National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for large experimental physics

  1. Particle physics---Experimental

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, J.J.; Boynton, P.E.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1991-08-21

    We are continuing a research program in particle astrophysics and high energy experimental particle physics. We have joined the DUMAND Collaboration, which is constructing a deep undersea astrophysical neutrino detector near Hawaii. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions using emulsion chamber techniques were also continued, using balloon flight exposures to ultra-high cosmic ray nuclei (JACEE) and accelerator beams. As members of the DUMAND Collaboration, we have responsibility for development a construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility. We have designed and developed the acoustical positioning system required to permit reconstruction of muon tracks with sufficient precision to meet the astrophysical goals of the experiment. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the database and triggering system to be used. Work has been continuing in other aspects of the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators, using balloon-borne emulsion chambers. On one of the flights we found two nuclear interactions of multiplicity over 1000 -- one with a multiplicity of over 2000 and pseudorapidity density {approximately} 800 in the central region. At the statistical level of the JACEE experiment, the frequency of occurrence of such events is orders of magnitude too large. We have continued our ongoing program to study hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams.

  2. Experimental Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Carl; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Purohit, Milind V.

    2014-08-31

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina, under the leadership of Profs. S.R. Mishra, R. Petti, M.V. Purohit, J.R. Wilson (co-PI's), and C. Rosenfeld (PI), engaged in studies in "Experimental Particle Physics." The group collaborated with similar groups at other universities and at national laboratories to conduct experimental studies of elementary particle properties. We utilized the particle accelerators at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California, and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. Mishra, Rosenfeld, and Petti worked predominantly on neutrino experiments. Experiments conducted in the last fifteen years that used cosmic rays and the core of the sun as a source of neutrinos showed conclusively that, contrary to the former conventional wisdom, the "flavor" of a neutrino is not immutable. A neutrino of flavor "e," "mu," or "tau," as determined from its provenance, may swap its identity with one of the other flavors -- in our jargon, they "oscillate." The oscillation phenomenon is extraordinarily difficult to study because neutrino interactions with our instruments are exceedingly rare -- they travel through the earth mostly unimpeded -- and because they must travel great distances before a substantial proportion have made the identity swap. Three of the experiments that we worked on, MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE utilize a beam of neutrinos from an accelerator at Fermilab to determine the parameters governing the oscillation. Two other experiments that we worked on, NOMAD and MIPP, provide measurements supportive of the oscillation experiments. Good measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters may constitute a "low energy window" on related phenomena that are otherwise unobservable because they would occur only at energies way above the reach of conceivable accelerators. Purohit and Wilson participated in the BaBar experiment

  3. Experimental Physical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Physics, Chair ASM International, Board of Trustees Association for Iron & Steel Technology, Board of Directors National Science Foundation, Condensed Matter Physics, Program...

  4. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walter, Chris [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States

    2010-01-08

    In this talk, I will review how a set of experiments in the last decade has given us our current understanding of neutrino properties.  I will show how experiments in the last year or two have clarified this picture, and will discuss how new experiments about to start will address remaining questions.  I will particularly emphasize the relationship between various experimental techniques.

  5. Elementary particle physics---Experimental

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, J.J.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1990-09-20

    We are continuing a research program in high energy experimental particle physics and particle astrophysics. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions were performed using several techniques, in addition, a high energy leptoproduction experiment was continued at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators. The data are being collected with ballon-borne emulsion chambers. The properties of nuclear interactions at these high energies will reveal whether new production mechanisms come into play due to the high nuclear densities and temperatures obtained. We carried out closely related studies of hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams. We are members of a large international collaboration which has exposed emulsion chamber detectors to beams of {sup 32}S and {sup 16}O with energy 60 and 200 GeV/n at CERN and 15 GeV/n at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The primary objectives of this program are to determine the existence and properties of the hypothesized quark-gluon phase of matter, and its possible relation to a variety of anomalous observations. Studies of leptoproduction processes at high energies involve two separate experiments, one using the Tevatron 500 GeV muon beam and the other exploring the >TeV regime. We are participants in Fermilab experiment E665 employing a comprehensive counter/streamer chamber detector system. During the past year we joined the DUMAND Collaboration, and have been assigned responsibility for development and construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility, to be deployed in 1991. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the triggering system to be used.

  6. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research The JASPER gas gun at the Nevada ... For more information visit JASPER's webpage. Jasper Gun Related Topics Maintaining the ...

  7. Summary of experimental electroweak physics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nodulman, L.

    1999-05-03

    Progress continues on many fronts of experimental testing of electroweak symmetry breaking. Updates were presented on LEP, SLC, Brookhaven g-2 ring, Tevatron Collider, HERA, CESR and Tevatron neutrino experiments. Perhaps most exciting is the Higgs search at LEP2, complementing the indirect constraints. However, the standard model with one Higgs doublet remains viable.

  8. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  9. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  11. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-31

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  12. Particle physics---Experimental. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, J.J.; Boynton, P.E.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1991-08-21

    We are continuing a research program in particle astrophysics and high energy experimental particle physics. We have joined the DUMAND Collaboration, which is constructing a deep undersea astrophysical neutrino detector near Hawaii. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions using emulsion chamber techniques were also continued, using balloon flight exposures to ultra-high cosmic ray nuclei (JACEE) and accelerator beams. As members of the DUMAND Collaboration, we have responsibility for development a construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility. We have designed and developed the acoustical positioning system required to permit reconstruction of muon tracks with sufficient precision to meet the astrophysical goals of the experiment. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the database and triggering system to be used. Work has been continuing in other aspects of the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators, using balloon-borne emulsion chambers. On one of the flights we found two nuclear interactions of multiplicity over 1000 -- one with a multiplicity of over 2000 and pseudorapidity density {approximately} 800 in the central region. At the statistical level of the JACEE experiment, the frequency of occurrence of such events is orders of magnitude too large. We have continued our ongoing program to study hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams.

  13. Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas: Los Alamos NPAC Research...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas: Los Alamos NPAC Research Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas: Los Alamos NPAC...

  14. Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System BASE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-08-01

    EPICS is a set of software tools and applications developed initially by the Los Alamos National Laboratories for the control of large accelerators, enhanced by contributions from users worldwide and continuing development for application to other large scientific experimental equipment, such as telescopes and detectors. EPICS consists of EPICS BASE, Extensions, and other unbundled modules. EPICS BASE marks a change in the handling of the distribution of the software starting with the EPICS BASE 3.13.7more » AND 3.140beta2 software.« less

  15. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) Physics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The CLAS Physics Data Base contains experimental data obtained by the CLAS Collaboration since 1998. Currently content of the DB is limited by experimental data on measured observables such as cross-sections, polarization asymmetries and structure functions. Information on completely integrated single and multi-differential cross-sections are available for various exclusive reactions off proton, neutron and nuclei, induced by real and virtual photons. The kinematics range covered by data sets are W < 4.0 GeV and Q2 < 5.0 GeV2. The search engine allows data to be selected according to various criteria, for instance: the initial and final states, particular kinematics range, observables of interest, date and author name(s) [Copied from http://clasweb.jlab.org/physicsdb/intro.html] A username and password are required to access and search the entire database. However, the Overview page provides links to detailed data pages for each of the experiments available for public access. There are many experiments with data that the public can freely access.

  16. ALCF hosts physics workshop to bridge computational and experimental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALCF hosts physics workshop to bridge computational and experimental efforts Author: Jim ... generate new ideas and projects in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. ...

  17. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Robert D.

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  18. Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics Program at CERN (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics Program at CERN Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics Program at CERN You are accessing a document from...

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies of elementary physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.; Slattery, P.; Tipton, P.; Das, A.; Hagen, C.R.; Rajeev, S.G.; Okubo, S.

    1992-04-30

    The experimental high energy physics program is directed toward the execution of experiments that probe the basic constituents of matter and the forces between them. These experiments are carried out at national and international accelerator facilities. At the current time, we are primarily concentrating on the following projects: Direct photon production in hadronic reactions (Fermilab E706); Production of hybrid mesons in the nuclear Coulomb field; The D-Zero experiment at the Tevatron collider; Deep inelastic neutrino- and electron-nucleon scattering at FNAL and SLAC; Nonlinear QED at critical field strengths at SLAC; The Experiments at KEK (AMY, 17keV neutrino); The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider; and SSC-related detector R D on scintillating tile- and diamond-based calorimetry and microstrip tracking detectors.

  20. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics HEPFrontcover.png Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics An HEP / ASCR / NERSC Workshop November 12-13, 2009 Report Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics, Report of the Joint HEP / ASCR / NERSC Workshop conducted Nov. 12-13, 2009 https://www.nersc.gov/assets/HPC-Requirements-for-Science/HEPFrontcover.png Goals This workshop was organized by the Department of

  1. Experimental Fusion Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Fusion Research PPPL fusion research centers on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), which is undergoing a $94 million upgrade that will make it the most powerful experimental fusion facility, or tokamak, of its type in the world when work is completed in 2014. Experiments will test the ability of the upgraded spherical facility to maintain a high-performance plasma under conditions of extreme heat and power. Results could strongly influence the design of future fusion

  2. Review of Experimental Aspects of Pentaquark Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strakovsky, I.I.; Arndt, R.A.; Workman, R.L.; Azimov, Ya.I.; Polyakov, M.V.

    2005-06-14

    Given the existing empirical evidence for an exotic {theta}+ baryon, we analyze possible properties of its SU(3)F-partners, paying special attention to the nonstrange member of the antidecuplet N*. A modified {pi}N partial-wave analysis results in two candidate masses, 1680 MeV and 1730 MeV. In both cases, the N* should be rather narrow and highly inelastic. Our results suggest several directions for experimental studies that may clarify properties of the antidecuplet baryons, and structure of their mixing with other baryons. Recent experimental evidence from the GRAAL and STAR Collaborations could be interpreted as observations of a candidate for the {theta}+ nonstrange partner. We also briefly discuss recent negative results regarding the {theta}-baryon.

  3. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-05-01

    This is the May 1988 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, the Laboratory`s booster linac project work, instrumentation, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1987-88 academic year, and publications. Refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-04-01

    This is the April 1989 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Labortaory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, computer systems, instrumentation, and the Laboratory`s booster linac work. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1988-1989 academic year, and publications. Refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Experimental High Energy Physics Research: Direct Detection of Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherell, Michael S.

    2014-10-02

    The grant supported research on an experimental search for evidence of dark matter interactions with normal matter. The PI carried out the research as a member of the LUX and LZ collaborations. The LUX research team collected a first data set with the LUX experiment, a large liquid xenon detector installed in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The first results were published in Physical Review Letters on March 4, 2014. The journal Nature named the LUX result a scientific highlight of the year for 2013. In addition, the LZ collaboration submitted the full proposal for the Lux Zeplin experiment, which has since been approved by DOE-HEP as a second-generation dark matter experiment. Witherell is the Level 2 manager for the Outer Detector System on the LUX-Zeplin experiment.

  6. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics: Target

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics: Target 2014 NPFrontcover.png May 26-27, 2011 Hyatt Regency Bethesda One Bethesda Metro Center (7400 Wisconsin Ave) Bethesda, Maryland, USA 20814 Final Report Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research, Report of the Joint NP / NERSC Workshop Conducted May 26-27, 2011 Bethesda, MD Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing

  7. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

    2012-03-02

    IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC’s continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called “case studies,” of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, “multi-core” environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

  8. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research The JASPER gas gun at the Nevada National Security Site is used to fire a projectile at a plutonium target. The shock wave produced by the impact passes through the plutonium, and diagnostic equipment measures the properties of the shocked plutonium. Shock physics experiments such as this are critical to maintaining the safety and security of the nation's stockpile in the absence of underground nuclear

  9. Large-x connections of nuclear and high-energy physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Accardi, Alberto

    2013-11-20

    I discuss how global QCD fits of parton distribution functions can make the somewhat separated fields of high-energy particle physics and lower energy hadronic and nuclear physics interact to the benefit of both. I review specific examples of this interplay from recent works of the CTEQ-Jefferson Lab collaboration, including hadron structure at large parton momentum and gauge boson production at colliders. Particular attention is devoted to quantifying theoretical uncertainties arising in the treatment of large partonic momentum contributions to deep inelastic scattering observables, and to discussing the experimental progress needed to reduce these.

  10. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  11. The physics and chemistry of large carbon clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, R.N.; Hetitch, R.L.

    1992-12-01

    The generation, separation, physics, and chemistry of large carbon clusters (fullerenes) and many of their exohedral (e.g. C{sub 60}H{sub 36}, C{sub 60}F{sub 48}) and endohedral (e.g. Ce@C{sub 60) derivatives will be reviewed. Electronic and ionic properties of these species are studied using resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy (FTMS). Gas and surface phase reactions will be discussed. The production of C{sub 60}{sup 2{minus}} via laser desorption from a surface is of particular interest. Exposure of a surface of C{sub 60}} (buckyball) to a hydrogen plasma results in coalescence of a large fraction of these clusters into C{sub 120}, C{sub 180}, C{sub 240}, etc. (buckytubes or geodesic domes?).

  12. Experimental High Energy Physics Brandeis University Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blocker, Craig A.; Bensinger, James; Sciolla, Gabriella; Wellenstein, Hermann

    2013-07-26

    During the past three years, the Brandeis experimental particle physics group was comprised of four faculty (Bensinger, Blocker, Sciolla, and Wellenstein), one research scientist, one post doc, and ten graduate students. The group focused on the ATLAS experiment at LHC. In 2011, the LHC delivered 5/fb of pp colliding beam data at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In 2012, the center-of-mass energy was increased to 8 TeV, and 20/fb were delivered. The Brandeis group focused on two aspects of the ATLAS experiment -- the muon detection system and physics analysis. Since data taking began at the LHC in 2009, our group actively worked on ATLAS physics analysis, with an emphasis on exploiting the new energy regime of the LHC to search for indications of physics beyond the Standard Model. The topics investigated were Z' -> ll, Higgs -> ZZ* -. 4l, lepton flavor violation, muon compositeness, left-right symmetric theories, and a search for Higgs -> ee. The Brandeis group has for many years been a leader in the endcap muon system, making important contributions to every aspect of its design and production. During the past three years, the group continued to work on commissioning the muon detector and alignment system, development of alignment software, and installation of remaining chambers.

  13. A guide to experimental particle physics literature, 1991-1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezhela, V.V.; Filimonov, B.B.; Lugovsky, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    We present an indexed guide to experimental particle physics literature for the years 1991 - 1996. Approximately 4200 papers are indexed by (1) Beam/Target/Momentum (2) Reaction/Momentum/Data-Descriptor (including the final state) (3) Particle/Decay (4) Accelerator/Experiment/Detector. All indices are cross-referenced to the paper`s title and references in the ID/Reference/Title index. The information presented in this guide is also publicly available on a regularly-updated DATAGUIDE database from the World Wide Web.

  14. Jefferson Lab Strategic Planning Experimental Nuclear Physics Division Town Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Strategic Planning Experimental Nuclear Physics Division Town Meeting December 08, 2011 - CEBAF Center Auditorium Agenda 08:30 - 08:35 Charge Bob McKeown 08:35 - 08:45 (5 + 5) Introduction Rolf Ent (Mission Statement, Scope of Current activities, Synergy) 08:45 - 09:00 (10 + 5) 12-GeV Upgrade: "<5 years" scientific program Glenn Young (Machine + Hall Equipment, Approved Experiments) 09:00 - 09:40 12-GeV Upgrade: "5-10 year" scientific program (5 + 5) Hall A

  15. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Harold G; Kostelecky, V Alan; Musser, James A

    2013-07-29

    The elementary particle physics research program at Indiana University spans a broad range of the most interesting topics in this fundamental field, including important contributions to each of the frontiers identified in the recent report of HEPAP's Particle Physics Prioritization Panel: the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. Experimentally, we contribute to knowledge at the Energy Frontier through our work on the D0 and ATLAS collaborations. We work at the Intensity Frontier on the MINOS and NOvA experiments and participate in R&D for LBNE. We are also very active on the theoretical side of each of these areas with internationally recognized efforts in phenomenology both in and beyond the Standard Model and in lattice QCD. Finally, although not part of this grant, members of the Indiana University particle physics group have strong involvement in several astrophysics projects at the Cosmic Frontier. Our research efforts are divided into three task areas. The Task A group works on D0 and ATLAS; Task B is our theory group; and Task C contains our MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE (LArTPC) research. Each task includes contributions from faculty, senior scientists, postdocs, graduate and undergraduate students, engineers, technicians, and administrative personnel. This work was supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-91ER40661. In the following, we describe progress made in the research of each task during the final period of the grant, from November 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013.

  16. UVA experimental and high energy physics. Final grant report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, B.

    1999-10-07

    The period 1992--1997 was a mixture of frustrations and of accomplishments for the UVa HEP group. The experimental HEP group began this period with the completion of a truncated run of Experiment E771 at Fermilab in 1992. This experiment was designed to measure the cross section for beauty production in 800 GeV/c pN interactions. It succeeded in this goal as well as in obtaining one of the best limits on FCNC in charm decays by setting an upper limit on D{sup 0} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}. In addition, they were able to measure {Psi}, {Psi}, {chi}{sub 1},{chi}{sub 2} and upsilon production. Three UVa PhD theses have resulted from this experiment (as well as 12 other PhD's at other institutions). At the same time, the UVa experimental group was vigorously pursuing the goal of studying CP violation in B production. This took the form of a proposal to the SSC for a super fixed target facility, the SFT, which would focus on studies of B mesons. B. Cox was the spokesman of this experiment that had over thirty institutions. This proposal EOI-14 had a good reception by the SSC PAC. A R and D activity to prove the technique of crystal channeling was undertaken to prove the accelerator aspects of this proposal. This activity, known as E853 or CEX at Fermilab, resulted in proof of the crystal channeling technique as viable for the extraction of 20 TeV beam at the SSC. In addition to this activity, the UVa group investigated many other aspects of B physics at the SSC. They were among the leaders of the 1993 Snowmass meeting on B Physics at Hadronic Accelerators. The UVa HEP group worked vigorously on developing the ideas for B physics at the SSC, as evidenced by the many different studies listed in the publication list given, up to the very day the SSC was terminated by an act of Congress.

  17. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes

  18. Experimental Condensed Matter Physics | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Condensed Matter Physics Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities Reports and Activities Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Experimental Condensed Matter Physics Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page This research area supports experimental condensed matter physics emphasizing the relationship between the

  19. Feeding a large-scale physics application to Python

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beazley, D.M.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1997-10-01

    The authors describe their experiences using Python with the SPaSM molecular dynamics code at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Originally developed as a large monolithic application for massive parallel processing systems, they have used Python to transform their application into a flexible, highly modular, and extremely powerful system for performing simulation, data analysis, and visualization. In addition, they describe how Python has solved a number of important problems related to the development, debugging, deployment, and maintenance of scientific software.

  20. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D; for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  1. Cross-checking of Large Evaluated and Experimental Nuclear Reaction Databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeydina, O.; Koning, A.J.; Soppera, N.; Raffanel, D.; Bossant, M.; Dupont, E.; Beauzamy, B.

    2014-06-15

    Automated methods are presented for the verification of large experimental and evaluated nuclear reaction databases (e.g. EXFOR, JEFF, TENDL). These methods allow an assessment of the overall consistency of the data and detect aberrant values in both evaluated and experimental databases.

  2. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Physics Print Because a large proportion of ALS experiments are "physics" experiments, it's useful to separate them into two categories - one focused on Materials/Condensed Matter, and this one, with a dual focus on AMO (atomic, molecular, and optical) physics and accelerator physics. Light sources such as the ALS have opened up research frontiers that may hold the answers to fundamental questions about structure and dynamics in AMO physics. The advanced spectroscopies that

  3. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Print Because a large proportion of ALS experiments are "physics" experiments, it's useful to separate them into two categories - one focused on Materials/Condensed Matter, and this one, with a dual focus on AMO (atomic, molecular, and optical) physics and accelerator physics. Light sources such as the ALS have opened up research frontiers that may hold the answers to fundamental questions about structure and dynamics in AMO physics. The advanced spectroscopies that have been

  4. Prediction of Multi-Physics Behaviors of Large Lithium-Ion Batteries During Internal and External Short Circuit (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, G. H.; Lee, K. J.; Chaney, L.; Smith, K.; Darcy, E.; Pesaran, A.; Darcy, E.

    2010-11-01

    This presentation describes the multi-physics behaviors of internal and external short circuits in large lithium-ion batteries.

  5. A guide to experimental elementary particle physics literature, 1985--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekhin, S.I.; Bazeeva, V.V.; Ezhela, V.V.; Filimonov, B.B.; Lugovsky, S.B.; Nikolaev, A.S.; Petrova, N.L.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Striganov, S.I.; Stroganov, Y.G.; Shelkovenko, A.N.; Yuschenko, O.P. . Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Yost, G.P.; Rittenberg, A.; Armstrong, F.E.; Barnett, R.M.; Simpson, K.H.; Trippe, T.G.; Wagman, G.S.; W

    1990-11-01

    We present an indexed guide to experimental high energy physics literature for the years 1985--1989. No actual data are given, but approximately 3500 papers are indexed by Beam/Target/Momentum, Reaction/Momentum (including the final stare), Final State Particle, and Accelerator/Experiment/ Detector.

  6. Towards an Experimental Testbed Facility for Cyber-Physical Security Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgar, Thomas W.; Manz, David O.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2012-01-07

    Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) are under great scrutiny due to large Smart Grid investments and recent high profile security vulnerabilities and attacks. Research into improved security technologies, communication models, and emergent behavior is necessary to protect these systems from sophisticated adversaries and new risks posed by the convergence of CPSs with IT equipment. However, cyber-physical security research is limited by the lack of access to universal cyber-physical testbed facilities that permit flexible, high-fidelity experiments. This paper presents a remotely-configurable and community-accessible testbed design that integrates elements from the virtual, simulated, and physical environments. Fusing data between the three environments enables the creation of realistic and scalable environments where new functionality and ideas can be exercised. This novel design will enable the research community to analyze and evaluate the security of current environments and design future, secure, cyber-physical technologies.

  7. GenASiS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-06-11

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual `unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. Lastly, these classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  8. GenASiS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-06-11

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual `unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. Lastly, these classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes themmore » useful for physics simulations in many fields.« less

  9. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.

    2014-04-07

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2 nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  10. The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System architecture: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalesio, L.R.; Hill, J.O.; Kraimer, M.; Lewis, S.; Murray, D.; Hunt, S.; Claussen, M.; Watson, W.; Dalesio, J.

    1993-11-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), has been used at a number of sites for performing data acquisition, supervisory control, closed-loop control, sequential control, and operational optimization. The EPICS architecture was originally developed by a group with diverse backgrounds in physics and industrial control. The current architecture represents one instance of the ``standard model.`` It provides distributed processing and communication from any LAN device to the front end controllers. This paper will present the genealogy, current architecture, performance envelope, current installations, and planned extensions for requirements not met by the current architecture.

  11. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  12. Experimental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scaling of fluctuations and confinement with Lundquist number in the reversed-field pinch M. R. Stoneking, a) J. T. Chapman, D. J. Den Hartog, S. C. Prager, and J. S. Sarff Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 18 September 1997; accepted 12 January 1998͒ The scaling of the magnetic and velocity fluctuations with Lundquist number (S) is examined experimentally over a range of values from 7ϫ10 4 to 10 6 in a reversed-field pinch ͑RFP͒

  13. A guide to experimental elementary particle physics literature, 1988--1992. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekhin, S.I.; Ezhela, V.V.; Filimonov, B.B.

    1993-09-01

    We present an indexed guide to the literature experimental particle physics for the years 1988--1992. About 4,000 papers are indexed by Beam/Target/Momentum, Reaction Momentum (including the final state), Final State Particle, and Accelerator/Detector/Experiment. All indices are cross-referenced to the paper`s title and reference in the ID/Reference/Title Index. The information in this guide is also publicly available from a regularly updated computer database.

  14. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  15. LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, C. A.; Dobson, P.F.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wang, J. S. Y.; Onstott, T.C.; Scherer, G.W.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ramakrishnan, T.S.; Stabinski, E.L.; Liang, K.; Verma, S.

    2010-10-01

    LUCI, the Laboratory for Underground CO{sub 2} Investigations, is an experimental facility being planned for the DUSEL underground laboratory in South Dakota, USA. It is designed to study vertical flow of CO{sub 2} in porous media over length scales representative of leakage scenarios in geologic carbon sequestration. The plan for LUCI is a set of three vertical column pressure vessels, each of which is {approx}500 m long and {approx}1 m in diameter. The vessels will be filled with brine and sand or sedimentary rock. Each vessel will have an inner column to simulate a well for deployment of down-hole logging tools. The experiments are configured to simulate CO{sub 2} leakage by releasing CO{sub 2} into the bottoms of the columns. The scale of the LUCI facility will permit measurements to study CO{sub 2} flow over pressure and temperature variations that span supercritical to subcritical gas conditions. It will enable observation or inference of a variety of relevant processes such as buoyancy-driven flow in porous media, Joule-Thomson cooling, thermal exchange, viscous fingering, residual trapping, and CO{sub 2} dissolution. Experiments are also planned for reactive flow of CO{sub 2} and acidified brines in caprock sediments and well cements, and for CO{sub 2}-enhanced methanogenesis in organic-rich shales. A comprehensive suite of geophysical logging instruments will be deployed to monitor experimental conditions as well as provide data to quantify vertical resolution of sensor technologies. The experimental observations from LUCI will generate fundamental new understanding of the processes governing CO{sub 2} trapping and vertical migration, and will provide valuable data to calibrate and validate large-scale model simulations.

  16. Physical control oriented model of large scale refrigerators to synthesize advanced control schemes. Design, validation, and first control results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonne, François; Bonnay, Patrick

    2014-01-29

    In this paper, a physical method to obtain control-oriented dynamical models of large scale cryogenic refrigerators is proposed, in order to synthesize model-based advanced control schemes. These schemes aim to replace classical user experience designed approaches usually based on many independent PI controllers. This is particularly useful in the case where cryoplants are submitted to large pulsed thermal loads, expected to take place in the cryogenic cooling systems of future fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced Fusion Experiment (JT-60SA). Advanced control schemes lead to a better perturbation immunity and rejection, to offer a safer utilization of cryoplants. The paper gives details on how basic components used in the field of large scale helium refrigeration (especially those present on the 400W @1.8K helium test facility at CEA-Grenoble) are modeled and assembled to obtain the complete dynamic description of controllable subsystems of the refrigerator (controllable subsystems are namely the Joule-Thompson Cycle, the Brayton Cycle, the Liquid Nitrogen Precooling Unit and the Warm Compression Station). The complete 400W @1.8K (in the 400W @4.4K configuration) helium test facility model is then validated against experimental data and the optimal control of both the Joule-Thompson valve and the turbine valve is proposed, to stabilize the plant under highly variable thermals loads. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  17. Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-08-24

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. Then, a new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the protonproton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. I summarize what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.

  18. Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-08-24

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. Then, a new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the proton–proton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. I summarize what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.

  19. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF LARGE AND SMALL GRANULES IN SOLAR QUIET REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Daren; Xie Zongxia; Hu Qinghua; Yang Shuhong; Zhang Jun; Wang Jingxiu E-mail: zjun@ourstar.bao.ac.cn

    2011-12-10

    The normal mode observations of seven quiet regions obtained by the Hinode spacecraft are analyzed to study the physical properties of granules. An artificial intelligence technique is introduced to automatically find the spatial distribution of granules in feature spaces. In this work, we investigate the dependence of granular continuum intensity, mean Doppler velocity, and magnetic fields on granular diameter. We recognized 71,538 granules by an automatic segmentation technique and then extracted five properties: diameter, continuum intensity, Doppler velocity, and longitudinal and transverse magnetic flux density to describe the granules. To automatically explore the intrinsic structures of the granules in the five-dimensional parameter space, the X-means clustering algorithm and one-rule classifier are introduced to define the rules for classifying the granules. It is found that diameter is a dominating parameter in classifying the granules and two families of granules are derived: small granules with diameters smaller than 1.''44, and large granules with diameters larger than 1.''44. Based on statistical analysis of the detected granules, the following results are derived: (1) the averages of diameter, continuum intensity, and Doppler velocity in the upward direction of large granules are larger than those of small granules; (2) the averages of absolute longitudinal, transverse, and unsigned flux density of large granules are smaller than those of small granules; (3) for small granules, the average of continuum intensity increases with their diameters, while the averages of Doppler velocity, transverse, absolute longitudinal, and unsigned magnetic flux density decrease with their diameters. However, the mean properties of large granules are stable; (4) the intensity distributions of all granules and small granules do not satisfy Gaussian distribution, while that of large granules almost agrees with normal distribution with a peak at 1.04 I{sub 0}.

  20. Towards physics responsible for large-scale Lyman-α forest bias parameters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agnieszka M. Cieplak; Slosar, Anze

    2016-03-08

    Using a series of carefully constructed numerical experiments based on hydrodynamic cosmological SPH simulations, we attempt to build an intuition for the relevant physics behind the large scale density (bδ) and velocity gradient (bη) biases of the Lyman-α forest. Starting with the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation applied to the smoothed total density field in real-space, and progressing through redshift-space with no thermal broadening, redshift-space with thermal broadening and hydrodynamically simulated baryon fields, we investigate how approximations found in the literature fare. We find that Seljak's 2012 analytical formulae for these bias parameters work surprisingly well in the limit of no thermalmore » broadening and linear redshift-space distortions. We also show that his bη formula is exact in the limit of no thermal broadening. Since introduction of thermal broadening significantly affects its value, we speculate that a combination of large-scale measurements of bη and the small scale flux PDF might be a sensitive probe of the thermal state of the IGM. Lastly, we find that large-scale biases derived from the smoothed total matter field are within 10–20% to those based on hydrodynamical quantities, in line with other measurements in the literature.« less

  1. The University of Virginia Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Principal Investigator: Harry B. Thacker

    2012-08-13

    The work covered in this report includes a joint project on using gauge-gravity duality to discover qualitatively new results on jet quenching in strongly-coupled QCD-like plasmas. Other topics addressed by the theoretical work include jet stopping and energy loss in weakly-coupled plasmas, perturbative QCD amplitudes, AdS/CMT, dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking with a heavy fourth generation, electroweak-scale #23;{nu}{sub R} model, vacuum topological structure and chiral dynamics in strongly coupled gauge theory. Effort committed to the CMS experiment is reported, particularly the management, maintenance, operation and upgrade of the CMS electromagnetic detector (ECAL). Activities in various physics analyses including Supersymmetry, Higgs, Top, and QCD analyses are reported. Physics projects covering wide areas of physics at the LHC are reported. CY2010 saw the accumulation of a data sample corresponding to approximately 36 pb{sup -1}; in CY 2011 the data sample swelled to more than 5 fb{sup -1}. The UVa CMS analysis efforts are focused on this large 2011 data sample in a suite of crucial measurements and searches. KTeV physics activities are reported. Efforts are reported pertaining to several experiments, including: HyperCP, CKM, MIPP, D?, NO#23;{nu}A, and Mu2e.

  2. Theoretical and experimental studies of elementary physics. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.; Slattery, P.; Tipton, P.; Das, A.; Hagen, C.R.; Rajeev, S.G.; Okubo, S.

    1992-04-30

    The experimental high energy physics program is directed toward the execution of experiments that probe the basic constituents of matter and the forces between them. These experiments are carried out at national and international accelerator facilities. At the current time, we are primarily concentrating on the following projects: Direct photon production in hadronic reactions (Fermilab E706); Production of hybrid mesons in the nuclear Coulomb field; The D-Zero experiment at the Tevatron collider; Deep inelastic neutrino- and electron-nucleon scattering at FNAL and SLAC; Nonlinear QED at critical field strengths at SLAC; The Experiments at KEK (AMY, 17keV neutrino); The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider; and SSC-related detector R&D on scintillating tile- and diamond-based calorimetry and microstrip tracking detectors.

  3. Large-Area Growth of Turbostratic Graphene on Ni(111) via Physical Vapor Deposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garlow, Joseph A.; Barrett, Lawrence K.; Wu, Lijun; Kisslinger, Kim; Zhu, Yimei; Pulecio, Javier F.

    2016-01-29

    Single-layer graphene has demonstrated remarkable electronic properties that are strongly influenced by interfacial bonding and break down for the lowest energy configuration of stacked graphene layers (AB Bernal). Multilayer graphene with relative rotations between carbon layers, known as turbostratic graphene, can effectively decouple the electronic states of adjacent layers, preserving properties similar to that of SLG. While the growth of AB Bernal graphene through chemical vapor deposition has been widely reported, we investigate the growth of turbostratic graphene on heteroepitaxial Ni(111) thin films utilizing physical vapor deposition. By varying the carbon deposition temperature between 800–1100°C, we report an increase inmore » the graphene quality concomitant with a transition in the size of uniform thickness graphene, ranging from nanocrystallites to thousands of square microns. Combination Raman modes of as-grown graphene within the frequency range of 1650 cm₋1 to 2300 cm₋1, along with features of the Raman 2D mode, were employed as signatures of turbostratic graphene. Bilayer and multilayer graphene were directly identified from areas that exhibited Raman characteristics of turbostratic graphene using high-resolution TEM imaging. Lastly, Raman maps of the pertinent modes reveal large regions of turbostratic graphene on Ni(111) thin films at a deposition temperature of 1100°C.« less

  4. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group (PDG) Organizations American Institute of Physics (AIP) American Physical Society (APS) Institute of Physics (IOP) SPIE - International society for optics and photonics Top...

  5. QCD Thermodynamics at High Temperature Peter Petreczky Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics (NP),

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    QCD Thermodynamics at High Temperature Peter Petreczky Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics (NP), Bethesda MD, April 29-30, 2014 NY Center for Computational Science 2 Defining questions of nuclear physics research in US: Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) "The Frontiers of Nuclear Science", 2007 Long Range Plan "What are the phases of strongly interacting matter and what roles do they play in the cosmos ?" "What does QCD predict for

  6. Theoretical and experimental power from large horizontal-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viterna, L A; Janetzke, D C

    1982-09-01

    A method for calculating the output power from large horizontal-axis wind turbines is presented. Modifications to the airfoil characteristics and the momentum portion of classical blade element-momentum theory are given that improve correlation with measured data. Improvement is particularly evident at low tip speed ratios where aerodynamic stall can occur as the blade experiences high angles of attack. Output power calculated using the modified theory is compared with measured data for several large wind turbines. These wind turbines range in size from the DOE/NASA 100 kW Mod-O (38 m rotor diameter) to the 2000 kW Mod-1 (61 m rotor diameter). The calculated results are in good agreement with measured data from these machines.

  7. Experimental research on heat transfer of natural convection in vertical rectangular channels with large aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Qing; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Tian, Wenxi; Ye, Zhonghao

    2010-01-15

    This work presents the experimental research on the steady laminar natural convection heat transfer of air in three vertical thin rectangular channels with different gap clearance. The much higher ratio of width to gap clearance (60-24) and the ratio of length to gap clearance (800-320) make the rectangular channels similar with the coolant flow passage in plate type fuel reactors. The vertical rectangular channels were composed of two stainless steal plates and were heated by electrical heating rods. The wall temperatures were detected with the K-type thermocouples which were inserted into the blind holes drilled in the steal plates. Also the air temperatures at the inlet and outlet of the channel were detected. The wall heat fluxes added to the air flow were calculated by the Fourier heat conduction law. The heat transfer characteristics were analyzed, and the average Nusselt numbers in all the three channels could be well correlated with the Rayleigh number or the modified Rayleigh number in a uniform correlation. Furthermore, the maximum wall temperatures were investigated, which is a key parameter for the fuel's integrity during some accidents. It was found that even the wall heat flux was up to 1500 W/m{sup 2}, the maximum wall temperature was lower than 350 C. All this work is valuable for the plate type reactor's design and safety analysis. (author)

  8. Hadron physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunce, G.

    1984-05-30

    Is all hadronic physics ultimately describable by QCD. Certainly, many disparate phenomena can be understood within the QCD framework. Also certainly, there are important questions which are open, both theoretically (little guidance, as yet) and experimentally, regarding confinement. Are there dibaryons, baryonium, glueballs. In addition, there are experimental results which at present do not have an explanation. This talk, after a short section on QCD successes and difficulties, will emphasize two experimental topics which have recent results - glueball spectroscopy and exclusive reactions at large momentum transfer. Both are experimentally accessible in the AGS/LAMPF II/AGS II/TRIUMF II/SIN II energy domain.

  9. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Physics Our science answers questions about the nature of the universe and delivers solutions for national security concerns. Contact Us Division Leader David Meyerhofer Deputy Division Leader Scott Wilburn Division Office (505) 667-4117 For more than 70 years-from the Manhattan Project to today-Physics Division researchers have been performing groundbreaking fundamental and applied research. For more than 70 years-from the Manhattan Project to today-Physics Division researchers have

  10. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; et al

    2014-03-15

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve σ (σmv) = 16 meV and σ (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020.more » Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero σmνσmν, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics — the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of Neff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that Neff = 3.046.« less

  11. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Dore, O.; Dunkley, J.; Errard, J.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jones, W. C.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Kuo, C. -L.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Slosar, A.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Wu, W. L.K.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.

    2014-03-15

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve ? (?mv) = 16 meV and ? (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020. Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero ?m??m?, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of Neff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that Neff = 3.046.

  12. Neutrino physics from the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Brock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.

    2015-03-15

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve σ (σmν)(σmν) = 16 meV and σ (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020. Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero σmνσmν, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics — the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of NeffNeff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that View the MathML sourceNeff=3.046.

  13. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program : implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security

  14. Model based multivariable controller for large scale compression stations. Design and experimental validation on the LHC 18KW cryorefrigerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonne, François; Bonnay, Patrick; Bradu, Benjamin

    2014-01-29

    In this paper, a multivariable model-based non-linear controller for Warm Compression Stations (WCS) is proposed. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to have precise control of every pressure in normal operation or to stabilize and control the cryoplant under high variation of thermal loads (such as a pulsed heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors such as those expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details how to set the WCS model up to synthesize the Linear Quadratic Optimal feedback gain and how to use it. After preliminary tuning at CEA-Grenoble on the 400W@1.8K helium test facility, the controller has been implemented on a Schneider PLC and fully tested first on the CERN's real-time simulator. Then, it was experimentally validated on a real CERN cryoplant. The efficiency of the solution is experimentally assessed using a reasonable operating scenario of start and stop of compressors and cryogenic turbines. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  15. On the physical and chemical details of alumina atomic layer deposition: A combined experimental and numerical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Dongqing; Ma, Lulu; Xie, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Chris; Jen, Tien Chien

    2015-03-15

    Alumina thin film is typically studied as a model atomic layer deposition (ALD) process due to its high dielectric constant, high thermal stability, and good adhesion on various wafer surfaces. Despite extensive applications of alumina ALD in microelectronics industries, details on the physical and chemical processes are not yet well understood. ALD experiments are not able to shed adequate light on the detailed information regarding the transient ALD process. Most of current numerical approaches lack detailed surface reaction mechanisms, and their results are not well correlated with experimental observations. In this paper, the authors present a combined experimental and numerical study on the details of flow and surface reactions in alumina ALD using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Results obtained from experiments and simulations are compared and correlated. By experiments, growth rate on five samples under different deposition conditions is characterized. The deposition rate from numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental results. Details of precursor distributions in a full cycle of ALD are studied numerically to bridge between experimental observations and simulations. The 3D transient numerical model adopts surface reaction kinetics and mechanisms based on atomic-level studies to investigate the surface deposition process. Surface deposition is shown as a strictly self-limited process in our numerical studies. ALD is a complex strong-coupled fluid, thermal and chemical process, which is not only heavily dependent on the chemical kinetics and surface conditions but also on the flow and material distributions.

  16. Closeout Report: Experimental High Energy Physics Group at the University of South Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Charles M; Godang, Romulus

    2013-06-25

    The High Energy Physics group at the University of South Alabama has been supported by this research grant (DE-FG02-96ER40970) since 1996. One researcher, Dr. Merrill Jenkins, has been supported on this grant during this time worked on fixed target experiments at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, west of Chicago, Illinois. These experiments have been E-705, E-771, E-871 (HyperCP) and E-921 (CKM) before it was canceled for budgetary reasons. After the cancellation of CKM, Dr. Jenkins joined the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment as an associate member via the High Energy Physics Group at the Florida State University. A second, recently tenured faculty member, Dr. Romulus Godang joined the group in 2009 and has been supported by this grant since then. Dr. Godang is working on the BaBaR experiment at SLAC and has joined the Belle-II experiment located in Japan at KEK. According to the instructions sent to us by our grant monitor, we are to concentrate on the activities over the last three years in this closeout report.

  17. The effect of large amplitude motions on the transition frequency redshift in hydrogen bonded complexes: A physical picture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.; Salmi, Teemu; Hnninen, Vesa; Halonen, Lauri

    2014-05-14

    We describe the vibrational transitions of the donor unit in water dimer with an approach that is based on a three-dimensional local mode model. We perform a perturbative treatment of the intermolecular vibrational modes to improve the transition wavenumber of the hydrogen bonded OH-stretching transition. The model accurately predicts the transition wavenumbers of the vibrations in water dimer compared to experimental values and provides a physical picture that explains the redshift of the hydrogen bonded OH-oscillator. We find that it is unnecessary to include all six intermolecular modes in the vibrational model and that their effect can, to a good approximation, be computed using a potential energy surface calculated at a lower level electronic structure method than that used for the unperturbed model.

  18. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh. Progress report, November 1, 1995--October 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreau, J.F.; Engels, E. Jr.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the progress on two different tasks, Task A and Task B. Task A focuses on rare and semi-rare decays of {phi} and of the short-lived kaon with emphasis on those aspects needed in preparation for the proposed {Phi}-Factory measurements of CPT violation and {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} from the CP-violating decays of the K{sub L}K{sub S} final state. The second aspect of the kaon decay work is participation in the so-called rare kaon decay experiments, E865, at BNL. The major goals of Task B, Fermilab program, are as follows: (1) participation in the analysis of the E706 data taken during the 1990--1991 fixed target run at Fermilab and (2) the continuation of the work with the CDF collaboration particularly the SVX II upgrade. The E706 part of the program involves the completion of publications reporting the results of the 1990--91 data run. The analysis of these data is now mature and physics results are emerging. The CDF program involves a dedicated effort to the design of a silicon vertex detector upgrade, SVX II, to be accomplished by the time Fermilab run II collider run (1999). In addition they are participating in the 1993--1995 collide run Ib and actively analyzing the data from both runs Ia and Ib.

  19. Radio-frequency sheaths physics: Experimental characterization on Tore Supra and related self-consistent modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Colas, Laurent Corre, Yann; Goniche, Marc; Gunn, Jamie; Kubič, Martin; Milanesio, Daniele; Heuraux, Stéphane

    2014-06-15

    During the 2011 experimental campaign, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra tokamak was equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). The new design aimed at minimizing the integrated parallel electric field over long field lines as well as increasing the heat exhaust capability of the actively cooled screen. It proved to be inefficient for attenuating the radio-frequency (RF)-sheaths on the screen itself on the contrary to the heat exhaust concept that allowed operation despite higher heat fluxes on the antenna. In parallel, a new approach has been proposed to model self-consistently RF sheaths: the SSWICH (Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for IC Heating) code. Simulations results from SSWICH coupled with the TOPICA antenna code were able to reproduce the difference between the two FS designs and part of the spatial pattern of heat loads and Langmuir probe floating potential. The poloidal pattern is a reliable result that mainly depends on the electrical design of the antenna while the radial pattern is on the contrary highly sensitive to loosely constrained parameters such as perpendicular conductivity that generates a DC current circulation from the private region inside the antenna limiters to the free scrape off layer outside these limiters. Moreover, the cantilevered bars seem to be the element in the screen design that enhanced the plasma potential.

  20. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D.

    1995-10-01

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA`s astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th{sup 80+} can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H{sub 2} performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe{sup q+} and Th{sup q+} (35 {le} q {le} 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be {approximately} 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events.

  1. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEARS 2000 - 2003; HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS GROUP; SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY; EXPERIMENTAL TASK A AND THEORY TASK B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ryszard Stroynowski

    2003-07-01

    The experimental program in High Energy Physics at SMU was initiated in 1992. Its main goal is the search for new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SSC, LHC) and the study of the properties of heavy quarks and leptons (CLEO, BTeV).

  2. Systems Sustainability: Implementation of Enhanced Maintenance Programs at the Kurchatov Institute, the All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental physics and the All-Russian Scientific Institute for Technical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppinger, M.; Pikula, M.; Randolph, J.D.; Windham, M.

    1999-09-20

    Implementation of quality maintenance programs is essential to enhancing sustainable continuous operations of United States funded Materials Protection, Control and Accountability (MPC and A) equipment/systems upgrades at various Russian nuclear facilities. An effective maintenance program is expected to provide assurances to both parties for achieving maximum continuous systems operations with minimum down time. To be effective, the program developed must focus on minimum down time for any part of a system. Minimum down time is realized through the implementation of a quality maintenance program that includes preventative maintenance, necessary diagnostic tools, properly trained technical staff, and an in-house inventory of required spare parts for repairing the impacted component of the system. A centralized maintenance management program is logistically essential for the success of this effort because of the large volume of MPC and A equipment/systems installed at those sites. This paper will discuss current programs and conditions at the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute, the All-Russian Scientific Institute for Technical Physics and the All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics and will address those steps necessary to implement an upgraded program at those sites.

  3. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. Annual grant progress report (FDP), January 15, 1993--January 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, D.B.

    1993-10-01

    Progress on seven tasks is reported. (I)UCLA hadronization model, antiproton decay, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis: In addition to these topics, work on CP and CPT phenomenology at a {phi} factory and letters of support on the hadronization project are included. (II)ICARUS detector and rare B decays with hadron beams and colliders: Developments are summarized and some typcial events as shown; in addition, the RD5 collaboration at CERN and the asymmetric {phi} factory project are sketched. (III)Theoretical physics: Feynman diagram calculations in gauge theory; supersymmetric standard model; effects of quantum gravity in breaking of global symmetries; models of quark and lepton substructure; renormalized field theory; large-scale structure in the universe and particle-astrophysics/early universe cosmology. (IV)H dibaryon search at BNL, kaon experiments (E799/KTeV) at Fermilab: Project design and some scatterplots are given. (V)UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab. (VI)Detectors for hadron physics at ultrahigh energy colliders: Scintillating fiber and visible light photon counter research. (VII)Administrative support and conference organization.

  4. An experimental investigation on the mechanical properties of the interface between large-sized graphene and a flexible substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Chaochen; Guo, Jiangang Song, Haibin; Xie, Haimei; Xue, Tao; Qin, Qinghua; Wu, Sen

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, the interfacial mechanical properties of large-sized monolayer graphene attached to a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate are investigated. Using a micro-tensile test and Raman spectroscopy, in situ measurements are taken to obtain the full-field deformation of graphene subjected to a uniaxial tensile loading and unloading cycle. The results of the full-field deformation are subsequently used to identify the status of the interface between the graphene and the substrate as one of perfect adhesion, one showing slide or partial debonding, and one that is fully debonded. The interfacial stress/strain transfer and the evolution of the interface from one status to another during the loading and unloading processes are discussed and the mechanical parameters, such as interfacial strength and interfacial shear strength, are obtained quantitatively demonstrating a relatively weak interface between large-sized graphene and PET.

  5. Fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons and possible path to the future of US experimental high-energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The authors outline primary physics motivation, present proposed new arrangement for Fermilab accelerator complex, and then discuss possible long-range application of fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons at Fermilab.

  6. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  7. (Experimental physics at Yale University: Research proposal and budget Proposal, 1 January 1992--31 December 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report reviews the following topics: nuclear and quark matter; correlated pairs from heavy ion collisions-search for new low mass resonances coupled to electron-positron collisions; proposed light ion research program; experimental nuclear astrophysics (explosive nucleosynthesis); search for rare decay modes and rare processes in nuclei; and nuclear spectroscopy at the extremes of spin, isospin, and temperature. (LSP).

  8. [Experimental physics at Yale University: Research proposal and budget Proposal, 1 January 1992--31 December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This report reviews the following topics: nuclear and quark matter; correlated pairs from heavy ion collisions-search for new low mass resonances coupled to electron-positron collisions; proposed light ion research program; experimental nuclear astrophysics (explosive nucleosynthesis); search for rare decay modes and rare processes in nuclei; and nuclear spectroscopy at the extremes of spin, isospin, and temperature. (LSP).

  9. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VII. THE LOW-VELOCITY COLLISION BEHAVIOR OF LARGE DUST AGGLOMERATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen; Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-10-10

    We performed micro-gravity collision experiments in our laboratory drop tower using 5 cm sized dust agglomerates with volume filling factors of 0.3 and 0.4, respectively. This work is an extension of our previous experiments reported in Beitz et al. to aggregates of more than one order of magnitude higher masses. The dust aggregates consisted of micrometer-sized silica particles and were macroscopically homogeneous. We measured the coefficient of restitution for collision velocities ranging from 1 cm s{sup -1} to 0.5 m s{sup -1}, and determined the fragmentation velocity. For low velocities, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing impact velocity, in contrast to findings by Beitz et al. At higher velocities, the value of the coefficient of restitution becomes constant, before the aggregates break at the onset of fragmentation. We interpret the qualitative change in the coefficient of restitution as the transition from a solid-body-dominated to a granular-medium-dominated behavior. We complement our experiments by molecular-dynamics simulations of porous aggregates and obtain a reasonable match to the experimental data. We discuss the importance of our experiments for protoplanetary disks, debris disks, and planetary rings. This work is an extension to the previous work of our group and gives new insight into the velocity dependency of the coefficient of restitution due to improved measurements, better statistics, and a theoretical approach.

  10. Final Technical Report - Large Deviation Methods for the Analysis and Design of Monte Carlo Schemes in Physics and Chemistry - DE-SC0002413

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupuis, Paul

    2014-03-14

    This proposal is concerned with applications of Monte Carlo to problems in physics and chemistry where rare events degrade the performance of standard Monte Carlo. One class of problems is concerned with computation of various aspects of the equilibrium behavior of some Markov process via time averages. The problem to be overcome is that rare events interfere with the efficient sampling of all relevant parts of phase space. A second class concerns sampling transitions between two or more stable attractors. Here, rare events do not interfere with the sampling of all relevant parts of phase space, but make Monte Carlo inefficient because of the very large number of samples required to obtain variance comparable to the quantity estimated. The project uses large deviation methods for the mathematical analyses of various Monte Carlo techniques, and in particular for algorithmic analysis and design. This is done in the context of relevant application areas, mainly from chemistry and biology.

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF THE RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON LARGE SCALE COMPUTATIONS IN NUCLEAR PHYSICS USING THE QCDOC, SEPTEMBER 26 - 28, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AOKI,Y.; BALTZ,A.; CREUTZ,M.; GYULASSY,M.; OHTA,S.

    2002-09-26

    The massively parallel computer QCDOC (QCD On a Chip) of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RI3RC) will provide ten-teraflop peak performance for lattice gauge calculations. Lattice groups from both Columbia University and RBRC, along with assistance from IBM, jointly handled the design of the QCDOC. RIKEN has provided $5 million in funding to complete the machine in 2003. Some fraction of this computer (perhaps as much as 10%) might be made available for large-scale computations in areas of theoretical nuclear physics other than lattice gauge theory. The purpose of this workshop was to investigate the feasibility and possibility of using a supercomputer such as the QCDOC for lattice, general nuclear theory, and other calculations. The lattice applications to nuclear physics that can be investigated with the QCDOC are varied: for example, the light hadron spectrum, finite temperature QCD, and kaon ({Delta}I = 1/2 and CP violation), and nucleon (the structure of the proton) matrix elements, to name a few. There are also other topics in theoretical nuclear physics that are currently limited by computer resources. Among these are ab initio calculations of nuclear structure for light nuclei (e.g. up to {approx}A = 8 nuclei), nuclear shell model calculations, nuclear hydrodynamics, heavy ion cascade and other transport calculations for RHIC, and nuclear astrophysics topics such as exploding supernovae. The physics topics were quite varied, ranging from simulations of stellar collapse by Douglas Swesty to detailed shell model calculations by David Dean, Takaharu Otsuka, and Noritaka Shimizu. Going outside traditional nuclear physics, James Davenport discussed molecular dynamics simulations and Shailesh Chandrasekharan presented a class of algorithms for simulating a wide variety of femionic problems. Four speakers addressed various aspects of theory and computational modeling for relativistic heavy ion reactions at RHIC. Scott Pratt and Steffen Bass gave general overviews of

  12. Experimental Investigation of Axial and Beam-Riding Propulsive Physics with TEA CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenoyer, D. A.; Salvador, I.; Myrabo, L. N.; Notaro, S. N.; Bragulla, P. W.

    2010-10-08

    A twin Lumonics K922M pulsed TEA CO{sub 2} laser system (pulse duration of approximately 100 ns FWHM spike, with optional 1 {mu}s tail, depending upon laser gas mix) was employed to experimentally measure both axial thrust and beam-riding behavior of Type no. 200 lightcraft engines, using a ballistic pendulum and Angular Impulse Measurement Device (AIMD, respectively. Beam-riding forces and moments were examined along with engine thrust-vectoring behavior, as a function of: a) laser beam lateral offset from the vehicle axis of symmetry; b) laser pulse energy ({approx}12 to 40 joules); c) pulse duration (100 ns, and 1 {mu}s); and d) engine size (97.7 mm to 161.2 mm). Maximum lateral momentum coupling coefficients (C{sub M}) of 75 N-s/MJ were achieved with the K922M laser whereas previous PLVTS laser (420 J, 18 {mu}s duration) results reached only 15 N-s/MJ--an improvement of 5x. Maximum axial C{sub M} performance with the K922M reached 225 N-s/MJ, or about {approx}3x larger than the lateral C{sub M} values. These axial C{sub M} results are sharply higher than the 120 N/MW previously reported for long pulse (e.g., 10-18 {mu}s)CO{sub 2} electric discharge lasers.

  13. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  14. Nuclear Physics: Meetings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Topics: Meetings Talks given at the Science & Technology Review 2004 Larry Cardman: Science Overview and the Experimental Program ppt | pdf Tony Thomas: Nuclear Physics ...

  15. Ratios of W and Z cross sections at large boson $p_T$ as a constraint on PDFs and background to new physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, Sarah Alam; Watt, Graeme

    2014-02-05

    We motivate a measurement of various ratios of W and Z cross sections at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at large values of the boson transverse momentum (p T ? M W,Z ). We study the dependence of predictions for these cross-section ratios on the multiplicity of associated jets, the boson p T and the LHC centre-of-mass energy. We present the flavour decomposition of the initial-state partons and an evaluation of the theoretical uncertainties. We also show that the W + /W - ratio is sensitive to the up-quark to down-quark ratio of parton distribution functions (PDFs), while other theoretical uncertainties are negligible, meaning that a precise measurement of the W + /W - ratio at large boson p T values could constrain the PDFs at larger momentum fractions x than the usual inclusive W charge asymmetry. The W /Z ratio is insensitive to PDFs and most other theoretical uncertainties, other than possibly electroweak corrections, and a precise measurement will therefore be useful in validating theoretical predictions needed in data-driven methods, such as using W (? ??) + jets events to estimate the Z(? ??) + jets background in searches for new physics at the LHC. Furthermore, the differential W and Z cross sections themselves, d?/dp T , have the potential to constrain the gluon distribution, provided that theoretical uncertainties from higher-order QCD and electroweak corrections are brought under control, such as by inclusion of anticipated next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections.

  16. Ratios of W and Z cross sections at large boson $p_T$ as a constraint on PDFs and background to new physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malik, Sarah Alam; Watt, Graeme

    2014-02-05

    We motivate a measurement of various ratios of W and Z cross sections at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at large values of the boson transverse momentum (p T ≳ M W,Z ). We study the dependence of predictions for these cross-section ratios on the multiplicity of associated jets, the boson p T and the LHC centre-of-mass energy. We present the flavour decomposition of the initial-state partons and an evaluation of the theoretical uncertainties. We also show that the W + /W - ratio is sensitive to the up-quark to down-quark ratio of parton distribution functions (PDFs), while other theoreticalmore » uncertainties are negligible, meaning that a precise measurement of the W + /W - ratio at large boson p T values could constrain the PDFs at larger momentum fractions x than the usual inclusive W charge asymmetry. The W ± /Z ratio is insensitive to PDFs and most other theoretical uncertainties, other than possibly electroweak corrections, and a precise measurement will therefore be useful in validating theoretical predictions needed in data-driven methods, such as using W (→ ℓν) + jets events to estimate the Z(→ νν¯) + jets background in searches for new physics at the LHC. Furthermore, the differential W and Z cross sections themselves, dσ/dp T , have the potential to constrain the gluon distribution, provided that theoretical uncertainties from higher-order QCD and electroweak corrections are brought under control, such as by inclusion of anticipated next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections.« less

  17. Introduction to Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linares, Edgar Casimiro

    2009-04-30

    I present a basic introduction to the physics of the neutrino, with emphasis on experimental results and developments.

  18. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. Isotopes» A roadmap of matter that will help unlock the secrets of how the universe is put together The DOE Office of Science's Nuclear Physics (NP) program supports the experimental and theoretical research needed to create this roadmap. This quest requires a broad approach to different, but related, scientific

  19. Physics Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thrust Areas Physics Thrust Areas Physics Division serves the nation through its broad portfolio of fundamental and applied research. Quality basic science research: critical component of maintaining our capabilities in national security research To further understand the physical world, generate new or improved technology in experimental physics, and establish a physics foundation for current and future Los Alamos programs, Physics Division leverages its expertise and experimental capabilities

  20. Larry Cardman new Associate Director of Physics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Larry Cardman new Associate Director of Physics Dr. Lawrence S. Cardman New Associate Director Physics Division Newport News, Virginia - Dr. Larry Cardman, former deputy associate director of physics at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), has assumed the role of Associate Director of Physics. He replaces Dr. John Domingo who stepped down following the completion and equipping of the three large and complex experimental halls at the laboratory. To date, six

  1. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  2. Experimental Hall B | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Jefferson Lab has four experimental halls. Hall B is the smallest of the experimental staging areas. It is 98 feet in diameter and 65 feet from floor to ceiling. Experiments that take data in Hall B employ beams of either electrons or photons. From 1995 to 2012, the heart of the Hall B physics program involved the use of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, or CLAS. This detector system spanned nearly the full angular range about the target and was specifically developed for the study of

  3. Physics Topics - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Topics UW Madison Madison Symmetric Torus Physics Topics MST HomeGraduate Student InformationLinksTourControl and Auxiliary SystemsPhysics TopicsDeviceResearch MissionMST People mst logo CPLA Home Directory Publications Links Internal University of Wisconsin Physics Department Research funding includes support from: Department of Energy National Science Foundation The MST physics challenges are large and many, but much of our work is captured in the following four major RFP physics goals

  4. Subatomic Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Subatomic Physics We play a major role in large-scale scientific collaborations around the world, performing nuclear physics experiments that advance the understanding of the hidden subatomic reactions of the universe and how high explosives affect matter. Contact Us Group Leader Melynda Brooks Email Deputy Group Leader Frans Trouw Email Group Office (505) 667-6941 A detector that uses muons, tiny particles generated when cosmic rays interact with Earth's atmosphere to look inside the cores of

  5. Resonant dimer relaxation in cold atoms with a large scattering length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.

    2007-05-15

    Efimov physics refers to universal phenomena associated with a discrete scaling symmetry in the three-body problem with a large scattering length. The first experimental evidence for Efimov physics was the recent observation of a resonant peak in the three-body recombination rate for {sup 133}Cs atoms with large negative scattering length. There can also be resonant peaks in the atom-dimer relaxation rate for large positive scattering length. We calculate the atom-dimer relaxation rate as a function of temperature and show how measurements of the relaxation rate can be used to determine accurately the parameters that govern Efimov physics.

  6. Conceptual design report, CEBAF basic experimental equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-04-13

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will be dedicated to basic research in Nuclear Physics using electrons and photons as projectiles. The accelerator configuration allows three nearly continuous beams to be delivered simultaneously in three experimental halls, which will be equipped with complementary sets of instruments: Hall A--two high resolution magnetic spectrometers; Hall B--a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer; Hall C--a high-momentum, moderate resolution, magnetic spectrometer and a variety of more dedicated instruments. This report contains a short description of the initial complement of experimental equipment to be installed in each of the three halls.

  7. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1988-03-01

    The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. A major activity within the Division is operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. Highlights for this year, which include a record number of beam hours provided for research, are summarized. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies (GANIL) and ultrarelativistic beams (CERN). The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. The experimental nuclear structure research of this consortium is included. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division also operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as /open quotes/User Resources/close quotes/. The tandem continues a long history of supporting research in accelerator-based atomic physics. During this past year, new beam lines have been added to the ECR ion source to create user opportunities for atomic physics experiments with this unique device. These two facilities and the experimental programs in atomic physics are discussed. The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. Also included is the theory effort in support of the UNISOR structure program. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program and operation of an atomic physics data center. The nuclear physics program also operates a compilation and evaluation effort; this work is also described.

  8. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) Physics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    A username and password are required to access and search the entire database. However, the Overview page provides links to detailed data pages for each of the experiments available for public access. There are many experiments with data that the public can freely access.

  9. LANSCE Weapons Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 LANSCE Weapons Physics Fortune 500 companies and weapons designers alike rely on our internationally recognized nuclear physics and materials science expertise as well as our one-of-a-kind experimental tools. Contact Us Group Leader Gus Sinnis Email Deputy Group Leader Fredrik Tovesson Email Deputy Group Leader and Experimental Area Manager Charles Kelsey Email Group Office (505) 665-5390 Time Projection Chamber at LANSCE Researcher making measurements of fission cross sections on the Time

  10. Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports NSTX-U...

  11. PHYSICAL SCIENCES, Physics Phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SCIENCES, Physics Phase competition in trisected superconducting dome I. M. Vishik, 1, 2 M Hashimoto, 3 R.-H. He, 4 W. S. Lee, 1, 2 F. Schmitt, 1, 2 D. H. Lu, 3 R. G. Moore, 1...

  12. Closeout for U.S. Department of Energy Final Technical Report for University of Arizona grant DOE Award Number DE-FG03-95ER40906 From 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004 Grant title: Theory and Phenomenology of Strong and Weak High Energy Physics (Task A) and Experimental Elementary Particle Physics (Task B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutherfoord, John; Toussaint, Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2005-03-03

    The following pages describe the high energy physics program at the University of Arizona which was funded by DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER40906, for the period 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004. In this report, emphasis was placed on more recent accomplishments. This grant was divided into two tasks, a theory task (Task A) and an experimental task (Task B but called Task C early in the grant period) with separate budgets. Faculty supported by this grant, for at least part of this period, include, for the theory task, Adrian Patrascioiu (now deceased), Ina Sarcevic, and Douglas Toussaint., and, for the experimental task, Elliott Cheu, Geoffrey Forden, Kenneth Johns, John Rutherfoord, Michael Shupe, and Erich Varnes. Grant monitors from the Germantown DOE office, overseeing our grant, changed over the years. Dr. Marvin Gettner covered the first years and then he retired from the DOE. Dr. Patrick Rapp worked with us for just a few years and then left for a position at the University of Puerto Rico. Dr. Kathleen Turner took his place and continues as our grant monitor. The next section of this report covers the activities of the theory task (Task A) and the last section the activities of the experimental task (Task B).

  13. Physical Description and Experimental Characterization of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: APS March Metting held March 3 - February 7, 2014 in Denver, CO.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the APS March Metting held March ...

  14. ADEPS Vitae Vitae Experimental Physical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Wanting more Bauer, who is from Southern Colorado, spent ... Nuclear-powered spacecrafts use the radioisotope ... For the certifcation process, IFIT heats the fuel clads, the ...

  15. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shochet, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The 9th {anti p}p Workshop was held in Tsukuba, Japan in October, 1993. A number of important issues remained after that meeting: Does QCD adequately describe the large cross section observed by CDF for {gamma} production below 30 GeV? Do the CDF and D0 b-production cross sections agree? Will the Tevatron live up to its billing as a world-class b-physics facility? How small will the uncertainty in the W mass be? Is there anything beyond the Minimal Standard Model? And finally, where is the top quark? Presentations at this workshop addressed all of these issues. Most of them are now resolved, but new questions have arisen. This summary focuses on the experimental results presented at the meeting by CDF and D0 physicists. Reviews of LEP and HERA results, future plans for hadron colliders and their experiments, as well as important theoretical presentations are summarized elsewhere in this volume. Section 1 reviews physics beyond the Minimal Standard Model. Issues in b and c physics are addressed in section 3. Section 4 focuses on the top quark. Electroweak physics is reviewed in section 5, followed by QCD studies in section 6. Conclusions are drawn in section 7.

  16. High Energy Physics Division, ANL Lattice QCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Physics Division, ANL Lattice QCD in extreme environments D. K. Sinclair (HEP, Argonne) J. B. Kogut (Physics, Illinois) D. ... At large I and high temperature we observe ...

  17. Experimental Evidence for Efimov Quantum States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naegerl, H.-C.; Kraemer, T.; Mark, M.; Waldburger, P.; Danzl, J. G.; Engeser, B.; Lange, A. D.; Pilch, K.; Jaakkola, A.; Chin, C.; Grimm, R.

    2006-11-07

    Three interacting particles form a system which is well known for its complex physical behavior. A landmark theoretical result in few-body quantum physics is Efimov's prediction of a universal set of weakly bound trimer states appearing for three identical bosons with a resonant two-body interaction. Surprisingly, these states even exist in the absence of a corresponding two-body bound state and their precise nature is largely independent of the particular type of the two-body interaction potential. Efimov's scenario has attracted great interest in many areas of physics; an experimental test however has not been achieved. We report the observation of an Efimov resonance in an ultracold thermal gas of cesium atoms. The resonance occurs in the range of large negative two-body scattering lengths and arises from the coupling of three free atoms to an Efimov trimer. We observe its signature as a giant three-body recombination loss when the strength of the two-body interaction is varied near a Feshbach resonance. This resonance develops into a continuum resonance at non-zero collision energies, and we observe a shift of the resonance position as a function of temperature. We also report on a minimum in the recombination loss for positive scattering lengths, indicating destructive interference of decay pathways. Our results confirm central theoretical predictions of Efimov physics and represent a starting point from which to explore the universal properties of resonantly interacting few-body systems.

  18. Neutrino Physics | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Physics Neutrino Physics Experimental neutrino physics is focused on the measurements of mass and other properties of neutrinos that may have profound consequences for understanding the evolution of the universe. Over the last few decades, particle physicists have accumulated experimental evidence on the properties of major constituents of matter, including neutrinos, to explain how neutrinos interact with matter and how these ghostly particles propagate over long distances. We have

  19. Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports NSTX-U Education Organization Contact Us Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports NSTX-U Research The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is dedicated to developing fusion as

  20. REVEALING THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MOLECULAR GAS IN ORION WITH A LARGE-SCALE SURVEY IN J = 2-1 LINES OF {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, AND C{sup 18}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, Atsushi; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kimura, Kimihiro; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Maezawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hideo; Onishi, Toshikazu [Department of Physical Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikita-machi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Mizuno, Akira [Solar-terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo, E-mail: atsushi.nishimura@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We present fully sampled ?3' resolution images of {sup 12}CO(J=2-1), {sup 13}CO(J=2-1), and C{sup 18}O(J=2-1) emission taken with the newly developed 1.85 m millimeter-submillimeter telescope over the entire area of the Orion A and B giant molecular clouds. The data were compared with J=1-0 of the {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O data taken with the Nagoya 4 m telescope and the NANTEN telescope at the same angular resolution to derive the spatial distributions of the physical properties of the molecular gas. We explore the large velocity gradient formalism to determine the gas density and temperature using line combinations of {sup 12}CO(J=2-1), {sup 13}CO(J=2-1), and {sup 13}CO(J=1-0) assuming a uniform velocity gradient and abundance ratio of CO. The derived gas density is in the range of 500 to 5000 cm{sup 3}, and the derived gas temperature is mostly in the range of 20 to 50 K along the cloud ridge with a temperature gradient depending on the distance from the star forming region. We found that the high-temperature region at the cloud edge faces the H II region, indicating that the molecular gas is interacting with the stellar wind and radiation from the massive stars. In addition, we compared the derived gas properties with the young stellar objects distribution obtained with the Spitzer telescope to investigate the relationship between the gas properties and the star formation activity therein. We found that the gas density and star formation efficiency are positively well correlated, indicating that stars form effectively in the dense gas region.

  1. Physics Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as Institute of Physics Fellow January 18, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, January 18, ... simulation, and computation, has been selected as a Fellow of the Institute of Physics. ...

  2. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. ...

  3. Theoretical Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Theoretical Physics Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get ... HEP Theory at Los Alamos The Theoretical High Energy Physics group at ...

  4. Top Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2011-06-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV analyzed by the CDF collaboration. Thanks to this large data sample, precision top quark measurements are now a reality at the Tevatron. Further, several new physics signals could appear in this large dataset. We will present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  5. Experimental Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experimental highlights Experimental Highlights A Big Week for NIF Discovery Science During the week of July 31 to Aug. 4, five groups of NIF users worked with LLNL researchers to carry out a successful NIF Discovery Science shot week. The teams conducted 13 experiments in five separate basic high energy density (HED) science experimental campaigns in five days. The campaigns are studying collisionless astrophysical shocks, charged particle stopping power, ionization balance at extreme density,

  6. Theoretical High Energy Physics | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Accelerator Technology ATLAS at the LHC Cosmology & Astrophysics Instrumentation Precision Muon Physics Neutrino Physics Theoretical High Energy Physics Theoretical High Energy Physics Theoretical High Energy Physics Much of the work of high-energy physics concentrates on the interplay between theory and experiment. The theory group of Argonne's High Energy Physics Division performs high-precision calculations of Standard Model processes, interprets experimental data in terms of

  7. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Finkelstein, Noah [University of Colorado, Colorado, USA

    2009-09-01

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  8. Staff Research Physicist (Experimental Research, FLARE) | Princeton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Research, FLARE) Department: Research Staff: RM 02 Requisition Number: 1500503 The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory seeks to fill a staff research physicist...

  9. Associate Research Physicist (Post Doc, Experimental Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Post Doc, Experimental Research, NSTX-U, Radio Frequency Waves) Department: Research Staff: RM1 Requisition Number: 1500421 The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) seeks to...

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  11. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017 ... Energy's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP), Office of Advanced Scientific ...

  12. Physics division progress report for period ending September 30 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in physics. The areas covered are: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; low/medium energy nuclear physics; high energy experimental physics; the Unisor program; experimental atomic physics; laser and electro-optics lab; theoretical physics; compilations and evaluations; and radioactive ion beam development. (LSP)

  13. Experimental Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experimental capabilities Experimental Capabilities The National Ignition Facility is the premier high energy density science facility in the world, with laser energies 10 times greater than any other high-energy inertial confinement fusion (ICF) laser system. A major focus of NIF is a national effort to demonstrate ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. NIF also conducts a variety of experiments to study matter at the extremes, including studies of material properties,

  14. Experimental Highlights - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Experimental Highlights - 2016 June NIF Experiments Study How 'Starstuff' Is Made April NIF Liquid-Hydrogen Target Gets Its First Test Shedding Laser Light on Mysterious Cosmic Rays March Testing NIF's Dual-Axis Imager Targeting Extreme Physics February Studying Shocks on the Rebound Astrophysicist Fields Questions about NIF Shots January 'Shock/Shear' Experiments Shed Light on Turbulent Mix Laying the Groundwork for NIF Magnetized Targets About What Is NIF? How NIF Works Seven Wonders

  15. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B.

    1989-03-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1988 fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1987, and ending September 30, 1988. The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. Operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility continues to represent the single largest activity within the Division. This year saw the completion of the acceleration tube upgrade of the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and the achievement of record terminal potentials, operation for an experiment with 25 million volts on terminal, and successful tests with beam at 25.5 MV. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen significant growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies and especially ultrarelativistic beams. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as ''User Resources.'' The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program. The concentration of this program on optical and laser technology is marked by the change in designation to the Laser and Electro-Optics Lab. A small, continuing effort in elementary particle physics, carried out in collaboration with the University of Tennessee, is reported.

  16. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearns, Edward

    2013-07-12

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  17. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995.

  18. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skubic, Patrick L.

    2013-07-31

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances

  19. Technical Reports - Disclaimer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Technical...

  20. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Equipment Information There are several major pieces of experimental equipment at ATLAS. These are listed below along with contact information for the system experts: Gammasphere (Mike Carpenter) Fragment Mass Analyzer (Cary Davids or Darek Seweryniak ) Helical Orbit Spectrometer (Birger Back) Enge Split Pole Spectrograph (Ernst Rehm) Canadian Penning Trap (Guy Savard) Large Scattering Chamber (Shaofei Zhu) Atom Trap at ATLAS (Zheng-Tian Lu or Peter Mueller) There are additional

  1. Theoretical Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Theoretical Physics Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten (505) 667-5657 Email HEP Theory at Los Alamos The Theoretical High Energy Physics group at Los Alamos National Laboratory is active in a number of diverse areas of research. Their primary areas of interest are in physics beyond the Standard Model, cosmology, dark matter, lattice quantum chromodynamics, neutrinos, the fundamentals of

  2. Planetary Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    planetary physics Planetary Physics Some of the most intriguing NIF experiments test the physics believed to determine the structures of planets down to their cores, both in our solar system and beyond. In particular, scientists are using NIF to "explore" recently discovered exoplanets by duplicating the extreme conditions thought to exist in their interiors. Hundreds of extrasolar planets have been identified, some smaller than Earth and others a dozen times more massive than Jupiter.

  3. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plasma physics Plasma Physics Almost all of the observable matter in the universe is in the plasma state. Formed at high temperatures, plasmas consist of freely moving ions and free electrons. They are often called the "fourth state of matter" because their unique physical properties distinguish them from solids, liquids and gases. Plasma densities and temperatures vary widely, from the cold gases of interstellar space to the extraordinarily hot, dense cores of stars and inside a

  4. physical security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5%2A en Physical Security Systems http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnuclearsecurityphysicalsecuritysystems

  5. Physical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the universe around us. Physics Division researchers are studying these interactions from the outermost reaches of the cosmos, to the innermost confines of subatomic particles....

  6. Toward a constructive physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, H.P.; Gefwert, C.; Manthey, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    We argue that the discretization of physics which has occurred thanks to the advent of quantum mechanics has replaced the continuum standards of time, length and mass which brought physics to maturity by counting. The (arbitrary in the sense of conventional dimensional analysis) standards have been replaced by three dimensional constants: the limiting velocity c, the unit of action h, and either a reference mass (eg m/sub p/) or a coupling constant (eg G related to the mass scale by hc/(2..pi..Gm/sub p//sup 2/) approx. = 1.7 x 10/sup 38/). Once these physical and experimental reference standards are accepted, the conventional approach is to connect physics to mathematics by means of dimensionless ratios. But these standards now rest on counting rather than ratios, and allow us to think of a fourth dimensionless mathematical concept, which is counting integers. According to constructive mathematics, counting has to be understood before engaging in the practice of mathematics in order to avoid redundancy. In its strict form constructive mathematics allows no completed infinities, and must provide finite algorithms for the computation of any acceptable concept. This finite requirement in constructive mathematics is in keeping with the practice of physics when that practice is restricted to hypotheses which are testable in a finite time. In this paper we attempt to outline a program for physics which will meet these rigid criteria while preserving, in so far as possible, the successes that conventional physics has already achieved.

  7. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

    2012-02-29

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma’s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research

  8. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B.

    1990-03-01

    This report discusses topics in the following areas: Holifield heavy ion research; Experimental Nuclear physics; The Uniser program; Experimental Atomic Physics; Theoretical Physics; Laser and electro-optics lab; High Energy Physics; compilations and evaluations; and accelerator design and development. (FI)

  9. The Coming Revolutions in Particle Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris

    2009-09-01

    Wonderful opportunities await particle physics over the next decade, with new instruments and experiments poised to explore the frontiers of high energy, infinitesimal distances, and exquisite rarity. We look forward to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to explore the 1-TeV scale (extending efforts at LEP and the Tevatron to unravel the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking) and many initiatives to develop our understanding of the problem of identity: what makes a neutrino a neutrino and a top quark a top quark. We suspect that the detection of proton decay is only a few orders of magnitude away in sensitivity. Astronomical observations should help to tell us what kinds of matter and energy make up the universe. We might even learn to read experiment for clues about the dimensionality of spacetime. If we are inventive enough, we may be able to follow this rich menu with the physics opportunities offered by a linear electron-positron collider and a (muon storage ring) neutrino factory. I expect a remarkable flowering of experimental particle physics, and of theoretical physics that engages with experiment.

  10. Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potential applications for energy storage, charge storage and power supplies. | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its potential applications for energy storage, charge storage and power supplies. Friday, May 27, 2011 - 4:00pm SSRL Conference Room 137-226 Alfred Hubler, Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign We study tunnel currents and electric break down in vacuum gaps experimentally and

  11. Nuclear Physics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Scientists from across the country and around the world use the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility to advance mankind's understanding of the atom's nucleus. To probe nuclei, scientists use continuous beams of high-energy electrons from the lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, or CEBAF, and the advanced particle-detection and ultra-high-speed data acquisition equipment in CEBAF's four experimental halls. Jefferson Lab has both theoretical and

  12. Accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in very large hadron colliders Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Accelerator physics and ...

  13. Physical Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of...

  14. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Plasma Physics By leveraging plasma under extreme conditions, we concentrate on solving critical scientific challenges such as detecting smuggled nuclear materials, advancing weapons physics and generating fusion energy. Contact Us Group Leader Ray Leeper Email Deputy Group Leader Julie Canepa Email Group Office (505) 665-9145 Laser-generated neutrons Researchers at Los Alamos have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 066315 (2012) Role of large-scale velocity fluctuations in a two-vortex kinematic dynamo E. J. Kaplan, 1,2,* B. P. Brown, 1,2 K. Rahbarnia, 1,2 and C. B. Forest 1,2 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA 2 Center for Magnetic-Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 21 North Park Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53715, USA (Received 10 April 2012; revised

  16. The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

  17. FTP archives for physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trunec, D.; Brablec, A.; Kapicka, V.

    1995-12-31

    We have established archives for programs, data, papers etc. in physics (mainly for plasma physics). The archives are located at computer ftp.muni.cz in the directory pub/muni.cz/physics. These archives can be reached by anonymous FTP or by gopher server gopher.muni.cz (147.251.4.33). At the present time, programs for PC, cross sections for electrons, swarm parameters and rate constants stored are in the archives. We would like to collect the programs for calculations in physics (mainly for PC). We suppose that each program should have a testing example and some description. We would also like to collect physical constants and experimental or theoretical data (e.g. cross sections, swarm parameters and rate constants), which are important for other calculation or for comparison with the results of others studies. Interested scholars are invited to sent us their programs, data, preprints and reports for these archives. All files in the archives are in public domain and can be obtained using computer network Internet.

  18. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  19. LHC Physics Potential versus Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u{bar d}, and qq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes.

  20. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-23

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of interests under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) purview ranging from facilities, buildings, Government property, and employees to national security interests such as classified information, special nuclear material (SNM), and nuclear weapons. Cancels Section A of DOE M 470.4-2 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  1. Physical Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    The future of physical security at government facilities and national laboratories is rapidly progressing beyond the cliché of gates, guns and guards, and is quickly being replaced by radars, sensors and cameras. Learn more about INL's security research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. Assessment of an ORION-based experimental platform for measuring...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Assessment of an ORION-based experimental platform for measuring the opacity of ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION ...

  3. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to

  4. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Energy Physics High Energy Physics Investigating the field of high energy physics ... Through the Office of High Energy Physics (HEP), Los Alamos conducts research in particle ...

  5. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Chg 1, dated 3/7/06. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B

  6. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    Establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B.

  7. Partnership for Edge Physics Simulation (EPSI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroder, Peter

    2015-02-11

    We propose to develop advanced simulation codes, based upon an extreme parallelism, first principles kinetic approach, to address the challenges associated with the edge region of magnetically confined plasmas. This work is relevant to both existing magnetic fusion facilities and essential for next-generation burning plasma experiments, such as ITER where success is critically dependent upon H-mode operation achieving an edge pedestal of sufficient height for good core plasma performance without producing deleterious large scale edge localized instabilities. The plasma edge presents a well-known set of multi-physics, multi-scale problems involving complex 3D magnetic geometry. Perhaps the greatest computational challenge is the lack of scale separation – temporal scales for drift waves, Alfven waves, ELM dynamics for example have strong overlap. Similar overlap occurs on the spatial scales for the ion poloidal gyro-radius, drift wave and pedestal width. The traditional approach of separating fusion problems into weakly interacting spatial or temporal domains clearly breaks down in the edge. A full kinetic model (full-f model) must be solved to understand and predict the edge physics including non-equilibrium thermodynamic issues arising from the magnetic topology (the open field lines producing a spatially sensitive velocity hole), plasma wall interactions, neutral and atomic physics. The plan here is to model these phenomena within a comprehensive first principles set of equations without the need for the insurmountable multiple-codes coupling issues by building on the XGC1 code developed under the SciDAC Proto-FSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). This proposal includes the critical participants in the XGC1 development. We propose enhancing the capability of XGC1 by including all the important turbulence physics contained in kinetic ion and electron electromagnetic dynamics, by extending the PIC technology to incorporate several positive features found

  8. LHC forward physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cartiglia, N.; Royon, C.

    2015-10-02

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. The report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  9. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Supernova Remnant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Supernova Remnant G8.7-0.1 Citation Details ... Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS ...

  10. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.; Teller, E.

    1995-10-20

    We describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, we focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: Equations of state, hydrodynamic mixing, and the transport of radiation. We will describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  11. Early Hadron Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askew, A.

    2010-08-05

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently undergoing beam commissioning in preparation for physics running in 2010 at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. I will briefly describe the hadron physics capabilities of the ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb detectors, their performance with cosmic ray and early collision data, as well as their plans for physics with the first data.

  12. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics: Target 2017 Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017 HEPlogo.jpg The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics" is organized by the Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP), Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The review's goal is to characterize

  13. Physical protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myre, W.C.; DeMontmollin, J.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Serious concern about physical protection of nuclear facilities began around 1972. R and D was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories which had developed techniques to protect weapons for many years. Special vehicles, convoy procedures, and a communications system previously developed for weapons shipments were improved and extended for shipments of other sensitive materials. Barriers, perimeter alarms, portal and internal control systems were developed, tested, and published in handbooks and presented at symposia. Training programs were initiated for U.S. and foreign personnel. Containment and surveillance techniques were developed for the IAEA. Presently emphasis is on computer security, active barriers, and techniques to prevent theft or sabotage by insiders .

  14. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, RaJah; Pemberton, Wendy; Beal, William

    2012-05-01

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

  15. The Future of Hadrons: The Nexus of Subatomic Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris

    2011-09-01

    The author offers brief observations on matters discussed at the XIV International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy and explore prospects for hadron physics. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has been validated as a new law of nature. It is internally consistent up to very high energies, and so could be a complete theory of the strong interactions. Whether QCD is the final answer for the strong interactions is a subject for continuing experimental tests, which are being extended in experimentation at the Large Hadron Collider. Beyond the comparison of perturbative calculations with experiment, it remains critically important to test the confinement hypothesis by searching for free quarks, or for signatures of unconfined color. Sensitive negative searches for quarks continue to be interesting, and the definitive observation of free quarks would be revolutionary. Breakdowns of factorization would compromise the utility of perturbative QCD. Other discoveries that would require small or large revisions to QCD include the observation of new kinds of colored matter beyond quarks and gluons, the discovery that quarks are composite, or evidence that SU(3){sub c} gauge symmetry is the vestige of a larger, spontaneously broken, color symmetry. While probing our underlying theory for weakness or new openings, we have plenty to do to apply QCD to myriad experimental settings, to learn its implications for matter under unusual conditions, and to become more adept at calculating its consequences. New experimental tools provide the means for progress on a very broad front.

  16. Physics Division News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PADSTE » ADEPS » Physics » Physics Division News Physics Division News Discover more about the wide-ranging scope of Physics Division science and technology. Contact Us ADEPS Communications Email Physics Flash An electronic newsletter featuring interviews with Physics Division staff and news of awards and the latest research published in peer-reviewed journals. Physics Flash archive Focus on Physics Focus on Proton Radiography (pdf) High Energy Physics: LBNE, HAWC (pdf) Nuclear Physics:

  17. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerating massive objects, Part 2 Physics states that Particles with mass such as protons and electrons can never truly travel at the speed of light in vacuum but they can get very close. Why not? Dan, This follows from Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity which predicts a number of physical consequences for objects moving at large velocities, consequences which are outside our normal everyday intuition gained from observing objects moving at low velocities. One effect is that particles

  18. Harvey Wasserman! Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics Research: Target 2017 ...www.nersc.govsciencerequirementsHEP * Mid---morning a

  19. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez, Hector

    2014-10-31

    This year the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) High Energy Physics (HEP) group continued with the ongoing research program outlined in the grant proposal. The program is centered on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the proton-proton (pp) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The main research focus is on data analysis and on the preparation for the High Luminosity (HL) LHC or experiment detector upgrade. The physics data analysis included Higgs Doublet Search and measurement of the (1)#3; Λ0b branching fraction, (2) B meson mass, and (3) hyperon θ-b lifetime. The detector upgrade included work on the preparations for the Forward Pixel (FPIX) detector Silicon Sensor Testing in a production run at Fermilab. In addition, the group has taken responsibilities on the Software Release through our former research associate Dr. Eric Brownson who acted until last December as a Level Two Offline Manager for the CMS Upgrade. In support of the CMS data analysis activities carried out locally, the UPRM group has built and maintains an excellent Tier3 analysis center in Mayaguez. This allowed us to analyze large data samples and to continue the development of algorithms for the upgrade tracking robustness we started several years ago, and we plan to resume in the near future. This project involves computer simulation of the radiation damage to be suffered at the higher luminosities of the upgraded LHC. This year we continued to serve as a source of outstanding students for the field of high energy physics. Three of our graduate students finished their MS work in May, 2014, Their theses research were on data analysis of heavy quark b-physics. All of them are currently enrolled at Ph.D. physics program across the nation. One of them (Hector Moreno) at New Mexico University (Hector Moreno), one at University of New Hampshire (Sandra Santiesteban) and one at University of

  20. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  1. Theoretical & Experimental Studies of Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, Kevin

    2012-10-04

    Abstract High energy physics has been one of the signature research programs at the University of Rochester for over 60 years. The group has made leading contributions to experimental discoveries at accelerators and in cosmic rays and has played major roles in developing the theoretical framework that gives us our ``standard model'' of fundamental interactions today. This award from the Department of Energy funded a major portion of that research for more than 20 years. During this time, highlights of the supported work included the discovery of the top quark at the Fermilab Tevatron, the completion of a broad program of physics measurements that verified the electroweak unified theory, the measurement of three generations of neutrino flavor oscillations, and the first observation of a ``Higgs like'' boson at the Large Hadron Collider. The work has resulted in more than 2000 publications over the period of the grant. The principal investigators supported on this grant have been recognized as leaders in the field of elementary particle physics by their peers through numerous awards and leadership positions. Most notable among them is the APS W.K.H. Panofsky Prize awarded to Arie Bodek in 2004, the J.J. Sakurai Prizes awarded to Susumu Okubo and C. Richard Hagen in 2005 and 2010, respectively, the Wigner medal awarded to Susumu Okubo in 2006, and five principal investigators (Das, Demina, McFarland, Orr, Tipton) who received Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator awards during the period of this grant. The University of Rochester Department of Physics and Astronomy, which houses the research group, provides primary salary support for the faculty and has waived most tuition costs for graduate students during the period of this grant. The group also benefits significantly from technical support and infrastructure available at the University which supports the work. The research work of the group has provided educational opportunities for graduate students

  2. Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics Program at CERN (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at CERN (AD) is looking at antimatter production and trapping. First trapped anti-hydrogen were reported in 2010. Interdisciplinary team is working in the CLOUD experiment,...

  3. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H.

    2012-02-10

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but

  4. Chicago Business Features Argonne Woman in Nuclear Physics | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Chicago Business Features Argonne Woman in Nuclear Physics Chicago Business Features Argonne Woman in Nuclear Physics January 9, 2012 - 4:08pm Addthis Kawtar Hafidi is an experimental nuclear physicist, working in the medium energy physics group at Argonne. Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Kawtar Hafidi is an experimental nuclear physicist, working in the medium energy physics group at Argonne. Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Chicago Business has the scoop

  5. High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, Mark; Errede, Steve; Gollin, George; Thaler, Jon; El-Khadra, Aida; Willenbrock, Scott; Leigh, Robert; Pitts, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and astronomy at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign is presented via a series of reprints of published papers.

  6. CDF Top Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Tartarelli, G. F.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    The authors present the latest results about top physics obtained by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data sample used for these analysis (about 110 pb{sup{minus}1}) represents almost the entire statistics collected by CDF during four years (1992--95) of data taking. This large data size has allowed detailed studies of top production and decay properties. The results discussed here include the determination of the top quark mass, the measurement of the production cross section, the study of the kinematics of the top events and a look at top decays.

  7. SEARCHING FOR HIGGS BOSONS AND NEW PHYSICS AT HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung Kao

    2007-09-05

    The objectives of research activities in particle theory are predicting the production cross section and decay branching fractions of Higgs bosons and new particles at hadron colliders, developing techniques and computer software to discover these particles and to measure their properties, and searching for new phenomena and new interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The results of our project could lead to the discovery of Higgs bosons, new particles, and signatures for new physics, or we will be able to set meaningful limits on important parameters in particle physics. We investigated the the prospects for the discovery at the CERN Large Hadron Collider of Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles. Promising results are found for the CP-odd pseudoscalar ($A^0$) and the heavier CP-even scalar ($H^0$) Higgs bosons with masses up to 800 GeV. Furthermore, we study properties of the lightest neutralino ($\\chi^0$) and calculate its cosmological relic density in a supersymmetric $U(1)'$ model as well as the muon anomalous magnetic moment $a_\\mu = (g_\\mu - 2)/2$ in a supersymmetric $U(1)'$ model. We found that there are regions of the parameter space that can explain the experimental deviation of $a_\\mu$ from the Standard Model calculation and yield an acceptable cold dark matter relic density without conflict with collider experimental constraints. % Recently, we presented a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to hh$) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model and the minimal supersymmetric model. We plan to predict the Higgs pair production rate and to study the trilinear coupling among the Higgs bosons. % In addition, we have made significant contributions in B physics, single top production, charged Higgs search at the Fermilab as well as in grid computing for both D0 and ATLAS.

  8. New Physics Search in the LHCb Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurth, Tobias; ,

    2010-06-11

    The authors present theoretical and experimental preparations for an indirect search for new physics (NP) using the rare decay {bar B}{sub d} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. They design new observables with very small theoretical uncertainties and good experimental resolution.

  9. Saturday Morning Physics - Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Further information online Contemporary Physics Education Project The Particle Adventure Particle Physics - Education and Outreach (Fermilab) CERN (Education Website) Wikipedia: ...

  10. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas.

  11. Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas: Los Alamos NPAC Research...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    D. 1 ; Kippen, Karen E. 1 ; Wilburn, Wesley S. 1 ; Vestrand, W. Thomas 1 ; Nelson, Ronald O. 1 ; Seestrom, Susan J. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National...

  12. VISTAS Winter 2009 Experimental Physical Sciences VISTAS E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... damage-tolerant nanocomposites will have ... have been discovered by accident," said Filip Ronning, ... of solar energy into electrical power or chemical fuels. ...

  13. Experimental Hall C | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C Jefferson Lab has four experimental halls. Hall C is 150 feet in diameter and 60 feet tall. Hall C houses a High Momentum Spectrometer and provides space for large-installation experiments. These are stand-alone experiments requiring unique or highly specialized detectors, magnets and targeting systems. The research equipment in Hall C is used to study the weak charge of the proton, form factors of simple quark systems, the transition from hadrons to quarks and nuclei with a strange quark

  14. Quantum simulations of physics problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somma, R. D.; Ortiz, G.; Knill, E. H.; Gubernatis, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    If a large Quantum Computer (QC) existed today, what type of physical problems could we efficiently simulate on it that we could not efficiently simulate on a classical Turing machine? In this paper we argue that a QC could solve some relevant physical 'questions' more efficiently. The existence of one-to-one mappings between different algebras of observables or between different Hilbert spaces allow us to represent and imitate any physical system by any other one (e.g., a bosonic system by a spin-1/2 system). We explain how these mappings can be performed, and we show quantum networks useful for the efficient evaluation of some physical properties, such as correlation functions and energy spectra.

  15. Design Considerations for Large Mass Ultra-Low Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-07-01

    Summary The objective of this document is to present the designers of the next generation of large-mass, ultra-low background experiments with lessons learned and design strategies from previous experimental work. Design issues divided by topic into mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements are addressed. Large mass low-background experiments have been recognized by the scientific community as appropriate tools to aid in the refinement of the standard model. The design of these experiments is very costly and a rigorous engineering review is required for their success. The extreme conditions that the components of the experiment must withstand (heavy shielding, vacuum/pressure and temperature gradients), in combination with unprecedented noise levels, necessitate engineering guidance to support quality construction and safe operating conditions. Physical properties and analytical results of typical construction materials are presented. Design considerations for achieving ultra-low-noise data acquisition systems are addressed. Five large-mass, low-background conceptual designs for the one-tonne scale germanium experiment are proposed and analyzed. The result is a series of recommendations for future experiments engineering and for the Majorana simulation task group to evaluate the different design approaches.

  16. Cost estimate of initial SSC experimental equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1986-06-01

    The cost of the initial detector complement at recently constructed colliding beam facilities (or at those under construction) has been a significant fraction of the cost of the accelerator complex. Because of the complexity of large modern-day detectors, the time-scale for their design and construction is comparable to the time-scale needed for accelerator design and construction. For these reasons it is appropriate to estimate the cost of the anticipated detector complement in parallel with the cost estimates of the collider itself. The fundamental difficulty with this procedure is that, whereas a firm conceptual design of the collider does exist, comparable information is unavailable for the detectors. Traditionally, these have been built by the high energy physics user community according to their perception of the key scientific problems that need to be addressed. The role of the accelerator laboratory in that process has involved technical and managerial coordination and the allocation of running time and local facilities among the proposed experiments. It seems proper that the basic spirit of experimentation reflecting the scientific judgment of the community should be preserved at the SSC. Furthermore, the formal process of initiation of detector proposals can only start once the SSC has been approved as a construction project and a formal laboratory administration put in place. Thus an ad hoc mechanism had to be created to estimate the range of potential detector needs, potential detector costs, and associated computing equipment.

  17. Experimental Tests of Special Relativity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roberts, Tom [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2009-09-01

    Over the past century Special Relativity has become a cornerstone of modern physics, and its Lorentz invariance is a foundation of every current fundamental theory of physics. So it is crucial that it be thoroughly tested experimentally. The many tests of SR will be discussed, including several modern high-precision measurements. Several experiments that appear to be in conflict with SR will also be discussed, such as claims that the famous measurements of Michelson and Morley actually have a non-null result, and the similar but far more extensive measurements of Dayton Miller that 'determined the absolute motion of the earth'. But the errorbars for these old experiments are huge, and are larger than their purported signals. In short, SR has been tested extremely well and stands un-refuted today, but current thoughts about quantum gravity suggest that it might not truly be a symmetry of nature.

  18. New Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, Melisa; /INFN, Trieste

    2010-06-01

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle interactions is one of the major achievements of fundamental science. However, despite its success in predicting experimental results through the years, several fundamental issues are left open such as: the origin of dark matter in the universe, the existence of a unifying theory of all known forces and interactions, why particles have the masses we observe and the hierarchy problem. Supersymmetry (SUSY) is one of the possible extensions of the SM. It proposes an additional symmetry that predicts the existence of an additional boson (fermion) for each SM fermion (boson). The appeal of SUSY is closely related to the fact that it naturally solves several of the open questions of the SM. Thus it is extensively tested in an experiment as CDF where many of its signatures can be searched for. On the other hand there is still no compelling reason to exclude other scenarios like Extra-dimensions and New Gauge Interaction Models, a priori. The CDF program in physics beyond the SM is quite rich and here we present some representative searches subdivided in two main categories: SUSY and non-SUSY searches. We present the current status of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model at the Tevatron 1.96-TeV proton-antiproton collider using data collected with the CDF experiment. We cover searches for supersymmetry, extra dimensions and new gauge bosons.

  19. Chunking of Large Multidimensional Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotem, Doron; Otoo, Ekow J.; Seshadri, Sridhar

    2007-02-28

    Data intensive scientific computations as well on-lineanalytical processing applications as are done on very large datasetsthat are modeled as k-dimensional arrays. The storage organization ofsuch arrays on disks is done by partitioning the large global array intofixed size hyper-rectangular sub-arrays called chunks or tiles that formthe units of data transfer between disk and memory. Typical queriesinvolve the retrieval of sub-arrays in a manner that accesses all chunksthat overlap the query results. An important metric of the storageefficiency is the expected number of chunks retrieved over all suchqueries. The question that immediately arises is "what shapes of arraychunks give the minimum expected number of chunks over a query workload?"In this paper we develop two probabilistic mathematical models of theproblem and provide exact solutions using steepest descent and geometricprogramming methods. Experimental results, using synthetic workloads onreal life data sets, show that our chunking is much more efficient thanthe existing approximate solutions.

  20. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  1. Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is dedicated to developing fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy and to advancing the frontiers of plasma science. The Laboratory pursues these goals through experiments and computer simulations of the behavior of plasma, the hot electrically charged gas that fuels fusion reactions and has a wide range of practical applications. Experimental Fusion Research Fusion powers the sun and stars. The process takes

  2. PARTICIPATION IN HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Christopher

    2012-12-20

    This grant funded experimental and theoretical activities in elementary particles physics at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). The experiments in which IIT faculty collaborated included the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, the MINOS experiment, the Double Chooz experiment, and FNAL E871 - HyperCP experiment. Funds were used to support summer salary for faculty, salary for postdocs, and general support for graduate and undergraduate students. Funds were also used for travel expenses related to these projects and general supplies.

  3. Physics Division Work Planning Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements The following is Physics Division requirements related to work planning, control and authorization for work projects and test set ups in division work areas across the laboratory. For the testing and commissioning of experimental equipment the consequences/cost of said equipment should receive careful consideration when doing the risk analysis. * Any small setup or task with total duration of less than two weeks requires an informal task hazard analysis. Informal means we can do

  4. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Large Scale Jobs Running Large Scale Jobs Users face various challenges with running and scaling large scale jobs on peta-scale production systems. For example, certain applications may not have enough memory per core, the default environment variables may need to be adjusted, or I/O dominates run time. This page lists some available programming and run time tuning options and tips users can try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers

  5. Carl A. Gagliardi PHYSICS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Gagliardi PHYSICS Fundamental interactions and nuclear astrophysics - Fellow, American Physical Society - Distinguished Achievement Award in Teaching, AFS, - Texas A&M John C. Hardy PHYSICS Fundamental interactions and exotic nuclei - Fellow, Royal Society of Canada - Fellow, American Physical Society Che Ming Ko PHYSICS Theoretical hadron physics and heavy-ion collisions - Humboldt Research Award - Fellow, American Physical Society Joseph B. Natowitz CHEMISTRY Heavy-ion reaction

  6. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the D� experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  7. Precision Muon Physics | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Precision Muon Physics Precision Muon Physics One avenue to search for particles far too heavy to be discovered at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is to investigate the properties of known particles with great precision. The muon, a heavy cousin of the electron, is well-suited for precision studies due to its relatively long lifetime and large mass. The Muon Group at Argonne is working on the design and construction of two experiments at Fermilab that will push the limits of precision

  8. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We reviewmore » a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  9. Teaching symmetry in the introductory physics curriculum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, C. T.; Lederman, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Modern physics is largely defined by fundamental symmetry principles and Noether's Theorem. Yet these are not taught, or rarely mentioned, to beginning students, thus missing an opportunity to reveal that the subject of physics is as lively and contemporary as molecular biology, and as beautiful as the arts. We prescribe a symmetry module to insert into the curriculum, of a week's length.

  10. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Searching for New Physics (2/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    This is the second lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This second lecture discusses techniques important for analyses searching for new physics using the CDF B_s --> mu+ mu- search as a specific example. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  11. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Searching for New Physics (2/3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-20

    This is the second lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This second lecture discusses techniques important for analyses searching for new physics using the CDF B_s --> mu+ mu- search as a specific example. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  12. Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, Mary

    2013-11-30

    Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

  13. VLHC accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Blaskiewicz et al.

    2001-11-01

    A six-month design study for a future high energy hadron collider was initiated by the Fermilab director in October 2000. The request was to study a staged approach where a large circumference tunnel is built that initially would house a low field ({approx}2 T) collider with center-of-mass energy greater than 30 TeV and a peak (initial) luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The tunnel was to be scoped, however, to support a future upgrade to a center-of-mass energy greater than 150 TeV with a peak luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} using high field ({approx} 10 T) superconducting magnet technology. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a report of the Design Study was produced by Fermilab in June 2001. 1 The Design Study focused on a Stage 1, 20 x 20 TeV collider using a 2-in-1 transmission line magnet and leads to a Stage 2, 87.5 x 87.5 TeV collider using 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology. The article that follows is a compilation of accelerator physics designs and computational results which contributed to the Design Study. Many of the parameters found in this report evolved during the study, and thus slight differences between this text and the Design Study report can be found. The present text, however, presents the major accelerator physics issues of the Very Large Hadron Collider as examined by the Design Study collaboration and provides a basis for discussion and further studies of VLHC accelerator parameters and design philosophies.

  14. The 3D structure of the hadrons: recents results and experimental program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz Camacho, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    The understanding of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at large distances still remains one of the main outstanding problems of nuclear physics. Studying the internal structure of hadrons provides a way to probe QCD in the non-perturbative domain and can help us unravel the internal structure of the most elementary blocks of matter. Jefferson Lab (JLab) has already delivered results on how elementary quarks and gluons create nucleon structure and properties. The upgrade of JLab to 12 GeV will allow the full exploration of the valence-quark structure of nucleons and the extraction of real threedimensional pictures. I will present recent results and review the future experimental program at JLab.

  15. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers and compiler options The available compilers on Hopper are PGI, Cray, Intel, GNU,...

  16. Accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in very large hadron colliders Authors: Bauer, P. ; Limon, P. ; Peggs, Stephen G. ; Syphers, ...

  17. Method for simulating discontinuous physical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baty, Roy S.; Vaughn, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    The mathematical foundations of conventional numerical simulation of physical systems provide no consistent description of the behavior of such systems when subjected to discontinuous physical influences. As a result, the numerical simulation of such problems requires ad hoc encoding of specific experimental results in order to address the behavior of such discontinuous physical systems. In the present invention, these foundations are replaced by a new combination of generalized function theory and nonstandard analysis. The result is a class of new approaches to the numerical simulation of physical systems which allows the accurate and well-behaved simulation of discontinuous and other difficult physical systems, as well as simpler physical systems. Applications of this new class of numerical simulation techniques to process control, robotics, and apparatus design are outlined.

  18. Nuclear Physics: Recent Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns Meetings Recent Talks Archived Talks Additional Information Computing at JLab Operations Logbook Physics Topics: ...

  19. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings ...

  20. UNIRIB: Physics Topics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Topics Research Capitalizing on the strengths of nine collaborating research ... Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium is conducting research at the forefront of nuclear physics. ...

  1. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Privacy and Security Notice Skip over navigation Search the JLab Site Nuclear Physics Program Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical ...

  2. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... equipped with the instruments required for precision nuclear and atomic physics research. ... Mass Analyzer (FMA), an atomic physics beam line, and two general purpose beam lines. ...

  3. Saturday Morning Physics - Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Further information online Contemporary Physics Education Project Secret Worlds: The Universe within (Java animation) The Particle Adventure Particle Physics - Education and ...

  4. Computational Physics and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Computational Physics and Methods Performing innovative simulations of physics phenomena on tomorrow's scientific computing platforms Growth and emissivity of young galaxy ...

  5. Office of Physical Protection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Physical Protection is comprised of a team of security specialists engaged in providing Headquarters-wide physical protection.

  6. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Tom Mullen, Physics Division Safety Engineer. Please Note: If you have any comments or concerns regarding safety at ATLAS, please contact the Physics Division Safety ...

  7. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational ...

  8. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  9. Diagnostics - Rotating Wall Machine - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagnostics UW Madison Line Tied Reconnection Experiment Diagnostics LTRX HomeResearch MissionLTRX DevicePhysics TopicsDiagnosticsLTRX GalleryLTRX People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation As the UW-LTRX was designed with the goal of employing a rotating solid wall along the boundary of the experimental volume, diagnostic access is necessarily much more constrained than in comparable devices. With the

  10. Stefan Gerhardt | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stefan Gerhardt Principal Research Physicist Stefan Gerhardt is head of Experimental Research Operations for the National Spherical Torus Experiment- Upgrade (NSTX-U). He operates numerous diagnostics on NSTX-U, along with designing plasma control schemes and running physics experiments. He has previously worked on a wide variety of fusion machines, including spherical tokamaks, stellarators, and field reversed configurations. Interests Fusion energy Plasma diagnostics Plasma physics

  11. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Feynman Computing Center State-of-the-art computing facilities and expertise drive successful research in experimental and theoretical particle physics. Fermilab is a pioneer in managing "big data" and counts scientific computing as one of its core competencies. For scientists to understand the huge amounts of raw information coming from particle physics experiments, they must process, analyze and compare the information to simulations. To accomplish these feats,

  12. Graduate Student Information - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduate Student Information UW Madison Madison Symmetric Torus Graduate Student Information MST HomeGraduate Student InformationLinksTourControl and Auxiliary SystemsPhysics TopicsDeviceResearch MissionMST People mst logo CPLA Home Directory Publications Links Internal University of Wisconsin Physics Department Research funding includes support from: Department of Energy National Science Foundation Opportunities: At any given time there are about a dozen graduate students doing experimental

  13. Theoretical Fusion Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSTX-U Education Organization Contact Us Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports NSTX-U Theoretical Fusion Research About Theory Department The fusion energy sciences mission of the Theory Department at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is to help provide the scientific foundations for establishing magnetic confinement as an attractive, technically

  14. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network ...

  15. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleland, W.E.; Engels, E. Jr.; Humanic, T.J.; Perera, U.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1993-04-01

    During the past year on Task A, the HELIOS work drew to a close with first results from the electron-muon pair studies (no anomalous sources are seen, and the final results and uncertainties are being set). First data from CMD2 will allow improvement of some phi branching ratios, including some improved limits on forbidden decays. The engineering run for E865 is scheduled for June and July of 1993. The principal efforts of Task B, the Fermilab program, have been the completion of the analysis of the 1987--88 data with resulting publications, completion of the 1990--91 data run, and the beginning of the analysis of the 1990--91 data. In addition, the Task B group is taking a leadership role in developing a proposal to Fermilab for the upgrade of the CDF silicon vertex detector in preparation for the 1995 data run. Task C has recently submitted results of its fractionally charged particle searches, placing new upper limits on the abundance of naturally-occurring fractionally-charged particles in various materials. This group has recently been approved by the Brookhaven management for an exposure of their p-i-n diodes in a high intensity proton beam. This measurement, along with its subsequent analysis, will complete the program. Task D concerned itself with silicon drift chamber studies for the SSC. Task E was devoted to studies of electronics for the GEM Level 1 liquid Ar calorimeter trigger.

  16. physics-based-html

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics-based High-Resolution Numerical Modeling of Bridge Foundation Scour

  17. Jefferson Lab Physicist Wins American Physical Society Award | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Physicist Wins American Physical Society Award Jefferson Lab Physicist Wins American Physical Society Award April 19, 2002 Keith Baker, from Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Va., was recently awarded the American Physical Society's 2002 Edward A. Bouchet Award for innovative research. Baker, a JLab experimental physicist is also a professor at Hampton University (Hampton, Va.). The APS award recognizes Baker for his contribution to nuclear and particle physics research, his development of

  18. Efimov physics in {sup 6}Li atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2010-01-15

    A new narrow three-atom loss resonance associated with an Efimov trimer crossing the three-atom threshold has recently been discovered in a many-body system of ultracold {sup 6}Li atoms in the three lowest hyperfine spin states at a magnetic field near 895 G. O'Hara and coworkers have used measurements of the three-body recombination rate in this region to determine the complex three-body parameter associated with Efimov physics. Using this parameter as the input, we calculate the universal predictions for the spectrum of Efimov states and for the three-body recombination rate in the universal region above 600 G where all three scattering lengths are large. We predict an atom-dimer loss resonance at 672+-2 G associated with an Efimov trimer disappearing through an atom-dimer threshold. We also predict an interference minimum in the three-body recombination rate at 759+-1 G where the three-spin mixture may be sufficiently stable to allow experimental study of the many-body system.

  19. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  20. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  1. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  2. Computing in high-energy physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mount, Richard P.

    2016-05-31

    I present a very personalized journey through more than three decades of computing for experimental high-energy physics, pointing out the enduring lessons that I learned. This is followed by a vision of how the computing environment will evolve in the coming ten years and the technical challenges that this will bring. I then address the scale and cost of high-energy physics software and examine the many current and future challenges, particularly those of management, funding and software-lifecycle management. Lastly, I describe recent developments aimed at improving the overall coherence of high-energy physics software.

  3. Electroweak Physics at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. D. McKeown

    2012-03-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility provides CW electron beams with high intensity, remarkable stability, and a high degree of polarization. These capabilities offer new and unique opportunities to search for novel particles and forces that would require extension of the standard model. CEBAF is presently undergoing an upgrade that includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV and enhancements to the experimental equipment. This upgraded facility will provide increased capability to address new physics beyond the standard model.

  4. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  5. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  6. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously withmore » the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.« less

  7. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Target 2014 High Energy Physics (HEP) Nuclear Physics (NP) Overview Published Reports Case Study FAQs NERSC HPC Achievement Awards Share Your Research User Submitted Research Citations NERSC Citations Home » Science at NERSC » HPC Requirements Reviews » Requirements Reviews: Target 2014 » Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2014 FESFrontcover.png An FES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop August 3-4, 2010 Final Report Large

  8. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics: Target 2017 Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics: Target 2017 NPicon.png This invitation-only review is organized by the Department of Energy's Offices of Nuclear Physics (NP) and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and by NERSC. The goal is to determine production high-performance computing, storage, and services that will be needed for NP to achieve its science goals through 2017. The review brings together DOE Program Managers,

  9. Large Group Visits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Group Visits Large Group Visits All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Contact Us thumbnail of 1350 Central Avenue (505) 667-4444 Email Let us know if you plan to bring a group of 10 or more. All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Parking for buses and RVs is available on Iris Street behind the Museum off of 15th St. See attached map (pdf). Contact

  10. Super-large optical gyroscopes for applications in geodesy and seismology: state-of-the-art and development prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velikoseltsev, A A; Luk'yanov, D P; Vinogradov, V I; Shreiber, K U

    2014-12-31

    A brief survey of the history of the invention and development of super-large laser gyroscopes (SLLGs) is presented. The basic results achieved using SLLGs in geodesy, seismology, fundamental physics and other fields are summarised. The concept of SLLG design, specific features of construction and implementation are considered, as well as the prospects of applying the present-day optical technologies to laser gyroscope engineering. The possibilities of using fibre-optical gyroscopes in seismologic studies are analysed and the results of preliminary experimental studies are presented. (laser gyroscopes)