RF Jitters in X-Band Main Linacs K. Kubo, KEK Abstract Tracking simulations have been performed for main linacs of X-band linear collider. We discuss about choice of the phase of the accelerating field relative to the bunches. The tolerances of the phase and the amplitude errors are studied. 1 INTRODUCTION In order to preserve the low emittance through the main linacs of future linear colliders, various effects

223

Heavy quarks and long-lived hadrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a recent Letter we reported on some work which led us to suggest the possibility of narrow spikes in the e+e- annihilation cross section into hadrons. In this paper, we discuss the theoretical infrastructure of this work more thoroughly, and improve and extend the calculations and experimental predictions. We examine a colored quark-gluon model of hadronic matter, with color an exact SU(3) gauge symmetry. In addition to the light quarks that make up ordinary hadrons, a heavy quark, such as the charmed c, is included. The narrow resonances recently discovered by the MIT-BNL and SLAC-LBL groups are interpreted as cc bound states (orthocharmonium). In this energy range, the effective coupling has become small according to asymptotic freedom, and many aspects of the bound-state structure can be calculated. The existence of 0- (paracharmonium) states is predicted, and decay widths and mass splittings are estimated. The total e+e- cross section into hadrons is predicted to scale asymptotically, with an approach to scaling from above that can be calculated over a large energy range.

Thomas Appelquist and H. David Politzer

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Onset of Quark-Hadron Duality in Pion Electroproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large data set of charged-pion electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets has been obtained spanning the low-energy residual-mass region. These data conclusively show the onset of the quark-hadron duality phenomenon, as predicted for high-energy hadron electroproduction. We construct several ratios from these data to exhibit the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark-to- pion production mechanisms.

T. Navasardyan

2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Onset of Quark-Hadron Duality in Pion Electroproduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large data set of charged-pion electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets has been obtained spanning the low-energy residual-mass region. These data conclusively show the onset of the quark-hadron duality phenomenon, as predicted for high-energy hadron electroproduction. We construct several ratios from these data to exhibit the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark-to- pion production mechanisms.

Tigran Navasardyan; Gary Adams; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Tatiana Angelescu; John Arrington; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Nawal Benmouna; Crystal Bertoncini; Henk Blok; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Herbert Breuer; Michael Christy; Simon Connell; Yonggang Cui; Mark Dalton; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Dodario; James Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Najib Elkhayari; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; Valera Frolov; Liping Gan; David Gaskell; Kawtar Hafidi; Wendy Hinton; Roy Holt; Tanja Horn; Garth Huber; Ed Hungerford; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Kyungseon Joo; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Edward Kinney; V. Kubarovski; Ya Li; Yongguang Liang; Simona Malace; Pete Markowitz; Erin McGrath; Daniella Mckee; David Meekins; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Brian Moziak; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Allena Opper; Tanya Ostapenko; Paul Reimer; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Stephen Rock; Elaine Schulte; Edwin Segbefia; C. Smith; G.R. Smith; Paul Stoler; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Maurizio Ungaro; Alicia Uzzle; Sandra Vidakovic; Anthony Villano; William Vulcan; Miao Wang; Glen Warren; Frank Wesselmann; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Stephen Wood; Chuncheng Xu; Lulin Yuan; Xiaochao Zheng; Hong Guo Zhu

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

Search for the Production of Gluinos and Squarks with the CDF II Experiment at the Tevatron Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis reports on two searches for the production of squarks and gluinos, supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model (SM) quarks and gluons, using the CDF detector at the Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collider. An inclusive search for squarks and gluinos pair production is performed in events with large E{sub T} and multiple jets in the final state, based on 2 fb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data. The analysis is performed within the framework of minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) and assumes R-parity conservation where sparticles are produced in pairs. The expected signal is characterized by the production of multiple jets of hadrons from the cascade decays of squarks and gluinos and large missing transverse energy E{sub T} from the lightest supersymmetric particles (LSP). The measurements are in good agreement with SM predictions for backgrounds. The results are translated into 95% confidence level (CL) upper limits on production cross sections and squark and gluino masses in a given mSUGRA scenario. An upper limit on the production cross section is placed in the range between 1 pb and 0.1 pb, depending on the gluino and squark masses considered. The result of the search is negative for gluino and squark masses up to 392 GeV/c{sup 2} in the region where gluino and squark masses are close to each other, gluino masses up to 280 GeV/c{sup 2} regardless of the squark mass, and gluino masses up to 423 GeV=c2 for squark masses below 378 GeV/c{sup 2}. These results are compatible with the latest limits on squark/gluino production obtained by the D0 Collaboration and considerably improve the previous exclusion limits from direct and indirect searches at LEP and the Tevatron. The inclusive search is then extended to a scenario where the pair production of sbottom squarks is dominant. The new search is performed in a generic MSSM scenario with R-parity conservation. A specific SUSY particle mass hierarchy is assumed such that the sbottom decays exclusively as {tilde b}{sub 1} {yields} b{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}}. The expected signal for direct sbottom pair production is characterized by the presence of two jets of hadrons from the hadronization of the bottom quarks and E=T from the two LSPs in the final state. The events are selected with large E{sub T} and two energetic jets in the final state, and at least one jet is required to be associated with a b quark. The measurements are in good agreement with SM predictions for backgrounds. The results are translated into 95% CL exclusion limits on production cross sections and sbottom and neutralino masses in the given MSSM scenario. Cross sections down to 0.1 pb are excluded for the sbottom mass range considered. Sbottom masses up to 230 GeV/c{sup 2} are excluded at 95% CL for neutralino masses below 70 GeV/c{sup 2}. This analysis increases the previous CDF limit by more than 40 GeV/c{sup 2}. The sensitivity of both the inclusive and the exclusive search is dominated by systematic effects and the results of the two analyses can be considered as conclusive for CDF Run II. With the new energy frontier of the newly commissioned Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, the experience from Tevatron will be of crucial importance in the developing of effective strategies to search for SUSY in the next era of particle physics experiments.

De Lorenzo, Gianluca; /Barcelona, IFAE

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy ion collisions are an ideal tool to explore the QCD phase diagram. The goal is to study the equation of state (EOS) and to search for possible in-medium modifications of hadrons. By varying the collision energy a variety of regimes with their specific physics interest can be studied. At energies of a few GeV per nucleon, the regime where experiments were performed first at the Berkeley Bevalac and later at the Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron (SIS) at GSI in Darmstadt, we study the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and try to identify in-medium modifications of hadrons. Towards higher energies, the regime of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the Super-Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, we expect to produce a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The physics goal is to identify the QGP and to study its properties. By varying the energy, different forms of matter are produced. At low energies we study dense nuclear matter, similar to the type of matter neutron stars are made of. As the energy is increased the main constituents of the matter will change. Baryon excitations will become more prevalent (resonance matter). Eventually we produce deconfined partonic matter that is thought to be in the core of neutron stars and that existed in the early universe. At low energies a great variety of collective effects is observed and a rather good understanding of the particle production has been achieved, especially that of the most abundantly produced pions and kaons. Many observations can be interpreted as time-ordered emission of various particle species. It is possible to determine, albeit model dependent, the equation of state of nuclear matter. We also have seen indications, that the kaon mass, especially the mass of the K{sup +}, might be modified by the medium created in heavy ion collisions. At AGS energies and above, emphasis shifts towards different aspects. Lattice QCD calculations predict the transition between a Quark-Gluon Plasma and a hadronic state at a critical temperature, T{sub c}, of about 150 to 190 MeV at vanishing baryon density. The energy density at the transition point is about 1:0 GeV/fm{sup 3}. It is generally assumed that chiral symmetry restoration happens simultaneously. In the high-energy regime, especially at RHIC, a rich field of phenomena [3] has revealed itself. Hot and dense matter with very strong collectivity has been created. There are indications that collectivity develops at the parton level, i.e. at a very early stage of the collision, when the constituents are partons rather than hadrons. Signs of pressure driven collective effects are our main tool for the study of the EOS. There are also strong indications that in the presence of a medium hadronization occurs through the process of quark coalescence and not through quark fragmentation, the process dominant for high-energy p+p reactions. We limit this report to the study of hadrons emitted in heavy ion reactions. The report is divided into two parts. The first part describes the phenomena observed from hadrons produced at low energies, whereas the second part concentrates on the search for signs of a partonic state at high energies.

Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fermilab | Science | Questions for the Universe | Einstein's...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solve the mystery of dark energy: Large Hadron Collider, CERN, Switzerland, Geneva International Linear Collider (proposed) Joint Dark Energy Mission (proposed) Large Synoptic...

229

Critical Issues and MUON Colliders - A Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prospects for a High Energy Muon Collider Based On Electro-and understanding of high energy muon colliders, associatedyield of muons per electron, even at the optimum energy of

Chattopadhyay, S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Monte Carlo approach for hadron azimuthal correlations in high energy proton and nuclear collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a Monte Carlo approach to study hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies at mid-rapidity. We build a hadron event generator that incorporates the production of $2\\to 2$ and $2\\to 3$ parton processes and their evolution into hadron states. For nucleus-nucleus collisions we include the effect of parton energy loss in the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a modified fragmentation function approach. In the presence of the medium, for the case when three partons are produced in the hard scattering, we analyze the Monte Carlo sample in parton and hadron momentum bins to reconstruct the angular correlations. We characterize this sample by the number of partons that are able to hadronize by fragmentation within the selected bins. In the nuclear environment the model allows hadronization by fragmentation only for partons with momentum above a threshold $p_T^{{\\tiny{thresh}}}=2.4$ GeV. We argue that one should treat properly the effect of those partons with momentum below the threshold, since their interaction with the medium may lead to showers of low momentum hadrons along the direction of motion of the original partons as the medium becomes diluted.

Alejandro Ayala; Isabel Dominguez; Jamal Jalilian-Marian; J. Magnin; Maria Elena Tejeda-Yeomans

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

Yagmur Tourun

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

232

Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

Yagmur Tourun

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

233

Highlights from COMPASS in hadron spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since Quantum Choromdynamics allows for gluon self-coupling, quarks and gluons cannot be observed as free particles, but only their bound states, the hadrons. This so-called confinement phenomenon is responsible for $98\\%$ of the mass in the visible universe. The measurement of the hadron excitation spectra therefore gives valuable input for theory and phenomenology to quantitatively understand this phenomenon. One simple model to describe hadrons is the Constituent Quark Model (CQM), which knows two types of hadrons: mesons, consisting of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which are made out of three quarks. More advanced models, which are inspired by QCD as well as calculations within Lattice QCD predict the existence of other types of hadrons, which may be e.g. described solely by gluonic excitations (glueballs) or mixed quark and gluon excitations (hybrids). In order to search for such states, the COMPASS experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN has collected large data sets, which allow to study the light-quark meson and baryon spectra in unmatched precision. The overview shown here focuses on the light meson sector, presenting a detailed Partial-Wave Analysis of the processes: $\\pi^- p \\to \\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^- p$ and $\\pi^-p\\to \\pi^-\\pi^0\\pi^0p$. A new state, the $a_1(1420)$ with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ is observed. Its Breit-Wigner parameters are found to be in the ranges: $m = 1412-1422\\,\\mathrm{MeV}/c^2$ and $\\Gamma = 130-150\\,\\mathrm{MeV}/c^2$. In the same analysis, a signal in a wave with $J^{PC}=1^{-+}$ is observed. A resonant origin of this signal would not be explicable within the CQM. In addition to this possibility of an exotic state, a possible non resonant origin of this signal is discussed.

Fabian Krinner

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Detector possibilities for a {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the problem of large background in detectors used in a muon-antimuon collider and proposes its solution through specific modifications to the CDF design. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Atac, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)]|[California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

Geer, S.; /Fermilab

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hadron multiplicities at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the predictions for hadron multiplicities in pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC based on our approach to the Color Glass Condensate.

D. Kharzeev; E. Levin; M. Nardi

2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

237

Muon Collider Physics at Very High Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muon colliders might greatly extend the energy frontier of collider physics. One can contemplate circular colliders with center-of-mass energies in excess of 10 TeV. Some physics issues that might be relevant at such a machine are discussed.

M. S. Berger

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

238

On transverse energy production in hadron collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transverse energy spectrum in the unit rapidity window in p-bar p collisions at 540 GeV c.m.s energy is calculated to the next-to-leading order accuracy O(a_s^3) and compared to the experimental data by UA(2) collaboration. We show that the calculated spectrum starts matching experimental data only at relatively large transverse energy Et=60 GeV and is in essential disagreement with it both in shape and magnitude at lower transverse energies. The data are well reproduced by HIJING Monte-Carlo generator indicating the crucial importance of all-order effects in perturbation theory as well as those of hadronization in describing the transverse energy production in hadron collisions at small and intermediate transverse energies.

Andrei Leonidov

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Preservation and control of the proton and deuteron polarizations in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a scheme of preserving the proton and deuteron beam polarizations during acceleration and storage in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab. This scheme allows one to provide both the longitudinal and transverse polarization orientations of the proton and deuteron beams at the interaction points of the figure-8 ion collider ring. We discuss questions of matching the polarization direction at all stages of the beam transport including the pre-booster, large booster and ion collider ring.

Kondratenko, Anatoliy [Scientific and Technical Laboratory Zaryad, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Filatov, Yury [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Lin, Fanglei [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Kondratenko, M. A. [Scientific and Technical Laboratory Zaryad, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Energy Efficiency of large Cryogenic Systems: the LHC Case and Beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research infrastructures for high-energy and nuclear physics, nuclear fusion and production of high magnetic fields are increasingly based on applied superconductivity and associated cryogenics in their quest for scientific breakthroughs at affordable capital and operation costs, a condition for their acceptance and sustained funding by society. The thermodynamic penalty for operating at low temperature makes energy efficiency a key requirement for their large cryogenic systems, from conceptual design to procurement, construction and operation. Meeting this requirement takes a combined approach on several fronts in parallel: management of heat loads and sizing of cooling duties, distribution of cooling power matching the needs of the superconducting devices, efficient production of refrigeration, optimal control resting on precise instrumentation and diagnostics, as well as a targeted industrial procurement policy. The case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is presented. Potential improvements for fu...

Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Conventional power sources for colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

Allen, M.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

NEUTRINO RADIATION CHALLENGES AND PROPOSED SOLUTIONS FOR MANY-TEV MUON COLLIDERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutrino radiation is expected to impose major design and siting constraints on many-TeV muon colliders. Previous predictions for radiation doses at TeV energy scales are briefly reviewed and then modified for extension to the many-TeV energy regime. The energy-cubed dependence of lower energy colliders is found to soften to an increase of slightly less than quadratic when averaged over the plane of the collider ring and slightly less than linear for the radiation hot spots downstream from straight sections in the collider ring. Despite this, the numerical values are judged to be sufficiently high that any many-TeV muon colliders will likely be constructed on large isolated sites specifically chosen to minimize or eliminate human exposure to the neutrino radiation. It is pointed out that such sites would be of an appropriate size scale to also house future proton-proton and electron-positron colliders at the high energy frontier, which naturally leads to conjecture on the possibilities for a new world laboratory for high energy physics. Radiation dose predictions are also presented for the speculative possibility of linear muon colliders. These have greatly reduced radiation constraints relative to circular muon colliders because radiation is only emitted in two pencil beams directed along the axes of the opposing linacs.

KING,B.J.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

Monte Carlo approach for hadron azimuthal correlations in high energy proton and nuclear collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a Monte Carlo approach to study hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies at mid-rapidity. We build a hadron event generator that incorporates the production of $2\\to 2$ and $2\\to 3$ parton processes and their evolution into hadron states. For nucleus-nucleus collisions we include the effect of parton energy loss in the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a modified fragmentation function approach. In the presence of the medium, for the case when three partons are produced in the hard scattering, we analyze the Monte Carlo sample in parton and hadron momentum bins to reconstruct the angular correlations. We characterize this sample by the number of partons that are able to hadronize by fragmentation within the selected bins. In the nuclear environment the model allows hadronization by fragmentation only for partons with momentum above a threshold $p_T^{{\\tiny{thresh}}}=2.4$ GeV. We argue that...

Ayala, Alejandro; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Magnin, J; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

How much does the hadronic phase contribute to the observed anisotropic flow at the LHC?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elliptic flow signals the presence of multiple interactions between the constituents of the created matter in heavy-ion collisions. This includes possible contributions from the different phases, including the hadronic phase. In these proceedings I will first show that the energy dependence of elliptic flow, based on recent ALICE and STAR beam energy scan measurements, can largely be understood in terms of a boosted thermal system. In addition, a detailed comparison between the identified particle elliptic flow measured by the ALICE collaboration and viscous hydrodynamical model calculations with and without a hadronic afterburner is performed to constrain the possible effects of individual hadron-hadron re-interaction cross-sections.

Snellings, Raimond

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hadronic wavefunctions in light-cone quantization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of light-cone wavefunctions seems the most promising theoretical approach to a detailed understanding of the structure of relativistic bound states, particularly hadrons. However, there are numerous complications in this approach. Most importantly, the light-cone approach sacrifices manifest rotational invariance in exchange for the elimination of negative-energy states. The requirement of rotational invariance of the full theory places important constraints on proposed light-cone wavefunctions, whether they are modelled or extracted from some numerical procedure. A formulation of the consequences of the hidden rotational symmetry has been sought for some time; it is presented in Chapter 2. In lattice gauge theory or heavy-quark effective theory, much of the focus is on the extraction of numerical values of operators which are related to the hadronic wavefunction. These operators are to some extent interdependent, with relations induced by fundamental constraints on the underlying wavefunction. The consequences of the requirement of unitarity are explored in Chapter 3, and are found to have startling phenomenological relevance. To test model light-cone wavefunctions, experimental predictions must be made. The reliability of perturbative QCD as a tool for making such predictions has been questioned. In Chapter 4, the author presents a computation of the rates for nucleon-antinucleon annihilation, improving the reliability of the perturbative computation by taking into account the Sudakov suppression of exclusive processes at large transverse impact parameter. In Chapter 5, he develops the analysis of semiexclusive production. This work focuses on processes in which a single isolated meson is produced perturbatively and recoils against a wide hadronizing system. At energies above about 10 GeV, semiexclusive processes are shown to be the most sensitive experimental probes of hadronic structure.

Hyer, T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland)This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop SecretariatIWLC2010 is hostedby CERN

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

Simulation of jets at colliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We review the development of the physics behind event generators during the last decade. After a more general description of parton showers, we focus mostly on the perturbative side of the simulations. Two newer developments of parton showers, as implemented in herwig++, are described in greater detail. Matching and merging of parton showers with fixed order computations are discussed. We describe some developments of multiple partonic interactions which are relevant for the simulation of jets from the underlying event, where the implementation in herwig++ is again taken as a generic example. Finally, we compare some event generator results to collider data from LEP and the LHC.

Stefan Gieseke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Finding the adding up of Feynman diagrams tedious? Hidden symmetries found in the sums of diagrams suggest there is a better way to predict the results of particle collisions - in the past two years, spin-offs of a new theory, known as the Twistor String Theory, have led to the development of efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams which can be useful for work at the Tevatron, the LHC and for future research at the International Linear Collider. Come see what this 'twistor' is all about!

Dixon, Lance

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

Subcritical Fission Reactor Based on Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beams of Linear Collider after main collision can be utilized to build an accelerator--driven sub--critical reactor.

I. F. Ginzburg

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Probing Higgs Boson Interactions At Future Colliders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present in this thesis a detailed analysis of Higgs boson interactions at future colliders. In particular we examine, in a model independent way, the (more)

Biswal, Sudhansu Sekhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A low emittance, flat-beam electron source for linear colliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a method to generate a flat (large horizontal to vertical emittance ratio) electron beam suitable for linear colliders. The concept is based on a round-beam rf photoinjector with finite solenoid field at the cathode together with a special beam optics adapter. Computer simulations of this new type of beam source show that the beam quality required for a linear collider may be obtainable without the need for an electron damping ring.

R. Brinkmann; Y. Derbenev; K. Flttmann

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - alice transition radiation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 ALICE-USA Contribution to the 2007 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Physics 1. Heavy Ions at the Large... Hadron Collider and the ALICE Experiment The Large Hadron Collider...

253

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

talk about the most complex scientific instrument ever built-the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The talk, entitled "The Large Hadron Collider Adventure," is at 1:10 p.m. in Los...

254

The Next Linear Collider Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

To use the left side navigation on this page, you will need to turn on To use the left side navigation on this page, you will need to turn on Javascript. You do not need JavaScript to use the text-based navigation bar at the bottom of the page. The Next Linear Collider at SLAC Navbar MISSION: Scientists expect research at this facility to answer fundamental questions about the behavior of matter and the origins of the Universe. NLC 8-Pack on the Drawing Board What's New In the Next Linear Collider: • NLC Newsletter October, 2001 • NLC Snowmass report 2001 • NLC All Hands Talk, August 2001 Upcoming Events: • Fall 2001 Working Sessions, Oct. 22-23, 2001 • Pulse Compression Workshop, Oct. 22-24, 2001 • Machine Advisory Committee Mtg., Oct. 24-26, 2001 • ISG-7 at KEK, Nov. 12-15, 2001 • LC' 02 at SLAC, Feb. 4-8, 2002 NLC Website Search: Entire SLAC Web | Help |

255

Extra Spin Asymmetries From the Breakdown of TMD-Factorization in Hadron-Hadron Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that partonic correlations that would traditionally be identified as subleading on the basis of a generalized TMD-factorization conjecture can become leading-power because of TMD-factorization breaking that arises in hadron-hadron collisions with large transverse momentum back-to-back hadrons produced in the final state. General forms of TMD-factorization fail for such processes because of a previously noted incompatibility between the requirements for TMD-factorization and the Ward identities of non-Abelian gauge theories. We first review the basic steps for factorizing the gluon distribution and then show that a conflict between TMD-factorization and the non-Abelian Ward identity arises already at the level of a single extra soft or collinear gluon when the partonic subprocess involves a TMD gluon distribution. Next we show that the resulting TMD-factorization violating effects produce leading-power final state spin asymmetries that would be classified as subleading in a generalized TMD-factorization framework. We argue that similar extra TMD-factorization breaking effects may be necessary to explain a range of open phenomenological QCD puzzles. The potential to observe extra transverse spin or azimuthal asymmetries in future experiments is highlighted as their discovery may indicate an influence from novel and unexpected large distance parton correlations.

Ted C. Rogers

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Interplay Between Collider Searches For Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons and Direct Dark Matter Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, we explore the interplay between searches for supersymmetric particles and Higgs bosons at hadron colliders (the Tevatron and the LHC) and direct dark matter searches (such as CDMS, ZEPLIN, XENON, EDELWEISS, CRESST, WARP and others). We focus on collider searches for heavy MSSM Higgs bosons (A, H, H{sup {+-}}) and how the prospects for these searches are impacted by direct dark matter limits and vice versa. We find that the prospects of these two experimental programs are highly interrelated. A positive detection of A, H or H{sup {+-}} at the Tevatron would dramatically enhance the prospects for a near future direct discovery of neutralino dark matter. Similarly, a positive direct detection of neutralino dark matter would enhance the prospects of discovering heavy MSSM Higgs bosons at the Tevatron or the LHC. Combining the information obtained from both types of experimental searches will enable us to learn more about the nature of supersymmetry.

Carena, Marcela; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Vallinotto, Alberto; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Superconducting materials for large scale applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant improvements in the properties ofsuperconducting materials have occurred recently. These improvements arebeing incorporated into the latest generation of wires, cables, and tapesthat are being used in a broad range of prototype devices. These devicesinclude new, high field accelerator and NMR magnets, magnets for fusionpower experiments, motors, generators, and power transmission lines.These prototype magnets are joining a wide array of existing applicationsthat utilize the unique capabilities of superconducting magnets:accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider, fusion experiments suchas ITER, 930 MHz NMR, and 4 Tesla MRI. In addition, promising newmaterials such as MgB2 have been discovered and are being studied inorder to assess their potential for new applications. In this paper, wewill review the key developments that are leading to these newapplications for superconducting materials. In some cases, the key factoris improved understanding or development of materials with significantlyimproved properties. An example of the former is the development of Nb3Snfor use in high field magnets for accelerators. In other cases, thedevelopment is being driven by the application. The aggressive effort todevelop HTS tapes is being driven primarily by the need for materialsthat can operate at temperatures of 50 K and higher. The implications ofthese two drivers for further developments will be discussed. Finally, wewill discuss the areas where further improvements are needed in order fornew applications to be realized.

Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

Gaugino physics of split supersymmetry spectra at the LHC and future proton colliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discovery of the Higgs boson and lack of discovery of superpartners in the first run at the LHC are both predictions of split supersymmetry with thermal dark matter. We discuss what it would take to find gluinos at hadron supercolliders, including the LHC at 14TeV center-of-mass energy, and future pp colliders at 100TeV and 200TeV. We generalize the discussion by reexpressing the search capacity in terms of the gluino to lightest superpartner mass ratio and apply results to other scenarios, such as gauge mediation and mirage mediation.

Sunghoon Jung and James D. Wells

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Dark matter searches in the mono-Z channel at high energy e+e? colliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explore the mono-Z signature for dark matter searches at future high energy e+e? colliders. In the context of effective field theory, we consider two kinds of contact operators describing dark matter interactions with electroweak gauge bosons and with electron/positron, respectively. For five benchmark models, we propose kinematic cuts to distinguish signals from backgrounds for both charged leptonic and hadronic decay modes of the Z boson. We also present the experimental sensitivity to cutoff scales of effective operators and compare it with that of the Fermi-LAT indirect search and demonstrate the gains in significance for the several configurations of polarized beams.

Zhao-Huan Yu; Xiao-Jun Bi; Qi-Shu Yan; Peng-Fei Yin

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

The management of large cabling campaigns during the Long Shutdown 1 of LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider at CERN entered into its first 18 month-long shutdown period in February 2013. During this period the entire CERN accelerator complex will undergo major consolidation and upgrade works, preparing the machines for LHC operation at nominal energy (7 TeV/beam). One of the most challenging activities concerns the cabling infrastructure (copper and optical fibre cables) serving the CERN data acquisition, networking and control systems. About 1000 kilometres of cables, distributed in different machine areas, will be installed, representing an investment of about 15 MCHF. This implies an extraordinary challenge in terms of project management, including resource and activity planning, work execution and quality control. The preparation phase of this project started well before its implementation, by defining technical solutions and setting financial plans for staff recruitment and material supply. Enhanced task coordination was further implemented by deploying selected competences to form a ...

Meroli, Stefano; Formenti, Fabio; Frans, Marten; Guillaume, Jean Claude; Ricci, Daniel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Research and Development of Future Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Governance of the International Linear Collider Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency, clearly apportioned at both a national and global level, is essential if the project is to be realised. Finally, models for running costs and decommissioning at the conclusion of the ILC project are proposed. This document represents an interim report of the bodies and individuals studying these questions inside the structure set up and supervised by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). It represents a request for comment to the international community in all relevant disciplines, scientific, technical and most importantly, political. Many areas require further study and some, in particular the site selection process, have not yet progressed sufficiently to be addressed in detail in this document. Discussion raised by this document will be vital in framing the final proposals due to be published in 2012 in the Technical Design Report being prepared by the Global Design Effort of the ILC.

Foster, B.; /Oxford U.; Barish, B.; /Caltech; Delahaye, J.P.; /CERN; Dosselli, U.; /INFN, Padua; Elsen, E.; /DESY; Harrison, M.; /Brookhaven; Mnich, J.; /DESY; Paterson, J.M.; /SLAC; Richard, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Stapnes, S.; /CERN; Suzuki, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Wormser, G.; /Orsay, LAL; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NLC Home Page NLC Technical SLAC The LCC Tech Note series was started in July 1998 to document the JLC/NLC collaborative design effort. The notes are numbered sequentially and may also be given a SLAC, FNAL, LBNL, LLNL and/or KEK publication number. The LCC notes will be distributed through the Web in electronic form as PDF files -- the authors are responsible for keeping the original documents. Other document series are the NLC Notes that were started for the SLAC ZDR, the KEK ATF Notes, and at some future time there should be a series of Technical (NLD) Notes to document work on detector studies for the next-generation linear collider. LCC-0001 "Memorandum of Understanding between KEK and SLAC," 2/98. LCC-0002 "Transparencies and Summaries from the 1st ISG meeting: January 1998," G. Loew, ed., 2/98.

264

Instability of colliding metastable strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The breaking of $U(1)_R$ symmetry plays a crucial role in modeling the breaking of supersymmetry (SUSY). In the models that possess both SUSY preserving and SUSY breaking vacua, tube-like cosmic strings called R-tubes, whose surfaces are constituted by domain walls interpolating a false and a true vacuum with some winding numbers, can exist. Their (in)stability can strongly constrain SUSY breaking models theirselves. In the present study, we investigate the dynamical (in)stability of two colliding metastable tube-like strings by field-theoretic simulations. From them, we find that the strings become unstable, depending on the relative collision angle and speed of two strings, and the false vacuum is eventually filled out by the true vacuum owing to rapid expansion of the strings or unstable bubbles created as remnants of the collision.

Takashi Hiramatsu; Minoru Eto; Kohei Kamada; Tatsuo Kobayashi; Yutaka Ookouchi

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

265

BRAHMS (Broad Range Hadron Magnetic Spectrometer) Figures and Data Archive  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The BRAHMS experiment was designed to measure charged hadrons over a wide range of rapidity and transverse momentum to study the reaction mechanisms of the relativistic heavy ion reactions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the properties of the highly excited nuclear matter formed in these reactions. The experiment took its first data during the RHIC 2000 year run and completed data taking in June 2006. The BRAHMS archive makes publications available and also makes data and figures from those publications available as separate items. See also the complete list of publications, multimedia presentations, and related papers at http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/brahms/WWW/publications.html

266

Tapered Six-Dimensional Cooling Channel for a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-luminosity muon collider requires a reduction of the six-dimensional emittance of the captured muon beam by a factor of {approx} 10{sup 6}. Most of this cooling takes place in a dispersive channel that simultaneously reduces all six phase space dimensions. We describe a tapered 6D cooling channel that should meet the requirements of a muon collider. The parameters of the channel are given and preliminary simulations are shown of the expected performance. A complete scheme for cooling a muon beam sufficiently for use in a muon collider has been previously described. This scheme uses separate 6D ionization cooling channels for the two signs of the particle charge. In each, a channel first reduces the emittance of a train of muon bunches until they can be injected into a bunch-merging system. The single muon bunches, one of each sign, are then sent through a second tapered 6D cooling channel where the transverse emittance is reduced as much as possible and the longitudinal emittance is cooled to a value below that needed for the collider. The beam can then be recombined and sent through a final cooling channel using high-field solenoids that cools the transverse emittance to the required values for the collider while allowing the longitudinal emittance to grow. This paper mainly describes the design of the 6D cooling channel before bunch merging. Cooling efficiency is conveniently measured using a parameter Q, which is defined as the rate of change of 6D emittance divided by the rate of change of the number of muons in the beam. In a given lattice Q starts off small due to losses from initial matching, then rises to a large value (Q {approx} 15 is typical for the channels discussed here), and finally falls as the emittance of the beam approaches its equilibrium value. The idea for the 6D cooling channel described here originated with the RFOFO cooling ring. This design evolved into a helical channel referred to as a 'Guggenheim' in order to avoid serious problems with injection of large emittance beams. We found that good cooling efficiency requires that the channel be tapered. In that case when Q starts to fall off the lattice is modified to reduce the beta function. This ensures that the beam emittance is always large compared with the equilibrium emittance.

Palmer, R.B.; Fernow, R.C.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Charmonium absorption and charmed hadron production in hadronic reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with that extracted from J/?production from both photo-and proton-nucleus reactions. We have also evaluated the cross sections for charmed hadron production from pion and rho meson interactions with nucleons. With the same cutoff parameter of 1 GeV at interaction...

Liu, Wei

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy calibration at high-energy photon colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calibration of the absolute energy scale at high-energy photon (gamma-gamma, gamma-electron) colliders is discussed. The luminosity spectrum at photon colliders is broad and has a rather sharp high-energy edge, which can be used, for example, to measure the mass of the Higgs boson in the process gamma-gamma to H or masses of charged scalars by observing the cross-section threshold. In addition to the precise knowledge of the edge energy of the luminosity spectrum, it is even more important to have a way to calibrate the absolute energy scale of the detector. At first sight, Compton scattering itself provides a unique way to determine the beam energies and produce particles of known energies that could be used for detector calibration. The energy scale is given by the electron mass m_e and laser photon energy \\omega_0. However, this does not work at realistic photon colliders due to large nonlinear effects in Compton scattering at the conversion region (\\xi^2 \\sim 0.3). It is argued that the process gamma-elec...

Telnov, V I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Resummed hadronic spectra of inclusive B decays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the hadronic mass spectra of inclusive B decays. Specifically, we study how an upper cut on the invariant mass spectrum, which is necessary to extract Vub, results in the breakdown of the standard perturbative expansion due to the existence of large infrared logs. We first show how the decay rate factorizes at the level of the double differential distribution. Then, we present closed form expressions for the resummed cut rate for the inclusive decays B?Xs? and B?Xue? at next-to-leading order in the infrared logs. Using these results, we determine the range of cuts for which resummation is necessary, as well as the range for which the resummed expansion itself breaks down. We also use our results to extract the leading and next to leading infrared log contribution to the two loop differential rate. We find that for the phenomenologically interesting cut values, there is only a small region where the calculation is under control. Furthermore, the size of this region is sensitive to the parameter ?. We discuss the viability of extracting Vub from the hadronic mass spectrum.

Adam K. Leibovich; Ian Low; I. Z. Rothstein

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Imaging Pion Showers with the CALICE Analogue Hadron Calorimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CALICE collaboration investigates different technology options for highly granular calorimeters for detectors at a future electron-positron collider. One of the devices constructed and tested by the collaboration is a 1m^3 prototype for an imaging scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter for hadrons with analogue readout (AHCAL). The light from 7608 small scintillator cells is detected with silicon photomultipliers. The AHCAL has been successfully operated during electron and hadron test-beam measurements at DESY, CERN, and Fermilab since 2005. The collected data allow for evaluating the novel technologies employed. In addition, these data provide a valuable basis for validating pion cascade simulations. This paper presents the current status of comparisons between the AHCAL data and predictions from different Monte Carlo models implemented in GEANT4. The comparisons cover the total visible energy, longitudinal and radial shower profiles, and the shower substructure. Furthermore, this paper discusses a software compensation algorithm for improving the energy resolution of the AHCAL for single pions.

Nils Feege; for the CALICE collaboration

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

An Exotic Approach to Hadron Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Exotic Approach to Hadron Physics 225 by "sum over external...and a meson, it should pass through a heavier state...Exotic Approach to Hadron Physics 227 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 z -0...may estimate the decay rate of the meson as a tunneling...Exotic Approach to Hadron Physics 229 6. Deformation of......

Masako Bando; Yoko Fukase; Jonathan Shock; Akio Sugamoto; Sachiko Terunuma

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Next-to-leading order slepton pair production at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute total cross sections for various slepton pair production reactions in next-to-leading order QCD. For pbarp collisions at root S=2TeV, we find leading order cross sections to be enhanced by typically 35% to 40%. For pp collisions at root S=14TeV, the enhancement ranges from 25% to 35% depending on the mass of the sleptons. We comment upon the phenomenological implications of these results.

Howard Baer; B. W. Harris; Mary Hall Reno

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

273

PHYSICS AT HIGH LUMINOSITY MUON COLLIDERS AND A FACILITY OVERVIEW.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included.

PARSA,Z.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Total Hadron Cross Section, New Particles, and Muon Electron Events in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation at SPEAR  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

The review of total hadron electroproduction cross sections, the new states, and the muon--electron events includes large amount of information on hadron structure, nine states with width ranging from 10's of keV to many MeV, the principal decay modes and quantum numbers of some of the states, and limits on charm particle production. 13 references. (JFP)

Richter, B.

1976-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

275

Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; /Measurment Science Inc.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

Lebrun, Philippe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Searches for B hadrons at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF data from the 1992--93 Tevatron run contains a large, clean sample of events which contain fully reconstructed J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}. This data has been employed in a search for B hadrons which contain J/{psi} amongst their decay products. An analysis of 8 pb{sup {minus}1} of data produces no evidence for {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}. A signal of 14.0 {plus_minus} 4.7 events is seen for the B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The B{sub s} mass has been determined to be 5383.3 {plus_minus} 4.5 (stat) {plus_minus} 5.0 (syst.).

Lukens, P.T.; CDF Collaboration

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

eRHIC Design Study: An Electron-Ion Collider at BNL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document presents BNL's plan for an electron-ion collider, eRHIC, a major new research tool that builds on the existing RHIC facility to advance the long-term vision for Nuclear Physics to discover and understand the emergent phenomena of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of the strong interaction that binds the atomic nucleus. We describe the scientific requirements for such a facility, following up on the community wide 2012 white paper, "Electron-Ion Collider: the Next QCD Frontier", and present a design concept that incorporates new, innovative accelerator techniques to provide a cost-effective upgrade of RHIC with polarized electron beams colliding with the full array of RHIC hadron beams. The new facility will deliver electron-nucleon luminosity of $\\sim10^{33} cm^{-2}sec^{-1}$ for collisions of 15.9 GeV polarized electrons on either 250 GeV polarized protons or 100 GeV/u heavy ion beams. The facility will also be capable of providing an electron beam energy of 21.2 GeV, at reduced luminosity. We discuss the on-going R\\&D effort to realize the project, and present key detector requirements and design ideas for an experimental program capable of making the "golden measurements" called for in the EIC-White Paper.

E. C. Aschenauer; M. D. Baker; A. Bazilevsky; K. Boyle; S. Belomestnykh; I. Ben-Zvi; S. Brooks; C. Brutus; T. Burton; S. Fazio; A. Fedotov; D. Gassner; Y. Hao; Y. Jing; D. Kayran; A. Kiselev; M. A. C. Lamont; J. -H. Lee; V. N. Litvinenko; C. Liu; T. Ludlam; G. Mahler; G. McIntyre; W. Meng; F. Meot; T. Miller; M. Minty; B. Parker; I. Pinayev; V. Ptitsyn; T. Roser; M. Stratmann; E. Sichtermann; J. Skaritka; O. Tchoubar; P. Thieberger; T. Toll; D. Trbojevic; N. Tsoupas; J. Tuozzolo; T. Ullrich; E. Wang; G. Wang; Q. Wu; W. Xu; L. Zheng

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hadronic multiparticle production at ultrahigh energies and extensive air showers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of the nature of cosmic ray particles at the highest energies are based on the measurement of extensive air showers. Most cosmic ray properties can therefore be obtained only from the interpretation of air shower data and are thus dependent on predictions of hadronic interaction models at ultrahigh energies. We discuss different scenarios of model extrapolations from accelerator data to air shower energies and investigate their impact on the corresponding air shower predictions. To explore the effect of different extrapolations by hadronic interaction models we developed an ad hoc model. This model is based on the modification of the output of standard hadronic interaction event generators within the air shower simulation process and allows us to study the impact of changing interaction features on the air shower development. In a systematic study we demonstrate the resulting changes of important air shower observables and also discuss them in terms of the predictions of the Heitler model of air shower cascades. It is found that the results of our ad hoc modifications are, to a large extent, independent of the choice of the underlying hadronic interaction model.

Ulrich, Ralf; Engel, Ralph; Unger, Michael [Pennsylvania State University, Center for Particle Astrophysics, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Production and propagation of heavy hadrons in air-shower simulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very energetic charm and bottom hadrons may be produced in the upper atmosphere when a primary cosmic ray or the leading hadron in an extensive air shower collide with a nucleon. At $E\\approx 10^8$ GeV their decay length becomes of the order of 10 km, implying that they tend to interact in the air instead of decaying. Since the inelasticity in these collisions is much smaller than the one in proton and pion collisions, there could be rare events where a heavy-hadron component transports a significant amount of energy deep into the atmosphere. We have developed a module for the detailed simulation of these processes and have included it in a new version of the air shower simulator AIRES. We study the frequency, the energy distribution and the depth of charm and bottom production, as well as the depth and the energy distribution of these quarks when they decay. As an illustration, we consider the production and decay of tau leptons (from $D_s$ decays) and the lepton flux at PeV energies from a 30 EeV proton primary. The proper inclusion of charm and bottom hadrons in AIRES opens the possibility to search for air-shower observables that are sensitive to heavy quark effects.

C. A. Garcia Canal; J. I. Illana; M. Masip; S. J. Sciutto

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Data acquisition and online processing requirements for experimentation at the Superconducting Super Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differences in scale between data acquisition and online processing requirements for detectors at the Superconducting Super Collider and systems for existing large detectors will require new architectures and technological advances in these systems. Emerging technologies will be employed for data transfer, processing, and recording. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Lankford, A.J.; Barsotti, E.; Gaines, I.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Towards a compensatable Muon Collider calorimeter with manageable backgrounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Muon Collider detectors pose very challenging problems in detector technology due to extremely large backgrounds present in the detector volume as a result of muon decays. Current designs of a 750 GeV/c per beam Muon Collider envisage 4.28 x 10{sup 5} muon decays per meter in the beam pipe close to the interaction region. The decay electrons after intense shielding still manage to produce large backgrounds in the detector volume of low energy photons, neutrons and higher energy Bethe Heitler muons. There are 170/184/6.8/177 TeVs energy entering the detector volume per crossing due to EM particles/Muons/Mesons/Baryons respectively. We investigate the capabilities of an iron calorimeter with pixelated readout where each pixel gives a yes/no answer as to whether a charged particle passed through it or not, to solve this problem. Each pixel is individually triggered by a 'travelling gate trigger' with a gate of 2 ns where the beginning of the gate is the time of arrival of a light signal from the interaction region to the pixel. We show that such a calorimeter is compensatable and propose two schemes to compensate the digital output in software to improve the resolution of the calorimeter. We show that such a calorimeter is capable of digitizing physics signals from the interaction region and as a result, the backgrounds from the muon decays are much reduced and under control.

Raja, R.; /Fermilab

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this hybrid target, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

Not Available

1993-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

285

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0100  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

100 100 August 2002 Systematic Ground Motion and Macroalignment for Linear Colliders Rainer Pitthan Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University Stanford, CA 94309, USA Abstract: Future colliders with their µm-range operational tolerances still need to be classically aligned to the 50 - 100 µm range, and kept there, over the km range. This requirement will not be a show-stopper, but not be trivial either. 50 µm movements over a betatron wavelength is a the range where systematic long term motions can prevent efficient operation. Systematic Ground Motion and Macro-Alignment for Linear Colliders Complete talk at: http://www-project.slac.stanford.edu/lc/wkshp/snowmass2001/t6/info/pitthan july

286

Fermilab | Muon Collider | Reports and Papers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports and Papers Reports and Papers Comprehensive Reports J. Gallardo, R. Palmer, A. Tollestrup, A. Sessler, A. Skrinsky et al., "μ+ μ- Collider: A Feasibility Study," DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics, Snow- mass, Colorado, 25 Jun - 12 Jul 1996, BNL - 52503, Fermilab - Conf - 96 - 092, LBNL - 38946, http://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/pubs/snowmass96.html C. Ankenbrandt et al.,"Status of muon collider research and development and future plans," Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2 (1999) 081001, http://prst-ab.aps.org/abstract/PRSTAB/v2/i8/e081001 M. M. Alsharo'a et al., "Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the Muon Collaboration," Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 6 (2003) 081001, http://prst-ab.aps.org/abstract/PRSTAB/v6/i8/e081001

287

The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

D. Burke et al.

2002-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

Muon Collider: Plans, Progress and Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We in the physics community expect the LHC to uncover new physics in the next few years. The character and energy scale of the new physics remain unclear, but it is likely that data from the LHC will need to be complemented by information from a lepton collider which can provide for precise examination of new phenomena. We describe the concept, accelerator design, and detector R&D for a high energy Muon Collider as well as the challenges associated with the machine and its detector environment.

Lipton, Ronald

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After summarizing the important commonalities between neutrino factories and muon colliders, the key differences are discussed. These include a much larger needed cooling factor ({approx}10{sup 6} in six-dimensional emittance), a smaller number of muon bunches (perhaps only one of each charge), and acceleration to much higher energy, implying significantly different technical choices for some of the cooling and acceleration subsystems. The final storage rings are also quite different. Nevertheless, a neutrino factory could serve as a key stepping stone on the path to a muon collider.

Kaplan, Daniel M. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

Validation of Hadronic Models in GEANT4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geant4 is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. It has abundant hadronic models from thermal neutron interactions to ultra relativistic hadrons. An overview of validations in Geant4 hadronic physics is presented based on thin target measurements. In most cases, good agreement is available between Monte Carlo prediction and experimental data; however, several problems have been detected which require some improvement in the models.

Koi, Tatsumi; Wright, Dennis H.; /SLAC; Folger, Gunter; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Starkov, Nikolai; /CERN; Heikkinen, Aatos; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Truscott,; Lei, Fan; /QinetiQ; Wellisch, Hans-Peter

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

Invisible Higgs in large extra dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the possibility of detecting a Higgs boson in electron-positron collider experiments if large extra dimensions are realized in nature. In such a case, the Higgs boson can decay invisibly by oscillating into a graviscalar Kaluza-Klein (KK) tower. We show that the search for such a Higgs at an $e^+ e^-$ linear collider entails more complications than are usually thought of in relation to an invisibly decaying Higgs.

Jari Laamanen

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

292

PHYSICS WITH AND PHYSICS OF COLLIDING ELECTRON BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributed so much to the physics of colliding beams, theyto reap so little from the physics with colliding beams.Conference on High-Energy Physics, Vienna" September 1968 (

Pellegrini, Claudio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Background Simulations for the International Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on superconducting technology to collide bunches of electrons and positrons. The baseline configuration (about 31 km in a clean experimental environment with low backgrounds. The LHC will likely discover the Higgs boson accelerator directly. DESY FLC, 22603 Hamburg, Germany, adrian.vogel@desy.de 1 #12;Figure 1: Overall view

294

From the LHC to Future Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; /CERN; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Jakobs, K.; /Freiburg U.; Weiglein, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Azuelos, G.; /TRIUMF; Dawson, S.; /Brookhaven; Gripaios, B.; /CERN; Han, T.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Hewett, J.; /SLAC; Lancaster, M.; /University Coll. London; Mariotti, C.; /INFN, Turin; Moortgat, F.; /Zurich, ETH; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Polesello, G.; /INFN, Pavia; Riemann, S.; /DESY; Assamagan, K.; /Brookhaven; Bechtle, P.; /DESY; Carena, M.; /Fermilab; Chachamis, G.; /PSI, Villigen /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /INFN, Florence /Bonn U. /CERN /Bonn U. /Freiburg U. /Oxford U. /Louvain U., CP3 /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /INFN, Milan Bicocca /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Frascati /Fermilab /Warsaw U. /Florida U. /Orsay, LAL /LPSC, Grenoble /Warsaw U. /Yale U. /Stockholm U., Math. Dept. /Durham U., IPPP /DESY /Rome U. /University Coll. London /UC, San Diego /Heidelberg U. /Florida State U. /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /McGill U. /Durham U., IPPP; /more authors.; ,

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hadron production from resonance decay in relativistic collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A statistical model for decay and formation of heavy hadronic resonances is formulated. The resonance properties become increasingly uncertain with increasing resonance mass. Drawing on analogy with the situation in low-energy nuclear physics, we employ the Weisskopf approach to the resonance processes. In the large-mass limit, the density of resonance states in mass is governed by a universal Hagedorn-like temperature T_H. As resonances decay, progressively more and more numerous lighter states get populated. For T_H \\simeq 170 MeV, the model describes data for the hadron yield ratios at the RHIC and SPS energies under the extreme assumption of a single heavy resonance giving rise to measured yields.

Subrata Pal; Pawel Danielewicz

2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

Towards a Future Linear Collider and The Linear Collider Studies at CERN  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN?s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

Extra spin asymmetries from the breakdown of transverse-momentum-dependent factorization in hadron-hadron collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate that partonic correlations that would traditionally be identified as subleading on the basis of a generalized transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) factorization conjecture can become leading-power because of TMD-factorization breaking that arises in hadron-hadron collisions with large transverse momentum back-to-back hadrons produced in the final state. General forms of TMD factorization fail for such processes because of a previously noted incompatibility between the requirements for TMD factorization and the Ward identities of non-Abelian gauge theories. We first review the basic steps for factorizing the gluon distribution and then show that a conflict between TMD factorization and the non-Abelian Ward identity arises already at the level of a single extra soft or collinear gluon when the partonic subprocess involves a TMD gluon distribution. Next we show that the resulting TMD-factorization violating effects produce leading-power final state spin asymmetries that would be classified as subleading in a generalized TMD-factorization framework. We argue that similar extra TMD-factorization breaking effects may be necessary to explain a range of open phenomenological QCD puzzles. The potential to observe extra transverse spin or azimuthal asymmetries in future experiments is highlighted as their discovery may indicate an influence from novel and unexpected large distance parton correlations.

Ted C. Rogers

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder , E. Esarey, Cs. T´oth, C. G. R. Geddes-generation linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator gamma-gamma () collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator collider

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

299

Observation of New Charmless Decays of Bottom Hadrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors search for new charmless decays of neutral b-hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using a data sample corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, they report the first observation of the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup +} decay, with a significance of 8.2{sigma}, and measure {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (5.0 {+-} 0.7 (stat.) {+-} 0.8 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6}. They also report the first observation of charmless b-baryon decays in the channels {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK{sup -} with significances of 6.0{sigma} and 11.5{sigma} respectively, and they measure {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}) = (3.5 {+-} 0.6 (stat.) {+-} 0.9 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK{sup -}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.8 (stat.) {+-} 1.5 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6}. No evidence is found for the decays B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and they set an improved upper limit {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 1.2 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. All quoted branching fractions are measured using {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) as a reference.

Morello, Michael J.; /Fermilab

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Linear Collider Calorimeter Testbeam Study Group Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

segmentation to distinguish energy deposits from charged and neutral hadrons, associating the energy clusters#cient single particle shower data at a wide range of energies for EFA development to construct shower librari, jet energy resolutions need to be at the level of 30%/ # E that is capable of distinguishing W and Z

Yu, Jaehoon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Linear Collider Calorimeter Testbeam Study Group Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

segmentation to distinguish energy deposits from charged and neutral hadrons, associating the energy clusters: · Sufficient single particle shower data at a wide range of energies for EFA development to construct shower , jet energy resolutions need to be at the level of 30%/ E that is capable of distinguishing W and Z

Yu, Jaehoon

302

A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

In-Medium Modifications of Hadron Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The in-medium modifications of hadron properties are briefly discussed. We restrict the discussion to the lattice QCD calculations for the hadron masses, screening masses, decay constants and wave functions. We review the progress made so far and describe how to broaden its horizon.

A. Tawfik

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

Mass generation in coalescence - effects on hadron spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Different scenarios for the creation of constituent mass in the hadron formation process are discussed. Effects of these may be observable in hadron momentum spectra.

T. Peitzmann

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

Parsa, Z. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Institute for Theoretical Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fermilab collider run 1b accelerator performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the performance of Run 1b as of the end of July 1995. This run is the conclusion of Fermilab Collider Run 1, which consists of Run 1a (May 1992 - May 1993) and Run 1b (January 1994 - February 1996). Run 1b is characterized by being the first with the new 400 MeV Linac. At this time the run is not complete. Colliding beam physics is scheduled to resume after the summer 1995 shut down and continue until mid-February 1996. All of the operation to date is at a Tevatron energy of 900 GeV. This report emphasizes performance numbers and the various improvements made to systems to achieve this performance. It will only discuss the underlying physics to a limited extent. The report is divided into sections on: run statistics, I&C issues, proton source performance, antiproton source performance, main ring performance, Tevatron performance, and a summary.

Bharadwaj, V.; Halling, M.; Lucas, P.; McCrory, E.; Mishra, S.; Pruss, S.; Werkema, S.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Directional muon jet chamber for a muon collider (Groovy Chamber)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A directional jet drift chamber with PAD readout is proposed here which can select vertex originated muons within a given time window and eliminate those muons which primarily originate upstream, using only a PAD readout. Drift time provides the Z-coordinate, and the center of gravity of charge distribution provides the r-{psi} coordinates. Directionality at the trigger level is obtained by the timing measurement from the PAD hits within a given time window. Because of the long drift time between the bunch crossings, a muon collider enables one to choose a drift distance in the drift chamber as long as 50 cm. This is an important factor in reducing cost of drift chambers which have to cover relatively large areas.

Atac, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

3-D SPH simulations of colliding winds in eta Carinae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study colliding winds in the superluminous binary eta Carinae by performing three-dimensional, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. For simplicity, we assume both winds to be isothermal. We also assume that wind particles coast without any net external forces. We find that the lower density, faster wind from the secondary carves out a spiral cavity in the higher density, slower wind from the primary. Because of the phase-dependent orbital motion, the cavity is very thin on the periastron side, whereas it occupies a large volume on the apastron side. The model X-ray light curve using the simulated density structure fits very well with the observed light curve for a viewing angle of i=54 degrees and phi=36 degrees, where i is the inclination angle and phi is the azimuth from apastron.

Atsuo T. Okazaki; Stanley P. Owocki; Christopher M. P. Russell; Michael F. Corcoran

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

Reliability and Maintainability Issues for the Next Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large accelerators for high energy physics research traditionally have been designed using informal best design, engineering, and management practices to achieve acceptable levels of operational availability. However, the Next Linear Collider(NLC) project presents a particular challenge for operational availability due to the unprecedented size and complexity of the accelerator systems required to achieve the physics goals of high center-of-mass energy and high luminosity. Formal reliability and maintainability analysis, design, and implementation will be required to achieve acceptable operational availability for the high energy physics research program. This paper introduces some of the basic concepts of reliability analysis and applies them to the 2.6-cm microwave power system of the two 10-km-long, 250-GeV linacs that are currently proposed for the NLC design.

Wilson, Zane J.; Gold, Saul L.; Koontz, Ron F.; Lavine, Ted L.; /SLAC

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion Collider: Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier Understanding the glue that binds us all Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier Understanding the glue that binds us all BNL-98815-2012-JA JLAB-PHY-12-1652 arXiv:1212.1701 Authors A. Accardi 14,28 , J. L. Albacete 16 , M. Anselmino 29 , N. Armesto 36 , E. C. Aschenauer 3,† , A. Bacchetta 35 , D. Boer 33 , W. Brooks 37,† , T. Burton 3 , N.-B. Chang 23 , W.-T. Deng 13,23 , A. Deshpande 25,∗,† , M. Diehl 11,† , A. Dumitru 2 , R. Dupr´ e 7 , R. Ent 28,‡ , S. Fazio 3 , H. Gao 12,† , V. Guzey 28 , H. Hakobyan 37 , Y. Hao 3 , D. Hasch 15 , R. Holt 1,† , T. Horn 5,† , M. Huang 23 , A. Hutton 28,† , C. Hyde 20 , J. Jalilian-Marian 2 , S. Klein 17 , B. Kopeliovich 37 , Y. Kovchegov 19,† , K. Kumar 24,† , K. Kumeriˇ cki 40 , M. A. C. Lamont 3 , T. Lappi 34 , J.-H. Lee 3 , Y. Lee 3 , E. M. Levin 26,37 , F.-L. Lin 28 , V. Litvinenko 3 , T. W. Ludlam 3,‡ , C. Marquet

311

Di-hadron SIDIS measurements at CLAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) is an essential tool to probe nucleon internal structure. Through single hadron SIDIS processes, indeed, it is possible to access the TMDs, containing information on both the longitudinal and transverse motion of the partons. In recent years, moreover, an increasing attention has been devoted to dihadron SIDIS. It constitutes the golden channel to access the higher-twist collinear Parton Distribution Functions e(x) and h{sub L}(x), so far only marginally known, whose extraction will complete the collinear description of the nucleon at the twist-3 level. The CLAS detector in the Hall-B at JLab, thanks to its large acceptance, is particularly suited for such measurements. Analyses aiming at the extraction of dihadron SIDIS Beam and Target-Spin Asymmetries are presently in progress. In these proceedings, preliminary results for the Beam-Spin Asymmetry are reported, together with a summary of the dihadron SIDIS experimental program at JLab.

Pisano, Silvia [Lab. Naz. Frascati, Frascati, Italy

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

High performance computing activities in hadron spectroscopy at BESIII  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BESIII experiment is operated in the ?-charm threshold energy region. It has collected the world's largest data samples of J/?, ?(3686), ?(3770) and ?(4040) decays. These data are being used to make a variety of interesting and unique studies of light hadron spectroscopy, precision charmonium physics and high-statistics measurements of D meson decays. As one of the experiments at the high luminosity frontier, data processing at BESIII is computationally very expensive for large data sets. In this presentation, we report two recent progresses in using high performance computing: a Tag-based preselection for data reduction and GPUPWA, a PWA framework harnessing the GPU parallel computing.

Beijiang Liu; Besiii collaboration

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

LEIC - A Polarized Low Energy Electron-ion Collider at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A polarized electron-ion collider is envisioned as the future nuclear science program at JLab beyond the 12 GeV CEBAF. Presently, a medium energy collider (MEIC) is set as an immediate goal with options for a future energy upgrade. A comprehensive design report for MEIC has been released recently. The MEIC facility could also accommodate electron and proton/ion collisions in a low CM energy range, covering proton energies from 10 to 25 GeV and ion energies with a similar magnetic rigidity, for additional science reach. In this paper, we present a conceptual design of this low energy collider, LEIC, showing its luminosity can reach above 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The design specifies that the large booster of the MEIC is converted to a low energy ion collider ring with an interaction region and an electron cooler integrated into it. The design provides options for either sharing the detector with the MEIC or a dedicated low energy detector in a third collision point, with advantages of either a minimum cost or extra detection parallel to the MEIC operation, respectively. The LEIC could be positioned as the first and low cost phase of a multi-stage approach to realize the full MEIC.

Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, Andrew M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Nissen, Edward W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Yunn, Byung C. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Sullivan, Michael K. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modelling hadronic interactions in HEP MC generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEP event generators aim to describe high-energy collisions in full exclusive detail. They combine perturbative matrix elements and parton showers with dynamical models of less well-understood phenomena such as hadronization, diffraction, and the so-called underlying event. We briefly summarise some of the main concepts relevant to the modelling of soft/inclusive hadron interactions in MC generators, in particular PYTHIA, with emphasis on questions recently highlighted by LHC data.

Skands, Peter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

6D mu (+/-) cooling using a solenoid-dipole ring cooler for a muon collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six dimensional cooling of large emittance {mu}{sup +} and {mu}{sup -} beams is required in order to obtain the desired luminosity for a muon collider. We propose to use a ring cooler that employs both dipoles and solenoids with the additional requirement that the arcs of the ring be achromatic. We describe the lattice and the beam dynamics of the proposed ring, and demonstrate that the lattice gives substantial cooling in all 6 phase space dimensions.

Garren, A.; Berg, J.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Kirk, H.G.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Searching Higgs in Noncommutative Electroweak Model at Photon-Photon Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the process of Higgs boson production in $\\gamma\\gamma$ collider on noncommutative spacetime and compare the results with large extra dimension in KK graviton channel. Summing all KK mode on IR brane, the affections are in the same order by comparing noncommutatve model prediction. This process is completely forbidden in standard model on unitarity condition and bosonic distribution. In noncommutative theory, the effect is induced by the coordinates noncommutable relation, $[x^{\\mu}, x^{\

Chien Yu Chen

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ovrview: The Shape of Hadrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article we address the physical basis of the deviation of hadron shapes from spherical symmetry (non-spherical amplitudes) with focus on the nucleon and $\\Delta$. An overview of both the experimental methods and results and the current theoretical understanding of the issue is presented. At the present time the most quantitative method is the $\\gamma^{*} p \\to \\Delta$ reaction for which significant non-spherical electric (E2) and Coulomb quadrupole (C2) amplitudes have been observed with good precision as a function of Q^{2} from the photon point through 6 GeV^{2}. Quark model calculations for these quadrupole amplitudes are at least an order of magnitude too small and even have the wrong sign. Lattice QCD, chiral effective field theory, and dynamic model calculations which include the effects of the pion-cloud are in approximate agreement with experiment. This is expected due to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD and the resulting, long range (low Q^{2}) effects of the pion-cloud. Other observables such as nucleon form factors and virtual Compton scattering experiments indicate that the pion-cloud is playing a significant role in nucleon structure. Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering experiments with transverse polarized beam and target also show the effect of non-zero quark angular momentum.

A. M. Bernstein; C. N. Papanicolas

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Identification of high transverse-momentum hadrons with a ring-imaging Cerenkov counter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have constructed and operated a large aperture ring-imaging Cerenkov counter in a high transverse-momentum experiment at Fermilab. We used multistep proportional chambers with a He/TEA photosensitive gas mixture to observe approximately 3.5 photons per relativistic particle. Hadron identification is obtained with good efficiency from threshold to 250 GeV/c.

Glass, H.; Adams, M.; Charpak, G.; Coutrakon, G.; Finley, D.; Hubbard, J.R.; Jaffe, D.; Kirz, J.; Mangeot, P.; McCarthy, R.; Peisert, A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0108  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 TESLA 2002-10 CBP Tech Note-268 November 2002 Comparison of Emittance Tuning Simulations in the NLC and TESLA Damping Rings Andrej Wolski Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA Winfried Decking Deutsches Elektron Synchrotron (DESY) Hamburg, Germany Abstract: Vertical emittance is a critical issue for future linear collider damping rings. Both NLC and TESLA specify vertical emittance of the order of a few picometers, below values currently achieved in any storage ring. Simulations show that algorithms based on correcting the closed orbit and the vertical dispersion can be effective in reducing the vertical emittance to the required levels, in the presence of a limited subset of

320

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0104  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 October 2002 Beamstrahlung Photon Load on the TESLA Extraction Septum Blade Andrei Seryi Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA 94309, USA Abstract: This note describes work performed in the framework of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee [1] to estimate the power load on the TESLA extraction septum blade due to beamstrahlung photons. It is shown, that under realistic conditions the photon load can be several orders of magnitude higher than what was estimated in the TESLA TDR [2] for the ideal Gaussian beams, potentially representing a serious limitation of the current design. Beamstrahlung Photon Load on the TESLA Extraction Septum Blade ANDREI SERYI STANFORD LINEAR

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Future high energy colliders. Formal report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

Parsa, Z. [ed.] [ed.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

Schroeder, C. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

RHIC | Physics of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Physics of RHIC Physicists from around the world are using the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore some of Nature's most basic -- and intriguing -- ingredients and...

324

QCD Factorization for heavy quarkonium production at collider energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk, I briefly review several models of the heavy quarkonium production at collider energies, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Muon-Muon and Other High Energy Colliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Before we discuss the muon collider in detail, it is useful to...(pp, $$p\\bar p$$ ), of lepton (e + e ...

R. B. Palmer; J. C. Gallardo

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Far Future Colliders and Required R&D Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle colliders for high energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the collider has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size and the cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but its pace of progress has greatly slowed down. In this paper we very briefly review the R&D toward near future colliders and make an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and outline the changes in the paradigm required for the next breakthroughs.

Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

VNI-3.1: MC-simulation program to study high-energy particle collisions in QCD by space-time evolution of parton-cascades and parton-hadron conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VNI is a general-purpose Monte-Carlo event-generator, which includes the simulation of lepton-lepton, lepton-hadron, lepton-nucleus, hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions. On the basis of renormalization-group improved parton description and quantum-kinetic theory, it uses the real-time evolution of parton cascades in conjunction with a self-consistent hadronization scheme that is governed by the dynamics itself. The causal evolution from a specific initial state (determined by the colliding beam particles) is followed by the time-development of the phase-space densities of partons, pre-hadronic parton clusters, and final-state hadrons, in position-space, momentum-space and color-space. The parton-evolution is described in terms of a space-time generalization of the familiar momentum-space description of multipl (semi) hard interactions in QCD, involving 2 -> 2 parton collisions, 2 -> 1 parton fusion processes, and 1 -> 2 radiation processes. The formation of color-singlet pre-hadronic clusters and their decays into hadrons, on the other hand, is treated by using a spatial criterion motivated by confinement and a non-perturbative model for hadronization. This article gives a brief review of the physics underlying VNI, which is followed by a detailed description of the program itself. The latter program description emphasizes easy-to-use pragmatism and explains how to use the program (including a simple example), annotates input and control parameters, and discusses output data provided by it.

Klaus Geiger

1997-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

328

Muon Colliders: New Prospects for Precision Physics and the High Energy Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview is given of muon collider technology and of the current status of the muon collider research program. The exciting potential of muon colliders for both neutrino physics and collider physics studies is then described and illustrated using self-consistent collider parameter sets at 0.1 TeV to 100 TeV center-of-mass energies.

Bruce J. King

1999-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Plans for Hadronic Structure Studies at J-PARC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hadron-physics projects at J-PARC are explained. The J-PARC is the most-intense hadron-beam facility in the multi-GeV high-energy region. By using secondary beams of kaons, pions, and others as well as the primary-beam proton, various hadron projects are planned. First, some of approved experiments are introduced on strangeness hadron physics and hadron-mass modifications in nuclear medium. Second, future possibilities are discussed on hadron-structure physics, including structure functions of hadrons, spin physics, and high-energy hadron reactions in nuclear medium. The second part is discussed in more details because this is an article in the hadron-structure session.

S. Kumano

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Plans for Hadronic Structure Studies at J-PARC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hadron-physics projects at J-PARC are explained. The J-PARC is the most-intense hadron-beam facility in the multi-GeV high-energy region. By using secondary beams of kaons, pions, and others as well as the primary-beam proton, various hadron projects are planned. First, some of approved experiments are introduced on strangeness hadron physics and hadron-mass modifications in nuclear medium. Second, future possibilities are discussed on hadron-structure physics, including structure functions of hadrons, spin physics, and high-energy hadron reactions in nuclear medium. The second part is discussed in more details because this is an article in the hadron-structure session.

Kumano, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

THEORETICAL STUDIES OF HADRONS AND NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details final research results obtained during the 9 year period from June 1, 1997 through July 15, 2006. The research project, entitled ?Theoretical Studies of Hadrons and Nuclei?, was supported by grant DE-FG02-97ER41048 between North Carolina State University [NCSU] and the U. S. Department of Energy [DOE]. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator [PI], Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, conducted a theoretical research program investigating hadrons and nuclei and devoted to this program 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of his time in the summer. Highlights of new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following three sections corresponding to the respective sub-programs of this project (hadron structure, probing hadrons and hadron systems electromagnetically, and many-body studies). Recent progress is also discussed in a recent renewal/supplemental grant proposal submitted to DOE. Finally, full detailed descriptions of completed work can be found in the publications listed at the end of this report.

STEPHEN R COTANCH

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the All-Hadronic Mode at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A measurement of the top quark mass (M{sub top}) in the all-hadronic decay channel is presented. It uses 5.8 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Events with six to eight jets are selected by a neural network algorithm and by the requirement that at least one of the jets is tagged as a b quark jet. The measurement is performed with a likelihood fit technique, which simultaneously determines M{sub top} and the jet energy scale (JES) calibration. The fit yields a value of M{sub top} = 172.5 {+-} 1.4 (stat) {+-} 1.0 (JES) {+-} 1.1 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Detectors for Neutrino Physics at the First Muon Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider possible detector designs for short-baseline neutrino experiments using neutrino beams produced at the First Muon Collider complex. The high fluxes available at the muon collider make possible high statistics deep-inelastic scattering neutrino experiments with a low-mass target. A design of a low-energy neutrino oscillation experiment on the ``tabletop'' scale is also discussed.

Deborah A. Harris; Kevin S. McFarland

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

EIS-0138-S: Superconducting Super Collider, Supplemental, Waxahatchie, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this supplementary statement to analyze the environmental impacts of design modifications to the Superconducting Super Collider that were made following the publication of the Record of Decision that selected Ellis County, Texas, as the location of the laboratory facility. This statement supplements DOE/EIS-0138, Superconducting Super Collider.

335

Energy Content of Colliding Plane Waves using Approximate Noether Symmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted to study the energy content of colliding plane waves using approximate Noether symmetries. For this purpose, we use approximate Lie symmetry method of Lagrangian for differential equations. We formulate the first-order perturbed Lagrangian for colliding plane electromagnetic and gravitational waves. It is shown that in both cases, there does not exist

M. Sharif; Saira Waheed

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Helmholtz Alliance Linear Collider Forum Proceedings of the Workshops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helmholtz Alliance Linear Collider Forum Proceedings of the Workshops Hamburg, Munich, Hamburg 2010 of the Helmholtz Alliance Linear Collider Forum 2010­2012, Hamburg, M¨unchen, Hamburg, Germany Conference homepage, Internationales Congress Center, Dresden (at the 4th Annual Workshop of the Helmholtz Alliance `Physics

337

A New Class of RC4 Colliding Key Pairs with Greater Hamming Distance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we discovered a new class of colliding key pairs of RC4, namely ... discovery of RC4 colliding keys with hamming distance greater than one, that is, the colliding ... the probability of the existen...

Jiageng Chen; Atsuko Miyaji

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hadronization of QCD and effective interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An introductory treatment of hadronization through functional integral calculus and bifocal Bose fields is given. Emphasis is placed on the utility of this approach for providing a connection between QCD and effective hadronic field theories. The hadronic interactions obtained by this method are nonlocal due to the QCD substructure, yet, in the presence of an electromagnetic field, maintain the electromagnetic gauge invariance manifest at the quark level. A local chiral model which is structurally consistent with chiral perturbation theory is obtained through a derivative expansion of the nonlocalities with determined, finite coefficients. Tree-level calculations of the pion form factor and {pi} {minus} {pi} scattering, which illustrate the dual constituent-quark-chiral-model nature of this approach, are presented.

Frank, M.R.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Technical design of hadron therapy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

Alonso, J.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

Alonso, J.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0109  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 TESLA 2002-11 CBP Tech Note-269 November 2002 Alignment Stability Models for Damping Rings Andrej Wolski Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA Winfried Decking Deutsches Elektron Synchrotron (DESY) Hamburg, Germany Abstract: Linear collider damping rings are highly sensitive to magnet alignment. Emittance tuning simulations for current designs of damping rings for TESLA and NLC have given encouraging results, but depend on invasive measurements of dispersion. The frequency with which such measurements must be made is therefore an operational issue, and depends on the time stability of the alignment. In this note, we consider three effects that lead to misalignment and the need to retune the damping ring: (1)

342

Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hadron production in heavy relativistic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate particle production in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies as function of incident energy, and centrality in a three-sources Relativistic Diffusion Model. Pseudorapidity distributions of produced charged hadrons in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6 GeV, 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV and 200 GeV show an almost equilibrated midrapidity source that tends to increase in size towards higher incident energy, and more central collisions. It may indicate quark-gluon plasma formation prior to hadronization.

Rolf Kuiper; Georg Wolschin

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

344

Observation of New Charmless Decays of Bottom Hadrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We search for new charmless decays of neutral b hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons, using 1??fb[superscript -1] of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report the first observation of the ...

Xie, Si

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - analogous hadronic calice Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 18 Particle Physics Phenomenology 7. Hadronization Summary: Particle Physics Phenomenology 7. Hadronization...

346

Diagnosing Energy Loss: PHENIX Results on High-pT Hadron Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of inclusive spectra of hadrons at large transverse momentum over a broad range of energy in different collision systems have been performed with the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The data allow to study the energy and system size dependence of the suppression observed in RAA of high-pT hadrons at sqrt(s_NN)= 200 GeV. Due to the large energy range from sqrt(s_NN)= 22 GeV to 200 GeV, the results can be compared to results from CERN SPS at a similar energy. The large Au+Au dataset from the 2004 run of RHIC also allows to constrain theoretical models that describe the hot and dense matter produced in such collisions. Investigation of particle ratios such as eta/pi0 helps understanding the mechanisms of energy loss.

B. Sahlmueller

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Shear-Viscosity to Entropy Density Ratio of a Relativistic Hadron Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) are thought to have produced a state of matter called the Quark-Gluon-Plasma, characterized by a very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$, near the lower bound predicted for that quantity by Anti-deSitter space/Conformal Field Theory (AdS/CFT) methods. As the produced matter expands and cools, it evolves through a phase described by a hadron gas with rapidly increasing $\\eta/s$. We calculate $\\eta/s$ as a function of temperature in this phase and find that its value poses a challenge for viscous relativistic hydrodynamics, which requires small values of $\\eta/s$ throughout the entire evolution of the reaction in order to successfully describe the collective flow observables at RHIC. We show that the inclusion of non-unit fugacities will reduce $\\eta/s$ in the hadronic phase, yet not sufficiently to be compatible with viscous hydrodynamics. We therefore conclude that the origin of the low viscosity matter at RHIC must be in the partonic phase of the reaction.

Nasser Demir; Steffen A. Bass

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

348

Large Cryogenic Infrastructure for LHC Superconducting Magnet and Cryogenic Component Tests: Layout, Commissioning and Operational Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The largest cryogenic test facility at CERN, located at Zone 18, is used to validate and to test all main components working at cryogenic temperature in the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) before final installation in the machine tunnel. In total about 1300 main dipoles, 400 main quadrupoles, 5 RF-modules, eight 1.8 K refrigeration units will be tested in the coming years.The test facility has been improved and upgraded over the last few years and the first 18 kW refrigerator for the LHC machine has been added to boost the cryogenic capacity for the area via a 25,000 liter liquid helium dewar. The existing 6 kW refrigerator, used for the LHC Test String experiments, will also be employed to commission LHC cryogenic components.We report on the design and layout of the test facility as well as the commissioning and the first 10,000 hours operational experience of the test facility and the 18 kW LHC refrigerator.

Calzas, C.; Chanat, D.; Knoops, S.; Sanmarti, M.; Serio, L. [Accelerator Technology Division, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

Brief introduction to viscosity in hadron physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce the concept of viscosity (both shear and bulk) in the context of hadron physics and in particular the meson gas, highlighting the current theoretical efforts to connect possible measurements of the viscosities to underlying physics such as a phase transition or the trace anomaly.

Dobado, Antonio; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Torres-Rincon, Juan M. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

Energy flow observables in hadronic collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present recent QCD calculations of energy flow distributions associated with the production of jets at wide rapidity separations in high-energy hadron collisions, and discuss the role of these observables to analyze contributions from parton showering and from multiple parton collisions.

F. Hautmann

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

Future Hadron Physics Facilities at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab's hadron physics research continues in all its accelerator-based programs. These efforts will be identified, and the optimization of the Fermilab schedules for physics will be described. In addition to the immediate plans, the Fermilab Long Range Plan will be cited, and the status and potential role of a new proton source, the Proton Driver, will be described.

Jeffrey A. Appel

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

Pion double charge exchange and hadron dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will review theoretical results to show how pion double charge exchange is contributing to our understanding of hadron dynamics in nuclei. The exploitation of the nucleus as a filter is shown to be essential in facilitating the comparison between theory and experiment. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Johnson, M.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fast hadron freeze-out generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a fast Monte Carlo procedure of hadron generation that allows one to study and analyze various observables for stable hadrons and hadron resonances produced in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. Particle multiplicities are determined based on the concept of chemical freeze-out. Particles can be generated on the chemical or thermal freeze-out hypersurface represented by a parametrization or a numerical solution of relativistic hydrodynamics with given initial conditions and equation of state. Besides standard spacelike sectors associated with the volume decay, the hypersurface may also include nonspacelike sectors related to the emission from the surface of expanding system. For comparison with other models and experimental data, we demonstrate the results based on the standard parametrizations of the hadron freeze-out hypersurface and flow velocity profile under the assumption of a common chemical and thermal freeze-out. The C++ generator code is written under the ROOT framework and is available for public use at http://uhkm.jinr.ru/.

N. S. Amelin; R. Lednicky; T. A. Pocheptsov; I. P. Lokhtin; L. V. Malinina; A. M. Snigirev; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Rho Meson in Dense Hadronic Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectral function of a rho meson that is at rest in dense hadronic matter and couples strongly to the pion is studied in the vector dominance model by including the effect of the delta-hole polarization on the pion. With the free rho-meson mass...

Asakawa, M.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.; Qiu, X. J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

Ong, R.A.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At the precision reached in current lattice QCD calculations, electromagnetic effects are becoming numerically relevant. We will present preliminary results for electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses, based on simulations in which a $\\mathrm{U}(1)$ degree of freedom is superimposed on $N_f=2+1$ QCD configurations from the BMW collaboration.

A. Portelli; S. Drr; Z. Fodor; J. Frison; C. Hoelbling; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Kurth; L. Lellouch; T. Lippert; K. K. Szab; A. Ramos

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

Emergence String and Mass Formulas of Hadrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assume that hadrons are formed from the emergence string. Usual string should possess two moving states: oscillation and rotation, so we propose corresponding potential and the equation of the emergence string, whose energy spectrum is namely the GMO mass formula and its modified accurate mass formula. These are some relations between the string and observable experimental data.

Yi-Fang Chang

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Upper bounds on sparticle masses from muon g-2 and the Higgs mass and the complementarity of future colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supersymmetric (SUSY) explanation of the discrepancy between the measurement of $(g-2)_\\mu$ and its SM prediction puts strong upper bounds on the chargino and smuon masses. At the same time, lower experimental limits on the chargino and smuon masses, combined with the Higgs mass measurement, lead to an upper bound on the stop masses. The current LHC limits on the chargino and smuon masses (for not too compressed spectrum) set the upper bound on the stop masses of about 10 TeV. The discovery potential of the future lepton and hadron colliders should lead to the discovery of SUSY if it is responsible for the explanation of the $(g-2)_\\mu$ anomaly. This conclusion follows from the fact that the upper bound on the stop masses decreases with the increase of the lower experimental limit on the chargino and smuon masses.

Badziak, Marcin; Lewicki, Marek; Olechowski, Marek; Pokorski, Stefan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying to two W bosons at CMS .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this thesis, we search for the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider, through its decay mode to two (more)

Xie, Si, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Search for the Higgs Boson in the Vector Boson Fusion Channel at the ATLAS Detector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The search for the Higgs boson has been a cornerstone of the physics program at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva Switzerland. The ATLAS experiment (more)

Ouellette, Eric Alexandre

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Standard Model Higgs Boson Discovery Potential in the Decay Channel H - > ZZ(*) - > 4 mu with the CMS Detector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) currently under construction at CERN with start-up date in (more)

Drozdetski, Alexei Alexandrovic

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Comparison of Black Hole Generators for the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare Monte Carlo event generators dedicated to simulating the production and decay of extra-dimensional black holes at the Large Hadron Collider.

Douglas M. Gingrich

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

Recycling Magnets | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recycling Magnets July 15, 2013 The cost of a nuclear or particle physics experiment can be enormous, several hundred million dollars for the Large Hadron Collider Experiments,...

364

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accelerator & Detector Physics Computing CMS Detector Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Works in Progress Energy Frontier Large Hadron Collider The LHC at CERN, the European...

365

Performance Evaluation of a Crystal-Enhanced Collimation System for the LHC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been constructed at CERN (Conseil Europen pour la Recherche Nuclaire, Geneva, Switzerland), and recently started up. The LHC beams, (more)

Previtali, Valentina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Important communication talk  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Higgs field * Predicted in 1964 * Still unconfirmed * Can prove it by finding the Higgs Boson WHAT'S A HIGGS BOSON? CERN Tevatron Large Hadron Collider THE SEARCH IS ON...

367

Two years with the Higgs boson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent results of the Standard Model Higgs boson searches at the ATLAS and CMS experiments at Large Hadron Collider at CERN are presented.

Tsukerman, Ilya; The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous neutral gauge Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the electroweak gauge boson quartic couplings, growing quadratically with the Higgs boson mass, is reviewed... . The potential of the CERN Large Hadron Collider and e+ e-...

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous triple gauge Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the electroweak gauge boson quartic couplings, growing quadratically with the Higgs boson mass, is reviewed... . The potential of the CERN Large Hadron Collider and e+ e-...

370

White House backs US contribution to LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... back a US contribution of $530 million towards construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland.

Colin Macilwain

1997-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

Relief and euphoria greet decision on LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) approved construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), one of the largest basic science research projects ever undertaken.

Alison Abbott

1994-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

372

LHC caught in French budget crunch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... find a way out of the impasse over funding prospects for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) being planned at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN).

Declan Butler

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Mirage Models Confront the LHC: I. Kahler-Stabilized Heterotic String Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 Mirage Models Confront the LHC: I. K ahler-StabilizedLarge Hadron Collider (LHC). The case of heterotic stringobservationally disfavored by the LHC results. Most of the

Kaufman, Bryan L.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

ESnet Extends 100G Connectivity Across Atlantic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and universities ultra-fast access to scientific data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other research sites in Europe. ESnet's transatlantic extension will deliver a...

375

Texan goes gunning for US role in LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... he can to block the United States' planned participation in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN, the European laboratory for particle physics in Switzerland.

Colin Macilwain

1997-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

376

DOE Issues Request for Proposals Seeking a Contractor to Manage...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fermilab is the Host Laboratory for U.S. participation in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Compact Muon Solenoid detector, construction of certain LHC accelerator components,...

377

Lecture Series  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources > Lecture Series Lecture Series The US LHC community has organized two nationwide public lecture series around the themes of the Large Hadron Collider and the Angels &...

378

A LATTICE FOR THE 50 GEV MUON COLLIDER RING.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A resent progress report on the lattice design of the 50-50 GeV muon collider is presented. The ring circumference needs to be as small as possible due to the short lifetime of the 50 GeV muons. The background at the detector is affected by the continuous decay of muons into electrons which requires a dipole between the high focusing quadrupoles and the detector. To obtain a luminosity on the order of 1 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} S{sup {minus}1} it is required to have beam intensities on the order of 1 x 10{sup 12} particles per bunch. The rms momentum spread of the beam is equal to 0.12% and the beta functions at the interaction point are equal to 4 cm. The maxima of the betatron functions at these quadrupoles are 1300 m, resulting in large chromaticities which must be corrected by local chromatic correction. Pairs of horizontal and vertical chromatic sextupoles are located at locations where the corresponding betatron functions are 100 m and the values of the horizontal dispersion functions are 3 and 2 m, respectively. They are carefully placed so that most of their nonlinear effects are canceled. The dynamic aperture is larger than 7 times the mean size of the beam for the momentum offsets larger than {minus}6 and +10 sigmas.

TRBOJEVIC,D.

1998-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

Lepton-Flavor Violation in the Left-handed Slepton Production at Future Lepton Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data suggest existence of the large lepton-flavor violating (LFV) interaction in the higher energy scale. If the minimal supersymmetric standard model is extended to have right-handed neutrinos, the left-handed sleptons in the second and third generations are expected to have the LFV masses in the minimal supergravity scenario. In this article we study the LFV signals in the left-handed slepton production at $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ colliders and $\\e^+\\e^-$ linear colliders (LC's), $\\mu^+\\mu^-(\\e^+\\e^-)\\to\\tau\\mu +4jets + \\E$ and $\\mu^+\\mu^-(\\e^+\\e^-)\\to\\tau\\mu l+ 2jets+ \\E$. The main background comes from decay of a tau lepton into a muon in the lepton-flavor conserving slepton pair production. They are significantly reduced by the energy and the impact parameter cuts for the muon. At $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ colliders (LC's) it may be possible to reach the mixing angle $\\sin 2\\theta_{\\tilde{\

Junji Hisano; Mihoko M. Nojiri; Yasuhiro Shimizu; Minoru Tanaka

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Design of the Proposed Low Energy Ion Collider Ring at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The polarized Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) envisioned at Jefferson Lab will cover a range of center-of-mass energies up to 65 GeV. The present MEIC design could also allow the accommodation of low energy electron-ion collisions (LEIC) for additional science reach. This paper presents the first design of the low energy ion collider ring which is converted from the large ion booster of MEIC. It can reach up to 25 GeV energy for protons and equivalent ion energies of the same magnetic rigidity. An interaction region and an electron cooler designed for MEIC are integrated into the low energy collider ring, in addition to other required new elements including crab cavities and ion spin rotators, for later reuse in MEIC itself. A pair of vertical chicanes which brings the low energy ion beams to the plane of the electron ring and back to the low energy ion ring are also part of the design.

Nissen, Edward W. [JLAB; Lin, Fanglei [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Higgs boson exempt no-scale supersymmetry and its collider and cosmology implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most straightforward ways to address the flavor problem of low-energy supersymmetry is to arrange for the scalar soft terms to vanish simultaneously at a scale M{sub c} much larger than the electroweak scale. This occurs naturally in a number of scenarios, such as no-scale models, gaugino mediation, and several models with strong conformal dynamics. Unfortunately, the most basic version of this approach that incorporates gaugino mass unification and zero scalar masses at the grand unification scale is not compatible with collider and dark matter constraints. However, experimental constraints can be satisfied if we exempt the Higgs bosons from flowing to zero mass value at the high scale. We survey the theoretical constructions that allow this and investigate the collider and dark matter consequences. A generic feature is that the sleptons are relatively light. Because of this, these models frequently give a significant contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and neutralino-slepton coannihilation can play an important role in obtaining an acceptable dark matter relic density. Furthermore, the light sleptons give rise to a large multiplicity of lepton events at colliders, including a potentially suggestive clean trilepton signal at the Tevatron, and a substantial four lepton signature at the LHC.

Evans, Jason L.; Morrissey, David E.; Wells, James D. [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics (MCTP), Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hadron Structure from Lattice QCD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lattice QCD in Nuclear Physics Lattice QCD in Nuclear Physics Robert Edwards Jefferson Lab NERSC 2011 Report: Robert Edwards, Martin Savage & Chip Watson Current HPC Methods * Algorithms - Gauge generation - Analysis phase * Codes - USQCD SciDAC codes - Heavily used at NERSC: QDP++ & Chroma * Quantities that affect the scale of the simulations - Lattice size, lattice spacing & pion mass Gauge generation Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) * Hamiltonian integrator: 1 st order coupled PDE's * Large, sparse, matrix solve per step * "Configurations" via importance sampling * Use Metropolis method * Produce ~1000 useful configurations in a dataset Cost: * Controlled by lattice size & spacing, quark mass * Requires capability resources

383

The Next Linear Collider Klystron Development Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Klystrons capable of 75 MW output power at 11.4 GHz have been under development at SLAC for the last decade. The work has been part of the program to realize all the components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The effort has produced a family of solenoid-focused 50 MW klystrons, which are currently powering a 0.5 GeV test accelerator at SLAC and several test stands, where high power components are evaluated and fundamental research is performed studying rf breakdown and dark current production. Continuing development has resulted in a Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focused 50 MW klystron, tested at SLAC and subsequently contracted for manufacture by industry in England and Japan. A 75 MW version of that PPM klystron was built at SLAC and reached 75 MW, with 2.8 microsecond pulses. Based on this design, a prototype 75 MW klystron, designed for low-cost manufacture, is currently under development at SLAC, and will eventually be procured from industry in modest quantities for ad...

Jongewaard, E; Pearson, C; Phillips, R M; Sprehn, D; Vlieks, A E

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Search for a signal on intermediate baryon systems formation in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analyzed the behavior of different characteristics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions as a function of centrality to get a signal on the formation of intermediate baryon systems. We observed that the data demonstrate the regime change and saturation. The angular distributions of slow particles exhibit some structure in the above mentioned reactions at low energy. We believe that the structure could be connected with the formation and decay of the percolation cluster. With increasing the mass of colliding nuclei, the structure starts to become weak and almost disappears ultimately. This shows that the number of secondary internuclear interactions increases with increasing the mass of the colliding nuclei. The latter could be a reason of the disintegration of any intermediate formations as well as clusters, which decrease their influence on the angular distribution of the emitted particles.

Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; S. Vokal

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

Beam Measurements on Argonne Linac for Collider Injector Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 20 MeV electron linac at Argonne produces 5 1010 electrons in a single bunch. This amount of charge per bunch is required for the proposed single pass collider at SLAC. For this reason the characteristics o...

G. Mavrogenes; M. B. James; R. F. Koontz

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Global QCD Analysis and Collider Phenomenology--CTEQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview is given of recent progress on a variety of fronts in the global QCD analysis of the parton structure of the nucleon and its implication for collider phenomenology, carried out by various subgroups of the CTEQ collaboration.

Wu-Ki Tung; H. L. Lai; J. Pumplin; P. Nadolsky; C. -P. Yuan

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

Ratios of $W$ and $Z$ cross sections at large boson $p_T$ as a constraint on PDFs and background to new physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We motivate a measurement of various ratios of $W$ and $Z$ cross sections at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at large values of the boson transverse momentum ($p_T\\gtrsim M_{W,Z}$). We study the dependence of predictions for these cross-section ratios on the multiplicity of associated jets, the boson $p_T$ and the LHC centre-of-mass energy. We present the flavour decomposition of the initial-state partons and an evaluation of the theoretical uncertainties. We show that the $W^+/W^-$ ratio is sensitive to the up-quark to down-quark ratio of parton distribution functions (PDFs), while other theoretical uncertainties are negligible, meaning that a precise measurement of the $W^+/W^-$ ratio at large boson $p_T$ values could constrain the PDFs at larger momentum fractions $x$ than the usual inclusive $W$ charge asymmetry. The $W^\\pm/Z$ ratio is insensitive to PDFs and most other theoretical uncertainties, other than possibly electroweak corrections, and a precise measurement will therefore be useful in validating theoretical predictions needed in data-driven methods, such as using $W(\\to\\ell\

Sarah Alam Malik; Graeme Watt

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hadron structure and left-right asymmetry in inclusive production in single-spin hadron-hadron collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical arguments and experimental facts are presented which show the following. Left-right asymmetries are expected to exist in a number of single-spin inclusive production processes. Measuring such asymmetries by using different types of projectile-target combinations, one can obtain useful information on the spin structure of hadrons in general, and determine the spin-dependent quark distribution functions in particular. Quantitative predictions for these asymmetries in various reactions are presented.

C. Boros; Liang Zuo-tang; Meng Ta-chung

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Accelerator Physics of a Muon Collider Kirk T. McDonald  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.edu October 20, 1998 Seminar at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Muon Collider main page: http(Some) Accelerator Physics of a Muon Collider Kirk T. McDonald Princeton U. mcdonald@puphep.princeton.html Princeton Muon Collider page: http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/ 1 #12; What is a Muon Collider

McDonald, Kirk

390

Accelerator Physics of a Muon Collider Kirk T. McDonald  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.edu October 20, 1998 Seminar at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Muon Collider main page: http(Some) Accelerator Physics of a Muon Collider Kirk T. McDonald Princeton U. mcdonald@puphep.princeton.html Princeton Muon Collider page: http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/ 1 #12;What is a Muon Collider

McDonald, Kirk

391

QGP viscosity at RHIC and the LHC - a 2012 status report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we briefly review the recent progress related to extracting the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) specific shear viscosity from the flow data measured at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

Huichao Song

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Searching for new physics at future accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I overview the status of the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking problem, paying special attention to the possible signals of new physics at the Large Hadron Collider (and at a Linear Collider)

Riccardo Barbieri

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fermilab Today  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reidar Hahn In 2012, when scientists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider discovered the Higgs boson, the machine was colliding particles at an energy of 8 teraelectronvolts, or 8 TeV....

394

First year of Mark-J: physics with high energy electron-positron colliding beams. Report No. 107  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the experimental investigation of high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions by the MARK J collaboration at PETRA, the electron-positron colliding beam accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, West Germany. The physics objectives include studies of several purely electromagnetic processes and hadronic final states, which further our knowledge of the nature of the fundamental constituents and of their strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. Before discussing the physics results, the main features and the principal components of the MARK J detector are discussed in terms of design, function, and performance. Several aspects of the online data collection and the offline analysis are also outlined. Results are presented on tests of quantum electrodynamics using e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. e/sup +/e/sup -/, ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/ and tau/sup +/tau/sup -/, on the measurement of R, the ratio of the hadronic to the point-like muon pair cross section, on the search for new quark flavors, on the discovery of three jet events arising from the radiation of hard noncollinear gluons as predicted by quantum chromodynamics, and on the determination of the strong coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub s/.

Aachen DESY M.I.T. NIKHEF Peking Collaboration

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hadronic Multiparticle Production at Ultra-High Energies and Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of the nature of cosmic ray particles at the highest energies are based on the measurement of extensive air showers. Most cosmic ray properties can therefore only be obtained from the interpretation of air shower data and are thus depending on predictions of hadronic interaction models at ultra-high energies. We discuss different scenarios of model extrapolations from accelerator data to air shower energies and investigate their impact on the corresponding air shower predictions. To explore the effect of different extrapolations by hadronic interaction models we developed an ad hoc model. This ad hoc model is based on the modification of the output of standard hadronic interaction event generators within the air shower simulation process and allows us to study the impact of changing interaction features on the air shower development. In a systematic study we demonstrate the resulting changes of important air shower observables and also discuss them in terms of the predictions of the Heitler model of air shower cascades. It is found that the results of our ad hoc modifications are, to a large extend, independent of the choice of the underlying hadronic interaction model.

Ralf Ulrich; Ralph Engel; Michael Unger

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

J/$?$ absorption in a multicomponent hadron gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for anomalous $J/\\Psi$ suppression in high energy heavy ion collisions is presented. As the additional suppression mechanism beyond standard nuclear absorption inelastic $J/\\Psi$ scattering with hadronic matter is considered. Hadronic matter is modeled as an evolving multi-component gas of point-like non-interacting particles (MCHG). Estimates for the sound velocity of the MCHG are given and the equation of state is compared with Lattice QCD data in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition. The approximate cooling pattern caused by longitudinal expansion is presented. It is shown that under these conditions the resulting $J/\\Psi$ suppression pattern agrees well with NA38 and NA50 data.

Dariusz Prorok; Ludwik Turko; David Blaschke

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hadrons in the Nuclear Medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum Chromodynamics, the microscopic theory of strong interactions, has not yet been applied to the calculation of nuclear wave functions. However, it certainly provokes a number of specific questions and suggests the existence of novel phenomena in nuclear physics which are not part of the traditional framework of the meson-nucleon description of nuclei. Many of these phenomena are related to high nuclear densities and the role of color in nucleonic interactions. Quantum fluctuations in the spatial separation between nucleons may lead to local high density configurations of cold nuclear matter in nuclei, up to four times larger than typical nuclear densities. We argue here that experiments utilizing the higher energies available upon completion of the Jefferson Laboratory energy upgrade will be able to probe the quark-gluon structure of such high density configurations and therefore elucidate the fundamental nature of nuclear matter. We review three key experimental programs: quasi-elastic electro-disintegration of light nuclei, deep inelastic scattering from nuclei at x>1, and the measurement of tagged structure functions. These interrelated programs are all aimed at the exploration of the quark structure of high density nuclear configurations. The study of the QCD dynamics of elementary hard processes is another important research direction and nuclei provide a unique avenue to explore these dynamics. We argue that the use of nuclear targets and large values of momentum transfer at would allow us to determine whether the physics of the nucleon form factors is dominated by spatially small configurations of three quarks.

Misak Sargsian; G.A. Miller; John Arrington; William Bertozzi; Werner Boeglin; Carl Carlson; Donal Day; Leonid Frankfurt; Kim Egiyan; Rolf Ent; Shalev Gilad; Keith Griffioen; Douglas Higinbotham; Sebastian Kuhn; Wally Melnitchouk; Eliezer Piasetzky; Stepan Stepanyan; Mark Strikman; Lawrence Weinstein

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Preliminary results on the empirical applicability of the Tsallis distribution in elastic hadron scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the proton-proton elastic differential cross section data at dip position and beyond can be quite well described by a parametrization based on the Tsallis distribution, with only five free fit parameters. Extrapolation of the results obtained at 7 TeV to large momentum transfer, suggests that hadrons may not behave as a black-disk at the asymptotic energy region.

Fagundes, D. A.; Menon, M. J.; Silva, P. V. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

Open bottom mesons in hot asymmetric hadronic medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The in-medium masses and optical potentials of $B$ and ${\\bar B}$ mesons are studied in an isospin asymmetric, strange, hot and dense hadronic environment using a chiral effective model. The chiral $SU(3)$ model originally designed for the light quark sector, is generalized to include the heavy quark sector ($c$ and $b$) to derive the interactions of the $B$ and $\\bar B$ mesons with the light hadrons. Due to large mass of bottom quark, we use only the empirical form of these interactions for the desired purpose, while treating the bottom degrees of freedom to be frozen in the medium. Hence, all medium effects are due to the in-medium interaction of the light quark content of these open-bottom mesons. Both $B$ and $\\bar B$ mesons are found to experience net attractive interactions in the medium, leading to lowering of their masses in the medium. The mass degeneracy of particles and antiparticles, ($B^+$, $B^-$) as well as ($B^0$, ${\\bar B}^0$), is observed to be broken in the medium, due to equal and opposite contributions from a vectorial Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction term. Addition of hyperons to the medium lowers further the in-medium mass for each of these four mesons, while a non-zero isospin asymmetry is observed to break the approximate mass degeneracy of each pair of isospin doublets. These medium effects are found to be strongly density dependent, and bear a considerably weaker temperature dependence. The results obtained in the present investigation are compared to predictions from the quark-meson coupling model, heavy meson effective theory, and the QCD Sum Rule approach.

Divakar Pathak; Amruta Mishra

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

400

Beam-strahlung effects in e-p collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electromagnetic fields produced by one beam in an interaction point of a colliding-beam facility cause to the emission of synchrotron radiation by the other beam. This effect, the beam strahlung, for the e+e/sup -/ colliders has been considered by several authors, and they have pointed out that the effect is very important consideration at very-high-energy e+e/sup -/ colliders. At the first glance, the beam-strahlung effect can play an important role in the e-p collision due to the fact that the circulating currents in the collider are much higher than those of the e+e/sup -/ machine. However the detailed study shows that is not the case because of the collision geometry involved. What follows in this note is the beam-strahlung derivations using the method previously used by Hofmann and Keil. The difference between this note and that of Hofman and Keil is that in the case of e+e/sup -/ collider, equal mass particles are involved in the consideration and, in the e-p case, the electrons radiate and the protons provide the electromagnetic fields.

Cho, Y.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Determination of Charm Hadronic Branching Fractions at CLEO-c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent results from CLEO-c on measurements of absolute hadronic branching fractions of D0, D+, and Ds+ mesons are presented.

A. Ryd

2007-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

402

The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

R. Raja et al.

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

403

When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home June 28, 2012 - 11:16am Addthis This is a graphic representation of the Milky Way, the galaxy in which Earth is contained. Scientists know of more than 20 visible satellite galaxies that circle the center of the Milky Way, with masses ranging from one million to one billion solar masses. Occasionally, one of these orbiting galaxies pass through the Milky Way making waves for millennia. | Graphic courtesy of NASA This is a graphic representation of the Milky Way, the galaxy in which Earth is contained. Scientists know of more than 20 visible satellite galaxies that circle the center of the Milky Way, with masses ranging from

404

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) - the nation's only remaining  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collider (RHIC) - the nation's only remaining Collider (RHIC) - the nation's only remaining particle collider, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory - has made a series of landmark discoveries and continuing breakthroughs in science and technology. One major accomplishment has been RHIC's ability to recreate and study in detail a type of matter that last existed at the beginning of the universe to better understand the strongest force in nature - the force that holds together the fundamental particles that make up 99 percent of visible matter in the universe today, everything from stars to planets to people. In addition to giving us a new way to explore and understand the nature of the early universe and the force that holds together ordinary matter, research at RHIC has revealed stunning

405

When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home June 28, 2012 - 11:16am Addthis This is a graphic representation of the Milky Way, the galaxy in which Earth is contained. Scientists know of more than 20 visible satellite galaxies that circle the center of the Milky Way, with masses ranging from one million to one billion solar masses. Occasionally, one of these orbiting galaxies pass through the Milky Way making waves for millennia. | Graphic courtesy of NASA This is a graphic representation of the Milky Way, the galaxy in which Earth is contained. Scientists know of more than 20 visible satellite galaxies that circle the center of the Milky Way, with masses ranging from

406

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction | Superconducting Magnet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction The final focus magnets for the International Linear Collider require very small quadrupoles be placed within the detector background field for both the entrance and exit beams. The use of superconducting magnets for this function provide solutions to several problems confronting the machine designers. One constraint is the operation within the 3 tesla detector field. The direct wind magnets are capable of operation without the use of magnetic materials in their construction, making them ideal for compact focussing solutions within detectors. The second constraint is the small physical size dictated by the crossing angle of the beams and proximity to the IR within the detector solenoid. The Direct Wind design does not require a collar to withstand Lorentz

407

Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Symmetric Achromatic Low-Beta Collider Interaction Region Design Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new symmetry-based concept for an achromatic low-beta collider interaction region design. A specially-designed symmetric Chromaticity Compensation Block (CCB) induces an angle spread in the passing beam such that it cancels the chromatic kick of the final focusing quadrupoles. Two such CCB?s placed symmetrically around an interaction point allow simultaneous compensation of the 1st-order chromaticities and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant 2nd-order aberrations. We first develop an analytic description of this approach and explicitly formulate 2nd-order aberration compensation conditions at the interaction point. The concept is next applied to develop an interaction region design for the ion collider ring of an electron-ion collider. We numerically evaluate performance of the design in terms of momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture. The advantages of the new concept are illustrated by comparing it to the conventional distributed-sextupole chromaticity compensation scheme.

Morozov, Vasiliy S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Johnson, Rolland P. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

In-Medium Properties of Hadrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A diverse experimental program for the study of the photoproduction of mesons off nuclei has been carried out - and is still running - at the Mainz MAMI and Bonn ELSA electron accelerators with the TAPS, Crystal Barrel, and Crystal Ball calorimeters. It is motivated as a detailed study of the in-medium properties of hadrons and the meson - nucleus interactions. Typical examples for the in-medium behavior of vector mesons ($\\omega$), scalar mesons ($\\sigma$), and nucleon resonances (P$_{33}$(1232), S$_{11}$(1535), D$_{15}$(1520)) are discussed. Special attention is paid to meson - nucleus final state interactions.

B. Krusche

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

410

Applications of Neural Networks in Hadron Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bayesian approach for the feed-forward neural networks is reviewed. Its potential for usage in hadron physics is discussed. As an example of the application the study of the the two-photon exchange effect is presented. We focus on the model comparison, the estimation of the systematic uncertainties due to the choice of the model, and the over-fitting. As an illustration the predictions of the cross sections ratio $d \\sigma(e^+ p\\to e^+ p)/d \\sigma(e^- p\\to e^- p)$ are given together with the estimate of the uncertainty due to the parametrization choice.

Graczyk, Krzysztof M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Applications of Neural Networks in Hadron Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bayesian approach for the feed-forward neural networks is reviewed. Its potential for usage in hadron physics is discussed. As an example of the application the study of the the two-photon exchange effect is presented. We focus on the model comparison, the estimation of the systematic uncertainties due to the choice of the model, and the over-fitting. As an illustration the predictions of the cross sections ratio $d \\sigma(e^+ p\\to e^+ p)/d \\sigma(e^- p\\to e^- p)$ are given together with the estimate of the uncertainty due to the parametrization choice.

Krzysztof M. Graczyk; Cezary Juszczak

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

412

Heavy Hadron Spectroscopy and Production at Tevatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the CDFII and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron, we present recent results on charm and bottom hadrons. The most recent CDF results on properties of the four bottom baryon resonant states {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)-}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)+}. New results on exotic {Upsilon}(4140) state observed by CDF are also reported. A precise measurement of production rates of the lowest lying bottom baryon, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}, produced in the D0 detector is presented.

Gorelov, Igor V.; /New Mexico U.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Properties of heavy flavoured hadrons at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present recent CDF results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy quarks. These include the measurements of mass, lifetime and relative cross section of the B{sub c} meson and an updated measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime. We also summarize new measurements of the mass of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon. We expect more results from the Tevatron which will accumulate more data until the end of Run II currently scheduled to conclude in 2010.

Fernandez, Juan Pablo; /Madrid, CIEMAT

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Open and hidden strangeness in hadronic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate production of \\phi mesons and \\Xi baryons in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Reactions on strange particles acting as a catalyser are proposed to interpret the high observed \\phi yields in HADES experiments as well as the energy dependence of the widths of \\phi rapidity spectra in collisions at the SPS energies. It is argued that the enhancement of \\Xi- yield observed by HADES is even higher than originally reported if effects of the experimental centrality trigger are taken into account. Cross sections for new hadronic processes that could produce \\Xi- are reviewed.

Tomasik, Boris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Charmonium and open charm production in nuclear collisions at SPS/FAIR energies and the possible influence of a hot hadronic medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide predictions for charmonium and open charm production in nuclear collisions at SPS/FAIR energies within the framework of the statistical hadronization model. The increasing importance at lower energies of Lambda_c production is demonstrated and provides a challenge for future experiments. We also demonstrate that, because of the large charm quark mass and the different timescales for charm quark and charmed hadron production, possible modifications of charmed hadrons in the hot hadronic medium do not lead to measurable changes in cross sections for D-meson production. A possible influence of medium effects can be seen, however, in yields of charmonium. These effects are visible at all energies and results are presented for the energy range between charm threshold and RHIC energy.

A. Andronic; P. Braun-Munzinger; K. Redlich; J. Stachel

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

A concept of the photon collider beam dump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photon beams at photon colliders are very narrow, powerful (10--15 MW) and cannot be spread by fast magnets (because photons are neutral). No material can withstand such energy density. For the ILC-based photon collider, we suggest using a 150 m long, pressurized (P ~ 4 atm) argon gas target in front of a water absorber which solves the overheating and mechanical stress problems. The neutron background at the interaction point is estimated and additionally suppressed using a 20 m long hydrogen gas target in front of the argon.

L. I. Shekhtman; V. I. Telnov

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Charge recombination in the muon collider cooling channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final stage of the ionization cooling channel for the muon collider must transversely recombine the positively and negatively charged bunches into a single beam before the muons can be accelerated. It is particularly important to minimize any emittance growth in this system since no further cooling takes place before the bunches are collided. We have found that emittance growth could be minimized by using symmetric pairs of bent solenoids and careful matching. We show that a practical design can be found that has transmission {approx}99%, emittance growth less than 0.1%, and minimal dispersion in the recombined bunches.

Fernow, R. C.; Palmer, R. B. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

418

Particle acceleration in the colliding winds binary WR140  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive WR+O star systems produce high-temperature, shock-heated plasma where the wind of the WR star and that of its binary companion collide - the wind-collision region (WCR). The WCR is a source of thermal (e.g. hard X-rays) and non-thermal (e.g. synchrotron) emission, the latter arising from electrons and ions accelerated to relativistic energies. These colliding wind binaries provide an excellent laboratory for the study of particle acceleration at higher mass, photon and magnetic energy densities than exist in SNRs. Recent models of the non-thermal emission from WR 140 have provided insight into this process.

J. M. Pittard; S. M. Dougherty

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

Optical data transmission at the superconducting super collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital and analog data transmissions via fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider have been investigated. The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides, receivers and associated electronics components are reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the radiation environment on the performance of an optical data transmission system components. Also, the performance of candidate components of the wide band digital and analog transmission systems intended for deployment of the Superconducting Super Collider Detector is discussed. 27 refs., 15 figs.

Leskovar, B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy-nuclei. We calculate the cross-sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production, and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross-sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times $10^{32}/$cm$^2$/s.

Spencer R. Klein

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Hadronic multiparticle production in extensive air showers and accelerator experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using CORSIKA for simulating extensive air showers, we study the relation between the shower characteristics and features of hadronic multiparticle production at low energies. We report about investigations of typical energies and phase space regions of secondary particles which are important for muon production in extensive air showers. Possibilities to measure relevant quantities of hadron production in existing and planned accelerator experiments are discussed.

C. Meurer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; A. Haungs; M. Roth

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Effect of resonance decays on hadron elliptic flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the quark coalescence model, we study effects of resonance decays, and of the quark momentum distribution in hadrons, on the elliptic flows of stable hadrons. We find that, with the exception of rho-meson decays, the resonance decays could...

Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

LHC Division EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LHC Division EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH European Laboratory for Particle Physics Status of the Large Hadron Collider and Magnet Program N. Siegel for the LHC Magnet Team The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), approved by the CERN Council in December 1994, is a 7 +7 TeV proton accelerator

Laughlin, Robert B.

425

Investigations of hadronization process in DIS at CLAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hadronization is the process through which partons, created in an elementary reaction, turn into hadrons. This phenomena has been studied for decades, however, the space-time features of this fundamentally non-perturbative process is not clearly understood. Semi-inclusive measurements of deep inelastic electron scattering from nuclei provide a unique testing ground to study the process of hadron formation. The space-time features and the nuclear dependence of quark propagation and hadronization can be extracted by comparing the production of various hadronic species from a number of target nuclei under different kinematic conditions. The CLAS experiment E02-104 was run with a variety of nuclear targets using a 5 GeV beam energy. The goal of this experiment is to measure observables related to propagation of a quark through cold nuclear matter.

A. Daniel, K. Hicks

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hadronic Parity Violation: a New View through the Looking Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of the strangeness changing hadronic weak interaction have produced a number of puzzles that have so far evaded a complete explanation within the Standard Model. Their origin may lie either in dynamics peculiar to weak interactions involving strange quarks or in more general aspects of the interplay between strong and weak interactions. In principle, studies of the strangeness conserving hadronic weak interaction using parity violating hadronic and nuclear observables provide a complementary window on this question. However, progress in this direction has been hampered by the lack of a suitable theoretical framework for interpreting hadronic parity violation measurements in a model-independent way. Recent work involving effective field theory ideas has led to the formulation of such a framework while motivating the development of a number of new hadronic parity violation experiments in few-body systems. In this article, we review these recent developments and discuss the prospects and opportunities for further experimental and theoretical progress.

Michael J. Ramsey-Musolf; Shelley A. Page

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

High-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in 1983, by the UA1 and UA2 experiments at the 560640-GeV Super Proton Synchroton (SPS) protonantiproton collider at CERN a collider project that was conceived for ...

Terry Wyatt

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric colliding nuclei Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

colliding nuclei Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: asymmetric colliding nuclei Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 managed for the U.S....

429

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER (IPAC12, WEPPD038) The target station a 15-20 T superconducting magnet. The target itself is a free mercury jet, moving at 20 m/s at an small angle to the magnetic axis, so as later to be collected in a mercury pool/beam dump. The replaceable

McDonald, Kirk

430

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER Van Graves , ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Factory is a free-stream mercury jet within a 20-T magnetic field being impacted by an 8-GeV proton beam. A pool of mercury serves as a receiving reservoir for the mercury and a dump for the unexpended proton

McDonald, Kirk

431

High-energy physics: New collider gets the nod  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... suggestion made was that member states might temporarily forgo about one half of a special rebate that has become payable this year with the accession to the organization of Spain. ... that has become payable this year with the accession to the organization of Spain. The rebate would instead be made upon the completion of LEP, CERN's electron-positron collider ...

Tim Beardsley

1983-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

LINEAR COLLIDER FINAL DOUBLET CONSIDERATIONS: ATF2 VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LINEAR COLLIDER FINAL DOUBLET CONSIDERATIONS: ATF2 VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS* B. Bolzon# , N. Geffroy to measure medium frequency vibrations in vertical axis. First, ground motion was measured for 72 hours vibrations (with their supports) were measured to evaluate their rigidity. The correlation of QD0 and QF1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

433

PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider place stringent demands on the proton beam used to generate the desired beam of muons. Here we discuss the advantages and challenges of muon accelerators and the rationale behind the requirements on proton beam energy, intensity, bunch length, and repetition rate. Example proton driver configurations that have been considered in recent years are also briefly indicated.

Zisman, Michael S.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

434

AN INTENSE LOW ENERGY MUON SOURCE FOR THE MUON COLLIDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INTENSE LOW ENERGY MUON SOURCE FOR THE MUON COLLIDER D. Taqqu Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH Abstract A scheme for obtaining an intense source of low energy muons is described. It is based of the decay muons an intense intermediate energy muon beam is obtained. For the specific case of negative

McDonald, Kirk

435

VEPP-2000 COLLIDER CONTROL SYSTEM* A.Senchenko1,#  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Russia Abstract Electron-positron collider VEPP-2000 has been commissioned at Budker Institute of Nuclear of quadrupole. To avoid dispersion in the detectors, RF cavity and injection straights, a pair of dipoles families of sextupole magnets located in the technical straight section, where the dispersion is high

Kozak, Victor R.

436

Muon Collider R&D at Princeton Shoibal Chakravarty (graduate student)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muon Collider R&D at Princeton Shoibal Chakravarty (graduate student) Hulya Guler (undergraduate) Changguo Lu Kirk McDonald Eric Prebys Sven Vahsen (graduate student) [Members of the Muon Collider Advisory Council Meeting Princeton Muon Collider page: http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/ 1 #12; What

McDonald, Kirk

437

MUON COLLIDER PROGRESS Robert B. Palmer (BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MUON COLLIDER PROGRESS Robert B. Palmer (BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York) Abstract A complete scheme for muon production, cooling, ac- celeration and storage in a collider ring is presented. Pa- rameters for two muon colliders are given. Both start with pion production on a mercury target. A capture

McDonald, Kirk

438

Time evolution of colliding laser produced magnesium plasmas investigated using a pinhole camera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suitable conditions for x-ray amplification in a laser produced plasma.24 When two plasmas collide, variTime evolution of colliding laser produced magnesium plasmas investigated using a pinhole camera S for publication 14 February 2001 Time resolved studies of colliding laser produced magnesium plasmas are performed

Harilal, S. S.

439

Hadronic Physics at CLEO-c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The charmonium system provides an opportunity to explore a wide variety of topics in hadronic physics. Studies of the properties of and transitions among cc-bar states yield insight into relativistic and non-perturbative QCD effects. At the same time, studies of the decays of charmonium states are a window into gluon dynamics and the role of glueball mixing in the production of light quark states. A collection of preliminary results utilizing the full CLEO-c psi(2S) data sample is presented including two-body branching fractions of chi_cJ decays, a precision measurement of the h_c mass, and results on the hindered M1 transition: psi(2S) -> gamma eta_c.

M. R. Shepherd

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Hadronic EDM Constraints on Orbifold GUTs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out that the null results of the hadronic electric dipole moment (EDM) searches constrain orbifold grand unified theories (GUTs), where the GUT symmetry and supersymmetry (SUSY) are both broken by boundary conditions in extra dimensions and it leads to rich fermion and sfermion flavor structures. A marginal chromoelectric dipole moment (CEDM) of the up quark is induced by the misalignment between the CP violating left- and right-handed up-type squark mixings, in contrast to the conventional four-dimensional SUSY GUTs. The up quark CEDM constraint is found to be as strong as those from charged lepton flavor violation (LFV) searches. The interplay between future EDM and LFV experiments will probe the structures of the GUTs and the SUSY breaking mediation mechanism.

Junji Hisano; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Minoru Nagai

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hadronization at the AdS wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe hadronization events, using the AdS/CFT Correspondence, which display many of the qualitative features expected in QCD. In particular we study the motion of strings with separating end points in a back-reacted hard wall geometry. The solutions show the development of a linear QCD-like string. The end points oscillate in the absence of string breaking. We introduce string breaking by hand and evolve the new state forward in time to observe the separation of two string segments. A kink associated with this breaking evolves to the end points of the string inducing rho meson production. We explicitly compute the rho meson production at the end point.

Nick Evans; James French; Kristan Jensen; Ed Threlfall

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-70  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

70 70 August 2001 Design Studies of Positron Collection for the NLC Yuri K. Batygin, Ninod K. Bharadwaj, David C. Schultz ,John C. Sheppard Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA Abstract: The positron source for the NLC project utilizes a 6.2 GeV electron beam interacting in a high-Z positron production target. The electromagnetic shower in the target results in large energy deposition which can cause damage to the target. Optimization of the collection system is required to insure long-term operation of the target with needed high positron yield into the 6-dimensional acceptance of the subsequent pre-damping ring. Positron tracking through the accelerating system indicates a dilution of the initial positron phase space density. Results of simulations indicate that a

443

Symmetry energy effects on the mixed hadron-quark phase at high baryon density  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase transition of hadronic to quark matter at high baryon and isospin density is analyzed. Relativistic mean-field models are used to describe hadronic matter, and the MIT bag model is adopted for quark matter. The boundaries of the mixed phase and the related critical points for symmetric and asymmetric matter are obtained. Due to the different symmetry term in the two phases, isospin effects appear to be rather significant. With increasing isospin asymmetry the binodal transition line of the (T,{rho}{sub B}) diagram is lowered to a region accessible through heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned facilities (e.g., the FAIR/NICA projects). Some observable effects are suggested, in particular an isospin distillation mechanism with a more isospin asymmetric quark phase, to be seen in charged meson yield ratios, and an onset of quark number scaling of the meson-baryon elliptic flows. The presented isospin effects on the mixed phase appear to be robust with respect to even large variations of the poorly known symmetry term at high baryon density in the hadron phase. The dependence of the results on a suitable treatment of isospin contributions in effective QCD Lagrangian approaches, at the level of explicit isovector parts and/or quark condensates, is discussed.

Di Toro, M.; Greco, V.; Plumari, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud INFN, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Pysics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania (Italy); Liu, B. [IHEP, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Scientific Facilities, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049 Beijing (China); Baran, V. [Pysics Faculty, University of Bucharest and NIPNE-HH (Romania); Colonna, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud INFN, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Proceedings of the 1992 workshops on high-energy physics with colliding beams. Volume 1, Search for new phenomena at colliding-beam facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains brief papers and viewgraphs on high energy topics like: supersymmetry; new gauge bosons; and new high energy colliders.

Rogers, J. [ed.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Computing the hadronic vacuum polarization function by analytical continuation  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We propose a method to compute the hadronic vacuum polarization function on the lattice at continuous values of photon momenta bridging between the spacelike and timelike regions. We provide two independent demonstrations to show that this method leads to the desired hadronic vacuum polarization function in Minkowski spacetime. We show with the example of the leading-order QCD correction to the muon anomalous magnetic moment that this approach can provide a valuable alternative method for calculations of physical quantities where the hadronic vacuum polarization function enters.

Feng, Xu [KEK, Tsukuba, Japan; Hashimoto, Shoji [KEK, Tsukuba, Japan; Sokendai, Tsukuba, Japan; Hotzel, Grit [Institut fur Physik, Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin; Jansen, Karl [DESY; University of Cyprus; Petschlies, Marcus [The Cyprus Institute; Renner, Dru B. [JLAB

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

446

Microsoft Word - 2003-0820 RHIC collider projections.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RHIC Collider Projections (FY2004 - FY2008) RHIC Collider Projections (FY2004 - FY2008) Thomas Roser, Wolfram Fischer Last update: August 20, 2003 This note discusses in Part I possible operating modes for the RHIC Run-4 (FY2004) running period including constraints from cryogenic cool-down, machine set-up and beam commissioning. In Part II a 5-year projection is given for gold-gold and polarized proton collisions. Part I - Run-4 Projections Cryogenic operation - After the summer shutdown the two RHIC rings will be at room temperature. They will be first brought to liquid nitrogen temperature, in about 10 days. Then, two weeks will be required to cool down to 4 Kelvin. At the end of the run, one week of refrigerator operation is required for the warm-up to 80 Kelvin. Running modes - A number of running modes are considered in RHIC, such as Au-Au

447

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider | The Case for Continuing Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Case for Continuing RHIC Operations The Case for Continuing RHIC Operations The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) - the nation's only remaining particle collider, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory - has made a series of landmark discoveries and continuing breakthroughs in science and technology. One major accomplishment has been RHIC's ability to recreate and study in detail a type of matter that last existed at the beginning of the universe to better understand the strongest force in nature - the force that holds together the fundamental particles that make up 99 percent of visible matter in the universe today, everything from stars to planets to people. In addition to giving us a new way to explore and understand the nature of the early universe and the force that holds together ordinary matter, research at RHIC has revealed stunning

448

R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the use of muon beams to create either an intense source of decay neutrinos aimed at a detector located 3000-7500 km away (a Neutrino Factory), or a Muon Collider that produces high-luminosity collisions at the energy frontier. R&D aimed at producing these facilities has been under way for more than 10 years. This paper will review experimental results from MuCool, MERIT, and MICE and indicate the extent to which they will provide proof-of-principle demonstrations of the key technologies required for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. Progress in constructing components for the MICE experiment will also be described.

Zisman, Michael S

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

449

Expectations for old and new physics at high energy colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past year, the first data from the SPS collider at CERN have become available. The initial results are only a glimpse at a new energy regime and we can reasonably expect an increase in the extent of the data by a factor of 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/. Moreover, within a few years, the Fermilab Tevatron Collider will be in operation with a center of mass energy nearly four times as great as that at CERN. Beyond these machines are other possibilities: a high luminosity pp machine at Brookhaven with a center of mass energy of 0.8 TeV; a p anti p or pp machine in the LEP tunnel at CERN; a desetron in the southwestern United States with many TeV in the center of mass. The purpose of these lectures is to provide an orientation for the wealth of data that these machines will provide.

Cahn, R.N.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Frictional Cooling Scheme for Use in a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Muon Group at the MPI for Physics, Munich is investigating frictional cooling as a fast muon-beam emittance reduction scheme for a muon collider. A new simulation package, CoolSim, based on Geant4 has been developed for the simulation of low-energy beam cooling. New physics processes for low energy muons and protons have been implemented in the Geant4 framework. The group's Frictional Cooling Demonstration experiment aims to verify the principle of the cooling scheme. For this purpose, a 10-cm-long cooling cell has been constructed to test simulation of the energy loss and scattering mechanisms at low energy. This paper contains an introduction to a muon-collider frictional cooling scheme and the status of the demonstration experiment.

Greenwald, Daniel; Caldwell, Allen [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Bao, Yu [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electric polarizability of hadrons with overlap fermions on multi-GPUs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric polarizability is an important parameter for the internal structure of hadrons. Previous studies of polarizabilities have been done at relatively heavy pion masses, leaving the chiral region largely unexplored. In this report, we use overlap fermions which are known to be computationally demanding to properly capture the chiral dynamics. We present an implementation strategy to construct overlap on multi-GPUs. We find that our GPU code has an equivalent of \\sim30 CPU cores to 1 GPU. We also present preliminary results for the polarizability of the neutral pion.

Michael Lujan; Andrei Alexandru; Frank Lee

2011-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

Cross sections for production of closed superstrings at high energy colliders in brane world models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In brane world string models with large extra dimensions, there are processes where fermion and antifermion (or two gluons) can annihilate producing a light particle (e.g. gluon) carrying transverse momentum and a Kaluza-Klein graviton or an excited closed string that propagates in the extra dimensions. In high energy colliders, this process gives a missing momentum signature. We compute the total cross section for this process within the context of type II superstring theory in the presence of a D brane. This includes all missing energy sources for this string theory model up to s=8M_s^2, and it can be used to put new limits on the string scale M_s.

Diego Chialva; Roberto Iengo; Jorge G. Russo

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

453

Test in a beam of large-area Micromegas chambers for sampling calorimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of Micromegas for sampling calorimetry puts specific constraints on the design and performance of this gaseous detector. In particular, uniform and linear response, low noise and stability against high ionisation density deposits are prerequisites to achieving good energy resolution. A Micromegas-based hadronic calorimeter was proposed for an application at a future linear collider experiment and three technologically advanced prototypes of 1$\\times$1 m$^{2}$ were constructed. Their merits relative to the above-mentioned criteria are discussed on the basis of measurements performed at the CERN SPS test-beam facility.

C. Adloff; M. Chefdeville; A. Dalmaz; C. Drancourt; R. Gaglione; N. Geffroy; J. Jacquemier; Y. Karyotakis; I. Koletsou; F. Peltier; J. Samarati; G. Vouters

2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

454

Test in a beam of large-area Micromegas chambers for sampling calorimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of Micromegas for sampling calorimetry puts specific constraints on the design and performance of this gaseous detector. In particular, uniform and linear response, low noise and stability against high ionisation density deposits are prerequisites to achieving good energy resolution. A Micromegas-based hadronic calorimeter was proposed for an application at a future linear collider experiment and three technologically advanced prototypes of 1$\\times$1 m$^{2}$ were constructed. Their merits relative to the above-mentioned criteria are discussed on the basis of measurements performed at the CERN SPS test-beam facility.

Adloff, C; Dalmaz, A; Drancourt, C; Gaglione, R; Geffroy, N; Jacquemier, J; Karyotakis, Y; Koletsou, I; Peltier, F; Samarati, J; Vouters, G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hadronic cross sections, elastic slope and physical bounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An almost model-independent parametrization for the ratio of the total hadronic cross section to elastic slope is discussed. Its applicability in studies of asymptotia and analyses of extensive air shower in cosmic-ray physics is also outlined.

Fagundes, D. A.; Menon, M. J. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

Acceleration of polarized protons in AHF (Advanced Hadron Facility)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper an analysis of the depolarization expected during acceleration from 0.8 to 45.0 GeV kinetic energy in the Advanced Hadron Facility (AHF) accelerators is performed.

Colton, E.P.

1987-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

Measurement of B-hadron masses at CDF run II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the mass of b-hadrons in exclusive J/[psi]-decay modes. The correct momentum scale is established by the following steps: validate and quantify distortions or systematic effects in the Central Outer Tracker and ...

Korn, Andreas, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Suppression of Dilepton Production in Hot Hadronic Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dilepton production from pion-pion annihilation in a hot hadronic matter is studied using an effective chiral Lagrangian that includes explicitly vector mesons. We find that the production rate for dileptons with invariant masses around the rho...

Song, C.; Lee, S. H.; Ko, Che Ming.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Polyakov loop and the hadron resonance gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Polyakov loop has been used repeatedly as an order parameter in the deconfinement phase transition in QCD. We argue that, in the confined phase, its expectation value can be represented in terms of hadronic states, similarly to the hadron resonance gas model for the pressure. Specifically, L(T) \\approx 1/2\\sum_\\alpha g_\\alpha \\,e^(-\\Delta_\\alpha/T), where g_\\alpha are the degeneracies and \\Delta_\\alpha are the masses of hadrons with exactly one heavy quark (the mass of the heavy quark itself being subtracted). We show that this approximate sum rule gives a fair description of available lattice data with N_f=2+1 for temperatures in the range 150MeVmodels. For temperatures below 150MeV different lattice results disagree. One set of data can be described if exotic hadrons are present in the QCD spectrum while other sets do not require such states.

E. Megias; E. Ruiz Arriola; L. L. Salcedo

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

460

Audit of controls over Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory subcontractor expenditures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1989 the Department of Energy contracted with Universities Research Association, Inc. to design, construct, manage, operate, and maintain the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. Through Fiscal Year 1992, costs for subcontractor goods and services accounted for about 75 percent of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory expenditures. The Office of Inspector General evaluated the adequacy of controls in place to ensure that subcontractor costs were reasonable, as required by the contract. The following conclusions were drawn from the audit. The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory did not consistently exercise prudent business judgment in making subcontractor expenditures. As a result, $60 million in expenditures already made and $128 million planned with commercial subcontractors were, in the authors opinion, unnecessary, excessive, or represented uncontrolled growth. The audit also found inadequate justifications, accountability, and cost controls over $143 million in expenditures made and $47 million planned with other Department of Energy laboratories. Improvements were needed in subcontract administration and internal controls, including appropriate audit coverage of the subcontracts. In addition, Department of Energy guidance concerning procurement actions between the laboratories needed to be established.

Not Available

1993-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Illuminating Dark Photons with High-Energy Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy colliders offer a unique sensitivity to dark photons, the mediators of a broken dark U(1) gauge theory that kinetically mixes with the Standard Model (SM) hypercharge. Dark photons can be detected in the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, h -> Z Z_D -> 4l, and in Drell-Yan events, pp -> Z_D -> ll. If the dark U(1) is broken by a hidden-sector Higgs mechanism, then mixing between the dark and SM Higgs bosons also allows the exotic decay h -> Z_D Z_D -> 4l. We show that the 14 TeV LHC and a 100 TeV proton-proton collider provide powerful probes of both exotic Higgs decay channels. In the case of kinetic mixing alone, direct Drell-Yan production offers the best sensitivity to Z_D, and can probe epsilon >~ 9 x 10^(-4) (4 x 10^(-4)) at the HL-LHC (100 TeV pp collider). The exotic Higgs decay h -> Z Z_D offers slightly weaker sensitivity, but both measurements are necessary to distinguish the kinetically mixed dark photon from other scenarios. If Higgs mixing is also present, then the decay h -> Z...

Curtin, David; Gori, Stefania; Shelton, Jessie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Electron-positron annihilation and hadronic sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The canonical leading light-cone contribution ???+(x)p?f(xp)+? to the electroproduction [?(q)+h(p)?anything;?=photon,h=hadron] matrix element ?h(p)|J?(x)J?(0)|h(p)? is such that f(?), by virtue of the J?J? operator-product expansion (OPE), is analytic for small ?. The corresponding contribution ???+(x)p?f(xp)+? to the annihilation [e+e-??(q)?h(p)+anything] matrix element ?0|R(J?(x)S^(p))R(J?(x)S^(-p))|0?, where S^(p) is the Fourier transform of a source operator S(y) for h(p), is such that f(?) can be singular for ??0; f(?)??-?. We show how the multiple OPE's among the operators involved can determine the degree ? of this short-distance singularity provided long-distance effects are not important. We refer to ? as the "slant" of the matrix element and we explicitly calculate ? in terms of the minimal dimension d of the source S(y). In the canonical case, we find ?=d-12 if h is a pseudoscalar particle and ?=d-1 if h is a spinor particle. These singularities imply that the scaling functions behave like ?? for ??q22qp?? and that the multiplicities behave like (q2)?-3 for q2??. These results provide handles on the heretofore elusive source dimensions d. For example, if logarithmic or greater multiplicities are observed (??3) along with canonical scaling, it can be concluded that d cannot have its canonical elementary value (d=52 for spinors, d=3 for scalars) but rather d?72 (spinors) or d?4 (scalars). These results can be readily generalized to noncanonical cases. For example, they lead to simple explanations of known results in renormalized perturbation theory (?3 theory, ?4 theory, pseudoscalar-meson theory, quantum electrodynamics). Since ? (and ?) is dimensionless, the dimensional analysis involved in our treatment is on a different footing from that which determines the usual short-distance and light-cone singularities of current products. The slants are nevertheless simple functions of the field and source dimensions. Phenomenologically, the operatorial nature of our approach makes it easily extendable to the treatment of other inclusive lepton hadron processes with one or more particles observed in the final state.

Richard A. Brandt and Ng Wing-Chiu

1974-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Collider signatures of the SO(5)xU(1) gauge-Higgs unification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collider signatures of the SO(5)xU(1) gauge-Higgs unification model in the Randall-Sundrum warped space are explored. Gauge couplings of quarks and leptons receive small corrections from the fifth dimension whose effects are tested by the precision data. It is found that the forward-backward asymmetries in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions on the Z pole are well explained in a wide range of the warp factor z{sub L}, but the model is consistent with the branching fractions of Z decay only for large z{sub L} > or approx. 10{sup 15}. Kaluza-Klein (KK) spectra of gauge bosons, quarks, and leptons as well as gauge and Higgs couplings of low-lying KK excited states are determined. Right-handed quarks and leptons have larger couplings to the KK gauge bosons than left-handed ones. Production rates of Higgs bosons and KK states at the Tevatron, LHC, and International Linear Collider are evaluated. The first KK Z has a mass 1130 GeV with a width 422 GeV for z{sub L}=10{sup 15}. The current limit on the Z' production at the Tevatron and LHC indicates z{sub L}>10{sup 15}. A large effect of parity violation appears in the difference between the rapidity distributions of e{sup +} and e{sup -} in the decay of the first KK Z. The first KK gauge bosons decay into light and heavy quarks evenly.

Hosotani, Yutaka; Tanaka, Minoru; Uekusa, Nobuhiro [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Probing strongly-interacting electroweak dynamics through W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}/ZZ ratios at future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors point out that the ratio of W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} {yields} ZZ cross sections is a sensitive probe of the dynamics of electroweak symmetry breaking, in the CM energy region {radical}s{sub ww} {approx_gt} 1 TeV where vector boson scattering may well become strong. They suggest ways in which this ratio can be extracted at a 1.5 TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider, using W{sup {+-}}, Z {yields} jj hadronic decays and relying on dijet mass resolution to provide statistical discrimination between W{sup {+-}} and Z. WW fusion processes studied here are unique for exploring scalar resonances of mass about 1 TeV and are complementary to studies via the direct channel e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} for the vector and non-resonant cases. With an integrated luminosity of 200 fb{sup {minus}1}, the signals obtained are statistically significant. Comparison with a study of e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{nu}W{sup {minus}}W{sup {minus}} process is made. Enhancements of the signal rate from using a polarized electron beam, or at a 2 TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider and possible higher energy {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders, are also presented.

Barger, V. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.; Cheung, K. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for Particle Physics; Han, T. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Physics Dept.; Phillips, R.J.N. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Effects of hadron irradiation on scintillating fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trackers based on scintillating-fiber technology are being considered by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at SSC and the D[phi] collaboration at Fermilab. An important issue is the effect of the radiation existing in the detector cores on fiber properties. Most studies of radiation damage in scintillators have irradiated small bulk samples rather than fibers, and have used X-rays, [sup 60]Co gammas, or electron beams, often at accelerated rates. The authors have irradiated some 600 fibers in the Fermilab Tevatron C[phi] area, thereby obtaining a hadronic irradiation at realistic rates. Four-meter-long samples of ten Bicron polystyrene-based fiber types, maintained in air, dry nitrogen, argon, and vacuum atmospheres within stainless-steel tubes, were irradiated for seven weeks at various distances from the accelerator beam pipes. Maximum doses, measured by thermoluminescence detectors, were about 80 Krad. Fiber properties, particularly light yield and attenuation length, have been measured over a one-year period. A description of the work together with the results is presented. At the doses achieved, corresponding to a few years of actual fiber-tracking detector operation, little degradation is observed. In addition, recovery after several days' exposure to air has been noted. Properties of unirradiated samples kept in darkness show no changes after one year.

Atac, M. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Buchanan, C.; Chrisman, D.; Cline, D.; Kolonko, J.; Kubic, J.; Park, J. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Baumbaugh, A.; Binkley, M.; Bross, A.D.; Finley, D.; Elias, J.; Foster, G.W.; Kephart, R.; Kephart, R.; Kim, C.; Park, H.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rivetta, C.; Tkaczyk, S.; Wagner, R. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Chung, M.; Goldberg, H.; Jeskik, R.; Margulies, S.; Mendez, H.; Solomon, J.; Vaca, F. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)); Kelley, C. (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston, MA (United States)); Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Biswas, N.; Cason, N.; Jacques, J.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.; Kenney, V.; LoSecco, J.; Ruchti, R.; Shephard, W.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Marchant, J.; Mountain, R.J. (Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)); Davis, D.; Vandergriff, D. (O

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Michael Schmitt Physics at a -Collider 15-March-2001 1 Physics at a -Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's { it is possible to prepare initial states of speci#12;c CP #15; Since photons couple only to electric charge mass charged particles can circulate, and sensitivity is not masked by a large SM tree level challenging. The cost comes in a broad energy distribution. (better than protons, inferior to electrons

Schmitt, Michael

467

Michael Schmitt Physics at a -Collider 20-March-2001 1 Physics at a -Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of speci#12;c CP #15; Since photons couple only to electric charge, production of neutral particles circulate, and sensitivity is not masked by a large SM tree level contribution. #12; Michael Schmitt Physics;. #15; Preparing the photon beam is experimentally challenging. The cost comes in a broad energy

Schmitt, Michael

468

HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLE COLLIDERS: PAST 20 YEARS, NEXT 20 YEARS, AND BEYOND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle colliders for high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the colliding beam method and the history of colliders, discusses the development of the method over the last two decades in detail, and examines near-term collider projects that are currently under development. The paper concludes with an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and to find what paradigm changes are necessary

Shiltsev, V.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

469

High-energy Particle Colliders: Past 20 Years, Next 20 Years, And Beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle colliders for high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the colliding beam method and the history of colliders, discusses the development of the method over the last two decades in detail, and examines near-term collider projects that are currently under development. The paper concludes with an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and to find what paradigm changes are necessary for breakthroughs in the field.

Shiltsev, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Lepton flavor violation at linear collider experiments in supersymmetric grand unified theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lepton flavor violation at linear collider experiments is discussed. We show that detectable lepton flavor violation could occur through scalar lepton pair production and decay in the supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified theory in spite of the stringent present experimental constraints by rare process searches. Possible cross sections about 40fb for an e+e- collider and 280fb for an e-e- collider are illustrated.

Masahide Hirouchi; Minoru Tanaka

1997-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

471

Muon capture for the front end of a muon collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the design of the muon capture front end for a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} Collider. In the front end, a proton bunch on a target creates secondary pions that drift into a capture transport channel, decaying into muons. A sequence of rf cavities forms the resulting muon beams into strings of bunches of differing energies, aligns the bunches to (nearly) equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. The muons are then cooled and accelerated to high energy into a storage ring for high-energy high luminosity collisions. Our initial design is based on the somewhat similar front end of the International Design Study (IDS) neutrino factory.

Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab; Yoshikawa, C.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Calorimetry for Lepton Collider Experiments - CALICE results and activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CALICE collaboration conducts calorimeter R&D for highly granular calorimeters, mainly for their application in detectors for a future lepton collider at the TeV scale. The activities ranges from generic R&D with small devices up to extensive beam tests with prototypes comprising up to several 100000 calorimeter cells. CALICE has validated the performance of particle flow algorithms with test beam data and delivers the proof of principle that highly granular calorimeters can be built, operated and understood. The successes achieved in the past years allows the step from prototypes to calorimeter systems for particle physics detectors to be addressed.

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Calorimetry for Lepton Collider Experiments - CALICE results and activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CALICE collaboration conducts calorimeter R&D for highly granular calorimeters, mainly for their application in detectors for a future lepton collider at the TeV scale. The activities ranges from generic R&D with small devices up to extensive beam tests with prototypes comprising up to several 100000 calorimeter cells. CALICE has validated the performance of particle flow algorithms with test beam data and delivers the proof of principle that highly granular calorimeters can be built, operated and understood. The successes achieved in the past years allows the step from prototypes to calorimeter systems for particle physics detectors to be addressed.

The CALICE Collaboration

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

474

Complementarity between collider, direct detection, and indirect detection experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the capabilities of planned direct detection, indirect detection, and collider experiments in exploring the 19-parameter p(henomenological)MSSM, focusing on the complementarity between the different search techniques. In particular, we consider dark matter searches at the 7, 8 (and eventually 14) TeV LHC, \\Fermi, CTA, IceCube/DeepCore, and LZ. We see that the search sensitivities depend strongly on the WIMP mass and annihilation mechanism, with the result that different search techniques explore orthogonal territory. We also show that advances in each technique are necessary to fully explore the space of Supersymmetric WIMPs.

Matthew Cahill-Rowley

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

475

Radio emission from Colliding-Wind Binaries: Observations and Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed radiative transfer models of the radio emission from colliding-wind binaries (CWB) based on a hydrodynamical treatment of the wind-collision region (WCR). The archetype of CWB systems is the 7.9-yr period binary WR140, which exhibits dramatic variations at radio wavelengths. High-resolution radio observations of WR140 permit a determination of several system parameters, particularly orbit inclination and distance, that are essential for any models of this system. A model fit to data at orbital phase 0.9 is shown, and some short comings of our model described.

S. M. Dougherty; J. M. Pittard; E. P. O'Connor

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceleration linear collider Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PARTICLES Electrons can be produced by Summary: is invariant Many current particle accelerators are used to collide high energy particle beams. The majority... of accelerators are...

477

Big bang nucleosynthesis constraints on hadronically and electromagnetically decaying relic neutral particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Big bang nucleosynthesis in the presence of decaying relic neutral particles is examined in detail. All nonthermal processes important for the determination of light-element abundance yields of H2, H3, He3, He4, Li6, and Li7 are coupled to the thermonuclear fusion reactions to obtain comparatively accurate results. Predicted light-element yields are compared to observationally inferred limits on primordial light-element abundances to infer constraints on the abundances and properties of relic decaying particles with decay times in the interval 0.01??sec??X?1012??sec. Decaying particles are typically constrained at early times by He4 or H2, at intermediate times by Li6, and at large times by the He3/H2 ratio. Constraints are shown for a large number of hadronic branching ratios and decaying particle masses and may be applied to constrain the evolution of the early universe.

Karsten Jedamzik

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

478

Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

Bertsche, Kirk; /SLAC; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

479

Numerical heat conduction in hydrodynamical models of colliding hypersonic flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamical models of colliding hypersonic flows are presented which explore the dependence of the resulting dynamics and the characteristics of the derived X-ray emission on numerical conduction and viscosity. For the purpose of our investigation we present models of colliding flow with plane-parallel and cylindrical divergence. Numerical conduction causes erroneous heating of gas across the contact discontinuity which has implications for the rate at which the gas cools. We find that the dynamics of the shocked gas and the resulting X-ray emission are strongly dependent on the contrast in the density and temperature either side of the contact discontinuity, these effects being strongest where the postshock gas of one flow behaves quasi-adiabatically while the postshock gas of the other flow is strongly radiative. Introducing additional numerical viscosity into the simulations has the effect of damping the growth of instabilities, which in some cases act to increase the volume of shocked gas and can re-he...

Parkin, E R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Highly Polarized Ion Sources for Electron Ion Colliders (EIC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of the RHIC facility at BNL and the Electron Ion Colliders (EIC) under development at Jefferson Laboratory and BNL need high brightness ion beams with the highest polarization. Charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron and Siberian snakes have the potential to handle the needed polarized beam currents, but first the ion sources must create beams with the highest possible polarization to maximize collider productivity, which is proportional to a high power of the polarization. We are developing one universal H-/D- ion source design which will synthesize the most advanced developments in the field of polarized ion sources to provide high current, high brightness, ion beams with greater than 90% polarization, good lifetime, high reliability, and good power efficiency. The new source will be an advanced version of an atomic beam polarized ion source (ABPIS) with resonant charge exchange ionization by negative ions. An integrated ABPIS design will be prepared based on new materials and an optimized magnetic focusing system. Polarized atomic and ion beam formation, extraction, and transport for the new source will be computer simulated.

V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, Y. Zhang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "large hadron collider" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Description of Hot and Dense Hadron Gas Properties in a New Excluded-Volume model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new equation of state for a hot and dense hadron gas (HG) is obtained where the finite hard-core size of baryons has been incorporated in a thermodynamically consistent formulation of excluded volume correction. Our model differs from other existing approaches on the following points. We assign a hard-core volume only to each baryon and mesons though possess a small volume but they can fuse and interpenetrate into one another. Use of the full quantum statistics is made in obtaining the grand canonical partition function where excluded-volume correction has been incorporated by explicitly integrating over volume. We thus find that the new model works even for the cases of extreme temperatures and/or densities where most of other approaches fail. The model does not violate causality even at extreme densities. The temperature and density dependence of various thermodynamical quantities, e.g. pressure, baryon density, entropy and energy density compare well with the results of other microscopic HG models. After suitable parametrization of the centre-of-mass energy in terms of temperature and baryon chemical potential, we explore some new freeze-out criteria which exhibit full independence of the collision energy and of the structures of the colliding nuclei. We further demonstrate the suitability of our model in explaining various experimental results of the multiplicity-ratios of various particles and their antiparticles. Finally, we use our excluded-volume model to obtain the transport behaviour of the hot and/or dense HG such as shear viscosity to entropy ratio, speed of sound etc. and compare the results with earlier calculations.

S. K. Tiwari; P. K. Srivastava; C. P. Singh

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

482

Exotic hadron production in a quark combination model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The philosophy on production of exotic hadrons (multiquark states) in the framework of the quark combination model is investigated, taking f{sub 0}(980) as an example. The production rate and p{sub T} spectra of f{sub 0}(980) considered as (ss) or (sqsq), respectively, are calculated and compared in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. The unitarity of various combination models, when open for exotic hadron production, is addressed.

Han Wei; Shao Fenglan [Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu, 273165 (China); Li Shiyuan; Shang Yonghui; Yao Tao [Department of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Hadron Production at Fixed Target Energies and Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NA61/SHINE is a fixed-target experiment to study hadron production in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS. Due to the very good acceptance and particle identification in forward direction, NA61/SHINE is well suited for measuring particle production to improve the reliability of air shower simulations. Data with proton and pion beams have been taken in 2007 and 2009. First analysis results for the pion yield in proton-carbon interactions at 31 GeV will be shown and compared to predictions from models used in air shower simulations.

M. Unger; for the NA61/SHINE Collaboration

2010-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

484

Collider signatures of the SO(5) x U(1) gauge-Higgs unification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collider signatures of the $SO(5) \\times U(1)$ gauge-Higgs unification model in the Randall-Sundrum warped space are explored. Gauge couplings of quarks and leptons receive small corrections from the fifth dimension whose effects are tested by the precision data. It is found that the forward-backward asymmetries in $e^+e^-$ collisions on the $Z$ pole are well explained in a wide range of the warp factor $z_L$, but the model is consistent with the branching fractions of $Z$ decay only for large $z_L \\simg 10^{15}$. Kaluza-Klein (KK) spectra of gauge bosons, quarks, and leptons as well as gauge and Higgs couplings of low-lying KK excited states are determined. Right-handed quarks and leptons have larger couplings to the KK gauge bosons than left-handed ones. Production rates of Higgs bosons and KK states at Tevatron, LHC and ILC are evaluated. The first KK $Z$ has a mass 1130 GeV with a width 422 GeV for $z_L = 10^{15}$. The current limit on the $Z'$ production at Tevatron and LHC indicates $z_L >10^{15}$. A large effect of parity violation appears in the difference between the rapidity distributions of $e^+$ and $e^-$ in the decay of the first KK $Z$. The first KK gauge bosons decay into light and heavy quarks evenly.

Yutaka Hosotani; Minoru Tanaka; Nobuhiro Uekusa

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Electron-Hadron shower discrimination in a liquid argon time projection chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By exploiting structural differences between electromagnetic and hadronic showers in a multivariate analysis we present an efficient Electron-Hadron discrimination algorithm for liquid argon time projection chambers, validated using Geant4 simulated data.

J. J. Back; G. J. Barker; A. J. Bennieston; S. B. Boyd; B. Morgan; Y. A. Ramachers

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

486

SINGLE CRYSTAL NIOBIUM TUBES FOR PARTICLE COLLIDERS ACCELERATOR CAVITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to produce single crystal niobium (Nb) tubes for use as particle accelerator cavities for the Fermi laboratorys International Linear Collider project. Single crystal Nb tubes may have superior performance compared to a polycrystalline tubes because the absence of grain boundaries may permit the use of higher accelerating voltages. In addition, Nb tubes that are subjected to the high temperature, high vacuum crystallization process are very pure and well annealed. Any impurity with a significantly higher vapor pressure than Nb should be decreased by the relatively long exposure at high temperature to the high vacuum environment. After application of the single crystal process, the surfaces of the Nb tubes are bright and shiny, and the tube resembles an electro polished Nb tube. For these reasons, there is interest in single crystal Nb tubes and in a process that will produce single crystal tubes. To convert a polycrystalline niobium tube into a single crystal, the tube is heated to within a few hundred ?C of the melting temperature of niobium, which is 2477 ?C. RF heating is used to rapidly heat the tube in a narrow zone and after reaching the operating temperature, the hot zone is slowly passed along the length of the tube. For crystallization tests with Nb tubes, the traverse rate was in the range of 1-10 cm per hour. All the crystallization tests in this study were performed in a water-cooled, stainless steel chamber under a vacuum of 5 x10-6 torr or better. In earliest tests of the single crystal growth process, the Nb tubes had an OD of 1.9 cm and a wall thickness of 0.15 mm. With these relatively small Nb tubes, the single crystal process was always successful in producing single crystal tubes. In these early tests, the operating temperature was normally maintained at 2200 ?C, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In the next test series, the Nb tube size was increased to 3.8 cm OD and the wall thickness was increased 0.18 mm and eventually to 0.21 mm. Again, with these larger tubes, single crystal tubes were usually produced by the crystallization process. The power supply was generally operated at full output during these tests, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In a few tests, the traverse rate was increased to 10 cm per hour, and at the faster traverse rate, single crystal growth was not achieved. In these tests with a faster traverse rate, it was thought that the tube was not heated to a high enough temperature to achieve single crystal growth. In the next series of tests, the tube OD was unchanged at 3.8 cm and the wall thickness was increased to 0.30 mm. The increased wall thickness made it difficult to reach an operating temperature above 2,000 ?C, and although the single crystal process caused a large increase in the crystal grains, no single crystal tubes were produced. It was assumed that the operating temperature in these tests was not high enough to achieve single crystal growth. In FY 2012, a larger power supply was purchased and installed. With the new power supply, temperatures above the melting point of Nb were easily obtained regardless of the tube thickness. A series of crystallization tests was initiated to determine if indeed the operating temperature of the previous tests was too low to achieve single crystal growth. For these tests, the Nb tube OD remained at 3.8 cm and the wall thickness was 0.30 mm. The first test had an operating temperature of 2,000 ?C. and the operating temperature was increased by 50 ?C increments for each successive test. The final test was very near the Nb melting temperature, and indeed, the Nb tube eventually melted in the center of the tube. These tests showed that higher temperatures did yield larger grain sizes if the traverse rate was held constant at 5 cm per hour, but no single crystal tubes were produced even at the highest operating temperature. In addition, slowing the traverse rate to as low as 1 cm per hour did not yield a single crystal tube regardless of operating temperature. At this time, it

MURPHY, JAMES E [University of Nevada, Reno] [University of Nevada, Reno

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

487

Hydrodynamic simulations of the colliding winds in Iota Orionis Julian M. Pittard*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamic simulations of the colliding winds in Iota Orionis Julian M. Pittard* School simulations of the colliding winds in the eccentric binary Iota Orionis (HR 1889; HD 37043) have been conducted. With the inclusion of radiative driving, the realistic simulation of such a system becomes

Pittard, Julian

488

DESIGN OF THE MERCURY HANDLING SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY TARGET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF THE MERCURY HANDLING SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY TARGET (IPAC13, THPFI092) The baseline target concept for a Muon Collider or Neutrino Factory is a free mercury jet within a 20-T magnetic field being impacted by an 8-GeV proton beam. A pool of mercury serves as a receiving reservoir

McDonald, Kirk

489

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders p Source, 8­24 GeV, 1­4MW A Neutrino Factory based on a Muon Storage Linac 2 ­ 50 GeV Recirculating Linac 50­GeV Muon Storage Ring ~ 1km circumference Neutrino Beam to Near

McDonald, Kirk

490

OPTIMIZING MUON CAPTURE AND TRANSPORT FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY/MUON COLLIDER FRONT END  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIMIZING MUON CAPTURE AND TRANSPORT FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY/MUON COLLIDER FRONT END Hisham K In the current baseline scheme of the Neutrino Fac- tory/Muon Collider a muon beam from pion decay is pro- duced of the field along the beam, were varied to maximize the number of muons delivered to the Cooling Channel

McDonald, Kirk

491

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders p Source, 8-24 GeV, 1-4MW A Neutrino Factory based on a Muon StorageV Recirculating Linac 50-GeV Muon Storage Ring ~ 1km circumference Neutrino Beam to Near Detector Neutrino Beam

McDonald, Kirk

492

Measurement of the W Boson Mass With the Collider Detector at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of the W Boson Mass With the Collider Detector at Fermilab A thesis presented by Andrew With the Collider Detector at Fermilab Andrew Scott Gordon Thesis Advisor: Melissa Franklin Abstract We measure at Fermilab from pp collisions at ps = 1800 GeV. The data weretaken from January 1994 through July 1995

Weitz, David

493

Study of the Fundamental Structure of Matter with an Electron-Ion Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an overview of the scientific opportunities that would be offered by a high-energy electron-ion collider. We discuss the relevant physics of polarized and unpolarized electron-proton collisions and of electron-nucleus collisions. We also describe the current accelerator and detector plans for a future electron-ion collider.

Abhay Deshpande; Richard Milner; Raju Venugopalan; Werner Vogelsang

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

494

Activation of the liquid helium contamination during its passage in the Collider ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactivation of possible contamination of the liquid helium trapped in the arcs of the Collider ring of the Superconducting Super Collider and transported by the liquid helium is estimated. This estimation is used to calculate the dose rate on the filter of the refrigerator plant located at the top of the shaft.

Lopez, G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z