Sample records for large effect greatly

  1. Effects of Great Plains Irrigation on Regional Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, David B.

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of radiative and turbulent fluxes, the development of the planetary boundary layer, and the transport of water vapor from the regions of irrigation. The first two effects have the potential to drastically alter the climate of irrigated regions of the Great...

  2. The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the North Norfolk Paper 97 #12;The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the North and seabed lowering due to dredging off Great Yarmouth. A scenario of extreme dredging was defined and used

  3. Source characteristics of large deep earthquakes: Constraint on the faulting mechanism at great depths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tibi, Rigobert

    indicate significant energy dissipation due to heating and possible melt production. The 1991 Argentina the other known South American large deep events such as 1963 Peru, 1970 Colombia and 1994 Bolivia

  4. NOVEMBER 1997 2847L O F G R E N Simulated Effects of Idealized Laurentian Great Lakes on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cycle of latent and sensible heat flux. Very high upward sensible heat flux occurs over these idealized noted remote effects of the Great Lakes in the form of different precipitation patterns over

  5. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism, Crustal...

  6. Summary report: The shadow effect of large wind farms: measurements,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary report: The shadow effect of large wind farms: measurements, data analysis and modelling of large wind farms Department: Wind Energy Risø-R-1615(EN) July 2007 ISSN 0106-2840 ISBN 978 of the project ­ by means of data from the demonstration wind farms Horns Rev and Nysted, analyses of these data

  7. Air Effects on Large Droplet Impact Frank T Smith1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purvis, Richard

    Air Effects on Large Droplet Impact Frank T Smith1 and Richard Purvis2 UCL, London WC1E 6BT, UK A study is presented of the interaction(s) between air and water in determining the motion of a large surrounding air motion. I.Nomenclature A = magnitude of shear flow in the air c = ratio U /V D

  8. The Effect of Caching in Sustainability of Large Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Effect of Caching in Sustainability of Large Wireless Networks Georgios S. Paschos Informatics the scalability and the efficiency for the future networks. In this landscape, wireless networks are considered]. Despite their worldwide deployment, wireless networks are mostly confined tof wireless networks is limited

  9. Large scale obscuration and related climate effects open literature bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, N.A.; Geitgey, J.; Behl, Y.K.; Zak, B.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large scale obscuration and related climate effects of nuclear detonations first became a matter of concern in connection with the so-called ``Nuclear Winter Controversy`` in the early 1980`s. Since then, the world has changed. Nevertheless, concern remains about the atmospheric effects of nuclear detonations, but the source of concern has shifted. Now it focuses less on global, and more on regional effects and their resulting impacts on the performance of electro-optical and other defense-related systems. This bibliography reflects the modified interest.

  10. Potential climate change effects on Great Lakes hydrodynamics and water quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, D.C.L.; Schertzer, W.M. [eds.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of climate change has become increasingly recognized as a major environmental concern. Its impact can affect many socio-economic and ecosystem components. This book provides a state-of-the-art review of the climate change effects on lake hydrodynamics and water quality. Most of the engineering cases covered deal with the ability of existing infrastructure to cope with extreme weather conditions. The aim is to provide sufficient case studies to illustrate the advancement in modeling research on lake hydrodynamics, thermal stratification, pollutant transport and water quality by highlighting the climate change aspects in the application of these techniques.

  11. New measurements of the EMC Effect in Light Nuclei and at Large x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskell, David

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the modification of structure functions in nuclei (the EMC Effect) has been the focus of intense experimental and theoretical study since the original discovery in 1983, the experimental emphasis has been on heavy or mediumheavy nuclei. The theoretical interpretation of the EMC Effect is far from clear; it remains difficult to disentangle the "conventional" nuclear physics effects of binding and Fermi motion from more exotic effects. The study of the EMC Effect in light nuclei, where the detailed nuclear structure is well understood, and at large x, where effects from Fermi motion dominate, will add new insight into the underlying mechanism at work. Experiment E03103 at Jefferson Lab measured electron scattering cross sections from nuclei (A=3 to 197) and the deuteron to provide new data on the EMC Effect. These measurements will greatly improve the precision of the existing data set on 4He, provide the first measurement of the EMC Effect in 3He for x>0.5, a

  12. Large piezoresistive effect in surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, S. D., E-mail: stoffel.d.janssens@gmail.com; Haenen, K., E-mail: ken.haenen@uhasselt.be [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Drijkoningen, S. [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface conductivity in hydrogen-terminated single crystal diamond is an intriguing phenomenon for fundamental reasons as well as for application driven research. Surface conductivity is also observed in hydrogen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond although the electronic transport mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, the piezoresistive properties of intrinsic surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond are investigated. A gauge factor of 35 is calculated from bulging a diamond membrane of 350?nm thick, with a diameter of 656??m and a sheet resistance of 1.45 M?/sq. The large piezoresistive effect is reasoned to originate directly from strain-induced changes in the resistivity of the grain boundaries. Additionally, we ascribe a small time-dependent fraction of the piezoresistive effect to charge trapping of charge carriers at grain boundaries. In conclusion, time-dependent piezoresistive effect measurements act as a tool for deeper understanding the complex electronic transport mechanisms induced by grain boundaries in a polycrystalline material or nanocomposite.

  13. Large Scale Obscuration and Related Climate Effects Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zak, B.D.; Russell, N.A.; Church, H.W.; Einfeld, W.; Yoon, D.; Behl, Y.K. [eds.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Workshop on Large Scale Obsurcation and Related Climate Effects was held 29--31 January, 1992, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The objectives of the workshop were: to determine through the use of expert judgement the current state of understanding of regional and global obscuration and related climate effects associated with nuclear weapons detonations; to estimate how large the uncertainties are in the parameters associated with these phenomena (given specific scenarios); to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on obscuration predictions; and to develop an approach for the prioritization of further work on newly-available data sets to reduce the uncertainties. The workshop consisted of formal presentations by the 35 participants, and subsequent topical working sessions on: the source term; aerosol optical properties; atmospheric processes; and electro-optical systems performance and climatic impacts. Summaries of the conclusions reached in the working sessions are presented in the body of the report. Copies of the transparencies shown as part of each formal presentation are contained in the appendices (microfiche).

  14. Large

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Highly Effective Action from Large N Gauge Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyun Seok Yang

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently John H. Schwarz put forward a conjecture that the world-volume action of a probe D3-brane in an AdS5 x S5 background of type IIB superstring theory can be reinterpreted as the highly effective action (HEA) of four-dimensional N=4 superconformal field theory on the Coulomb branch. We argue that the HEA can be derived from the noncommutative (NC) field theory representation of the AdS/CFT correspondence and the Seiberg-Witten (SW) map defining a spacetime field redefinition between ordinary and NC gauge fields. It is based only on the well-known facts that the master fields of large N matrices are higher-dimensional NC U(1) gauge fields and the SW map is a local coordinate transformation eliminating U(1) gauge fields known as the Darboux theorem in symplectic geometry.

  16. Magnetic refrigeration, based on the magnetocaloric ef-fect, has great promise for domestic and industrial use and is at-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    Magnetic refrigeration, based on the magnetocaloric ef- fect, has great promise for domestic the magnetization phase, and heat is withdrawn from the volume to be refrigerated during the demagnetization phase but these LaFeSi ma- terials seem to have the best properties in view of magnetic refrigeration applications

  17. Energy and water in the Great Lakes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  18. Shetland and the Great War 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riddell, Linda Katherine

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great War was an enormous global cataclysm affecting the lives of all inhabitants of the combatant countries and many others. The effects were not uniform, however, and, by assessing the experience of the people of ...

  19. The effects of proposed water development by AWDI on Great Sand Dunes National Monument and the San Luis Valley in southern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raines, Richard Thomas

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF PROPOSED WATER DEVELOPMENT BY AWDI ON GREAT SAND DUNES NATIONAL MONUMENT AND THE SAN LUIS VALLEY IN SOUTHERN COLORADO A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by RICHARD THOMAS RAINES Submitted to thc College of Agriculture of Texas Agr... LUIS VALLEY IN SOUTHERN COLORADO A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by RICHARD THOMAS RAINES Approved as to style and content by: r Dr. Robert C. Ma mmittec Chairman Dr. Robert W. Kni@~mmittcc Member Dr. a igh olfe, Corbmittcc Member I'Dc t August, 1992...

  20. Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers William L. Graf including more than 75,000 dams. One hundred thirty-seven of the very large dams, each storing 1.2 km3 (106 effects of these very large dams emerge from an analysis of the stream gage records of 72 river reaches

  1. Effect of Large Dynamic Loads on Interconnected Power Systems with Power Oscillation Damping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Effect of Large Dynamic Loads on Interconnected Power Systems with Power Oscillation Damping.hossain and H.Pota)@adfa.edu.au Abstract--Power systems are composed of dynamic loads. In this paper presents an analysis to investigate the effects of large dynamic loads on interconnected power systems

  2. Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed in the southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS 1 ) to investigate the impact of urban and land vegetation processes on the prediction of the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 30 July 2003 in the vicinity of Oklahoma City

  3. Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Weihao

    Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power to wind speed variations, the wind shear and the tower shadow effects. The fluctuating power may be ableSILENT/PowerFactory. In this paper, the impacts of wind shear and tower shadow effects on the small signal stability of power systems

  4. Spatial analysis of health effects of large industrial incinerators in England,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diggle, Peter J.

    Spatial analysis of health effects of large industrial incinerators in England, 1998­2008: a study of large industrial incinerators in England, 1998­2008: a study using matched case­control areas. BMJ Open to industrial incinerators in England is associated with increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality

  5. Effects of experimental warming and clipping on metabolic change of microbial community in a US Great Plains tallgrass prairie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Jianping; Liu, Xinxing; Liu, Xueduan; Nostrand, Joy D. Van; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qiu, Guanzhou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    While more and more studies are being conducted on the effects of global warming, little is known regarding the response of metabolic change of whole soil microbial communities to this phenomenon. In this study, functional gene changes at the mRNA level were analyzed by our new developed GeoChip 3.0. Soil samples were taken from a long-term climate warming experiment site, which has been conducted for ~;;8 years at the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory, a 137.6-ha farm located in the Central Redbed Plains, in McClain County, Oklahoma. The experiment uses a paired factorial design with warming as the primary factor nested with clipping as a secondary factor. An infrared heater was used to simulate global warming, and clipping was used to mimic mowing hay. Twelve 2m x 2m plots were divided into six pairs of warmed and control plots. The heater generates a constant output of ~;;100 Watts m-2 to approximately 2 oC increase in soil temperature above the ambient plots, which is at the low range of the projected climate warming by IPCC. Soil whole microbial communities? mRNA was extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized with our GeoChip 3.0, a functional gene array covering genes involved in N, C, P, and S cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation, to examine expressed genes. The results showed that a greater number and higher diversity of genes were expressed under warmed plots compared to control. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that the soil microbial communities were clearly altered by warming, with or without clipping. The dissimilarity of the communities based on functional genes was tested and results showed that warming and control communities were significantly different (P<0.05), with or without clipping. Most genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling were expressed at higher levels in warming samples compared to control samples. All of the results demonstrated that the whole microbial communities increase functional gene expression under warming with or without clipping in order to adapt the changed out environment. More detail analysis is underway.

  6. Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, Emily Brooke

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE: THE EFFECTS OF WOODY PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted... PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  7. Power Compensation Effect of an Adjustable-Speed Rotary Condenser with a Flywheel for a Large Capacity Magnet Power Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akagi, H

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power Compensation Effect of an Adjustable-Speed Rotary Condenser with a Flywheel for a Large Capacity Magnet Power Supply

  8. Large-scale Ocean-based or Geothermal Power Plants by Thermoelectric Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Liping

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat resources of small temperature difference are easily accessible, free and unlimited on earth. Thermoelectric effects provide the technology for converting these heat resources directly into electricity. We present designs of electricity generators based on thermoelectric effects and using heat resources of small temperature difference, e.g., ocean water at different depths and geothermal sources, and conclude that large-scale power plants based on thermoelectric effects are feasible and economically competitive. The key observation is that the power factor of thermoelectric materials, unlike the figure of merit, can be improved by orders of magnitude upon laminating good conductors and good thermoelectric materials. The predicted large-scale power plants based on thermoelectric effects, if validated, will have a global economic and social impact for its scalability, and the renewability, free and unlimited supply of heat resources of small temperature difference on earth.

  9. Grassland carbon and nitrogen dynamics: effects of seasonal fire and clipping in a mixed-grass prairie of the southern great plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Wylie Neal

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant production and soil microbial biomass (SMB) in grassland ecosystems are linked by flows of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) between the two groups of organisms. In native mixed grasslands of the southern Great Plains, ...

  10. Grassland carbon and nitrogen dynamics: effects of seasonal fire and clipping in a mixed-grass prairie of the southern great plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Wylie Neal

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant production and soil microbial biomass (SMB) in grassland ecosystems are linked by flows of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) between the two groups of organisms. In native mixed grasslands of the southern Great Plains, these cycles are strongly...

  11. Effects of large-scale distribution of wind energy in and around Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of large-scale distribution of wind energy in and around Europe Gregor Giebel Niels Gylling energy in Europe? · Distribution of wind energy all over Europe leads to smoothing of the wind power energy can easily supply up to ~20% of the European demand. At this stage, · Less than 13% of the wind

  12. New Measurements of the EMC Effect in Light Nuclei and at Large x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskell, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA, 23606 (United States)

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The modification of structure functions in nuclei (the EMC effect) has been the focus of intense experimental and theoretical study since the original observation in 1983. The EMC effect unequivocally demonstrates that quark distributions in nuclei are not simply the incoherent sum of the nucleon quark distributions. However, progress in understanding the root cause of these modifications has been hampered by the complexity of nuclear structure, making it difficult to disentangle the ''conventional'' nuclear effects of Fermi motion and binding from true medium modifications to nucleon structure. Experiment E03--103 at Jefferson Lab made measurements of nuclear structure function ratios from few--body nuclei ({sup 3}He and {sup 4}He) to deuterium, where the nuclear structure is well known, and for a range of nuclei, A = 3 to 197, at large x, where effects from Fermi motion and binding dominate.

  13. Great River (1973)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'In the- EnergyGreat-River

  14. Effect of Subgrid Cloud Variability on Parameterization of Indirect Aerosol Effect in Large-Scale Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11ComputationalEdNERSC:Effect of Subgrid Cloud

  15. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri S. Djikaev; Eli Ruckenstein

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamics of hydration changes gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc... We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on temperature and solute size, one can obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of temperature and solute size. These function can provide interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T=293.15 K to T=333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  16. Reduction of Ion Heating During Magnetic Reconnection by Large-Scale Effective Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haggerty, C C; Drake, J F; Phan, T D; McHugh, C T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion heating due to magnetic reconnection is an important process with applications to diverse plasmas, but previous simulations and observations have measured heating less than half oftheoretical predictions. Using kinetic particle-in-cell simulations, we show that this heating reduction is due to the presence of large scale parallel electric fields creating an effective field aligned potential which reduces the velocities of counterstreaming ions created by Fermi reflection. This potential arises to contain hot exhaust electrons, and an analytic form suitable for observations is derived.

  17. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris-Sud 11, 91767 Palaiseau (France); INAC/SP2M, CEA-Université Joseph Fourier, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Savero-Torres, W.; Notin, L.; Beigné, C.; Marty, A.; Attané, J.-P.; Vila, L. [INAC/SP2M, CEA-Université Joseph Fourier, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Jaffrès, H.; Reyren, N.; Deranlot, C.; George, J.-M.; Fert, A. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris-Sud 11, 91767 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2?nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  18. book reviews Climate Changeon the Great Lakes Basin. 1992.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,personal communication). The second paper, "Effects of Climate Change on the Water Resources of the Great is a compilation of five papers presented at the Symposium of Climate Change on the Great Lakes Basin held as part- ested in learning more a out climate change issues andstudiesintheGreatL kesisadvisedtoconsultthe

  19. Large Eddy Simulation studies of the effects of alignment and wind farm length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Richard J A M; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large eddy simulations of wind farms are performed to study the effects of wind turbine row alignment with respect to the incoming flow direction. Various wind farms with fixed stream-wise spacing (7.85 rotor diameters) and varying lateral displacements and span-wise turbine spacings are considered, for a fixed inflow direction. Simulations show that, contrary to common belief, a perfectly staggered (checker-board) configuration does not necessarily give the highest average power output. Instead, the highest mean wind farm power output is found to depend on several factors, the most important one being the alignment that leads to minimization of wake effects from turbines in several upstream rows. This alignment typically occurs at significantly smaller angles than those corresponding to perfect staggering. The observed trends have implications for wind farm designs, especially in sites with a well-defined prevailing wind direction.

  20. A. Gershunov R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gershunov Æ R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large Abstract Coupled variability of the greenhouse effect (GH) and latent heat flux (LHF) over the tropical of convection) form regions of strong greenhouse effect in tropical convergence zones while subtropical high

  1. Analysis of the Potential for a Heat Island Effect in Large Solar Vasilis Fthenakis1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of the Potential for a Heat Island Effect in Large Solar Farms Vasilis Fthenakis1 flow fields induced by large solar PV farms to answer questions pertaining to potential impacts simulations of a 1 MW section of a solar farm in North America and compared the results with recorded wind

  2. Discovering the relevant variables in a large clinical database by back-fitting fixed effects in a mixed linear model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Discovering the relevant variables in a large clinical database by back-fitting fixed effects are investigates according to a planned protocol and with a predetermined cohort. They also differ from basic

  3. A study of beam-beam effects in hadron colliders with a large number of bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieloni, Tatiana; Bay, Aurelio; Rivkin, Leonid

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle beam is a collection of a large number of charges and represents an electromagnetic potential for other charges, therefore exerting forces on itself and other beams. The control of this so called Beam-Beam Interactions (BBIs) in particle colliders is fundamental to preserve beam stability and achieve the collider maximal luminosity. In the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, these forces are experienced as localized periodic distortions when the two beams cross each other in the four experimental areas. The forces are most important for high density beams, i.e. high intensity and small beam sizes. Each LHC beam is composed of 2808 bunches, each containing $10^{11}$ protons and with a transverse size of 16~$\\mu $m at the interaction points. These extreme parameters are the key to obtain high ``luminosity'', i. e. the number of collisions per second needed to study rare physics phenomena. The BBI is therefore often the limiting factor for the luminosity of colliders. Within all BB effect...

  4. Large Extra Dimension effects through Light-by-Light Scattering at the CERN LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Sun

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Observing light-by-light scattering at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has received quite some attention and it is believed to be a clean and sensitive channel to possible new physics. In this paper, we study the diphoton production at the LHC via the process $\\rm pp\\rightarrow p\\gamma\\gamma p\\rightarrow p\\gamma\\gamma p$ through graviton exchange in the Large Extra Dimension (LED) model. Typically, when we do the background analysis, we also study the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) of $\\gamma\\gamma$ production. We compare its production in the quark-quark collision mode to the gluon-gluon collision mode and find that contributions from the gluon-gluon collision mode are comparable to the quark-quark one. Our result shows, for extra dimension $\\delta=4$, with an integrated luminosity $\\rm {\\cal L} = 200 fb^{-1}$ at the 14 TeV LHC, that diphoton production through graviton exchange can probe the LED effects up to the scale $\\rm M_S=5.06 (4.51, 5.11) TeV$ for the forward detector acceptance $\\xi_1 (\\xi_2, \\xi_3)$, respectively, where $0.00150.5$, $0.10.5$ and $0.0015<\\xi_3<0.15$.

  5. Large N non-perturbative effects in $\\mathcal{N}=4$ superconformal Chern-Simons theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuyuki Hatsuda; Masazumi Honda; Kazumi Okuyama

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the large $N$ instanton effects of partition functions in a class of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ circular quiver Chern-Simons theories on a three-sphere. Our analysis is based on the supersymmetry localization and the Fermi-gas formalism. The resulting matrix model can be regarded as a two-parameter deformation of the ABJM matrix model, and has richer non-perturbative structures. Based on a systematic semi-classical analysis, we find analytic expressions of membrane instanton corrections. We also exactly compute the partition function for various cases and find some exact forms of worldsheet instanton corrections, which appear as quantum mechanical non-perturbative corrections in the Fermi-gas system.

  6. A radiographic analysis of the effect of dietary fiber on transit time through the rat large intestine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meacher, Mary Melanie

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A RADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF DIETARY FIBER ON TRANSIT TIME THROUGH THE RAT LARGE INTESTINE A Thesis by MARY MELANIE MEACHER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject. ' Nutrition A RADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF DIETARY FIBER ON TRANSIT TIME THROUGH THB RAT LARGE INTESTINE A Thesis by MARY MELANIE MEACHER Approved as to style and content by...

  7. Combined Climate and Carbon-Cycle Effects of Large-Scale Deforestation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Wickett, M; Phillips, T J; Lobell, D B; Delire, C; Mirin, A

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevention of deforestation and promotion of afforestation have often been cited as strategies to slow global warming. Deforestation releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, which exerts a warming influence on Earth's climate. However, biophysical effects of deforestation, which include changes in land surface albedo, evapotranspiration, and cloud cover also affect climate. Here we present results from several large-scale deforestation experiments performed with a three-dimensional coupled global carbon-cycle and climate model. These are the first such simulations performed using a fully three-dimensional model representing physical and biogeochemical interactions among land, atmosphere, and ocean. We find that global-scale deforestation has a net cooling influence on Earth's climate, since the warming carbon-cycle effects of deforestation are overwhelmed by the net cooling associated with changes in albedo and evapotranspiration. Latitude-specific deforestation experiments indicate that afforestation projects in the tropics would be clearly beneficial in mitigating global-scale warming, but would be counterproductive if implemented at high latitudes and would offer only marginal benefits in temperate regions. While these results question the efficacy of mid- and high-latitude afforestation projects for climate mitigation, forests remain environmentally valuable resources for many reasons unrelated to climate.

  8. National Forest Inventory of Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory of Great Britain Survey Manual #12;2 Remember to Save your Edit Session Regularly, Validate the information and Backup the Data NFI Survey Manual National Forest Inventory Survey in the surveys contributes to the National Forest Inventory (NFI) of Great Britain. With the information from

  9. FLAME facility: The effect of obstacles and transverse venting on flame acceleration and transition on detonation for hydrogen-air mixtures at large scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, M.P.; Tieszen, S.R.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) for hydrogen-air mixtures carried out in the FLAME facility, and describes its relevance to nuclear reactor safety. Flame acceleration and DDT can generate high peak pressures that may cause failure of containment. FLAME is a large rectangular channel 30.5 m long, 2.44 m high, and 1.83 m wide. It is closed on the ignition end and open on the far end. The three test variables were hydrogen mole fraction (12--30%), degree of transverse venting (by moving steel top plates---0%, 13%, and 50%), and the absence or presence of certain obstacles in the channel (zero or 33% blockage ratio). The most important variable was the hydrogen mole fraction. The presence of the obstacles tested greatly increased the flame speeds, overpressures, and tendency for DDT compared to similar tests without obstacles. Different obstacle configurations could have greater or lesser effects on flame acceleration and DDT. Large degrees of transverse venting reduced the flame speeds, overpressures, and possibility of DDT. For small degrees of transverse venting (13% top venting), the flame speeds and overpressures were higher than for no transverse venting with reactive mixtures (>18% H/sub 2/), but they were lower with leaner mixtures. The effect of the turbulence generated by the flow out the vents on increasing flame speed can be larger than the effect of venting gas out of the channel and hence reducing the overpressure. With no obstacles and 50% top venting, the flame speeds and overpressures were low, and there was no DDT. For all other cases, DDT was observed above some threshold hydrogen concentration. DDT was obtained at 15% H/sub 2/ with obstacles and no transverse venting. 67 refs., 62 figs.

  10. Large Component QCD and Theoretical Framework of Heavy Quark Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Liang Wu

    2006-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a large component QCD derived directly from full QCD by integrating over the small components of quark fields with $|{\\bf p}| < E + m_Q$, an alternative quantization procedure is adopted to establish a basic theoretical framework of heavy quark effective field theory (HQEFT) in the sense of effective quantum field theory. The procedure concerns quantum generators of Poincare group, Hilbert and Fock space, anticommutations and velocity super-selection rule, propagator and Feynman rules, finite mass corrections, trivialization of gluon couplings and renormalization of Wilson loop. The Lorentz invariance and discrete symmetries in HQEFT are explicitly illustrated. Some new symmetries in the infinite mass limit are discussed. Weak transition matrix elements and masses of hadrons in HQEFT are well defined to display a manifest spin-flavor symmetry and $1/m_Q$ corrections. A simple trace formulation approach is explicitly demonstrated by using LSZ reduction formula in HQEFT, and shown to be very useful for parameterizing the transition form factors via $1/m_Q$ expansion. As the heavy quark and antiquark fields in HQEFT are treated on the same footing in a fully symmetric way, the quark-antiquark coupling terms naturally appear and play important roles for simplifying the structure of transition matrix elements, and for understanding the concept of `dressed heavy quark' - hadron duality. In the case that the `longitudinal' and `transverse' residual momenta of heavy quark are at the same order of power counting, HQEFT provides a consistent approach for systematically analyzing heavy quark expansion in terms of $1/m_Q$. Some interesting features in applications of HQEFT to heavy hadron systems are briefly outlined.

  11. Large anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic insulator-topological insulator heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alegria, L. D.; Petta, J. R. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Ji, H.; Cava, R. J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Yao, N. [Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Clarke, J. J. [Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc., Clarksburg, Maryland 20871 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(001)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and (110)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(100)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The 61?K Curie temperature of Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE.

  12. Rocky Great Mountains Southwest Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocky Great Mountains Southwest Plains Research Note RM.502 January 1991 USDA Forest Service Rocky),Carbondale, IL.2 Propellant is now solely available through Winn- Star, Inc. (WSI),Marion, IL.,2which also

  13. The Effects of Large Wood on Stream Channel Morphology on Three Low-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    in the extraction of natural resources in the western United States. Today, the impacts of these disturbances can received much attention due to two valuable resources, timber and salmonids. The role of large, downed and less than approximately 20 m in bankfull width) the channel is largely made up of pools and slack water

  14. Exploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Wild Onion & Balsamroot Gambel Oak Pinyon Pine Salina Wild Rye Sunflower Seed Great Basin Rye IndianExploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin: nutrient content, handling costs, effects of human settlement, subsistence, and sociopolitical change in Basin/Plateau #12;Problems Geophytes

  15. Effects of tropical cyclones on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport. Secondly, TCs pump surface heat downward to the thermocline, increasing the heat injection from cyclone Á Heat transport Á Air-sea interaction 1 Introduction The South China Sea (SCS) is the largestEffects of tropical cyclones on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China

  16. The Impact of Climate Change on Great Lakes Water Levels Region: Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Discuss global warming as an issue to discover what students already know about polar ice cap melting of global warming, due to melting of the polar ice caps. 3. Have students discuss the effects of changes places in the world (such as the Great Lakes region), while at the same time polar melting is occurring

  17. Western Coal/Great Lakes Alternative export-coal conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference dealt with using the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway as an alternative to the East and Gulf Coasts for the exporting of coal to Europe and the potential for a piece of the European market for the subbituminous coals of Montana and Wyoming. The topics discussed included: government policies on coal exports; the coal reserves of Montana; cost of rail transport from Western mines to Lake Superior; the planning, design, and operation of the Superior Midwest Energy Terminal at Superior, Wisconsin; direct transfer of coal from self-unloading lakers to large ocean vessels; concept of total transportation from mines to users; disadvantage of a nine month season on the Great Lakes; costs of maritime transport of coal through the Great Lakes to Europe; facilities at the ice-free, deep water port at Sept Iles; the use of Western coals from an environmental and economic viewpoint; the properties of Western coal and factors affecting its use; the feasibility of a slurry pipeline from the Powder River Basin to Lake Superior; a systems analysis of the complete hydraulic transport of coal from the mine to users in Europe; the performance of the COJA mill-burner for the combustion of superfine coal; demand for steam coal in Western Europe; and the effect the New Source Performance Standards will have on the production and use of Western coal. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 19 papers for the Energy Data Base (EDB); 17 will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and 11 in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (CKK)

  18. Effect of fluctuating wind direction on cross natural ventilation in buildings from large eddy simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    simulation Yi Jiang and Qingyan Chen* Building Technology Program Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 direction on cross natural ventilation in building from large eddy simulation," Building and Environment, 37 in many industrial applications. To simulate natural ventilation in buildings, however, RANS modeling has

  19. Atmospheric Effects of the Kuroshio Large Meander during 2004-05 Haiming Xu*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    reduction of wind speed is found over the cool water pool, and the positive SST-wind speed correlation to the Kuroshio large meander. The model experiments suggest that the reduced surface wind speed and precipitation shows the importance of the pressure adjustment mechanism in surface wind response to the cold SST

  20. DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200529 Quantifying Large Effects of Framework Flexibility on Diffusion in MOFs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    as a rigid structure. A small number of computational studies have explored the influence of framework flexibility on molecular diffusion in MOFs.[4] In large-pore materials, the impact of flexibility on dif of interest. It is highly desirable to have efficient and reliable methods that can assess the role of MOF

  1. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washtenaw Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan48104 #12;Mention of a commercial company or product does-atmosphere- sediment system of the areas in and around the Great Lakesand coastal and estuarinewaters and the many activities. GLERL'smultidisciplinaryprogram reflectsthe needfor improved understanding, prediction

  2. Thermal Conductivity and Large Isotope Effect in GaN from First Principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, L. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Broido, D. A. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States); Reinecke, T. L. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present atomistic first principles results for the lattice thermal conductivity of GaN and compare them to those for GaP, GaAs, and GaSb. In GaN we find a large increase to the thermal conductivity with isotopic enrichment, ~65% at room temperature. We show that both the high thermal conductivity and its enhancement with isotopic enrichment in GaN arise from the weak coupling of heat-carrying acoustic phonons with optic phonons. This weak scattering results from stiff atomic bonds and the large Ga to N mass ratio, which give phonons high frequencies and also a pronounced energy gap between acoustic and optic phonons compared to other materials. Rigorous understanding of these features in GaN gives important insights into the interplay between intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering and isotopic scattering in a range of materials.

  3. Effects of Large Area Liquid Lithium Limiters on Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; G. Gettelfinger; T. Gray; D. Hoffman; S. Jardin; H. Kugel; P. Marfuta; T. Munsat; C. Neumeyer; S. Raftopoulos; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; L. Delgado-Aparicio; R.P. Seraydarian; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; M. Baldwin; R.W. Conn; R. Maingi; M. Menon; R. Causey; D. Buchenauer; M. Ulrickson; B. Jones; D. Rodgers

    2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium surface as a first wall has significantly improved the plasma performance in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Previous CDX-U experiments with a partially-covered toroidal lithium limiter tray have shown a decrease in impurities and the recycling of hydrogenic species. Improvements in loading techniques have permitted nearly full coverage of the tray surface with liquid lithium. Under these conditions, there was a large drop in the loop voltage needed to sustain the plasma current. The data are consistent with simulations that indicate more stable plasmas having broader current profiles, higher temperatures, and lowered impurities with liquid lithium walls. As further evidence for reduced recycling with a liquid lithium limiter, the gas puffing had to be increased by up to a factor of eight for the same plasma density achieved with an empty toroidal tray limiter.

  4. Review: The Great Lead Water Pipe Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karalus, Daniel E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: The Great Lead Water Pipe Disaster By WernerUSA Troesken, Werner. The Great Lead Water Pipe Disaster.paper. Alkaline paper. Lead poisoning usually conjures

  5. Finite element analysis and design of large diameter flexible vertical pipes subjected to incremental compacted backfill loads and creep effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, Mohammad Kabir

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS AND DESiGN OF LARGE DIANETER FLEXIBLE VERTICAL PIPES SUBJECTED TO INCREMENTAL COMPACTED BACKFILL LOADS AND CREEP EFFECTS A Thesis by MOHAMMAD KABIR HOSSAIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... BACKFILL LOADS AND CREEP EFFECTS A Thesis by MOHAMMAD KABIR HOSSAIN Approved as to sty1e and content by: R be+r L. Lytton (Chair of Committee) Ozden 0. Ochoa (Member) Derek V. Morris (Member) ames T P Yao (Head of rtment) ABSTRACT Finite...

  6. Stability of large-scale oceanic flows and the importance of non-local effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristova, Hristina G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    My thesis covers two general circulation problems that involve the stability of largescale oceanic flows and the importance of non-local effects. The first problem examines the stability of meridional boundary currents, ...

  7. Factors influencing the efficiency and cost effectiveness of large power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peacock, D.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to identify those factors that can influence transformer design, to identify some fundamental and practical constraints that the designer must satisfy, and to show the effect on transformer efficiency and evaluated cost.

  8. Behavioral ecology and conservation of large mammals: historical distribution, reintroduction and the effects of fragmented habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilad, Oranit

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , including effects of migration corridors; (2) identification of possible predators of the reintroduced species; and (3) a post-reintroduction assessment including an evaluation of the species' population dynamics. In this study I examine the suitability...

  9. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichinger, F.T. [BMH Claudius Peters AG, Buxtehude (Germany); Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  10. Effect of the large scale environment on the internal dynamics of early-type galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Maubon; Ph. Prugniel

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the population-density relation in very sparse environments, from poor clusters to isolated galaxies, and we find that early-type galaxies with a young stellar population are preferably found in the lowest density environments. We show a marginal indication that this effect is due to an enhancement of the stellar formation independent of the morphological segregation, but we failed to find any effect from the internal dynamics.

  11. Measurements of the EMC effect in few-body nuclei at large x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Daniel; J. Arrington; D. Gaskell

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data on the EMC effect from Jefferson Lab experiment E03103 suggest that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the local nuclear environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect. We briefly discuss the analysis and results of the E03103 experiment focusing on the light nuclei and high x region. In addition, we also discuss a future experiment at the upgraded 12 GeV Jefferson Lab facility which will further investigate the role of the local nuclear environment and the influence of detailed nuclear structure on the modification of quark distributions.

  12. Measurements of the EMC effect in few-body nuclei at large x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Arrington, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Gaskell, D. [Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data on the EMC effect from Jefferson Lab experiment E03103 suggest that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the local nuclear environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect. We briefly discuss the analysis and results of the E03103 experiment focusing on the light nuclei and high x region. In addition, we also discuss a future experiment at the upgraded 12 GeV Jefferson Lab facility which will further investigate the role of the local nuclear environment and the influence of detailed nuclear structure on the modification of quark distributions.

  13. Measurements of the EMC effect in few-body nuclei at large x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Daniel, J. Arrington, D. Gaskell

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data on the EMC effect from Jefferson Lab experiment E03103 suggest that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the local nuclear environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect. We briefly discuss the analysis and results of the E03103 experiment focusing on the light nuclei and high x region. In addition, we also discuss a future experiment at the upgraded 12 GeV Jefferson Lab facility which will further investigate the role of the local nuclear environment and the influence of detailed nuclear structure on the modification of quark distributions.

  14. Large scale flows in the solar interior: Effect of asymmetry in peak profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring diagram analysis can be used to study large scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone. All previous works assume that the peak profiles in the solar oscillation power spectrum are symmetric. However, it has now been demonstrated that the peaks are not symmetric. In this work we study how the explicit use of asymmetric peak profiles in ring-diagram analysis influences the estimated velocity fields. We find that the use of asymmetric profiles leads to significant improvement in the fits, but the estimated velocity fields are not substantially different from those obtained using a symmetric profile to fit the peaks. The resulting velocity fields are compared with those obtained by other investigators.

  15. Distortive Effects of Initial-Based Name Disambiguation on Measurements of Large-Scale Coauthorship Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jinseok

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scholars have often relied on name initials to resolve name ambiguities in large-scale coauthorship network research. This approach bears the risk of incorrectly merging or splitting author identities. The use of initial-based disambiguation has been justified by the assumption that such errors would not affect research findings too much. This paper tests this assumption by analyzing coauthorship networks from five academic fields - biology, computer science, nanoscience, neuroscience, and physics - and an interdisciplinary journal, PNAS. Name instances in datasets of this study were disambiguated based on heuristics gained from previous algorithmic disambiguation solutions. We use disambiguated data as a proxy of ground-truth to test the performance of three types of initial-based disambiguation. Our results show that initial-based disambiguation can misrepresent statistical properties of coauthorship networks: it deflates the number of unique authors, number of component, average shortest paths, clustering ...

  16. Detection of the effect of cosmological large-scale structure on the orientation of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignacio Trujillo; Conrado Carretero; Santiago G. Patiri

    2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxies are not distributed randomly throughout space but are instead arranged in an intricate "cosmic web" of filaments and walls surrounding bubble-like voids. There is still no compelling observational evidence of a link between the structure of the cosmic web and how galaxies form within it. However, such a connection is expected on the basis of our understanding of the origin of galaxy angular momentum: disk galaxies should be highly inclined relative to the plane defined by the large-scale structure surrounding them. Using the two largest galaxy redshift surveys currently in existence (2dFGRS and SDSS) we show at the 99.7% confident level that these alignments do indeed exist: spiral galaxies located on the shells of the largest cosmic voids have rotation axes that lie preferentially on the void surface.

  17. Assessing the Vulnerability of Large Critical Infrastructure Using Fully-Coupled Blast Effects Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, L D; Noble, C R; Margraf, J D; Glascoe, L G

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural failures, such as the MacArthur Maze I-880 overpass in Oakland, California and the I-35 bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, are recent examples of our national infrastructure's fragility and serve as an important reminder of such infrastructure in our everyday lives. These two failures, as well as the World Trade Center's collapse and the levee failures in New Orleans, highlight the national importance of protecting our infrastructure as much as possible against acts of terrorism and natural hazards. This paper describes a process for evaluating the vulnerability of critical infrastructure to large blast loads using a fully-coupled finite element approach. A description of the finite element software and modeling technique is discussed along with the experimental validation of the numerical tools. We discuss how such an approach can be used for specific problems such as modeling the progressive collapse of a building.

  18. Effects of stray DC currents on the performance of large core type transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christini, J.M.; Girgis, R.S. (ABB Power and Company, Inc., Muncie, IN (US))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study made on the effects of stray DC current on power transformer performance. A circuit model was developed to analyze the magnetic behavior of three-phase five-leg core type transformers. The magnetic field distribution was obtained for several different operating conditions by taking into account core geometry, core design, magnitude of D.C. current, and magnitude of A.C. voltage. The change in transformer performance is discussed.

  19. Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnetEffective safety ...

  20. Large positive magnetoresistance effects in the dilute magnetic semiconductor (Zn,Mn)Se in the regime of electron hopping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, F., E-mail: fjansson@abo.fi; Wiemer, M.; Gebhard, F.; Baranovskii, S. D. [Department of Physics and Material Sciences Center, Philipps-University, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Nenashev, A. V. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Petznick, S.; Klar, P. J. [Institute of Experimental Physics I, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Hetterich, M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik and Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Universität Karlsruhe, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetoresistance in dilute magnetic semiconductors is studied in the hopping transport regime. Measurements performed on Cl-doped Zn{sub 1–x}Mn{sub x}Se with x?large positive contribution to the magnetoresistance arises. This broadening of the donor energy distribution is largely sufficient to account for the experimentally observed magnetoresistance effects in n-type (Zn,Mn)Se with donor concentrations below the metal–insulator transition.

  1. Outcomes and Effect of Radiotherapy in Patients With Stage I or II Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballonoff, Ari [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: ari.ballonoff@uchsc.edu; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Schwer, Amanda; McCammon, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Bassetti, Michael; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess disease-specific survival (DSS), overall survival (OS), and the effect of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Patients and Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for all patients diagnosed with Stage I, IE, II, or IIE DLBCL between 1988 and 2004. The analyzable data included gender, age, race, stage, presence of extranodal disease, and RT administration. Patients who had died or were lost to follow-up within 6 months of diagnosis were excluded. Results: A total of 13,420 patients met the search criteria. Of these, 5,547 (41%) had received RT and 7,873 (59%) had not. RT was associated with a significant DSS (hazard ratio, 0.82, p <0.0001) and OS benefit that persisted during the 15 years of follow-up. Elderly patients, defined either as those >60 or >70 years old, had significantly improved DSS and OS associated with RT. On multivariate analysis, RT was significantly associated with increased DSS and OS. The 5-year DSS outcomes were highly variable among patient subsets, defined by age, stage, and extranodal disease (range for RT-treated patients, 70% for Stage II, age >60 years to 87% for Stage I, age {<=}60 years). Conclusion: This analysis presents the largest detailed data set of Stage I-II DLBCL patients. The results of our study have demonstrated that RT is associated with a survival advantage in patients with localized DLBCL, a benefit that extends to elderly patients. Outcomes for discrete patient subsets varied greatly. The development of tailored therapy according to the relapse risk is warranted, rather than uniform treatment of all early-stage DLBCL.

  2. The Effects of Smoothing on the Statistical Properties of the Large-Scale Cosmic Fileds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bernardeau

    1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that the large--scale correlation functions of the density field (and velocity divergence field) follow a specific hierarchy in the quasilinear regime and for Gaussian initial conditions (Bernardeau 1992). The exact relationships between the cumulants of the probability distribution functions (the so-called $S_p$ parameters) are however sensitive to the smoothing window function applied to the fields. In this paper, I present a method to derive the whole series of the $S_p$ parameters when the density field is smoothed with a top--hat window function. The results are valid for any power spectrum and any cosmological parameters. Similar calculations are presented for the velocity divergence field. The resulting shapes of the one--point probability distribution functions of the cosmic density and the velocity divergence fields are given as a function of the power spectrum and $\\Omega$. Simple analytical fits are proposed when the index of the power spectrum is -1. Comparisons with numerical simulations prove these analytical results to be extremely accurate.

  3. Large-deviation principles, stochastic effective actions, path entropies, and the structure and meaning of thermodynamic descriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Smith

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The meaning of thermodynamic descriptions is found in large-deviations scaling of the fluctuations probabilities. The primary large-deviations rate function is the entropy, which is the basis for both fluctuation theorems and for characterizing the thermodynamic interactions of systems. Freidlin-Wentzell theory provides a general formulation of large-deviations scaling for non-equilibrium stochastic processes, through a representation in terms of a Hamiltonian dynamical system. A number of related methods now exist to construct the Freidlin-Wentzell Hamiltonian for many kinds of stochastic processes; one method due to Doi and Peliti, appropriate to integer counting statistics, is widely used in reaction-diffusion theory. Using these tools together with a path-entropy method due to Jaynes, we show how to construct entropy functions that both express large-deviations scaling of fluctuations, and describe system-environment interactions, for discrete stochastic processes either at or away from equilibrium. A collection of variational methods familiar within quantum field theory, but less commonly applied to the Doi-Peliti construction, is used to define a "stochastic effective action", which is the large-deviations rate function for arbitrary non-equilibrium paths. We show how common principles of entropy maximization, applied to different ensembles of states or of histories, lead to different entropy functions and different sets of thermodynamic state variables. Yet the relations of among all these levels of description may be constructed explicitly and understood in terms of information conditions. The example systems considered introduce methods that may be used to systematically construct descriptions with all the features familiar from equilibrium thermodynamics, for a much wider range of systems describable by stochastic processes.

  4. Large-scale optimal power flow: Effects of initialization, decoupling and discretization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papalexopoulos, A.D.; Imparato, C.F.; Wu, F.F.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimal power flow has entered a new era since the introduction of second-order methods. These methods have renewed hopes for its on-line application in Energy Management Systems. This paper reports on some of the results of tests of a second-order OPF method. The testing was conducted using a 1500 bus network, under a variety of loading conditions. Three issues were studied: Sensitivity of OPF solutions with respect to the starting points used in the solution; Accuracy of the active/reactive decoupled approach to OPF solution; Effects of discretization of transformer taps on the OPF solutions.

  5. EFFECT OF MEASUREMENT ERRORS ON PREDICTED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM SHEAR PEAK STATISTICS WITH LARGE SYNOPTIC SURVEY TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bard, D.; Chang, C.; Kahn, S. M.; Gilmore, K.; Marshall, S. [KIPAC, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Kratochvil, J. M.; Huffenberger, K. M. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); May, M. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); AlSayyad, Y.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R. R.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Lorenz, S. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Haiman, Z.; Jernigan, J. G., E-mail: djbard@slac.stanford.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); and others

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of galaxy shape measurement errors on predicted cosmological constraints from the statistics of shear peak counts with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We use the LSST Image Simulator in combination with cosmological N-body simulations to model realistic shear maps for different cosmological models. We include both galaxy shape noise and, for the first time, measurement errors on galaxy shapes. We find that the measurement errors considered have relatively little impact on the constraining power of shear peak counts for LSST.

  6. Light Cone Dynamics and EMC Effects in the Extraction of F_{2n} at Large Bjorken x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misak M Sargsian

    2011-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss theoretical issues related to the extraction of deep inelastic~(DIS) structure function of neutron from inclusive DIS scattering off the deuteron at large Bjorken x. Theoretical justification is given to the consideration of only $pn$ component of the deuteron wave function and consistency with both the baryonic number and light-cone momentum conservation sum rules. Next we discuss the EMC type effects and argue that in all cases relevant to the nuclear DIS reactions at large x the main issue is the medium modification of the properties of bound nucleon rather than the non-nucleonic components like pions. We give brief description of the color screening model of EMC and within this model we estimate uncertainties in the extraction of the neutron DIS structure function at large x. We emphasize also that these uncertainties are rather "model independent" since any theoretical framework accounting for the medium modification is proportional to the magnitude of the virtuality of bound nucleon which increases with an increase of x.

  7. Light Cone Dynamics and EMC Effects in the Extraction of F{sub 2n} at Large Bjorken x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargsian, Misak M. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss theoretical issues related to the extraction of deep inelastic (DIS) structure function of neutron from inclusive DIS scattering off the deuteron at large Bjorken x. Theoretical justification is given to the consideration of only pn component of the deuteron wave function and consistency with both the baryonic number and light-cone momentum conservation sum rules. Next we discuss the EMC type effects and argue that in all cases relevant to the nuclear DIS reactions at large x the main issue is the medium modification of the properties of bound nucleon rather than the non-nucleonic components like pions. We give brief description of the color screening model of EMC and within this model we estimate uncertainties in the extraction of the neutron DIS structure function at large x. We emphasize also that these uncertainties are rather ''model independent'' since any theoretical framework accounting for the medium modification is proportional to the magnitude of the virtuality of bound nucleon which increases with an increase of x.

  8. Effect of the large scale environment on the stellar content of early-type galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ph. Prugniel; V. Golev; G. Maubon

    1999-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study the influence of the environment on the stellar population of early-type galaxies we have analyzed the relations between the density of the environment (lrho) and the residuals to the Mg2-sigma relation, R_a, and between lrho and the residuals to the Fundamental Plane, R_f. Our sample of galaxies covers the range of densities, between field galaxies and poor clusters. We confirm the existence of a slight environmental bias on the mean stellar population and we show that this effect is due to a small fraction of galaxie s containing a younger stellar sub-population while the majority of galaxies, in any environment, are equally old. The galaxies which are likely to contain a young stellar sub-population (negative R_a and R_f) are preferentially found in the less dense environment. This segregation of the stellar population may reflect the morphology-density relation or may result from a higher rate of recent star formation activity in sparse environments. Using the rotational support to assess the presence of a disk and to parameterize the morphology, we subtracted the contribution of the morphological segregation to population segregation. It is not yet possible to rule out that the morphology-density relation is at the origin of the population-density relation.

  9. Groundwater in the Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater lies hidden beneath the soil, out of sight and largely out of mind. As a result, it’s poorly understood by most who depend on it for drinking water and other uses. Misconceptions about groundwater are common. In 1904, a Texas judge ruled...

  10. DETECTION OF THE NEUPERT EFFECT IN THE CORONA OF AN RS CANUM VENATICORUM BINARY SYSTEM BY XMM-NEWTON AND THE VERY LARGE ARRAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audard, Marc

    th Street, New York, NY 10027; behar@astro.columbia.edu Anthony J. Beasley Owens Valley Radio during a large, long-duration flare simultaneously with XMM-Newton and the Very Large Array. The light curves show a characteristic time dependence that is compatible with the Neupert effect observed in solar

  11. Effects of interactive transport and scavenging of smoke on the calculated temperature change resulting from large amounts of smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, M.C.; Walton, J.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several theoretical studies with numerical models have shown that substantial land-surface cooling can occur if very large amounts (approx. 100 x 10/sup 12/ = 100 Tg) of highly absorbing sooty-particles are injected high into the troposphere and spread instantaneously around the hemisphere (Turco et al., 1983; Covey et al. 1984; MacCracken, 1983). A preliminary step beyond these initial calculations has been made by interactively coupling the two-layer, three-dimensional Oregon State University general circulation model (GCM) to the three-dimensional GRANTOUR trace species model developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GCM simulation includes treatment of tropospheric dynamics and thermodynamics and the effect of soot on solar radiation. The GRANTOUR simulation includes treatment of particle transport and scavenging by precipitation, although no satisfactory verification of the scavenging algorithm has yet been possible. We have considered the climatic effects of 150 Tg (i.e., the 100 Mt urban war scenario from Turco et al., 1983) and of 15 Tg of smoke from urban fires over North America and Eurasia. Starting with a perpetual July atmospheric situation, calculation of the climatic effects as 150 Tg of smoke are spread slowly by the winds, rather than instantaneously dispersed as in previous calculations, leads to some regions of greater cooling under the denser parts of the smoke plumes and some regions of less severe cooling where smoke arrival is delayed. As for the previous calculations, mid-latitude decreases of land surface air temperature for the 150 Tg injection are greater than 15/sup 0/C after a few weeks. For a 15 Tg injection, however, cooling of more than several degrees centigrade only occurs in limited regions under the dense smoke plumes present in the first few weeks after the injection. 10 references, 9 figures.

  12. 2009 Great Places Awards -- Call for Submissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Great Places Awards Places, the Environmental Designannounce the twelfth annual awards program for Place Design,ipation of Metropolis, the awards program has a new name in

  13. RECONSTRUCTING CLIMATE ON THE GREAT PLAINS FROM BURIED SOILS: A QUANTITATIVE APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zung, Ashley B.

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Plains, U.S.A. lack quantitative paleoclimatic data for the late Quaternary largely because two common sources of paleoclimatic data, tree ring and pollen records, are rare in the region. Sequences of buried ...

  14. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL’s WTP gas retention and release modeling.

  15. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains are located in Appendices F through K. II. Purpose This cooperative operating plan facilitates assistance ordered through the Compact and used on joint US Federal/State fires will be considered agents

  16. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. D EPARTMENT OF COMM ER CE Great Lakes Ice Cover facts since 1973 - 94.7% ice coverage in 1979 is the maximum on record - 9.5% ice coverage in 2002 is the lowest on record - 11.5% ice coverage in 1998, a strong El Nino

  17. Great Works Academic Certificate Program Great Works of Our Intellectual Heritage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Great Works Academic Certificate Program Great Works of Our Intellectual Heritage Not all works-Reckoner) Apollonius of Perga (c. 262 - c. 190 BCE) On Conic Sections Ssu-ma Ch'ien (c. 145 - c. 85 BCE) Historical

  18. J. Great Lakes Res. 33 (Special Issue 3):211223 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    , coastal wetlands, Great Lakes. *Corresponding author. E-mail: hower@uwgb.edu 211 #12;212 Price et al

  19. Great Lakes Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat BasinGreatGreat

  20. Contact Upper Great Plains Regional Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Plains Regional Office Mailing Address: PO Box 35800 Billings, MT 59107-5800 406-255-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-358-3415 Fax: 406-255-2900 Organizational chart with phone numbers...

  1. Nonlinear effects resulting from the interaction of a large-scale Alfven wave with a density filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    through the plasma-sheet boundary layer in the earth's magnetosphere at altitudes of 4­6 Earth radii-scale wave are large enough to produce oscillatory velocities comparable to the electron thermal velocity

  2. Large-eddy simulations of structure effects of an upstream elbow main pipe on hot and cold fluids mixing in a vertical tee junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attinger, Daniel

    in e.g. nuclear power plants. In the present work, the mixing of a hot and a cold fluid streamLarge-eddy simulations of structure effects of an upstream elbow main pipe on hot and cold fluids Fuel Injection Equipment Stock Co., Ltd., Beijing 100166, China c Department of Mechanical Engineering

  3. HSE 1 HSE 2 HSE 3 GE 1 GE 2 GE 3 Residual effects of Large Vessels in GE BOLD Differential Mapping of Ocular Dominance Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HSE 1 HSE 2 HSE 3 GE 1 GE 2 GE 3 Residual effects of Large Vessels in GE BOLD Differential Mapping these techniques in humans. Previous human studies (4-6) instead used the conventional GE BOLD technique, combined and limitations of GE BOLD differential mapping as compared to HSE BOLD differential mapping of ocular dominance

  4. A radiographic analysis of the effect of dietary fiber on transit time through the rat large intestine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meacher, Mary Melanie

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    excretion of the first radiopaque pellet. Prior to radiography, each animal was intubated with a radiopaque substance that traversed with the gastrointestinal contents. Results showed transit times, between designated markers, differed from each dietary.... RESULTS. . . . 19 . 19 . . . 25 . . . 25 . 26 . 28 . . . 28 . 29 . 31 Effect of dietary fiber on food and energy intake. . . Effect of dietary fiber on body weights. . . . . . . . . . . . . Effect of dietary fiber on weight gain from first...

  5. Ostracoda of Moss Town Blue Hole, Great Exuma Island, Great Bahama Bank (Crustacea: Ostracoda: Myodocopa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    Ostracoda of Moss Town Blue Hole, Great Exuma Island, Great Bahama Bank (Crustacea: Ostracoda Halocypridina, and one Cladocopina) are reported from 30 to 60 m depths in Moss Town Blue Hole, an ocean blue. The collection from Moss Town Blue Hole contained no new species, but five species had not been reported

  6. Housing and the Great Depression Mehmet Balcilar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Housing and the Great Depression Mehmet Balcilar Department of Economics Eastern Mediterranean Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada, 89154-6005 USA Abstract: This paper considers the role of the real housing between the real housing price and real GDP per capita. We test for structural change in parameter values

  7. The bulking effect of dietary fiber in the rat large intestine: an in vivo study of cellulose, guar, pectin, wheat bran and oat bran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Jeanne Marie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE BULKING EFFECT OF DIETARY FIBER IN THE RAT LARGE INTESTINE: AN IN VIVO STUDY OF CELLULOSE, GUAR, PECTIN, WHEAT BRAN AND OAT BRAN A Thesis by JEANNE MARIE GAZZANIGA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... JEANNE MARIE GAZZANIGA Approved as to style and content by: o~P L sc J nne R. Lupton (Chair of Committee) Karen S. Kubena (Member) ayne Suter (Member) G. C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1985 ABSTRACT The Bulking Effect of Dietary Fiber...

  8. Great Lakes Water Level Statistics Primary Investigator: Cynthia Sellinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Water Level Statistics Primary Investigator: Cynthia Sellinger Overview Extreme Great disruption throughout the Great Lakes system. Reliable lake level frequency distributions are a critical of monthly lake levels reflect secular changes in connecting channel hydraulics, watershed hydrologic

  9. Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly Reduced Emissions and Improved Fuel Efficiency Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly...

  10. american great lakes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polynorphismsobserved among the North American Great Lakes ciscoes suggest that this fish group has Bernatchez, Louis 2 Great Lakes CiteSeer Summary: Grant realized an...

  11. Multilayered YSZ/GZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    YSZGZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Multilayered YSZGZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction for low...

  12. Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur...

  13. Post-Mining 2005, November 16-17, Nancy, France 1 LARGE SCALE APPLICATIONS OF COVERS WITH CAPILLARY BARRIER EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    cause acidification and heavy metal release in surface and ground water. To inhibit the acid formation. These covers can be used to limit oxygen and/or water migration. Different evaluation methods were used as part and constructed, effectively reduce water infiltration in the case of a semi-arid climate, and limit oxygen

  14. Effects of composition and temperature on the large field behavior of [011]{sub C} relaxor ferroelectric single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, John A.; Lynch, Christopher S., E-mail: cslynch@seas.ucla.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Tian, Jian [H. C. Materials Corporation, 479 Quadrangle Dr., Suite-E, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The large field behavior of [011]{sub C} cut relaxor ferroelectric lead indium niobate–lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate, xPb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-(1-x-y)Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-yPbTiO{sub 3}, single crystals was experimentally characterized in the piezoelectric d{sub 322}-mode configuration under combined mechanical, electrical, and thermal loading. Increasing the concentration of lead indium niobate and decreasing the concentration of lead titanate in compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary resulted in a decrease of mechanical compliance, dielectric permittivity, and piezoelectric coefficients as well as a shift from a continuous to a discontinuous transformation.

  15. Quark number density at imaginary chemical potential and its extrapolation to large real chemical potential by the effective model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junichi Takahashi; Junpei Sugano; Masahiro Ishii; Hiroaki Kouno; Masanobu Yahiro

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate quark number densities at imaginary chemical potential by lattice QCD with clover-improved two-flavor Wilson fermion. The quark number densities are extrapolated to the small real chemical potential region by assuming some function forms. The extrapolated quark number densities are consistent with those calculated at real chemical potential with the Taylor expansion method for the reweighting factors. In order to study the large real chemical potential region, we use the two-phase model consisting of the quantum hadrodynamics model for the hadron phase and the entanglement-PNJL model for the quark phase. The quantum hadrodynamics model is constructed to reproduce nuclear saturation properties, while the entanglement-PNJL model reproduces well lattice QCD data for the order parameters such as the Polyakov loop, the thermodynamic quantities and the screening masses. Then, we calculate the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and explore the hadron-quark phase transition with the two-phase model.

  16. Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

  17. Optimization of auxiliary power systems design for large generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabri, E.I.; Kang, E.K.; Dusterdick, R.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern fossil and nuclear generating units require the support of a fairly large and complex electric auxiliary power system. The selection of an optimized and cost-effective auxiliary power transformer rating may be a difficult process, since the loading profile and coincident operation of the loads often cannot be firmly defined at an early stage of design. The authors believe that this important design process could be greatly aided by systematic field tests and recording of the actual auxiliary loading profiles during various modes of plant operations.

  18. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; ,

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  19. Geomechanical effects on CO{sub 2} leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, A.P.; Rutqvist, J.; Cappa, F.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of geomechanics—including the potential for faults to reactivate during large scale geologic carbon sequestration operations—has recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO{sub 2} to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO{sub 2} to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO{sub 2} injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO{sub 2} will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

  20. The effect of large amplitude motions on the transition frequency redshift in hydrogen bonded complexes: A physical picture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G., E-mail: hgk@chem.ku.dk [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Salmi, Teemu; Hänninen, Vesa; Halonen, Lauri, E-mail: lauri.halonen@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, A.I. Virtasen aukio 1, FI-00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)] [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, A.I. Virtasen aukio 1, FI-00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the vibrational transitions of the donor unit in water dimer with an approach that is based on a three-dimensional local mode model. We perform a perturbative treatment of the intermolecular vibrational modes to improve the transition wavenumber of the hydrogen bonded OH-stretching transition. The model accurately predicts the transition wavenumbers of the vibrations in water dimer compared to experimental values and provides a physical picture that explains the redshift of the hydrogen bonded OH-oscillator. We find that it is unnecessary to include all six intermolecular modes in the vibrational model and that their effect can, to a good approximation, be computed using a potential energy surface calculated at a lower level electronic structure method than that used for the unperturbed model.

  1. What is the effect of LiDAR-derived DEM resolution on large-scale watershed model results?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Yang; Daniel B. Ames; Andre Fonseca; Danny Anderson; Rupesh Shrestha; Nancy F. Glenn; Yang Cao

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the effect of raster cell size on hydrographic feature extraction and hydrological modeling using LiDAR derived DEMs. LiDAR datasets for three experimental watersheds were converted to DEMs at various cell sizes. Watershed boundaries and stream networks were delineated from each DEM and were compared to reference data. Hydrological simulations were conducted and the outputs were compared. Smaller cell size DEMs consistently resulted in less difference between DEM-delineated features and reference data. However, minor differences been found between streamflow simulations resulted for a lumped watershed model run at daily simulations aggregated at an annual average. These findings indicate that while higher resolution DEM grids may result in more accurate representation of terrain characteristics, such variations do not necessarily improve watershed scale simulation modeling. Hence the additional expense of generating high resolution DEM's for the purpose of watershed modeling at daily or longer time steps may not be warranted.

  2. Great Lakes WIND Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms A SUK Place:GeorgiaGimcheonWindenergyGreat Lakes

  3. Great Energy Debate | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartmentCounselGlass CoatingEducation » ForasGreat Energy

  4. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat Basin Geothermal

  5. Great Plains Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat

  6. Great River Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiver Energy Jump to:

  7. Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiver Energy

  8. GreatPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiver

  9. Great Lakes Energy Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGoldenarticle is aGreat Lakes Energy Coop

  10. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology|Solar wind samplesUS Dept ofSouthern Great

  11. J. Great Lakes Res. 25(4):663682 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories and Mercury Profiles from Lake Superior: Evidence for Mining Impacts W. Charles Kerfoot*,1, Sandra size of Lake Superior, were sediment profiles at locations far offshore impacted by nearshore activi, copper, mining, mercury, sediment. 663 INTRODUCTION The Great Lakes ecosystem is susceptible to loading

  12. J. Great Lakes Res. 33:722735 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes, with their vast nat- ural resources, contribute significantly to the eco- nomic 1992), as well as the hy- dropower industry (Assel et al. 1983), and shipping industry (Cooper et al for icebreaking operations and the most hazardous for ship navigation, can be uniquely identified by co

  13. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

  14. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-135 Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Update: Winters 2003, 2004, and 2005 Raymond A. Assel NOAA, Great..................................................................................................6 DATES OF FIRST (LAST) ICE AND ICE DURATION. .............................................................7 SEASONAL PROGRESSION OF ICE COVER

  15. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  16. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  17. Survey of large protein complexes D. vulgaris reveals great structural diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, B.-G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GroEL, DVU1976); 14. Riboflavin synthase (DVU1198, DVU1200).S9. Purification of riboflavin synthase. Fractions from thearrow in A shows the riboflavin synthase and in B shows

  18. Establishing Representative No-Take Areas in the Great Barrier Reef: Large-Scale Implementation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    Institute for Regional Development, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6907, Australia Abstract, Townsville, QLD 4810, Australia b GeoScience Australia, GPO Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia c National Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia e Port Stephens Research Center, New South Wales Fisheries, Taylor

  19. Large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers for pH measurement at the Nernstian limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fakih, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.fakih@mail.mcgill.ca; Sabri, Shadi; Szkopek, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.szkopek@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Mahvash, Farzaneh [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Nannini, Matthieu [McGill Nanotools Microfab, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Siaj, Mohamed [Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have fabricated and characterized large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers and demonstrated pH sensitivities approaching the Nernstian limit. Low temperature atomic layer deposition was used to deposit tantalum pentoxide atop large area graphene ISFETs. The charge neutrality point of graphene, inferred from quantum capacitance or channel conductance, was used to monitor surface potential in the presence of an electrolyte with varying pH. Bare graphene ISFETs exhibit negligible response, while graphene ISFETs with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers show increased sensitivity reaching up to 55?mV/pH over pH 3 through pH 8. Applying the Bergveld model, which accounts for site binding and a Guoy-Chapman-Stern picture of the surface-electrolyte interface, the increased pH sensitivity can be attributed to an increased buffer capacity reaching up to 10{sup 14} sites/cm{sup 2}. ISFET response was found to be stable to better than 0.05 pH units over the course of two weeks.

  20. Multiferroicity and magnetoelectric coupling enhanced large magnetocaloric effect in DyFe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, L. H.; Yang, J.; Dai, J. M.; Song, W. H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, R. R. [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Sun, Y. P., E-mail: ypsun@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    DyFe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} has been synthesized using a sol-gel method. It exhibits ferroelectricity at the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature T{sub N1}?261?K. Large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) (11.3?J/kg?K at 4.5?T) enhanced by magnetoelectric coupling due to magnetic field and temperature induced magnetic transition was observed. Temperature-dependent Raman study shows an anomalous behavior near T{sub N1} in the phonon modes related to the vibration of Dy atoms and stretching of CrO{sub 6}/FeO{sub 6} octahedra, suggesting the ferroelectricity in DyFe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} is associated with the spin-phonon coupling with respect to both Dy and Cr/Fe ions. These results suggest routes to obtain high-temperature multiferroicity and large MCE for practical applications.

  1. Evolutionary Non-linear Great Deluge for University Course Timetabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    Evolutionary Non-linear Great Deluge for University Course Timetabling Dario Landa-Silva and Joe-linear great deluge algorithm in which evolutionary opera- tors are incorporated. First, we generate of the evo- lutionary operators. Our results show that the hybrid between non-linear great deluge

  2. Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report to USDA Forest Service and MN Cooperative. #12;Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report ii Executive Summary We summarize the second year of a project on the Canada lynx ecology in the Great Lakes region. The project is designed

  3. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  4. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination R & D Supercritiacl CO2 Rock Chemicals Interactions Properties of CO2-Rich Pore Fluids and Their Effect on Porosity Evolution in EGS Rocks...

  5. Hyper heuristic based on great deluge and its variants for exam timetabling problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Ei Shwe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, University Timetabling problems are occurred annually and they are often hard and time consuming to solve. This paper describes Hyper Heuristics (HH) method based on Great Deluge (GD) and its variants for solving large, highly constrained timetabling problems from different domains. Generally, in hyper heuristic framework, there are two main stages: heuristic selection and move acceptance. This paper emphasizes on the latter stage to develop Hyper Heuristic (HH) framework. The main contribution of this paper is that Great Deluge (GD) and its variants: Flex Deluge(FD), Non-linear(NLGD), Extended Great Deluge(EGD) are used as move acceptance method in HH by combining Reinforcement learning (RL).These HH methods are tested on exam benchmark timetabling problem and best results and comparison analysis are reported.

  6. Large, noisy, and incomplete : mathematics for modern biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baym, Michael Hartmann

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years there has been a great deal of new activity at the interface of biology and computation. This has largely been driven by the massive in flux of data from new experimental technologies, particularly ...

  7. Weather pattern climatology of the Great Plains and the related wind regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barchet, W.R.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meteorology of the Great Plains can be described as a constant progression of air masses, fronts and cyclonic storm systems. Each of these meteorological conditions can be characterized by identifiable isobaric and related weather parameter patterns. Nine such patterns have been defined to type the weather patterns in the Great Plains. Time series of weather pattern types were produced for 62 stations on the Great Plains. Statistical analyses of these time series produced annual and seasonal frequencies of occurrence of the weather pattern types. Maps of the annual and seasonal frequency of occurrence of weather pattern type are presented for the Great Plains. Persistence and alternation frequencies match what is expected for traveling temperate latitude cyclones, anticyclones and fronts. The wind regime for stations at which the anemometer height and location was constant (and known) for a minimum of three consecutive years was stratified by weather pattern type. Statistical analyses were made to show the response of the wind to the large-scale distribution of air pressure associated with a weather pattern type. The response of the wind to the weather pattern is a site-specific result of the interaction of the large-scale meteorology with local terrain, surface roughness and atmospheric stability. Mean wind speed discriminates between pairs of weather pattern types with better than 75% confidence for more than two-thirds of the possible pairs of weather pattern types.

  8. The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, John

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

  9. Jet Substructure at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher K. Vermilion

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I explore many aspects of jet substructure at the Large Hadron Collider, ranging from theoretical techniques for jet calculations, to phenomenological tools for better searches with jets, to software for implementing and comparing such tools. I begin with an application of soft-collinear effective theory, an effective theory of QCD applied to high-energy quarks and gluons. This material is taken from Ref. 1, in which we demonstrate factorization and logarithmic resummation for a certain class of observables in electron-positron collisions. I then explore various phenomenological aspects of jet substructure in simulated events. After observing numerous features of jets at hadron colliders, I describe a method -- jet pruning -- for improving searches for heavy particles that decay to one or more jets. This material is a greatly expanded version of Ref. 2. Finally, I give an overview of the software tools available for these kinds of studies, with a focus on SpartyJet, a package for implementing and comparing jet-based analyses I have collaborated on. Several detailed calculations and software examples are given in the appendices. Sections with no new content are italic in the Table of Contents.

  10. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  11. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  12. Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for geothermal energy in the Great Basin. In addition, understanding the geochemical evolution of these various types of systems will provide important insights into the possible...

  13. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    wind development in the Great Lakes closer to fruition." "The country's vast offshore wind resources have the potential to dramatically reduce America's dependence on fossil...

  14. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Maine, Great Lakes, and Mid-Atlantic coastal states regions to inform efforts to mitigate potential impacts associated with offshore wind energy development in these regions....

  15. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Abstract Utilizing commercial mine blasts and local earthquakes, as well as a dense...

  16. The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves Jinlun influences the marine planktonic ecosystem by enhancing productivity on the shelves of the Chukchi, East days, the simulated biological effects on the shelves last 1 month or longer. At some locations

  17. Low-Risk and Cost-Effective Prior Savings Estimates for Large-Scale Energy Conservation Projects in Housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Thornton, Jeff W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: military housing, federally-subsidized low-income housing, and planned communities (condominiums, townhomes, senior centers) to name a few. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. More accurate prior estimates reduce project risk, decrease financing costs, and help avoid post-construction legal disputes over performance contract baseline adjustments. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, Louisiana, we have collected energy use data - both at the electrical feeder level and at the level of individual residences - which allowed us to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. We believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects, particularly in cases where the energy consumption of large populations of housing can be captured on one or a few meters. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The feeder serves 46 buildings containing a total of 200 individual apartments. Of the 46 buildings, there are three unique types, and among these types the only difference is compass orientation. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Our analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data (Shonder and Hughes, 1997) indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper. Using the method outlined, we have been able to predict this savings within 0.1% of its measured value, using only pre-construction energy consumption data, and data from one pilot test site. It is well-known that predictions of savings from energy conservation programs are often optimistic, especially in the case of residential retrofits. Fels and keating (1993) cite several examples of programs which achieved as little as 20% of the predicted energy savings. Factors which influence the sometimes large discrepancies between actual and predicted savings include changes in occupancy, take-back effects (in which more efficient system operation leads occupants to choose higher levels of comfort), and changes in base energy use (e.g. through purchase of additional appliances such as washing machines and clothes dryers). An even larger factor, perhaps, is the inaccuracy inherent in the engineering models (BLAST, DOE-2, etc.) commonly used to estimate building energy consumption, if these models are not first calibrated to site-monitored data. For example, prior estimates of base-wide savings from the Fort Polk ESPC were on the order of 40% of pre-retrofit electrical use; our analysis has shown the true savings for the entire project (which includes 16 separate electrical feeders) to be about 32%. It should be noted that the retrofits ca

  18. GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 6 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset' ABSTRACT: Theformation of ice on the Lallrentian (~rthe Great Lakes anel local weather and climate. The (I1Inllal seasonal and ~'Patialprogression of ice Lake (Section 6.2) incillding ice thickness, the different types of iceformed, and ice classification

  19. Science and innovation strategy for forestry in Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science and innovation strategy for forestry in Great Britain #12;The cover image is derived from X-rays of juniper berries (Juniperus communis), some containing seeds. #12;Science and innovation strategy COMMISSION (2014). Science and innovation strategy for forestry in Great Britain. Forestry Commission

  20. INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great Lakes to track changes Concentrations Measured by Acoustic and Optical Sensors Nathan Hawley* Great Lakes Environmental Research sensitive to particles of different sizes, the simultaneous deployment of acoustic and optical sensors may

  1. DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE T.J. Dekker1 , J.V. DePinto1 , S, collaborative, and consensus-based enterprise architecture design process was conducted under the direction that will achieve an integrated, comprehensive, and sustainable observing system enterprise for the Great Lakes

  2. All Other Retired Employees Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer. Great-West Life's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to you and your family. The Plan is underwritten by #12;Protecting Your Personal Information At Great as life, disability and critical illness insurance for individuals and families. As a leading providerAll Other Retired Employees #12;Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer

  3. Mercury and cause of death in great white herons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, M.G.; Sundlof, S.F. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Djork, R.D.; Powell, G.V.N. (National Audobon Research, Tavernier, FL (United States))

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury contamination is suspected to adversely affect wading birds in southern Florida. To determine the magnitude of contamination associated with cause of death we followed 3 adult and 19 juvenile radio-tagged great white herons (Ardea herodias occidentalis), recovered them soon after death, and determined liver mercury content and cause of death. Birds that died from acute causes had less (P < 0.001) mercury in their livers (geometric [bar x] [GM] = 1.77 ppm wet mass [wm], range 0.6-4.0 ppm, n = 9) than did those that died of chronic, often multiple, diseases (GM = 9.76 ppm, range 2.9-59.4 ppm, n = 13). Juvenile herons that migrated to mainland Florida accumulated more (P = 0.009) mercury in their livers than those that did not migrate. Kidney disease and gout were present in birds that died with >25 ppm wm liver mercury. Although detrimental to the health of wading birds, mercury contamination is presumably more detrimental to their reproductive efforts; therefore, an understanding of its ill effects is important in the management of these birds. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Effect of friction on disoriented chiral condensate formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the effect of friction on the DCC domain formation. We solve the Newton equation of motion for the O(4) fields, with quenched initial condition. The initial fields are randomly distributed in a Gaussian form. In one dimensional expansion, on the average, large DCC domains can not be formed. However, in some particular orbits, large instabilities may occur. This possibility also greatly diminishes with the introduction of friction. But, if the friction is large, the system may be overdamped and then, there is a possibility of large DCC domain formation in some events.

  5. J. Great Lakes Res. 31:373385 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Grand Traverse Bay, an episodic event increased the water column inventory of PCBs and PAHs by as much is the primary mechanism of sediment-water ex- change of this material, and that the time to trans- port, while in a resuspension zone, can be a large source of contamination to the overlying water col- umn

  6. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology (2001), 51, 737749 Printed in Great Britain Phylogenetic relationships among algae based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    in Great Britain Phylogenetic relationships among algae based on complete large-subunit rRNA sequences 1 of the different groups of algae, and in particular to study the relationships among the different classes of heterokont algae. In LSU rRNA phylogenies, the chlorarachniophytes, cryptomonads and haptophytes seem to form

  7. Thomas Carlyle and the making of Frederick the Great 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Linda Clark

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thomas Carlyle’s History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, called Frederick the Great was published in six volumes between 1858 and 1865 and was his last major work. Carlyle had a specific purpose in mind when he began writing ...

  8. african great lakes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 FISH COMMUNITIES IN THE EAST AFRICAN GREAT LAKES PEUPLEMENTS ICHTHYOLOGIQUES CiteSeer...

  9. Colorado's Economic Recovery since the Great Recession Professor Martin Shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Colorado's Economic Recovery since the Great Recession Professor Martin Shields Regional Economics Institute Colorado State University csurei, economic performance has been mixed. The northern Front Range has fared best

  10. Serial Echocardiographic Evaluation of 22 Closely Related Great Danes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Michael R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    additive mixed regression, linear regression, and non-linear regression. Results: All dogs demonstrated progressive echocardiographic changes. The Great Danes with DCM showed several echocardiographic differences when compared to the normal dogs...

  11. EIS-0106: Great Falls-Conrad Transmission Line Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of a 230-kilovolt transmission line from Great Falls, Montana, to Conrad, Montana.

  12. 241 Strength in numbers 243 Great leap outwards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    INSIGHT QUANTUM MECHANICS EDITORIAL 241 Strength in numbers THESIS 243 Great leap outwards Mark spintronics: Pumping spins through polymers Bert Koopmans INSIGHT: FOUNDATIONS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS EDITORIAL 253 Foundations of quantum mechanics COMMENTARY 254 Gravity in quantum mechanics Giovanni Amelino

  13. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations...

  14. Great Lakes Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Great Lakes Energy offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase of efficiency air-source heat pumps or geothermal heat pumps. A rebate of $250 is available for air-source heat pumps,...

  15. 17.952 Great Power Military Intervention, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posen, Barry

    The purpose of this seminar is to examine systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990's. These civil wars were high on the policy agenda of western states ...

  16. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional Gravity...

  17. What Polarized Country? Clean Energy -The Great Convener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    What Polarized Country? Clean Energy - The Great Convener Tuesday, October 2, 2012 11:30 a.m. - 1, vast agreement that we should champion clean energy and energy efficiency. Join us for an engaging

  18. A study of the relationship between trust and the effective communication of information within project teams of large high tech organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Alyson

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the effects trust has on the truthfulness of communications and its effectiveness within a project team. The research focuses specifically on organizational context, the situational forces that exist ...

  19. Quaternary freshwater Ostracoda from the Great Salt Lake Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lister, K. H.

    1975-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissertation Fellowship. I appreciate loans of type specimens by The Illinois State Geological Survey; The United States National Museum; and the Geological Sur- 5 vey of Canada, Saskatchewan. Specimens of the Great Salt Lake Basin ostracodes studied have been... Dissertation Fellowship. I appreciate loans of type specimens by The Illinois State Geological Survey; The United States National Museum; and the Geological Sur- 5 vey of Canada, Saskatchewan. Specimens of the Great Salt Lake Basin ostracodes studied have been...

  20. Atmospheric Effects of the Kuroshio Large Meander during 200405* Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster and College of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    , whereas the SST signature substantially weakens in summer. A local reduction of wind speed is found over the cool water pool, and the positive SST­wind speed correlation is indicative of ocean forcing. The model experiments suggest that the reduced surface wind speed and precipitation are due to the large

  1. J. Great Lakes Res. 25(4):697720 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to search for multi-elemental "signatures" in concentration and flux profiles. For exam- ple, several rare to identify stamp sand material across Lake Superior. Although conditions of variable mass loading from multiple sources can produce complicating dilution effects in concentration profiles, multi- variate

  2. Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willcox, Karen [MIT] [MIT; Marzouk, Youssef [MIT] [MIT

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The SAGUARO (Scalable Algorithms for Groundwater Uncertainty Analysis and Robust Optimization) Project focused on the development of scalable numerical algorithms for large-scale Bayesian inversion in complex systems that capitalize on advances in large-scale simulation-based optimization and inversion methods. The project was a collaborative effort among MIT, the University of Texas at Austin, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Sandia National Laboratories. The research was directed in three complementary areas: efficient approximations of the Hessian operator, reductions in complexity of forward simulations via stochastic spectral approximations and model reduction, and employing large-scale optimization concepts to accelerate sampling. The MIT--Sandia component of the SAGUARO Project addressed the intractability of conventional sampling methods for large-scale statistical inverse problems by devising reduced-order models that are faithful to the full-order model over a wide range of parameter values; sampling then employs the reduced model rather than the full model, resulting in very large computational savings. Results indicate little effect on the computed posterior distribution. On the other hand, in the Texas--Georgia Tech component of the project, we retain the full-order model, but exploit inverse problem structure (adjoint-based gradients and partial Hessian information of the parameter-to-observation map) to implicitly extract lower dimensional information on the posterior distribution; this greatly speeds up sampling methods, so that fewer sampling points are needed. We can think of these two approaches as ``reduce then sample'' and ``sample then reduce.'' In fact, these two approaches are complementary, and can be used in conjunction with each other. Moreover, they both exploit deterministic inverse problem structure, in the form of adjoint-based gradient and Hessian information of the underlying parameter-to-observation map, to achieve their speedups.

  3. Shallow Water Offshore Wind Optimization for the Great Lakes (DE-FOA-0000415) Final Report: A Conceptual Design for Wind Energy in the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wissemann, Chris [Freshwater Wind I, LLC] [Freshwater Wind I, LLC; White, Stanley M [Stanley White Engineering LLC] [Stanley White Engineering LLC

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the project was to develop a innovative Gravity Base Foundation (GBF) concepts, including fabrication yards, launching systems and installation equipment, for a 500MW utility scale project in the Great Lakes (Lake Erie). The goal was to lower the LCOE by 25%. The project was the first to investigate an offshore wind project in the Great Lakes and it has furthered the body of knowledge for foundations and installation methods within Lake Erie. The project collected historical geotechnical information for Lake Erie and also used recently obtained data from the LEEDCo Icebreaker Project (FOA DE-EE0005989) geotechnical program to develop the conceptual designs. Using these data-sets, the project developed design wind and wave conditions from actual buoy data in order to develop a concept that would de-risk a project using a GBF. These wind and wave conditions were then utilized to create reference designs for various foundations specific to installation in Lake Erie. A project partner on the project (Weeks Marine) provided input for construction and costing the GBF fabrication and installation. By having a marine contractor with experience with large marine projects as part of the team provides credibility to the LCOE developed by NREL. NREL then utilized the design and construction costing information as part of the LCOE model. The report summarizes the findings of the project. • Developed a cost model and “baseline” LCOE • Documented Site Conditions within Lake Erie • Developed Fabrication, Installation and Foundations Innovative Concept Designs • Evaluated LCOE Impact of Innovations • Developed Assembly line “Rail System” for GBF Construction and Staging • Developed Transit-Inspired Foundation Designs which incorporated: Semi-Floating Transit with Supplemental Pontoons Barge mounted Winch System • Developed GBF with “Penetration Skirt” • Developed Integrated GBF with Turbine Tower • Developed Turbine, Plant Layout and O&M Strategies The report details lowering LCOE by 22.3% and identified additional strategies that could further lower LCOE when building an utility scale wind farm in the Great Lakes.

  4. Great Lakes ports coal handling capacity and export coal potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, A.H. Jr.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was developed to determine the competitive position of the Great Lakes Region coal-loading ports in relation to other US coastal ranges. Due to the congestion at some US Atlantic coastal ports US coal producers have indicated a need for alternative export routes, including the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System. The study assesses the regions coal handling capacity and price competitiveness along with the opportunity for increased US flag vessel service. A number of appendices are included showing major coal producers, railroad marketing representatives, US vessel operators, and port handling capacities and throughput. A rate analysis is provided including coal price at the mine, rail rate to port, port handling charges, water transportation rates to western Europe, Great Lakes route versus the US Atlantic Coast ports.

  5. Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat BasinGreat Boiling

  6. Great Falls, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat BasinGreat

  7. Great Power Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGoldenarticle is aGreat Lakes EnergyGreat

  8. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhakal, P; Myneni, G R; Gray, K E; Groll, N; Maheshwari, P; McRae, D M; Pike, R; Proslier, T; Stevie, F; Walsh, R P; Yang, Q

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q{sub 0} values of the order of 2×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B{sub p}) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q{sub 0} value of (5±1)×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and B{sub p}=90??mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  9. Thermal conductivity of large-grain niobium and its effect on trapped vortices in the temperature range 1.8?5 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondal, Jayanta [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Mittal, Kailash C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre; Myneni, Ganapati Rao [JLAB

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental investigation of the thermal conductivity of large grain and its dependence on the trapped vortices in parallel magnetic field with respect to the temperature gradient {gradient}T was carried out on four large-grain niobium samples from four different ingots. The zero-field thermal conductivity measurements are in good agreement with the measurements based on the theory of Bardeen-Rickayzen-Tewordt (BRT). The change in thermal conductivity with trapped vortices is analysed with the field dependence of the conductivity results of Vinen et al for low inductions and low-temperature situation. Finally, the dependence of thermal conductivity on the applied magnetic field in the vicinity of the upper critical field H{sub c2} is fitted with the theory of pure type-II superconductor of Houghton and Maki. Initial remnant magnetization in the sample shows a departure from the Houghton?Maki curve whereas the sample with zero trapped flux qualitatively agrees with the theory. A qualitative discussion is presented explaining the reason for such deviation from the theory. It has also been observed that if the sample with the trapped vortices is cycled through T{sub c}, the subsequent measurement of the thermal conductivity coincides with the zero trapped flux results.

  10. ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 Computing and Muon Calibration Center Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawn McKee

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale computing in ATLAS is based on a grid-linked system of tiered computing centers. The ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 came online in September 2006 and now is commissioning with full capacity to provide significant computing power and services to the USATLAS community. Our Tier-2 Center also host the Michigan Muon Calibration Center which is responsible for daily calibrations of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes for ATLAS endcap muon system. During the first LHC beam period in 2008 and following ATLAS global cosmic ray data taking period, the Calibration Center received a large data stream from the muon detector to derive the drift tube timing offsets and time-to-space functions with a turn-around time of 24 hours. We will present the Calibration Center commissioning status and our plan for the first LHC beam collisions in 2009.

  11. A Computer Tutorial for Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Computer Tutorial for Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology R.A. ASSELL U.S. Department of Commerce tutorial was developed to provide an overview of the annual ~ r e a fLakes ice cycle. The tutorial includes an animation to aid in visualizing the normal seasonal progression and the spatial patterns of ice cover

  12. GUEST EDITORIAL Multimedia indexing and retrieval: ever great challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbouj, Moncef

    GUEST EDITORIAL Multimedia indexing and retrieval: ever great challenges Chabane Djeraba & Moncef Abstract In this introduction, we present a brief state of the art of multimedia indexing and retrieval the next multimedia indexing and retrieval generation. The contributions explore wide range of fields

  13. The great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamnidae), and the tiger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , located dorsolaterally and posterior to the first dorsal fin. A second boat was present and both shark646 The great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamnidae), and the tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhin- idae), are two of the largest species of macropredatory sharks. Both are known

  14. Great Lakes Ecosystems Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    --> light energy ­ there is a loss of "useful" energy during transformation: heat The sun is the ultimate ­ Sun to producer to consumer to decomposer · Solar energy is trapped by photosynthesis as chemical1 Great Lakes Ecosystems Part I Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of matter within

  15. August 2012 Brazil is one of the great success stories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    August 2012 Brazil is one of the great success stories of the last several decades ­ and today has become a vibrant democracy and an economic powerhouse. Brazil's international profile has never been and staff. Our study of Brazil is strong and our engagement with Brazil is growing. Today, work

  16. Coupling Quantitative Precipitation Estimate and Great Lakes Hydrologic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rationale The ability to provide accurate runoff estimates not only impacts forecasting of the water levels of the Seaway, but can help business such as commercial shippers, marinas, and hydropower and nuclear plants environment, the Great Lakes basin, and GLERL will improve its LBRM to hourly computations and its AHPS

  17. Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2003 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2003 Annual Report to USDA Forest Service and MN Cooperative-01 #12;Canada Lynx Annual Report ii of 33 ii In this report we summarize accomplishments of the Canada Forest to address 4 major questions about this population of Canada lynx: location, distribution

  18. How extensive are the impacts of nitrogen pollution in Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How extensive are the impacts of nitrogen pollution in Great Britain's forests? Protecting our forests from pollutant deposition is and has been a topical issue for some time. Nitrogen, as well as being an essential nutrient for trees, is one of the most important of these pollutants. This article

  19. Genetic analysis of dilated cardiomyopathy in the great dane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbst, Stephanie Michelle

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    that are involved in the sarcomere or cytoskeletal components, leading to problems with contraction or cardiac cell integrity. In order to identify causative or susceptibility genes for DCM in the Great Dane, a whole-genome linkage screen was conducted in a family...

  20. FGas Regulation & Ecodesign: A great challenge for Heatpumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Europe 4. Using all types of refrigerants #12;EPEE's main fields of activities · Promote Energy of Buildings Directive ­ RES Renewable Energies Directive ­ Energy Efficiency Directive · The FGas RegulationFGas Regulation & Ecodesign: A great challenge for Heatpumps Andrea Voigt, EPEE October 2013 #12

  1. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison through Coursera, this four-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change.

  2. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  3. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  4. FACULTY and LIBRARIANS Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer. Great-West Life's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , disability and critical illness insurance for individuals and families. As a leading provider of employee. This booklet contains important information and should be kept in a safe place known to you and your family. The Plan is underwritten by 10-11 #12;Protecting Your Personal Information At Great-West Life, we recognize

  5. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Applicaiton from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice. EA-389 Great Bay Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export...

  6. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  7. Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis) in Great Smoky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis ``Capsule'': Ground-level ozone causes deleterious effects to cutleaf coneflower and crown-beard in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abstract Incidence and severity of visible foliar ozone injury on cutleaf

  8. Automated Vehicle Policy Work Automated vehicles are a subject of great interest, both in transportation and society in general.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automated Vehicle Policy Work Automated vehicles are a subject of great interest, both researchers are currently exploring automation's effects on the transportation system, determining preparation in the estimations of how automation will affect both congestion and safety. Both of these issues are critical

  9. Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydro- logic effects.5 years) cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Cloud climatologies

  10. Handbook for the GREAT08 Challenge: An image analysis competition for cosmological lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah Bridle; John Shawe-Taylor; Adam Amara; Douglas Applegate; Sreekumar T. Balan; Joel Berge; Gary Bernstein; Hakon Dahle; Thomas Erben; Mandeep Gill; Alan Heavens; Catherine Heymans; F. William High; Henk Hoekstra; Mike Jarvis; Donnacha Kirk; Thomas Kitching; Jean-Paul Kneib; Konrad Kuijken; David Lagatutta; Rachel Mandelbaum; Richard Massey; Yannick Mellier; Baback Moghaddam; Yassir Moudden; Reiko Nakajima; Stephane Paulin-Henriksson; Sandrine Pires; Anais Rassat; Alexandre Refregier; Jason Rhodes; Tim Schrabback; Elisabetta Semboloni; Marina Shmakova; Ludovic van Waerbeke; Dugan Witherick; Lisa Voigt; David Wittman

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2008 (GREAT08) Challenge focuses on a problem that is of crucial importance for future observations in cosmology. The shapes of distant galaxies can be used to determine the properties of dark energy and the nature of gravity, because light from those galaxies is bent by gravity from the intervening dark matter. The observed galaxy images appear distorted, although only slightly, and their shapes must be precisely disentangled from the effects of pixelisation, convolution and noise. The worldwide gravitational lensing community has made significant progress in techniques to measure these distortions via the Shear TEsting Program (STEP). Via STEP, we have run challenges within our own community, and come to recognise that this particular image analysis problem is ideally matched to experts in statistical inference, inverse problems and computational learning. Thus, in order to continue the progress seen in recent years, we are seeking an infusion of new ideas from these communities. This document details the GREAT08 Challenge for potential participants. Please visit http://www.great08challenge.info for the latest information.

  11. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  12. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  13. The effect of asymmetric large-scale dissipation on energy and potential enstrophy injection in two-layer quasi-geostrophic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleftherios Gkioulekas

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Nastrom-Gage spectrum of atmospheric turbulence we observe a $k^{-3}$ energy spectrum that transitions into a $k^{-5/3}$ spectrum, with increasing wavenumber $k$. The transition occurs near a transition wavenumber $k_t$, located near the Rossby deformation wavenumber $k_R$. The Tung-Orlando theory interprets this spectrum as a double downscale cascade of potential enstrophy and energy, from large scales to small scales, in which the downscale potential enstrophy cascade coexists with the downscale energy cascade over the same length-scale range. We show that, in a temperature forced two-layer quasi-geostrophic model, the rates with which potential enstrophy and energy are injected place the transition wavenumber $k_t$ near $k_R$. We also show that if the potential energy dominates the kinetic energy in the forcing range, then the Ekman term suppresses the upscale cascading potential enstrophy more than it suppresses the upscale cascading energy, a behavior contrary to what occurs in two-dimensional turbulence. As a result, the ratio $\\gn/\\gee$ of injected potential enstrophy over injected energy, in the downscale direction, decreases, thereby tending to decrease the transition wavenumber $k_t$ further. Using a random Gaussian forcing model, we reach the same conclusion, under the modeling assumption that the asymmetric Ekman term predominantly suppresses the bottom layer forcing, thereby disregarding a possible entanglement between the Ekman term and the nonlinear interlayer interaction. Based on these results, we argue that the Tung-Orlando theory can account for the approximate coincidence between $k_t$ and $k_R$. We also identify certain open questions that require further investigation via numerical simulations.

  14. Low-risk and cost-effective prior savings estimates for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thornton, J.W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, the authors have collected energy use data which allowed them to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. They believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights. The analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper.

  15. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota – Western’s Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

  16. Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

    1981-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

  17. Reinforced Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search Jean-Baptiste Mairy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deville, Yves

    a fragment of the variables of the current solution. Large Neighborhood Search has three parameters that must be specified (size of the fragment, search limit and fragment selection procedure). Its performances greatly Programming and the speed of Local Search. The LNS metaheuristic has three main parameters that have

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes NA D'souza1,3 , Y evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment

  19. Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV...

  20. AIR: THE GREAT, THE LARGE and the small. accompanies Air Lecture 1. P.B.Rhines 4 ii 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , transformations from one kind to another...heat to electricity and back. These were ideas about small things swamps over tens of millions of years, then locked deep underground as coal, oil and natural gas-scale behavior of the atmosphere, particular the layer just above the ground which we breathe and pollute

  1. AIR: THE GREAT, THE LARGE and the small. Lecture 3-4. P.B.Rhines 5 ii 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (warm) air rises. · the sun heats the tropics more than the Poles, leading to a distribution of air (and its circulation). Here our earlier ideas about sun's radiation are important too. The atmosphere, which trap pollutants in the lower atmosphere. · the basic temperature decreases by about 500 C from

  2. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowa |Programs inPrograms inwith Great

  3. Great Bend, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat Basin

  4. Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiver Energy Jump

  5. North Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy ResourcesGranby, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to:Great

  6. Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBig Windy (Great

  7. Great Plains The Camelina Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGoldenarticle is aGreat Lakes Energy

  8. Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederic Kuzel

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Council of Great Lakes Governors administered the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This Partnership grew out of the existing Regional Biomass Energy Program which the Council had administered since 1983. The GLBSRP includes the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. The GLBSRPÃ?Â?s overall goal is to facilitate the increased production and use of bioenergy and biobased products throughout the region. The GLBSRP has traditionally addressed its goals and objectives through a three-pronged approach: providing grants to the States; undertaking region-wide education, outreach and technology transfer projects; and, providing in-house management, support and information dissemination. At the direction of US Department of Energy, the primary emphasis of the GLBSRP in recent years has been education and outreach. Therefore, most activities have centered on developing educational materials, hosting workshops and conferences, and providing technical assistance. This report summarizes a selection of activities that were accomplished under this cooperative agreement.

  9. Lighting the Great Outdoors: LEDs in Exterior Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Tyson D. S.; Bryan, Mary M.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in the development of white light LEDs promises great impact by opening up the huge potential for LED illumination in new areas. One such area is general illumination for exterior applications. For example, there are an estimated combined 60.5 million roadway and parking installations in the U.S. These lights account for an estimated 53.3 TWh of electricity usage annually -- nearly 7% of all lighting. If LEDs could provide the same light performance with just 25% greater efficiency, savings of over 13 TWh could be achieved. In 2007, the authors assessed emerging LED lighting technologies in a parking garage and on a city street. The purpose of these tests was to enable a utility to determine whether energy efficiency programs promoting white light LED products might be justified. The results have supported the great promise of LEDs in exterior applications, while also highlighting the barriers that continue to hinder their widespread adoption. Such barriers include 1) inconsistent product quality across manufacturers; 2) lack of key metrics for comparing LEDs to conventional sources; and 3) high upfront cost of LED luminaires compared to conventional luminaires. This paper examines these barriers, ways in which energy-efficiency programs could help to overcome them, and the potential for energy and financial savings from LED lighting in these two exterior applications.

  10. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Hinz, Nicholas H. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Coolbaugh, Mark F [Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

  11. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  12. Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution of Design Rules for Biological Automation, polydimethylsiloxane Abstract Microfluidic large-scale integration (mLSI) refers to the develop- ment of microfluidic, are discussed. Several microfluidic components used as building blocks to create effective, complex, and highly

  13. The International Large Detector: Letter of Intent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, Toshinori; Abramowicz, Halina; Adamus, Marek; Adeva, Bernardo; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Alabau Pons, Carmen; Albrecht, Hartwig; Andricek, Ladislav; Anduze, Marc; Aplin, Steve J.; Arai, Yasuo; Asano, Masaki; Attie, David; Attree, Derek J.; Burger, Jochen; Bailey, David; Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Ball, Markus; Ballin, James; Barbi, Mauricio; Barlow, Roger; Bartels, Christoph; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassignana, Daniela; Bates, Richard; Baudot, Jerome; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Jeannine; Beckmann, Moritz; Bedjidian, Marc; Behnke, Ties; Belkadhi, Khaled; Bellerive, Alain; Bentvelsen, Stan; Bergauer, Thomas; Berggren, C.Mikael U.; Bergholz, Matthias; Bernreuther, Werner; Besancon, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biebel, Otmar; Bilki, Burak; Blair, Grahame; Blumlein, Johannes; Bo, Li; Boisvert, Veronique; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Boos, Eduard; Boudry, Vincent; Bouquet, Bernard; Bouvier, Joel; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Brient, Jean-Claude; Brock, Ian; Brogna, Andrea; Buchholz, Peter; Buesser, Karsten; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Buzulutskov, A.F.; Caccia, Massimo; Caiazza, Stefano; Calcaterra, Alessandro; Caldwell, Allen; Callier, Stephane L.C.; Calvo Alamillo, Enrique; Campbell, Michael; Campbell, Alan J.; Cappellini, Chiara; Carloganu, Cristina; Castro, Nuno; Castro Carballo, Maria Elena; Chadeeva, Marina; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chang, Paoti; Charpy, Alexandre; Chen, Xun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Hongfang; Cheon, Byunggu; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, B.C.; Christen, Sandra; Ciborowski, Jacek; Ciobanu, Catalin; Claus, Gilles; Clerc, Catherine; Coca, Cornelia; Colas, Paul; Colijn, Auke; Colledani, Claude; Combaret, Christophe; Cornat, Remi; Cornebise, Patrick; Corriveau, Francois; Cvach, Jaroslav; Czakon, Michal; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Da Silva, Wilfrid; Dadoun, Olivier; Dam, Mogens; Damerell, Chris; Danilov, Mikhail; Daniluk, Witold; Daubard, Guillaume; David, Dorte; David, Jacques; De Boer, Wim; De Groot, Nicolo; De Jong, Sijbrand; De Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De Masi, Rita; De Roeck, Albert; Decotigny, David; Dehmelt, Klaus; Delagnes, Eric; Deng, Zhi; Desch, Klaus; Dieguez, Angel; Diener, Ralf; Dima, Mihai-Octavian; Dissertori, Gunther; Dixit, Madhu S.; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris A.; Dollan, Ralph; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doublet, Philippe; Doyle, Tony; Doziere, Guy; Dragicevic, Marko; Drasal, Zbynek; Drugakov, Vladimir; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Dulucq, Frederic; Dumitru, Laurentiu Alexandru; Dzahini, Daniel; Eberl, Helmut; Eckerlin, Guenter; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eigen, Gerald; Eklund, Lars; Elsen, Eckhard; Elsener, Konrad; Emeliantchik, Igor; Engels, Jan; Evrard, Christophe; Fabbri, Riccardo; Faber, Gerard; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Feege, Nils; Feng, Cunfeng; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Garcia, Marcos; Filthaut, Frank; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischer, Manfred; Fleta, Celeste; Fleury, Julien L.; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Foster, Brian; Fourches, Nicolas; Fouz, Mary-Cruz; Frank, Sebastian; Frey, Ariane; Frotin, Mickael; Fujii, Hirofumi; Fujii, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Junpei; Fujita, Yowichi; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gaddi, Andrea; Gaede, Frank; Galkin, Alexei; Galkin, Valery; Gallas, Abraham; Gallin-Martel, Laurent; Gamba, Diego; Gao, Yuanning; Garrido Beltran, Lluis; Garutti, Erika; Gastaldi, Franck; Gaur, Bakul; Gay, Pascal; Gellrich, Andreas; Genat, Jean-Francois; Gentile, Simonetta; Gerwig, Hubert; Gibbons, Lawrence; Ginina, Elena; Giraud, Julien; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Gladilin, Leonid; Goldstein, Joel; Gonzalez Sanchez, Francisco Javier; Gournaris, Filimon; Greenshaw, Tim; Greenwood, Z.D.; Grefe, Christian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Philippe; Grondin, Denis; Grunewald, Martin; Grzelak, Grzegorz; Gurtu, Atul; Haas, Tobias; Haensel, Stephan; Hajdu, Csaba; Hallermann, Lea; Han, Liang; Hansen, Peter H.; Hara, Takanori; Harder, Kristian; Hartin, Anthony; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harz, Martin; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hauschild, Michael; He, Qing; Hedberg, Vincent; Hedin, David; Heinze, Isa; Helebrant, Christian; Henschel, Hans; Hensel, Carsten; Hertenberger, Ralf; Herve, Alain; Higuchi, Takeo; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hironori, Kazurayama; Hlucha, Hana; Hommels, Bart; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horvath, Dezso; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Wei-Shu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Huang, Xingtao; Huppert, Jean Francois; Ide, Yasuhiro; Idzik, Marek; Iglesias Escudero, Carmen; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Igonkina, Olga; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Ikuno, Toshinori; Imbault, Didier; Imhof, Andreas; Imhoff, Marc; Ingbir, Ronen; Inoue, Eiji

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC. The ILC will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV. The ILC has an ambitious physics program, which will extend and complement that of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hallmark of physics at the ILC is precision. The clean initial state and the comparatively benign environment of a lepton collider are ideally suited to high precision measurements. To take full advantage of the physics potential of ILC places great demands on the detector performance. The design of ILD is driven by these requirements. Excellent calorimetry and tracking are combined to obtain the best possible overall event reconstruction, including the capability to reconstruct individual particles within jets for particle ow calorimetry. This requires excellent spatial resolution for all detector systems. A highly granular calorimeter system is combined with a central tracker which st...

  14. Large scale disease prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to present the foundation of an automated large-scale disease prediction system. Unlike previous work that has typically focused on a small self-contained dataset, we explore the possibility ...

  15. Star Formation in the Era of the Three Great Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott J. Wolk; Norbert Schulz; John Stauffer; Nancy Evans; Leisa Townsley; Tom Megeath; Dave Huenemoerder; Claus Leitherer; Ray Jayawardana

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes contributions and suggestions as presented at the Chandra Workshop Star Formation in the Era of Three Great Observatories conducted in July 2005. One of the declared goals of the workshop was to raise recognition within the star formation research community about the sensible future utilization of the space observatories Spitzer, Hubble, and Chandra in their remaining years of operation to tackle imminent questions of our understanding of stellar formation and the early evolution of stars. A white paper was generated to support the continuous and simultaneous usage of observatory time for star formation research. The contents of this paper have been presented and discussed at several other meetings during the course of 2005 and January 2006.

  16. Introductory remarks by Julian Hunt talks at CoZSSA 2, Nov 2005 Ministerial colleagues, I am greatly honoured to open this conference on Coastal Zones in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    for economic and social development consistent with adapting to the special features of the changing climate. Environmental and climate change present great challenges to every country in the world and especially such as those in oil rich areas. The effects of deforestation also have major effects on regional climate

  17. The reception and study of Renaissance architecture in Great Britain, 1890-1914

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Katherine Jean

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The writing of Renaissance architectural history in the period 1890-1914 in Great Britain changed dramatically. Despite modernism's tenet of rejecting history from design, Renaissance architectural history in Great Britain ...

  18. Great Republic: a historical and archaeological analysis of a Pacific mail steamship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Andrew Philip

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Republic that belonged to the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, rather than Isabella. This thesis investigates the history of Great Republic and its role in American maritime history, as well as its possible archaeological remains at the bottom...

  19. Construction of Course Timetables Based on Great Deluge and Tabu Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, Barry

    Construction of Course Timetables Based on Great Deluge and Tabu Search Salwani Abdullah1 , Khalid of two metaheuristics i.e. great deluge and tabu search approaches. The algorithm is tested over eleven when compared against other techniques from the literature. Keywords: Great deluge, tabu search, course

  20. Non-Linear Great Deluge with Reinforcement Learning for University Course Timetabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    Non-Linear Great Deluge with Reinforcement Learning for University Course Timetabling Joe Henry.sevaux@univ-ubs.fr Abstract. This paper describes a non-linear great deluge hyper-heuristic incorporating a reinforcement learning mechanism for the selection of low-level heuristics and a non-linear great deluge acceptance

  1. Electromagnetism-like Mechanism with Force Decay Rate Great Deluge for the Course Timetabling Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, Barry

    Electromagnetism-like Mechanism with Force Decay Rate Great Deluge for the Course Timetabling called Electromagnetism-like mechanism with force decay rate great deluge algorithm for university course on these benchmark problems. Keywords: Electromagnetism-like mechanism, force decay rate great deluge, course

  2. Computational Study of Non-linear Great Deluge for University Course Timetabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    Computational Study of Non-linear Great Deluge for University Course Timetabling Joe Henry Obit and Dario Landa-Silva Abstract. The great deluge algorithm explores neighbouring solutions which the current water level. In the original great deluge method, the water level decreases steadily in a linear

  3. Great Deluge with Non-linear Decay Rate for Solving Course Timetabling Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    Great Deluge with Non-linear Decay Rate for Solving Course Timetabling Problems Dario Landa. The great deluge algorithm explores neighbouring solutions which are accepted if they are better than. In the original great deluge, the water level decreases steadily in a linear fashion. In this paper, we propose

  4. Long-term Trends in Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Raymond A. Assel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-term Trends in Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Raymond A. Assel OPEN FILE REPORT December Commonwealth Blvd. Ann Arbor, MI 48105 #12;Long-Term Trends in Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Raymond A is to give a brief overview of nearshore and lake wide trends in Great Lakes ice cover over the past one

  5. Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover is an important environmental factor affecting physical and biological processes in the coastal region of the Great Lakes. However, computerized ice thickness data along the shores of the Great

  6. PROCEEDINGS OF THE GREAT LAKES ICE RESEARCH WORKSHOP* Held October 18-19, 1983

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE GREAT LAKES ICE RESEARCH WORKSHOP* Held October 18-19, 1983 at the Ohio State, and where we should be going relative to ice cover research on the Great Lakes. The original papers research in which Great Lakes ice is an important consideration. #12;CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION

  7. Tmoins Muets/Mute Witnesses: ethnography and archaeology encounter the objects of the Great War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    59 Témoins Muets/Mute Witnesses: ethnography and archaeology encounter the objects of the Great War MUTE WITNESSES: AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND ETHNOLOGICAL APPROACH TO OBJECTS FROM THE GREAT WAR "Mute witnesses" are objects from the Great War according to the brochure of a remarkable collection open

  8. A Formation Behavior for Large-Scale Micro-Robot Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudenhoeffer, Donald Dean; Jones, Michael Paul

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-robots will soon be available for deployment by the thousands. Consequently, controlling and coordinating a force this large to accomplish a prescribed task is of great interest. This paper describes a flexible architecture for modeling thousands of autonomous agents simultaneously. The agents’ behavior is based on a subsumption architecture in which individual behaviors are prioritized with respect to all others. The primary behavior explored in this work is a group formation behavior based on social potential fields (Reif and Wang 1999). This paper extends the social potential field model by introducing a neutral zone within which other behaviors may exhibit themselves. Previous work with social potential fields has been restricted to models of “perfect” autonomous agents. The paper evaluates the effect of social potential fields in the presence of agent death (failure) and imperfect sensory input.

  9. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in the Sediments of the Great Lakes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    -retardants that are used in a wide range of consumer products including paints, plastics, textiles, and electronics. They are considered to be environmentally persistent due to their resistance to various degradation, and their high and have a large impact on their distribu- tion, transport, and fate. Sediment profiles from carefully

  10. Soil property database: Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    measurement campaigns have been carried out concurrently with large-scale remote sensing hydrologic campaigns surface and the subsurface and the highly nonlinear nature of local-scale water and heat transport head, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity) and the soil thermal properties (heat capacity, heat

  11. Large power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsai, K.; Kerenyi, D.; Kiss, L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book deals with the following aspects of transformer engineering: general principles governing the function of transformers, iron cores, windings, stray losses caused by stray flux, the insulation of transformers, and the structural parts and accessories. This edition includes the developments in theory and practice on the basis of the authors' experience in design, manufacturing and testing of large transformers. New developments have been particularly extensive in the fields of new magnetic materials, cooling methods, dielectric strength for overvoltages of different types, and stray-load loss problems, which are presented in the book in detail. The many diagrams in the book can be used directly in the design, manufacture and testing of large transformers. In preparing their text, the authors have aimed to satisfy the demand for a work that summarizes the latest experience in development and design of large power transformers.

  12. Adapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; this is the adaptation component. Communication of climate change information to various publicsAdapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin 52 Great Lakes in response to potential climate change and variability. When we were preparing for this talk on what we have

  13. New Deal Policies and Recovery from the Great Depression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hausman, Joshua Kautsky

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aggregate effects of the bonus . . . . . . . . .on the veterans’ bonus . . . . . . Evidence from the 1935-3652. Daniels, Roger. 1971. The Bonus March: An Episode of the

  14. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  15. Handbook for the GREAT08 Challenge: An image analysis competition for cosmological lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridle, Sarah; Amara, Adam; Applegate, Douglas; Balan, Sreekumar T; Bernstein, Gary; Berge, Joel; Dahle, Hakon; Erben, Thomas; Gill, Mandeep; Heavens, Alan; Heymans, Catherine; High, Will; Hoekstra, Henk; Jarvis, Mike; Kitching, Thomas; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kuijken, Konrad; Lagattuta, David; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Massey, Richard; Mellier, Yannick; Moghaddam, Baback; Moudden, Yassir; Nakajima, Reiko; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Pires, Sandrine; Rassat, Anais; Refregier, Alexandre; Rhodes, Jason; Schrabback, Tim; Semboloni, Elisabetta; Shmakova, Marina; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Voigt, Lisa; Wittman, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2008 (GREAT08) Challenge focuses on a problem that is of crucial importance for future observations in cosmology. The shapes of distant galaxies can be used to determine the properties of dark energy and the nature of gravity, because light from those galaxies is bent by gravity from the intervening dark matter. The observed galaxy images appear distorted, although only slightly, and their shapes must be precisely disentangled from the effects of pixelisation, convolution and noise. The worldwide gravitational lensing community has made significant progress in techniques to measure these distortions via the Shear TEsting Program (STEP). Via STEP, we have run challenges within our own community, and come to recognise that this particular image analysis problem is ideally matched to experts in statistical inference, inverse problems and computational learning. Thus, in order to continue the progress seen in recent years, we are seeking an infusion of new ideas from the...

  16. Composting Large Animal Carcasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how...

  17. Composting Large Animal Carcasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how...

  18. Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From transporting the oil necessary to fuel jets and vehicles to supplying battery packs to infantry, energy plays a central role in almost everything the U.S. military does. Because of this reliance, it’s imperative that the military cultivate energy sources that are not subject to the whims of outside nations. While renewables like solar are playing a large role in this effort, advanced biofuels produced domestically are rapidly becoming another choice for transportation fuel.

  19. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., Vol. 7, 1974. Printed in Great Britain. 01974 Electron multiplicationin a gas discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    with large space gradients. More recently, experimental data (Haydon and Stock 1966, Folkard and Haydon 1971 the pressure of the gas and xoa distance introduced to take into account the non-equilibrium effects at small

  20. Final Report: Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghattas, Omar [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The SAGUARO (Scalable Algorithms for Groundwater Uncertainty Analysis and Robust Optimiza- tion) Project focuses on the development of scalable numerical algorithms for large-scale Bayesian inversion in complex systems that capitalize on advances in large-scale simulation-based optimiza- tion and inversion methods. Our research is directed in three complementary areas: efficient approximations of the Hessian operator, reductions in complexity of forward simulations via stochastic spectral approximations and model reduction, and employing large-scale optimization concepts to accelerate sampling. Our efforts are integrated in the context of a challenging testbed problem that considers subsurface reacting flow and transport. The MIT component of the SAGUARO Project addresses the intractability of conventional sampling methods for large-scale statistical inverse problems by devising reduced-order models that are faithful to the full-order model over a wide range of parameter values; sampling then employs the reduced model rather than the full model, resulting in very large computational savings. Results indicate little effect on the computed posterior distribution. On the other hand, in the Texas-Georgia Tech component of the project, we retain the full-order model, but exploit inverse problem structure (adjoint-based gradients and partial Hessian information of the parameter-to- observation map) to implicitly extract lower dimensional information on the posterior distribution; this greatly speeds up sampling methods, so that fewer sampling points are needed. We can think of these two approaches as "reduce then sample" and "sample then reduce." In fact, these two approaches are complementary, and can be used in conjunction with each other. Moreover, they both exploit deterministic inverse problem structure, in the form of adjoint-based gradient and Hessian information of the underlying parameter-to-observation map, to achieve their speedups.

  1. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  2. Large Spectral Library Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilton, Lawrence K.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperspectral imaging produces a spectrum or vector at each image pixel. These spectra can be used to identify materials present in the image. In some cases, spectral libraries representing atmospheric chemicals or ground materials are available. The challenge is to determine if any of the library chemicals or materials exist in the hyperspectral image. The number of spectra in these libraries can be very large, far exceeding the number of spectral channels collected in the ¯eld. Suppose an image pixel contains a mixture of p spectra from the library. Is it possible to uniquely identify these p spectra? We address this question in this paper and refer to it as the Large Spectral Library (LSL) problem. We show how to determine if unique identi¯cation is possible for any given library. We also show that if p is small compared to the number of spectral channels, it is very likely that unique identi¯cation is possible. We show that unique identi¯cation becomes less likely as p increases.

  3. Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within a larger natural ecosystem. An Eco-Logical guide waschanges in the Great Lakes ecosystem from the introductionfor a State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC) Pre-

  4. Wind Shear and Turbulence Profiles at Elevated Heights: Great Lakes and Midwest Sites (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzed wind resource characteristics at elevated heights (50 m-200+m) incuding shear and turbulence profiles for some areas of the Great Lakes and M idwest sites.

  5. Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set forth requirements for the registration of water withdrawals and reporting of water losses from the Great Lakes Basin. The regulations apply to water withdrawals from...

  6. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  7. The Great Season Climatic Oscillation and the Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucenna, Ahmed

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present earth warming up is often explained by the atmosphere gas greenhouse effect. This explanation is in contradiction with the thermodynamics second law. The warming up by greenhouse effect is quite improbable. It is cloud reflection that gives to the earth s ground its 15 degres C mean temperature. Since the reflection of the radiation by gases is negligible, the role of the atmosphere greenhouse gases in the earth warming up by earth radiation reflection loses its importance. We think that natural climatic oscillations contribute more to earth climatic disturbances. The oscillation that we hypothesize to exist has a long period (800 to 1000 years). The glacier melting and regeneration cycles lead to variations in the cold region ocean water density and thermal conductibility according to their salinity. These variations lead one to think about a macro climate oscillating between maximum hot and minimum cold temperatures. This oscillation is materialized by the passages of the planet through hot, mil...

  8. DROUGHTin the Life, Cultures, and Landscapes of the Great Plains The 40th annual Center for Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    . Daugherty Water for Food Institute. Drought or the ever-present threat of it has had a pervasive effect Plains Studies symposium is a collaboration with the National Drought Mitigation Center and the Robert B on the region and its people. It has molded the region's settlement patterns, agriculture, and commerce

  9. The Effects of Great Plains Irrigation on the Surface Energy Balance, Regional Circulation, and Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, David B.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Mechem, David B.

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Irrigation provides a needed source of water in regions of low precipitation. Adding water to a region that would otherwise see little natural precipitation alters the partitioning of surface energy fluxes, the evolution of the planetary boundary...

  10. Widespread effects of middle Mississippian deformation in the Great Basin of western North America

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A

  11. Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrialSupportingAlbedo at theSurface SoilSurface

  12. The International Large Detector: Letter of Intent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ILD Concept Group

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC. The ILC will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV. The ILC has an ambitious physics program, which will extend and complement that of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hallmark of physics at the ILC is precision. The clean initial state and the comparatively benign environment of a lepton collider are ideally suited to high precision measurements. To take full advantage of the physics potential of ILC places great demands on the detector performance. The design of ILD is driven by these requirements. Excellent calorimetry and tracking are combined to obtain the best possible overall event reconstruction, including the capability to reconstruct individual particles within jets for particle ow calorimetry. This requires excellent spatial resolution for all detector systems. A highly granular calorimeter system is combined with a central tracker which stresses redundancy and efficiency. In addition, efficient reconstruction of secondary vertices and excellent momentum resolution for charged particles are essential for an ILC detector. The interaction region of the ILC is designed to host two detectors, which can be moved into the beam position with a push-pull scheme. The mechanical design of ILD and the overall integration of subdetectors takes these operational conditions into account.

  13. Large-N droplets in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using lattice effective field theory, we study the ground state binding energy of N distinct particles in two dimensions with equal mass interacting weakly via an attractive SU(N)-symmetric short range potential. We find that in the limit of zero range and large N, the ratio of binding energies B_{N}/B_{N-1} approaches the value 8.3(6).

  14. Natural history of thorny devils Moloch horridus (Lacertilia: Agamidae) in the Great Victoria Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pianka, Eric R.

    183 Natural history of thorny devils Moloch horridus (Lacertilia: Agamidae) in the Great Victoria received August 1997; accepted February 1998 Abstract Daily movements and activity of three male and five female thorny devils (Moloch horridus) were monitored using biotelemetry in the Great Victoria Desert

  15. Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co-Investigators: Thomas Croley - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover affects mass and energy exchange between the planetary boundary layer and the waters of the Great Lakes. The improved ice

  16. Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 20032004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 2003: Received 4 May 2009 Accepted 30 November 2009 Communicated by Dr. Ram Yerubandi Index words: Coupled Ice-Ocean Model Ice modeling Lake ice cover Ice thickness Ice speed Lake surface temperature Great Lakes Lake Erie

  17. Great Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co Board The formation, duration, and extent of ice cover on the Great Lakes has a major impact and cooling water intakes, and damaging shoreline structures. The ice cover also has an impact on the water

  18. Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant) - NOAA GLERL Overview This work is based on previous projects titled "Great Lakes Ice Cycle" conducted and climate GCM products along with historical sea ice observations including recent satellite measurements

  19. Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States Received 19 April 2006; accepted 23 August 2006 Abstract Over key ecosystem processes in the Great Basin, including hydrology and energy balance. To determine how

  20. GRC Transactions, Vol. 29, 2005 Geothermal, GIS, potential, favorability, Great Basin, map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _gis2. htm) of the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBC- GE). This map allows for separate to host high-temperature (> 150° C) geothermal systems capable of producing electrical energy. ThreeGRC Transactions, Vol. 29, 2005 223 Keywords Geothermal, GIS, potential, favorability, Great Basin

  1. GOALS: The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey J. M. MAZZARELLA,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    GOALS: The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey L. ARMUS,1 J. M. MAZZARELLA,2 A. S. EVANS,3,4 J. The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS20 ) combines data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope 200 low-redshift (z Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset

  2. Citizen Science Case Study: The Great Sunflower Project Nathan R. Prestopnik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science Case Study: The Great Sunflower Project Nathan R. Prestopnik Syracuse University napresto@syr.edu Abstract The Great Sunflower Project is a citizen science project designed to collect play in citizen science implementations, and the debate between custom website development

  3. The Great Moderation and Leptokurtosis after GARCH WenShwo Fang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    The Great Moderation and Leptokurtosis after GARCH Adjustment WenShwo Fang Department of Economics that this finding of fat tails may reflect the Great Moderation. That is, leptokurtosis disappears after GARCH Moderation, leptokurtosis, GARCH models JEL classification: C32; E32; O40 * Corresponding author #12

  4. ...2!.J1... .J. J!j btl Great Lakes Gill Net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...2!.J1... .J. J!j btl Great Lakes Gill Net AUG1;) 1968 UNITED ST ATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES Great Lakes Gill Net and cordage Synthetic twines. Cordage . Mesh size Gill net construction Fishing operations . . Setting

  5. Petrology and Petrography of Ely Limestone in Part of Eastern Great Basin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Petrology and Petrography of Ely Limestone in Part of Eastern Great Basin* YAZDAN MOLLAZAL Tehran petrology and petrography in three areas in the eastern Great Basin. Results are as follows: (1) At Moorman ..............................Ely Limestone 7 Carbonate petrology and ......................................petrography 8

  6. Geothermics, Vol. 15, No. 3, pp. 347-358, 1986. Printed inGreatBritain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Geothermics, Vol. 15, No. 3, pp. 347-358, 1986. Printed inGreatBritain. 0375 - 6505/86 $3.130 + 0.00 Pergamon Journals Ltd. © 1986 CNR. THERMOPHILIC MICROORGANISMS IN THE HOT SPRINGS OF TENGCHONG GEOTHERMAL volcanicgeothermalenvironmentsis discussed. INTRODUCTION In recent years biologists have been attaching great importance to thermal

  7. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  8. Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11ComputationalEdNERSC:Effect of0/2002Effects of

  9. Using cloud resolving model simulations of deep convection to inform cloud parameterizations in large-scale models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Stephen A.; Pincus, Robert; Xu, Kuan-man

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud parameterizations in large-scale models struggle to address the significant non-linear effects of radiation and precipitation that arise from horizontal inhomogeneity in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid box size of the large-scale models. Statistical cloud schemes provide an attractive framework to self-consistently predict the horizontal inhomogeneity in radiation and microphysics because the probability distribution function (PDF) of total water contained in the scheme can be used to calculate these non-linear effects. Statistical cloud schemes were originally developed for boundary layer studies so extending them to a global model with many different environments is not straightforward. For example, deep convection creates abundant cloudiness and yet little is known about how deep convection alters the PDF of total water or how to parameterize these impacts. These issues are explored with data from a 29 day simulation by a cloud resolving model (CRM) of the July 1997 ARM Intensive Observing Period at the Southern Great Plains site. The simulation is used to answer two questions: (a) how well can the beta distribution represent the PDFs of total water relative to saturation resolved by the CRM? (b) how can the effects of convection on the PDF be parameterized? In addition to answering these questions, additional sections more fully describe the proposed statistical cloud scheme and the CRM simulation and analysis methods.

  10. Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

  11. ADVANCES IN HYDROGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS FOR THE DISCOVERY OF NEW GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE GREAT BASIN, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Stuart F [Colorado School of Mines; Spycher, Nicolas [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Sonnenthal, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I work for a go/no go decision on Phase II funding. In the first objective, we assessed the extent to which fluid-mineral equilibria controlled deep water compositions in geothermal systems across the Great Basin. Six systems were evaluated: Beowawe; Desert Peak; Dixie Valley; Mammoth; Raft River; Roosevelt. These represent a geographic spread of geothermal resources, in different geological settings and with a wide range of fluid compositions. The results were used for calibration/reformulation of chemical geothermometers that reflect the reservoir temperatures in producing reservoirs. In the second objective, we developed a reactive -transport model of the Desert Peak hydrothermal system to evaluate the processes that affect reservoir fluid geochemistry and its effect on solute geothermometry. This included testing geothermometry on “reacted” thermal water originating from different lithologies and from near-surface locations where the temperature is known from the simulation. The integrated multi-component geothermometer (GeoT, relying on computed mineral saturation indices) was tested against the model results and also on the systems studied in the first objective.

  12. Large neutrino asymmetries from neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Foot; M. J. Thomson; R. R. Volkas

    1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine neutrino oscillations in the early universe. Contrary to previous studies, we show that large neutrino asymmetries can arise due to oscillations between ordinary neutrinos and sterile neutrinos. This means that the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) bounds on the mass and mixing of ordinary neutrinos with sterile neutrinos can be evaded. Also, it is possible that the neutrino asymmetries can be large (i.e. $\\stackrel{>}{\\sim} 10\\%$), and hence have a significant effect on BBN through nuclear reaction rates.

  13. Planet. Space Sci., Vol. 40, No. 4, pp. 439~i45. 1992 00324)633/92 $5.00+0.00 Printed in Great Britain. ~ 1992Pergamon Press pie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruntman, Mike

    Planet. Space Sci., Vol. 40, No. 4, pp. 439~i45. 1992 00324)633/92 $5.00+0.00 Printed in Great are not accurately known. A self-consistent model of the heliosphere has still to be built and many important which its kinetic energy is largely converted into thermal energy in the subsonic plasma. Details

  14. Ferroelectric opening switches for large-scale pulsed power drivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Glover, Steven Frank

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast electrical energy storage or Voltage-Driven Technology (VDT) has dominated fast, high-voltage pulsed power systems for the past six decades. Fast magnetic energy storage or Current-Driven Technology (CDT) is characterized by 10,000 X higher energy density than VDT and has a great number of other substantial advantages, but it has all but been neglected for all of these decades. The uniform explanation for neglect of CDT technology is invariably that the industry has never been able to make an effective opening switch, which is essential for the use of CDT. Most approaches to opening switches have involved plasma of one sort or another. On a large scale, gaseous plasmas have been used as a conductor to bridge the switch electrodes that provides an opening function when the current wave front propagates through to the output end of the plasma and fully magnetizes the plasma - this is called a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Opening can be triggered in a POS using a magnetic field to push the plasma out of the A-K gap - this is called a Magnetically Controlled Plasma Opening Switch (MCPOS). On a small scale, depletion of electron plasmas in semiconductor devices is used to affect opening switch behavior, but these devices are relatively low voltage and low current compared to the hundreds of kilo-volts and tens of kilo-amperes of interest to pulsed power. This work is an investigation into an entirely new approach to opening switch technology that utilizes new materials in new ways. The new materials are Ferroelectrics and using them as an opening switch is a stark contrast to their traditional applications in optics and transducer applications. Emphasis is on use of high performance ferroelectrics with the objective of developing an opening switch that would be suitable for large scale pulsed power applications. Over the course of exploring this new ground, we have discovered new behaviors and properties of these materials that were here to fore unknown. Some of these unexpected discoveries have lead to new research directions to address challenges.

  15. Program and abstracts of the 28th conference on Great Lakes research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts of papers presented at the 28th Conference on Great Lakes Research and the annual meeting of the International Association for Great Lakes Research covered two symposia. The first was a comparison of Great Lakes and Baltic ecosystems, which provided an opportunity for international exchanges of information and insights. The second featured pollution problems in the Green Bay estuary environment that is of particular value to Wisconsin and Michigan. There are 41 separate abstracts selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB). Four of those were also selected for Energy Research Abstracts (ERA), six for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA), and two for INS.

  16. Polymers: Molecular Structure [A polymer is a very large molecule comprising hundreds or thousands of atoms,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher

    1 Polymers: Molecular Structure [A polymer is a very large molecule comprising hundreds into chain or network structures|The concept of the polymer is one of the great ideas of twentieth century with the name of Hermann Staudinger who received the Nobel Prize in 1953. The influence of the polymer (or

  17. Platform-of-Platforms: A Modular, Integrated Resource Framework for Large-Scale Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissman, Jon

    Platform-of-Platforms: A Modular, Integrated Resource Framework for Large-Scale Services Rahul there has been a great deal of research ac- tivity in the development of diverse network service platforms-tier resource platform may be a natural fit for such multi-tier network services. Figure 1: Hierarchical

  18. Standards Development and Deployment of a Comprehensive, Integrated, Open-standard Monitoring and Equipment Control Networking Protocol Infrastructure for Effective Facility Energy Management of a Large-scale Industrial Site in Alberta, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of a Large-scale Industrial Site in Alberta, Canada Ron Bernstein ESL-IE-14-05-27 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Suncor – Oil Sands Recovery Process ESL-IE-14...

  19. Evidence of late Quaternary wet/dry climate episodes derived from paleoclimatic proxy data recovered from the paleoenvironmental record of the Great Basin of western North America: Paleobotanical studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the integration of several avenues of paleoclimatic proxy data, the authors intend to arrive a definite conclusions regarding the frequency of periods of wetter climate, and to drive information regarding the magnitudes of these episodes, rates of their onset and demise, and the climatic conditions under which wetter climate can occur. These will in turn lead to rough estimates of: (1) the amounts of rainfall available for recharge during past periods of effectively wetter climate; and (2) the durations and spacing of such events that provide an indication of the amount of time that the area was subjected to these inputs. To accomplish these goals the paleobotanical record over a broad region is being examined to identify periods of greater effective precipitation. Although the project focus is on a region a of about 200 km around Yucca Mountain, they have collected data in other areas of the Great Basin in order to be able to identify large-scale climatic patterns. Once identified and described these climatic patterns can be separated from purely local climatic phenomena that might hinder the understanding of the Pliestocene climates of southern Nevada and the Yucca Mountain area in particular.

  20. Seizing a species : the story of the Great Salt Lake brine shrimp harvest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wotipka, Samuel Alex

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1950s, C.C. "Sparkplug" Sanders began harvesting brine shrimp from Utah's Great Salt Lake. Sanders built up a small business selling their eggs, called "cysts, to aquarium stores across the country. During the ...

  1. On death ground : why weak states resist great powers explaining coercion failure in asymmetric interstate conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haun, Phil M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Powers often adopt coercive strategies, threatening or using limited force to convince weak states to comply with their demands. While coercive strategies have succeeded in just over half of asymmetric crises since ...

  2. Did the Great Recession Wipe Out a Decade of Economic Progress in Colorado?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Did the Great Recession Wipe Out a Decade of Economic Associate Professor of Economics Michael Marturana Research Economist Colorado rebuild. To make better decisions about Colorado's open economic path

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER An Equation of State for Hypersaline Water in Great Salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Great Salt Lake, Utah 810 Aquat Geochem (2011) 17:809­820 123 #12;more saline brine layer in the south arm, commonly referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is not subject to annual turnover and can

  4. Microbiology (2000), 146, 851860 Printed in Great Britain Absence of translationally selected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbiology (2000), 146, 851­860 Printed in Great Britain Absence of translationally selected Batterie des Lions, 13007 Marseille, France. Abbreviations: GC3s, GjC content at synonymously variable

  5. Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nissan Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines DOE Supports PG&E Development of Next Generation Plug-in Hybrid Electric Trucks...

  6. Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great Lakes a content of planktonic algae and benthic algae in periphyton on acrylic rods and in epiphyton growing

  7. Great Lakes Issues of Interest by Dr. Stephen B. Brandt and Margaret B. Lansing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    26 T Great Lakes Issues of Interest by Dr. Stephen B. Brandt and Margaret B. Lansing he National. This figure was provided by Stuart Ludsin (NOAA-GLERL) and Tom Johengen (CILER, U of Michigan). (including

  8. A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A Map Of...

  9. Estimating Nonpoint Source Pollution Loadings in the Great Lakes Watersheds Chansheng He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contaminated sediments, urban runoff, storm sewers, and agriculture impairs Great Lakes shoreline waters will be used as the input to the water quality model for simulating pollutant transport through surface-scale water quality model to estimat

  10. Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

  11. Environmental and Pedogenic Change in the Central Great Plains from the Middle Wisconsinan to the Present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willey, Karen Lynn

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the middle Wisconsinan, the Gilman Canyon Formation (GCF), consisting of three loess units and three soils, formed on the loess plateaus of the central Great Plains about 40-25 ka. Stable carbon isotope analysis of ...

  12. A review of "Peter the Great and the West: New Perspectives." by Lindsey Hughes, ed. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathy J. Potter

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - lication of Lindsey Hughes?s own important book, Russia in the Age of Peter the Great, as well as a collection sponsored by the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, Britain and Russia in the Age of Peter the Great: Historical Documents... made it possible for Russia to surmount a systemic crisis that had matured by the end of the seventeenth century. Andrei Medushevskii argues for the applica- tion of a comparative approach to the Petrine reforms and Russian modernization, again...

  13. An investigation of dust storm generation in the Southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Marshall Conrad

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF DUST STORM GENERATION IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS A Thesis by NARSHALL CONRAD POLLARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of HASTER... OF SCIFNCE December 1977 H. -ior S?b]ect: Jleteorology AN INVESTIGATION OF DUST STORM GENERATION IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS A Thesis by MARSHALL CONRAD POLLARD Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committ ) (Head of Department...

  14. Large-scale simulations of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Katharina; /JILA, Boulder /Fermilab; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; /Fermilab; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

  15. Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems Wednesday October 26, 2011, Babbio energy storage devices. Specifically, this talk discusses 1) the challenges for grid scale of emergent technologies with ultralow costs on new energy storage materials and mechanisms. Dr. Jun Liu

  16. QUENCHES IN LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, P.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QUENCHES IN LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS. P. H. Eberhard,Study of an Unprotected Superconducting Coil Going Normal,"Method for Testing Superconducting Magnets," LBL Physics

  17. Dilemmas of decline, risks of rise : the systemic and military sources of rising state strategy towards declining great powers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzkowitz Shifrinson, Joshua R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What explains variation in relatively rising state strategy towards declining great powers? This project develops and tests a theory of state strategy vis-a-vis declining great powers, termed Realist Decline Theory. Realist ...

  18. Investigation of MAGMA chambers in the Western Great Basin. Final report, 9 June 1982-31 October 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppin, W.A.

    1986-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes efforts made by the Seismological Laboratory toward the detection and delineation of shallow crustal zones in the western Great Basin, and toward the development of methods to accomplish such detection. The work centers around the recently-active volcanic center near Long Valley, California. The work effort is broken down into three tasks: (1) network operations, (2) data analysis and interpretation, and (3) the study of shallow crustal amomalies (magma bodies). Section (1) describes the efforts made to record thousand of earthquakes near the Long Valley caldera, and focusses on the results obtained for the November 1984 round Valley earthquake. Section (2) describes the major effort of this contract, which was to quantify the large volume of seismic data being recorded as it pertains to the goals of this contract. Efforts described herein include (1) analysis of earthquake focal mechanisms, and (2) the classification, categorization, and interpretation of unusual seismic phases in terms of reflections and refractions from shallow-crustal anomalous zones. Section (3) summarizes the status of our research to date on the locations of magma bodies, with particular emphasis on a location corresponding to the map location of the south end of Hilton Creek fault. Five lines of independent evidence suggest that magma might be associated with this spot. Finally, new evidence on the large magma bodies within the Long Valley caldera, of interest to the DOE deep drilling project, is presented.

  19. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Bieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project report details activities and results of the 'Market Characterization' project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as 'archetypes' by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market. Key research activities included; literature review, statistical analysis of national and regional data of the American Housing Survey (AHS) collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, analysis of Michigan specific data, development of a housing taxonomy of architectural styles, case studies of two local markets (i.e., Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids in Michigan) and development of a suggested framework (or process) for characterizing local markets. In order to gain a high level perspective, national and regional data from the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed using cross tabulations, multiple regression models, and logistic regression to characterize the housing stock and determine dominant house types using 21 variables.

  20. Thermodynamics of QCD at large quark chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Gerhold; Andreas Ipp; Anton Rebhan

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the existing weak-coupling results on the thermodynamic potential of deconfined QCD at small and large quark chemical potential and compare with results from lattice gauge theory as well as the exactly solvable case of large-N_f QCD. We also discuss the new analytical results on non-Fermi-liquid effects in entropy and specific heat as well as in dispersion laws of quark quasiparticles at large quark chemical potential.

  1. Towards a chronology of brownware pottery in the western Great Basin: A case study from owens valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eerkens, J W

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revisions in Archaeological Sequences of the Great Basin in Interior Southern California, Nevada Archaeological Survey Research Papers, 5,

  2. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  3. MIC 2009: The VIII Metaheuristics International Conference id-1 Non-Linear Great Deluge with Learning Mechanism for Solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    M IC 2009 MIC 2009: The VIII Metaheuristics International Conference id-1 Non-Linear Great Deluge acceptance criterion while Kendall and Mohamad [15] used the great deluge acceptance criterion. Hamburg In this paper, we propose an approach that uses a learning mechanism and a non-linear great deluge acceptance

  4. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration as a CUAHSI Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration.S., the Great Salt Lake Basin provides the opportunity to observe climate and human-induced land-surface changes relationship between people and water across the globe and make the Great Salt Lake Basin a microcosm

  5. Prebreakdown and breakdown phenomena in large oil gaps under AC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saker, A.; Gournay, P.; Lesaint, O.; Tobazeon, R. [CNRS, Grenoble (France). Lab. d`Electrostatique et de Materiaux Dielectriques; Trinh, N.G. [Inst. de Recherche d`Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Boisdon, C. [Jeumont-Schneider Transformateurs, Lyon (France)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study of prebreakdown and breakdown phenomena under AC voltage in mineral oil in large gaps to 60 cm. The investigations presented concern the study of streamers and the measurement of breakdown voltages in rod-plane and sphere-plane gaps. Also, the influence of a contamination by solid particles in the oil has been considered. A specific breakdown mode under AC voltage is evidenced, where bursts of streamers lead to the lowest breakdown fields recorded. Numerical values of the mean field in oil required for direct or burst breakdown modes are derived from the experiments. As a consequence, the great sensitivity to the presence of particles on EHV transformers insulation with large oil gaps is pointed out.

  6. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Kun Hyung [Korea Gas Corporation, Incheon, 406-130 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

  7. Investigation of the Impact of Aerosols on Clouds During May 2003 Intensive Operational Period at the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H.; Penner, J.E.; Herzog, M.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of aerosols on the clouds, or the so-called aerosol indirect effect (AIE), is highly uncertain (Penner et al. 2001). The estimation of the AIE can vary from 0.0 to -4.8 W/m2 in Global Climate Models (GCM). Therefore, it is very important to investigate these interactions and cloud-related physical processes further. The Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in May 2003 dedicated some effort towards the measurement of the Cloud Condensation Nucleus concentration (CCN) as a function of super-saturation and in relating CCN concentration to aerosol composition and size distribution. Furthermore, airborn measurement for the cloud droplet concentration was also available. Therefore this AIOP provides a good opportunity to examine the AIE. In this study, we use a Cloud Resolving Model (CRM), i.e., Active Tracer High-resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM), to discuss the effect of aerosol loadings on cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and concentration. The case we examine is a stratiform cloud that occurred on May 17, 2003.

  8. The Description of Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitman, Kent

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss the problems associated with the description and manipulation of large systems when their sources are not maintained as single fields. We show why and how tools that address these issues, such ...

  9. Analytic bootstrap at large spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apratim Kaviraj; Kallol Sen; Aninda Sinha

    2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We use analytic conformal bootstrap methods to determine the anomalous dimensions and OPE coefficients for large spin operators in general conformal field theories in four dimensions containing a scalar operator of conformal dimension $\\Delta_\\phi$. It is known that such theories will contain an infinite sequence of large spin operators with twists approaching $2\\Delta_\\phi+2n$ for each integer $n$. By considering the case where such operators are separated by a twist gap from other operators at large spin, we analytically determine the $n$, $\\Delta_\\phi$ dependence of the anomalous dimensions. We find that for all $n$, the anomalous dimensions are negative for $\\Delta_\\phi$ satisfying the unitarity bound, thus extending the Nachtmann theorem to non-zero $n$. In the limit when $n$ is large, we find agreement with the AdS/CFT prediction corresponding to the Eikonal limit of a 2-2 scattering with dominant graviton exchange.

  10. Analytic bootstrap at large spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaviraj, Apratim; Sinha, Aninda

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use analytic conformal bootstrap methods to determine the anomalous dimensions and OPE coefficients for large spin operators in general conformal field theories in four dimensions containing a scalar operator of conformal dimension $\\Delta_\\phi$. It is known that such theories will contain an infinite sequence of large spin operators with twists approaching $2\\Delta_\\phi+2n$ for each integer $n$. By considering the case where such operators are separated by a twist gap from other operators at large spin, we analytically determine the $n$, $\\Delta_\\phi$ dependence of the anomalous dimensions. We find that for all $n$, the anomalous dimensions are negative for $\\Delta_\\phi$ satisfying the unitarity bound, thus extending the Nachtmann theorem to non-zero $n$. In the limit when $n$ is large, we find agreement with the AdS/CFT prediction corresponding to the Eikonal limit of a 2-2 scattering with dominant graviton exchange.

  11. Large-scale pool fires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhaus, Thomas; Welch, Stephen; Carvel, Ricky O; Torero, Jose L

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of research into the burning behaviour of large pool fires and fuel spill fires is presented. The features which distinguish such fires from smaller pool fires are mainly associated with the fire dynamics at low ...

  12. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile element. Now, another use has been found: magnets. One would not expect pure...

  13. SuomiNet efforts in the U. S. Southern Great Plains.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R. A.; Carr, F. H.; Ahern, J. L.; Liljegren, J. C.; Eagan, R. C.; Smith, J. J.

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    SuomiNet provides great promise for advancing research at the University of Oklahoma in numerical weather prediction and plate tectonics studies, and will further help the U.S. DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Program better specify the measurement of water vapor over the Southern Great Plains. The SuomiNet program is also allowing ARM to upgrade its data collection infrastructure to provide more reliable and near real-time observations not only to SuomiNet but also to other researchers.

  14. Aging assessment of large electric motors in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villaran, M.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large electric motors serve as the prime movers to drive high capacity pumps, fans, compressors, and generators in a variety of nuclear plant systems. This study examined the stressors that cause degradation and aging in large electric motors operating in various plant locations and environments. The operating history of these machines in nuclear plant service was studied by review and analysis of failure reports in the NPRDS and LER databases. This was supplemented by a review of motor designs, and their nuclear and balance of plant applications, in order to characterize the failure mechanisms that cause degradation, aging, and failure in large electric motors. A generic failure modes and effects analysis for large squirrel cage induction motors was performed to identify the degradation and aging mechanisms affecting various components of these large motors, the failure modes that result, and their effects upon the function of the motor. The effects of large motor failures upon the systems in which they are operating, and on the plant as a whole, were analyzed from failure reports in the databases. The effectiveness of the industry`s large motor maintenance programs was assessed based upon the failure reports in the databases and reviews of plant maintenance procedures and programs.

  15. Is there a large risk of radiation? A critical review of pessimistic claims

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shihab-Eldin, A.; Shlyakhter, A.; Wilson, R. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of situations where it has been claimed that moderate radiation doses cause leukemia or other cancers are carefully reviewed. We look at cases in the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union. Usually it can be demonstrated that there is an alternative, more probable, explanation for the effect seen. In several cases the authors of the papers have fallen into statistical traps. The most frequent is a posteriori selection of cohort boundaries in both space and time: a trap illustrated dramatically by Feynman. The next most common trap is to arbitrarily select one out of many ways of looking at the data, against which we were warned by Tippett. Several cohorts are compared with respect to the number of persons at risk, average dose, and the number of cancers expected. Of these, only the cohort of A-bomb survivors in Japan and the recently unclassified data on the very large occupational doses for early Soviet nuclear workers at Chelyabinsk provide evidence of clearly visible excess cancers.

  16. Is there a large risk of radiation A critical review of pessimistic claims

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shihab-Eldin, A.; Shlyakhter, A.; Wilson, R. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of situations where it has been claimed that moderate radiation doses cause leukemia or other cancers are carefully reviewed. We look at cases in the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union. Usually it can be demonstrated that there is an alternative, more probable, explanation for the effect seen. In several cases the authors of the papers have fallen into statistical traps. The most frequent is a posteriori selection of cohort boundaries in both space and time: a trap illustrated dramatically by Feynman. The next most common trap is to arbitrarily select one out of many ways of looking at the data, against which we were warned by Tippett. Several cohorts are compared with respect to the number of persons at risk, average dose, and the number of cancers expected. Of these, only the cohort of A-bomb survivors in Japan and the recently unclassified data on the very large occupational doses for early Soviet nuclear workers at Chelyabinsk provide evidence of clearly visible excess cancers.

  17. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  18. Classification of Annual Great Lakes Ice Cycles: Winters of 19732002* RAYMOND A. ASSEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classification of Annual Great Lakes Ice Cycles: Winters of 1973­2002* RAYMOND A. ASSEL National (Manuscript received 12 July 2004, in final form 13 June 2005) ABSTRACT Annual seasonal average ice cover from 1973 to 2002 and associated dates of first ice, last ice, and ice duration are presented and discussed

  19. Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice-Ocean Model) in Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice- Ocean Model) in Lake Erie Primary of the ice-ocean models, assistance with development of project reports and scientific presentations will first start the implementation of the CIOM in Lake Erie, assemble satellite observations of ice cover

  20. IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RAYMOND A. ASSEL US. Department to project daily mean basin ice cover and annual ice cover duration for Lakes Superior and Erie. Models were), and the Oregon State University (OSU)general circulationmodels. Ice cover estimateswere made for the West

  1. ANIMATION OF THE NORMAL ICE CYCLE OF THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES OF NORTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANIMATION OF THE NORMAL ICE CYCLE OF THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES OF NORTH AMERICA R.A. Assel and J describes an interactive menu- driven computer tutorial on the contemporary ice cover climatology information on ice cover data and analysis, and the second text module contains a generalized description

  2. [ ]May 2014 Portland cement concrete (PCC) overlays have been used with great success in many locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    accelerated pavement testing on bonded concrete overlay pavements to be constructed at the Pavement Research testing; evaluate the structural bearing capacity of the concrete overlay pavement structures[ ]May 2014 PROBLEM Portland cement concrete (PCC) overlays have been used with great success

  3. Lack of conservation effort rapidly increases African great ape extinction risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Leipzig, Germany 3 Fauna Flora International 4 Wildlife Conservation Society 5 Garamba National ParkLETTER Lack of conservation effort rapidly increases African great ape extinction risk Sandra, Democratic Republic of Congo 6 Ghana Wildlife Society 7 Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria 8

  4. Planet. Space Sri. Vol. 30, No. 8. pp.&g-854, 1982 Printed in Great Britain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    Planet. Space Sri. Vol. 30, No. 8. pp.&g-854, 1982 Printed in Great Britain. 0032-0533/82/08084946s, and the Lyman-alpha dayglow of Saturn when analyzed in conjunction with photochemical models of the hydrocarbons and energy budget, of the upper atmospheric composition and thermal structure of Jupiter (Atreya, Donahue

  5. Planet. Space Sci., Vol. 37, No. I, pp. 109-129, 1989 Printed in Great Britain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    spectra and model predictions. Differences occur at low energies (below 500 eV) in the structurePlanet. Space Sci., Vol. 37, No. I, pp. 109-129, 1989 Printed in Great Britain. ANGULAR DEPENDENT scattering of electrons resulting in changes of pitch angle, and degradation in energy as the electrons

  6. Ultrafast Switching of Coherent Electronic Excitation: Great Promise for Reaction Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    With the advent of femtosecond laser pulses the temporal aspect of the interplay of light and molecular dynamics pulses [4] are the suitable tools to exert microscopic control on molecular dynamics at the quantum levelUltrafast Switching of Coherent Electronic Excitation: Great Promise for Reaction Control

  7. On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques Alfredo Pe~na1 by the wind energy industry due to the high sensitivity that the wind characteristics have on the performance Dong energy, Dong Energy, Kraftværksvej 53, DK-7000, Fredericia, Denmark e-mail: alfredo

  8. People love watching TV and going to the movies. This is great news for multimedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, John

    People love watching TV and going to the movies. This is great news for multimedia researchers that rarely gets addressed in the research is, Why do people love to consume TV programs and movies? Current, which lift them out of their ordinary exis- tence. Viewers develop strong attachments

  9. Using Open Source Geospatial Tools to Create OSM Web Services for Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    OSM­GB OSM­GB Using Open Source Geospatial Tools to Create OSM Web Services for Great Britain A use case of integrating a variety of open-source geospatial tools is presented in this paper of the volunteer nature of the commu- nity, many open-source geospatial tools have been developed around OSM

  10. Anthony Wayne: The History and Archaeology of an Early Great Lakes Steamboat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, Bradley Alan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Lakes side-wheel steamboat Anthony Wayne was built in 1837 at Perrysburg, OH and participated in lakes shipping during a time when such vessels were experiencing their heyday. Designed as a passenger and cargo carrier, the steamer spent 13...

  11. AIR QUALITY: ODOR, DUST, AND GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM CONCENTRATED FEEDING OPERATIONS IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    standards are imposed. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, West Texas A&M University, Texas IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS NON TECHNICAL SUMMARY: Texas and Kansas are the nation's largest cattle at cattle feedlots and dairies in Northwest Texas and Southwest Kansas. They will test alternative surface

  12. www.carbon-business.com 67 THERE'S REALLY NOT a great deal of guidance for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    thirty BELC companies and developed a model for business to address climate change as a business problem and operations, the sustainable consumption of resources, improving the efficiencies of processes and methodswww.carbon-business.com 67 THERE'S REALLY NOT a great deal of guidance for business when it comes

  13. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to test the strengths and limitations of cloud boundary retrievals from radiosonde profiles, 4 yearsComparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains radiosonde-based methods applied to 200 m resolution profiles obtained at the same site. The lidar

  14. GRC Transactions, Vol. 31, 2007 Geothermal, energy resources, Great Basin, GPS, geodesy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GRC Transactions, Vol. 31, 2007 391 Keywords Geothermal, energy resources, Great Basin, GPS, and will be incorporated in future models. Introduction Geothermal energy resources have long been associated of active crustal deformation and its spatial relationship to active geothermal systems in the northern

  15. Observations of erosion of in-bed tubes in the Great Lake AFBC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantesaria, P.P.; Jukkola, G.D.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Erosion measurements have been made on evaporator tubes, superheater tubes and front wall tubes in the atmospheric, fluidised-bed combustor, demonstration plant at Great Lakes Naval Base, Chicago. A brief indication of the results obtained is given. High erosion rates on vertical tube surfaces were attributed to the tendency of bubbles rising through the bed to follow preferred paths along the vertical surfaces.

  16. www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great The Nuclear on keeping costs and book length in check. For example, most of the graphics use gray- scale, with only a few pages in the cen- ter providing color plates. In addition, in many places additional graphics could have

  17. Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven -NOAA GLERL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven - NOAA elicited concern by fishery managers and commercial fishermen. We propose to use bioenergetics modeling that are contributing to declines in fish growth is bioenergetics modeling. We recently evaluated and modified

  18. Anthony Wayne: The History and Archaeology of an Early Great Lakes Steamboat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, Bradley Alan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Lakes side-wheel steamboat Anthony Wayne was built in 1837 at Perrysburg, OH and participated in lakes shipping during a time when such vessels were experiencing their heyday. Designed as a passenger and cargo carrier, the steamer spent 13...

  19. Capital improvements can contribute greatly to an airport's future success, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    description, cost estimate, federal programming sheets (available at www.mnaero.com), and start date. FederalCapital improvements can contribute greatly to an airport's future success, but they require a serious financial commit- ment by the airport owner. Planning ahead for capital improvements is critical

  20. The discovery of topological insulators and possible topological superconductors has greatly expanded research into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    The discovery of topological insulators and possible topological superconductors has greatly Superconductor, a Copper-doped Topological Insulator: Cu1/4Bi2Se3 Ben J. Lawson1, Y. S. Hor2, J. Mannhart3, Lu Li in CuxBi2Se3 and its implications for pairing in the undoped topological insulator" PRL, 104, 057001

  1. Director, MIT Libraries A great benefit of involvement in the planning for MIT's 150th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Martin

    Director, MIT Libraries A great benefit of involvement in the planning for MIT's 150th anniversary, and then sustain, MIT's novel and visionary educational philosophy of "Mens et Manus." MIT's future- oriented a university library system that is, like MIT itself, inventive and forward looking. From an early expectation

  2. Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    LETTERS Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event Kurt O a decline in the molar nickel to iron ratio recorded in banded iron formations about 2.7 Gyr ago, which we attribute to a reduced flux of nickel to the oceans, a consequence of cooling upper-mantle temperatures

  3. Race and Male Employment in the Wake of the Great Recession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Race and Male Employment in the Wake of the Great Recession: Black Male Employment Rates by this Center), nearly half of working-age black males were not employed in many inner city neighborhoods.1 another devastating blow to inner city economies and the employment prospects of African American males

  4. AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL SPECIATION MONITOR Yin-Nan Lee1 , Fan Mei1 , Stephanie DeJong1 , Anne Jefferson2 1 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

  5. GREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERMITTENCY POWER ELECTRONICS EFFICIENCY INFRASTRUCTURE CODES & STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY MANAGE- MENT GRIDGREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts-55080 #12;GREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Electric Vehicle Grid Integration 2 Cross Cutting

  6. Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping° to 60° for all polarizations, was processed to radar cross-section to establish a library of signatures (look-up table) for different ice types. The library is used in the computer classifica- tion

  7. Tycho Brahe made observations of the motions of the planets from his great observatory on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tycho Brahe made observations of the motions of the planets from his great observatory,and understood the importance of random and systematic errors in his observations. In 1600Tycho Brahe employed such a diligent observer inTycho Brahe that his observations convicted this Ptolemaic calculation of an error of 8

  8. Book Reviews 93 2012 Center for Great Plains Studies, University of NebraskaLincoln

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldridge, Cameron

    of disturbed sites. While alternative or renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, and biofuels appearBook Reviews 93 © 2012 Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska­Lincoln Energy Development and Wildlife Conservation in Western North America. Edited by David E. Naugle. Foreword by Mark S

  9. Histology of Herniations through the Body Wall and Cuticle of Zooplankton from the Laurentian Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; §Department of Pathology, Veterans Administration Medical and then preserved. A fresh sam- ple was collected from Lake Michigan at 3 m on 2 June 1999, placed on ice Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105; and Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, National Oceanic

  10. Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was developed to assess to what degree landscapes represent a natural state. Protected areas are often regarded Land-use history Á Land-use change Á Naturalness Á Logging Á Great Lakes Á Protected areas Introduction the question to what degree protected areas represent a natural state. To assess this question conservation

  11. Energy Budget-Based Simulation of Evapotranspiration from Land in the Great Lakes Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Budget-Based Simulation of Evapotranspiration from Land in the Great Lakes Basin Primary-available data for change in net radiative energy for land surfaces in the same region in the same general energy available in this region according to the corresponding GCM. Thus there is a mismatch: While air

  12. THE GREAT DEBATE: STARBURSTS AS THE ENERGY SOURCE OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Robert D.

    THE GREAT DEBATE: STARBURSTS AS THE ENERGY SOURCE OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES R. D. JOSEPH response (from someone aged less than 30 yr) will be, "Wow! Cool!" On the other hand, if you reply, "I am as the principal and dominant energy source in ULIRGs. 2. Evidence that ULIRGS Are Predominantly Powered by Star

  13. Modeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    . Introduction Linkages between atmospheric carbon dioxide and global thermal properties have forcedModeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake the examination of biospheric carbon flows and pools. Variability in carbon storage or the net ecosystem exchange

  14. VIEW OFPASSAIC FALLS by W. H. Bartlett, 1840 FOSSIL GREAT LAKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Paul E.

    to Field Trips,52nd Ann. Mtg.New York State Geology Association, Newark College of Arts and SciencesVIEW OFPASSAIC FALLS by W. H. Bartlett, 1840 FOSSIL GREAT LAKES OF THE NEWARK SUPERGROUP IN NEW JERSEY Paul E. Olsen From: W. Manspeizer (ed.),1980,Field Studies in New Jersey Geology and Guide

  15. Southern Great Plains Expansion of Glyphosate Resistant Brassica Napus L.: Management and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Alfredo

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    , as well as control of volunteer/weed B. napus in wheat cropping systems that have been incorporated in the southern latitudes of the Great Plains. A secondary objective was the refinement and potential implementation of a new precision farming tool...

  16. The Great Lakes at a Crossroads Preparing for a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /index.html Communication Tactics for Climate Change: www.futerra.co.uk/downloads/NewRules:NewGame.pdf Union of ConcernedThe Great Lakes at a Crossroads Preparing for a Changing Climate International Association Climate Change Science 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report: www

  17. great basin naturalist 502 1990 ppap 121 134 FOLIAGE BIOMASS AND COVER relationships BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inin the great basin and southwest both species are aggressive and can nearly eliminate the previous the range of site conditions sampled treetiee dominated plots varied by about two to one cover inin shrub twototwotroto to one total foliage biomass inin both tree and shrub dominated plots correlated best

  18. Drought experience and cavitation resistance in six shrubs from the Great Basin, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacke, Uwe

    Drought experience and cavitation resistance in six shrubs from the Great Basin, Utah Uwe G. Hacke capability of the xylem. This is due to drought-induced cavitation. We used the centrifuge method to measure the vulnerability of root and stem xylem to cavitation in six native shrub species. The shrubs fall into three

  19. Trends in Job Quality during the Great Recession: a Comparative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Décembre 2012 Trends in Job Quality during the Great Recession: a Comparative Approach for the EU, Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière, Janine Leschke, Andrew Watt 161-1 Document de travail #12;#12;Trends in Job publication : Jean-Louis Dayan ISSN 1629-7997 ISBN 978-2-11-129831-6 #12;TRENDS IN JOB QUALITY DURING

  20. Monitoring Creatures Great and Small: ComputerVision Systems for Looking at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Greg

    Monitoring Creatures Great and Small: ComputerVision Systems for Looking at Grizzly Bears, Fish'iinlii Njik Park #12;Bearcam · Bearcam system recorded approx. 4h video per day for 15 days #12;Bear Detection background subtraction and gradient features pos. gradient ht(x) = pt ft(x)

  1. Estimating the return times of great Himalayan earthquakes in eastern Nepal: Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinger, Yann

    Estimating the return times of great Himalayan earthquakes in eastern Nepal: Evidence from the Patu, Kathmandu, Nepal, 3 Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore not documented the occurrence of several similar events at the same location. In east central Nepal, however

  2. Technical Report: Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Great Lakes Protection Fund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, Robert J.

    1 Technical Report: Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Great Lakes Protection (TTR). In mammals, TTR is a T4-specific binding protein. However, in nonmammalian species, TTR binds 3 competitive binding assays with several PCB congeners or hydroxylated PCBs to determine whether they exhibit

  3. Large aperture optical switching devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1983-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new approach to constructing large aperture optical switches for next generation inertial confinement fusion lasers. A transparent plasma electrode formed in low pressure ionized gas acts as a conductive coating to allow the uniform charging of the optical faces of an electro-optic material. In this manner large electric fields can be applied longitudinally to large aperture, high aspect ratio Pockels cells. We propose a four-electrode geometry to create the necessary high conductivity plasma sheets, and have demonstrated fast (less than 10 nsec) switching in a 5x5 cm aperture KD*P Pockels cell with such a design. Detaid modelling of Pockels cell performance with plasma electrodes has been carried out for 15 and 30 cm aperture designs.

  4. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLand andComputingLargeLarge

  5. Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Singh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute Gwahangno 113, Yu-seong-gu, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (B{sub x}) of 100?G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (B{sub z} ? 6.2?G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1?G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (n{sub e} ? 2 × 10{sup 11}?cm{sup ?3} and T{sub e} ? 2?eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50?and?600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

  6. Can fermions save large N dimensional reduction?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo F. Bedaque; Michael I. Buchoff; Aleksey Cherman; Roxanne P. Springer

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores whether Eguchi-Kawai reduction for gauge theories with adjoint fermions is valid. The Eguchi-Kawai reduction relates gauge theories in different numbers of dimensions in the large $N$ limit provided that certain conditions are met. In principle, this relation opens up the possibility of learning about the dynamics of 4D gauge theories through techniques only available in lower dimensions. Dimensional reduction can be understood as a special case of large $N$ equivalence between theories related by an orbifold projection. In this work, we focus on the simplest case of dimensional reduction, relating a 4D gauge theory to a 3D gauge theory via an orbifold projection. A necessary condition for the large N equivalence between the 4D and 3D theories to hold is that certain discrete symmetries in the two theories must not be broken spontaneously. In pure 4D Yang-Mills theory, these symmetries break spontaneously as the size of one of the spacetime dimensions shrinks. An analysis of the effect of adjoint fermions on the relevant symmetries of the 4D theory shows that the fermions help stabilize the symmetries. We consider the same problem from the point of view of the lower dimensional 3D theory and find that, surprisingly, adjoint fermions are not generally enough to stabilize the necessary symmetries of the 3D theory. In fact, a rich phase diagram arises, with a complicated pattern of symmetry breaking. We discuss the possible causes and consequences of this finding.

  7. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Building Survey Information Database of Buildings over 100 Energy Systems: Productivity and Building Science Program. This program was funded by the California of Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Project Management: Cathy Higgins, Program Director for New Buildings

  8. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work reported included analysis of pentad (5 day) averaged data, proposal of a hypothesis concerning the key role of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains, analysis of recurrent super-synoptic evolution of the Great Plains low-level jet, and study of pentad evolution of the 1988 drought and 1993 flood over the Great Plains from a NARR perspective on the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance.

  9. Addressing the Impact of Temperature Extremes on Large Format Li-Ion Batteries for Vehicle Applications (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the effects of temperature on large format lithium-ion batteries in electric drive vehicles.

  10. Numerical methods for the solution of large and very large, sparse Lyapunov equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodel, A.S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation the author considers the numerical solution of large (100 {le} n {le} 1000) and very large (n {ge} 1000), sparse Lyapunov equations AX-+ XA' + Q = 0. The author first presents a parallel version of the Hammarling algorithm for the solution of Lyapunov equations where the coefficient matrix A is large and dense. The author then presents a novel parallel algorithm for the solution of Lyapunov equations where A is large and banded. A detailed analysis of the computational requirements in tandem with the results of numerical experiments with these algorithms on an Alliant FX-8 multiprocessor is provided. In the second half of this dissertation, the author considers the numerical solution of Lyapunov equations where the coefficient matrix A is very large and sparse. Under these conditions, the solution X of the Lyapunov equation is typically full rank and dense. The associated excessive storage requirements compel us to compute low rank approximations of the solution X of the Lyapunov equation. The author presents in detail two methods for the low rank approximate solution of the Lyapunov equation. The first method, Trace Maximization, computes an orthogonal matrix V {element of}{Re}{sup n{times}k} that maximizes the trace of the solution {Sigma}{sub V} of the associated reduced order Lyapunov equation (V'AV){Sigma}{sub V} + {Sigma}{sub V}(V'A'V) + V'QV = 0. While Trace Maximization is an effective method for low rank approximation of explicitly specified Hermitian matrices, the author shows that Trace Maximization is not an effective strategy for low rank approximation of positive semidefinite Hermitian matrices X that are implicitly specified as the solution of a Lyapunov equation. Our second algorithm for low rank approximate solution of Lyapunov equations, Approximate Power Iteration, attempts to directly compute an orthogonal basis of the dominant eigenspace of the solution X.

  11. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76 George A. Leshkevich.2 Data Analysis 2 3. DATA PRESENTATION 4 3.1 Freezing Degree-Days 4 3.2 Composite Ice Charts 4 4. DISCUSSION 4 4.1 Winter Characteristics 4 4.2 General Seasonal Trends in Ice-Cover Distribution 5 4.3 Lake

  12. Reproductive Peformance of Great Egrets (Ardea alba) at High Island, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnes, Andrew

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and Baxter 1991), Brazil (de Toledo 2000), Mexico (Gladstone 1979), and Rhodesia (Tomlinson 1976). The Great Egret?an Ardeidae (Ardea alba) in the order Ciconiiformes along with ibises, spoonbills, storks, and others?is a common wading bird along...). As such, quality foraging habitat proximal to breeding colonies is an important aspect driving the general health of colonial wading birds (Custer and Galli 2002); nesting wading birds are constrained to forage relatively close to the colony; therefore...

  13. Images of Moby-Dick: An exhibition of editions of Herman Melville's great novel of whaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : University Press of Kansas, 1995), the culmination of many years of study of Melville's great novel by Elizabeth A. Schultz, professor of English at the University of Kansas. Herman Melville's Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, a work which fills the mind's eye... of Moby-Dick presents a selection of these illustrated editions, collected by Professor Schultz during her study of Moby-Dick and now generously donated to the Kenneth Spencer Research Library. Professor Schultz's gift collection, supplemented here...

  14. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  15. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  16. Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  17. Modeling a Dry Etch Process for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.J.; Hebner, G.A.; Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been considerable interest in developing dry processes which can effectively replace wet processing in the manufacture of large area photovoltaic devices. Environmental and health issues are a driver for this activity because wet processes generally increase worker exposure to toxic and hazardous chemicals and generate large volumes of liquid hazardous waste. Our work has been directed toward improving the performance of screen-printed solar cells while using plasma processing to reduce hazardous chemical usage.

  18. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  19. The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the engineering and design of additional in-stream and bank restoration, and the treatment of invasive speciesThe health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration opportunities exist to protect and restore critical elements of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Habitat and Wildlife

  20. Stabilization of Large Scale Structure by Adhesive Gravitational Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Buchert

    1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between gravitational and dispersive forces in a multi-streamed medium leads to an effect which is exposed in the present note as the genuine driving force of stabilization of large-scale structure. The conception of `adhesive gravitational clustering' is advanced to interlock the fairly well-understood epoch of formation of large-scale structure and the onset of virialization into objects that are dynamically in equilibrium with their large-scale structure environment. The classical `adhesion model' is opposed to a class of more general models traced from the physical origin of adhesion in kinetic theory.

  1. Sub-metering to Electricity Use in Large-scale Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~240Hotel251218113~129Office Building181118103~119government office building4582775~89 #0;?#0;? Great Difference between each type Sub-metering and statistics to electricity use in commercial buildings 5 Situation of Energy consumption in Large...Sub-metering to Electricity Use in Large-scale Commercial Buildings Wang YuanTsinghua University2006.11 Sub-metering and statistics to electricity use in commercial buildings 2 Index #0;?#0;? Situation of Energy consumption in commercial buildings...

  2. LARGE FORCE SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY LINEAR ACTUATOR JOS R. SANTIAGO ANADN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    LARGE FORCE SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY LINEAR ACTUATOR By JOSÉ R. SANTIAGO ANADÓN A THESIS PRESENTED ............................................................................................................1 Shape Memory Basics........................................................................................... 5 The Shape Memory Effect

  3. Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite for wind retrieval over the Great Lakes on a daily basis. We use data acquired by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT (QSCAT) satellite launched in June 1999 to derive wind speeds and directions over

  4. 1914-1918: The Death Throes of Civilisation. The elites of Latin America face the Great War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 1914-1918: The Death Throes of Civilisation. The elites of Latin America face the Great War less on the two world wars than on two turning points that mark a true break in continuity in the sub.1 The natural conclusion of this approach is that the Great War did not have the same formative role in Latin

  5. Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F. Schaefer b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gido, Keith B.

    Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F 66506, USA b Department of Biology, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62026 in Oklahoma and Kansas to examine spatial patterns of species invasions in the Great Plains region of the US

  6. Trophic Transfer of Atmospheric and Sedimentary Contaminants into Great Lakes Fish: Control on Ecosystem Scale Response Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Administration (FDA) advisory level is problematic. The persistence of PCBs in Great Lakes fish has led some in the Great Lakes is a natural consequence of internal recycling and continental scale atmospheric exchange atmospheric deposition) and 'in-place' (i.e., recycling from contaminated sediments) sources of contaminants

  7. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system.

  8. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) is aiming at the detection of the high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) in high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). WCD at high altitude offer a unique possibility of detecting low gamma fluxes in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV range. The status of the Observatory and data collected from 2007 to date will be presented.

  9. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowland toShade Landscaping forandLarge

  10. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLand andComputingLarge

  11. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLandLarge Magnetization at

  12. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLandLarge Magnetization

  13. Extra-Large Memory Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecularGE, Ford, University ofExtra-Large

  14. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyde, Roderick A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  15. The Expanded Very Large Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perley, R; Jackson, J; Butler, B; Carlson, B; Fort, D; Dewdney, P; Clark, B; Hayward, R; Durand, S; Revnell, M; McKinnon, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In almost 30 years of operation, the Very Large Array (VLA) has proved to be a remarkably flexible and productive radio telescope. However, the basic capabilities of the VLA have changed little since it was designed. A major expansion utilizing modern technology is currently underway to improve the capabilities of the VLA by at least an order of magnitude in both sensitivity and in frequency coverage. The primary elements of the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) project include new or upgraded receivers for continuous frequency coverage from 1 to 50 GHz, new local oscillator, intermediate frequency, and wide bandwidth data transmission systems to carry signals with 16 GHz total bandwidth from each antenna, and a new digital correlator with the capability to process this bandwidth with an unprecedented number of frequency channels for an imaging array. Also included are a new monitor and control system and new software that will provide telescope ease of use. Scheduled for completion in 2012, the EVLA will prov...

  16. The ionized and hot gas in M17 SW: SOFIA/GREAT THz observations of [C II] and 12CO J=13-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Beaupuits, J P; Ossenkopf, V; Stutzki, J; Guesten, R; Simon, R; Huebers, H -W; Ricken, O; Sandell, G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With new THz maps that cover an area of ~3.3x2.1 pc^2 we probe the spatial distribution and association of the ionized, neutral and molecular gas components in the M17 SW nebula. We used the dual band receiver GREAT on board the SOFIA airborne telescope to obtain a 5'.7x3'.7 map of the 12CO J=13-12 transition and the [C II] 158 um fine-structure line in M17 SW and compare the spectroscopically resolved maps with corresponding ground-based data for low- and mid-J CO and [C I] emission. For the first time SOFIA/GREAT allow us to compare velocity-resolved [C II] emission maps with molecular tracers. We see a large part of the [C II] emission, both spatially and in velocity, that is completely non-associated with the other tracers of photon-dominated regions (PDR). Only particular narrow channel maps of the velocity-resolved [C II] spectra show a correlation between the different gas components, which is not seen at all in the integrated intensity maps. These show different morphology in all lines but give hardly...

  17. Storage and retrieval of large digital images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradley, J.N.

    1998-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Image compression and viewing are implemented with (1) a method for performing DWT-based compression on a large digital image with a computer system possessing a two-level system of memory and (2) a method for selectively viewing areas of the image from its compressed representation at multiple resolutions and, if desired, in a client-server environment. The compression of a large digital image I(x,y) is accomplished by first defining a plurality of discrete tile image data subsets T{sub ij}(x,y) that, upon superposition, form the complete set of image data I(x,y). A seamless wavelet-based compression process is effected on I(x,y) that is comprised of successively inputting the tiles T{sub ij}(x,y) in a selected sequence to a DWT routine, and storing the resulting DWT coefficients in a first primary memory. These coefficients are periodically compressed and transferred to a secondary memory to maintain sufficient memory in the primary memory for data processing. The sequence of DWT operations on the tiles T{sub ij}(x,y) effectively calculates a seamless DWT of I(x,y). Data retrieval consists of specifying a resolution and a region of I(x,y) for display. The subset of stored DWT coefficients corresponding to each requested scene is determined and then decompressed for input to an inverse DWT, the output of which forms the image display. The repeated process whereby image views are specified may take the form an interaction with a computer pointing device on an image display from a previous retrieval. 6 figs.

  18. Storage and retrieval of large digital images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradley, Jonathan N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Image compression and viewing are implemented with (1) a method for performing DWT-based compression on a large digital image with a computer system possessing a two-level system of memory and (2) a method for selectively viewing areas of the image from its compressed representation at multiple resolutions and, if desired, in a client-server environment. The compression of a large digital image I(x,y) is accomplished by first defining a plurality of discrete tile image data subsets T.sub.ij (x,y) that, upon superposition, form the complete set of image data I(x,y). A seamless wavelet-based compression process is effected on I(x,y) that is comprised of successively inputting the tiles T.sub.ij (x,y) in a selected sequence to a DWT routine, and storing the resulting DWT coefficients in a first primary memory. These coefficients are periodically compressed and transferred to a secondary memory to maintain sufficient memory in the primary memory for data processing. The sequence of DWT operations on the tiles T.sub.ij (x,y) effectively calculates a seamless DWT of I(x,y). Data retrieval consists of specifying a resolution and a region of I(x,y) for display. The subset of stored DWT coefficients corresponding to each requested scene is determined and then decompressed for input to an inverse DWT, the output of which forms the image display. The repeated process whereby image views are specified may take the form an interaction with a computer pointing device on an image display from a previous retrieval.

  19. Iron (III) Chloride doping of large-area chemical vapor deposition graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical doping is an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. This thesis aims to develop an effective method of doping large area Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) graphene using Iron (III) Chloride ...

  20. Regional efforts through the IJC to address contaminated bottom-sediment problems in the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kizlauskas, A.G.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Joint Commission (IJC) is a binational (United States and Canada) organization that was established under the Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909. In 1978, the two countries signed a Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, pursuant to the Boundary Waters Treaty. Carrying out the provisions of this Agreement, the United States and Canada, through the IJC, are addressing the problem of contaminated bottom sediments both in the traditional context of dredging projects and in the newer context of the potentially harmful environmental impacts of contaminated bottom sediments, even in the absence of dredging activity.

  1. Evolution of a mafic volcanic field in the central Great Basin, south central Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Naumann, T. R.; Smith, E. I.; Bradshaw, T. K.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1996-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    2 (basanites and hawaiites) is more restricted (0.7035 - 0.7037, Figure 10). Neodymium isotopes are also more variable in basalts of episode I than episode 2, though the differences are not as great as for Sr (Figure 10). A similar pattern can... Sr=850 ppm .  Nd=10 ppm _ Xl Nd=85) . I I I I I I I 0.70800 0.71000 Figure 12. Neodymium-Sr isotope correlation diagram for Reveille Range basalts with binary mixing lines between low 87Sr/86Sr episode 2 basalts (hawaiites and basanites...

  2. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  3. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartment of EnergyEnergy DraftEnergy 8: Upper Great

  4. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  5. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  6. Visualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrew

    that are now considered the "lenses" for examining large-scale data. THE LARGE-SCALE DATA VISUALIZATIONVisualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data Jason Leigh1 , Andrew Johnson1 , Luc Renambot1 representation of data and the interactive manipulation and querying of the visualization. Large-scale data

  7. Analysis of large urban fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.A.; Takata, A.N.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fires in urban areas caused by a nuclear burst are analyzed as a first step towards determining their smoke-generation chacteristics, which may have grave implications for global-scale climatic consequences. A chain of events and their component processes which would follow a nuclear attack are described. A numerical code is currently being developed to calculate ultimately the smoke production rate for a given attack scenario. Available models for most of the processes are incorporated into the code. Sample calculations of urban fire-development history performed in the code for an idealized uniform city are presented. Preliminary results indicate the importance of the wind, thermal radiation transmission, fuel distributions, and ignition thresholds on the urban fire spread characteristics. Future plans are to improve the existing models and develop new ones to characterize smoke production from large urban fires. 21 references, 18 figures.

  8. Effective fracture geometry obtained with large water sand ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Amrendra

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -Pressure z Compressibility Factor viii t Time M Molecular Weight R Gas Constant T Temperature Pi Initial Reservoir Pressure q Flow Rate qsc Flow Rate at Standard Condition B Formation Volume Factor Bg Formation Gas Volume Factor Gp Cumulative... be solved with two boundaries and one initial condition. iprp =)0,( (Initial Condition) (2.34) h qB r prk wrr r pi ? 2=? ? = (Constant Rate Inner Boundary...

  9. Studies of the Scott effect using large magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, Raiford Mill

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the ccils ?ere wound in pairs on copper pipe coil-forms, which are 1. 651 cm wide and have an inside radius of 3. 805 cm. Fach form has six 0. 3. 75 cm slots equally spaced around the circumference. The remaining coils were wound on an aluminum knockout... and soldered together at the inside turn. Those wound on the copper forms were soldered to the form itself. Two coils form a single pancake with a nominal room tempera- ture resistance of 1. 56 ohms. The total resistance of the magnet at liquid nitrogen...

  10. Large multiple resonance of magnetoelectric effect in a multiferroic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ernie

    applications in various smart devices and systems, e.g. antennas, energy harvesters, magnetic sensors, current microwave devices, such as antennas. ß 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1 Introduction

  11. Photovoltaics effective capacity: Interim final report 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R.; Seals, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors provide solid evidence, based on more than 8 million data points, that regional photovoltaic (PV) effective capacity is largely unrelated to the region`s solar resource. They confirm, however, that effective capacity is strongly related to load-shape characteristics. The load-shape effective-capacity relationship appears to be valid for end-use loads as small as 100 kW, except possibly in the case of electrically heated buildings. This relationship was used as a tool to produce a US map of PV`s effective capacity. The regions of highest effective capacities include (1) the central US from the northern Great Plains to the metropolitan areas of Chicago and Detroit, down to the lower Mississippi Valley, (2) California and western Arizona, and (3) the northeast metropolitan corridor. The features of this map are considerably different from the traditional solar resource maps. They tend to reflect the socio-economic and climatic factors that indirectly drive PV`s effective capacity: e.g., commercial air-conditioning, little use of electric heat, and strong summer heat waves. The map provides a new and significant insight to a comprehensive valuation of the PV resource. The authors assembled preliminary evidence showing that end-use load type may be related to PV`s effective capacity. Highest effective capacities were found for (nonelectrically heated) office buildings, followed by hospitals. Lowest capacities were found for airports and residences. Many more data points are needed, however, to ascertain and characterize these preliminary findings.

  12. Prototype Vector Machine for Large Scale Semi-Supervised Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Kai; Kwok, James T.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Practicaldataminingrarelyfalls exactlyinto the supervisedlearning scenario. Rather, the growing amount of unlabeled data poses a big challenge to large-scale semi-supervised learning (SSL). We note that the computationalintensivenessofgraph-based SSLarises largely from the manifold or graph regularization, which in turn lead to large models that are dificult to handle. To alleviate this, we proposed the prototype vector machine (PVM), a highlyscalable,graph-based algorithm for large-scale SSL. Our key innovation is the use of"prototypes vectors" for effcient approximation on both the graph-based regularizer and model representation. The choice of prototypes are grounded upon two important criteria: they not only perform effective low-rank approximation of the kernel matrix, but also span a model suffering the minimum information loss compared with the complete model. We demonstrate encouraging performance and appealing scaling properties of the PVM on a number of machine learning benchmark data sets.

  13. Contamination of stream fishes with chlorinated hydrocarbons from eggs of Great Lakes salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merna, J.W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. have been stocked in the Great Lakes where they accumulate body burdens of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The transport of these contaminants to resident communities in spawning streams was studied in two tributaries of Lake Michigan accessible to anadromous spawners and one control tributary blocked to them. No polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT, or dieldrin were detected in the sediments or biota of the control stream, or in sediments of the test streams. However, trout Salmo spp. and, to a lesser extent, sculpins Cottus spp. accumulated PCBs and DDT as a result of eating contaminated salmon eggs. Eggs constituted as much as 87% (by weight) of the total stomach contents of trout collected during the salmon spawning season early October to early January. Salmon eggs contained 0.46-9.50 mg PCBs/kg,. and 0.14-1.80 mg DDT/kg. Consumption of eggs varied greatly among individual trout, and there was a strong correlation between numbers of eggs in the stomachs and PCB and DDT concentrations in the fillets.

  14. Fast response system for large-volume acid stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilson, B.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, the conventional approach to large-volume offshore acid stimulation has been to use a vessel dedicated to offshore stimulation services or to use a semi-permanent installation on the rig or platform. This approach often results in long-term commitment to an offshore vessel restricted to stimulation work or a great reduction of the valuable space on the rig or platform for an extended time. Both of these options usually require continuous, large capital outlays with periods of little or no use. The fast response stimulation package (FRSP) described in this paper provides a 25-bbl/min, centrally controlled, modular, acid-stimulation system with 50,000-gal acid storage capacity, 25-bbl/min, computer-operated blending equipment, acid-resistant manifold modules, and high-pressure pumping units. All processes are monitored and operated from a central control cabin. The FRSP can be quickly installed on an offshore work vessel or drilling rig of sufficient size to perform matrix acidizing and acid frac, and then be removed between jobs. The equipment has recently completed acid-stimulation services in a five-well program in 30 days, delivering up to 41,000 gal of blended acid at rates of 0.5 to 17 bbl/min from two different drilling rigs. This equipment has provided for greater versatility and better use of operator assets while providing specified requirements for stimulation services.

  15. Asymmetric Structure-Preserving Subgraph Queries for Large Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Byron "Koon Kau"

    Asymmetric Structure-Preserving Subgraph Queries for Large Graphs Zhe Fan1 Byron Choi1 Jianliang Xu the novel cyclic group based encryption so that query processing is transformed into a series of private are effective. I. INTRODUCTION Subgraph queries (via subgraph isomorphism) are a fun- damental and powerful

  16. Redundancy Elimination Within Large Collections of Files Purushottam Kulkarni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglis, Fred

    been shown to reduce storage over- heads, with varying requirements for resources such as computation permanently and accessed infrequently); e-mail, in which large byte sequences are commonly re- peated. There are nu- merous trade-offs between the effectiveness of data re- duction and the resources required

  17. Worst Case Scenario for Large Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Worst Case Scenario for Large Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation M. A. Mahmud) in distri- bution network has significant effects on voltage profile for both customers and distribution on variation of the voltage and the amount of DG that can be connected to the distribution networks. This paper

  18. Effects of radiation and compression on propagating spherical flames of methane/air mixtures near the lean flammability limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zheng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Large discrepancies between the laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths measured in experiments and those predicted by simulations for ultra-lean methane/air mixtures bring a great concern for kinetic mechanism validation. In order to quantitatively explain these discrepancies, a computational study is performed for propagating spherical flames of lean methane/air mixtures in different spherical chambers using different radiation models. The emphasis is focused on the effects of radiation and compression. It is found that the spherical flame propagation speed is greatly reduced by the coupling between thermal effect (change of flame temperature or unburned gas temperature) and flow effect (inward flow of burned gas) induced by radiation and/or compression. As a result, for methane/air mixtures near the lean flammability limit, the radiation and compression cause large amounts of under-prediction of the laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths extracted from propagating spherical flames. Since radiation and compression both exist in the experiments on ultra-lean methane/air mixtures reported in the literature, the measured laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths are much lower than results from simulation and thus cannot be used for kinetic mechanism validation. (author)

  19. WAYNESTATEUNIVERSITY A great university always strives to challenge the imagination. Wayne State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    large-scale, sleek geometric constructions. 7 MORRIS BROSE (1914­2000) Sentinel II, 1969, Cast bronze Gift of Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Linden Sentinel II is a slender sculpture based on a theme Morris Brose began

  20. Stratigraphy, structure, and zonation of large Silurian reef at Delphi, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, A.W.; Bottjer, D.J.; Droste, J.B.; Horowitz, A.S.; Kelly, S.M.; Krisher, D.L.; Shaver, R.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Silurian reef complex at Delphi, Indiana, consists of two subcircular reefs occupying an area of about 4 sq mi (10.6 sq km). The reef is more than 400 ft (62 m) thick, has a volume of about 0.15 cu mi (0.64 cu km), and effected as much as 75 ft (23 m) of compaction-induced drape in the overlying Middle Devonian strata. Stratigraphically, the complex extends upward from Salamonie (Middle Silurian) into Salina rocks (Upper Silurian). Growth of the complex proceeded through alternating periods of lateral expansion and restriction as reflected in the cross-sectional geometry of at least one of the reefs. These growth characteristics probably reflect the conditions that led to cyclic deposition of carbonate and evaporite rocks in the Michigan basin during Middle to Late Silurian time. Present dips along reef flanks locally exceed 35/sup 0/ but structural and stratigraphic analyses suggest that original depositional slopes may have been more gentle, that reef tops were never appreciably more than 200 ft (60 m) above the seafloor (although reef thicknesses of several hundred feet were attained before erosion), and that the central parts of the main reef masses were occupied by relatively rigid and volumetrically litle changing structural cores. Biozones include: two central areas of highest organic-framework buildup characterized by corals and stromatoporoids and flanking zones characterized separately by echinodermal and other debris, pentamerid brachiopods, gastropods, and fine debris and chert. The zonal distribution is similar to that already proposed for the large Silurian reef at Monon, Indiana, and somewhat resembles that proposed for the reef at Thornton, Illinois. These similarities and the fact of zonation in itself help to support the conclusion that the often debated Silurian buildups in the Great Lakes area satisfy all but the most rigid definitions of ecologic (organic-framework) reefs. 8 figures, 1 table.

  1. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CLUB OF NEW YORK Now is a great time to join the Columbia University Club of New York!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CLUB OF NEW YORK Now is a great time to join the Columbia University Club-719-0380 fax: 212-944-6944 info@columbiaclub.org www.columbiaclub.org Columbia's Social

  2. From new towns to eco-towns : transferable lessons in the building of new cities in Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Trinity F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis looks to Great Britain for lessons in building New Towns, with an eye towards the nascent Eco-Towns program. Specifically, three areas in urban design are considered: the employment of the neighborhood unit, ...

  3. Comparers Chem. Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 91-102, 1993 Printed in Great Britain. All rightsreserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    suggest that 3-D modeling will be possible at the level of chemical resolution in the programs. INTRODUffComparers Chem. Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 91-102, 1993 Printed in Great Britain. All rightsreserved 0097

  4. Identification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knott CD, Wrangham RW: Energy intake by wild chimpanzees andwild derive a significant amount of their total daily metabolic energywild great apes derive greater amount of total daily metabolic energy

  5. ~mcupkric EnviroMvnr Vol. IS. No. IO, pp. 1969-2002. 1984 Pnnted in Great Britain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    ~mcupkric EnviroMvnr Vol. IS. No. IO, pp. 1969-2002. 1984 Pnnted in Great Britain. ocKJ4-6981/84 13 diffusion, stratified flow, wind tunnel, towing tank, complex terrain, air pollution. NOMENCLATURE constant

  6. The quenching effect of hydrogen on the nitrogen in metastable state in atmospheric-pressure N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shou-Zhe, E-mail: lisz@dlut.edu.cn; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Chuan-Jie; Zhang, Jialiang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Yong-Xing [College of Electrical Engineering, Dalian 116024 (China); Xia, Guang-Qing [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheric-pressure microwave N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} plasma torch is generated and diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy. It is found that a large amount of N atoms and NH radicals are generated in the plasma torch and the emission intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative band is the strongest over the spectra. The mixture of hydrogen in nitrogen plasma torch causes the morphology of the plasma discharge to change with appearance that the afterglow shrinks greatly and the emission intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative band decreases with more hydrogen mixed into nitrogen plasma. In atmospheric-pressure microwave-induced plasma torch, the hydrogen imposes a great influence on the characteristics of nitrogen plasma through the quenching effect of the hydrogen on the metastable state of N{sub 2}.

  7. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. [BP and Statoil Alliance, Stavanger (Norway)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team`s ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  8. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. (BP and Statoil Alliance, Stavanger (Norway))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team's ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  9. Water assessment report: Section 13 (c); Great Plains gasification project, Mercer County, ND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Resources Council is completing a water assessment of synfuels development in the Upper Missouri River Basin. This is being done under Section 13(a) of the Federal Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act. The assessment area includes the coal deposits in the Mercer County project site. Levels of North Dakota coal gasification development that are several times the production level of the Great Plains gasification project are being examined. This report assesses: (1) the availability of adequate water supplies to meet the water requirements of the project, supporting activities, and other development induced by the project; and (2) the changes in the water resources that will result from the project. Findings of the 13(a) assessment show that water supplies are physically available within the mainstem of the Missouri River in North Dakota to supply the requirements of the gasification facilities and the supporting activities - mining and reclamation, electricity, and project-induced population increases.

  10. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1992. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.C.; Bixby, R.; Engman, J.; Ross, L.; Stocker, L. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of summer in 1992 the fishery of the Great Miami River took an unexpected deviation from the stasis of past years as an intense suspended algal bloom decreased the compositional diversity found at the lower GMR stations. Daytime supersaturation of oxygen and elevated pHs, reaching 9 by midday during the month of August, undoubtedly caused severe deficits of oxygen at night. Despite the aeration at every riffle, the intensities of the biological processes in the water were sufficient to cause very high positive and negative excursions of oxygen over the day and night cycle. This report documents a fish harvest that was conducted as part of the oxygen excess/deficit study.

  11. Anthropic prediction for a large multi-jump landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delia Schwartz-Perlov

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption of a flat prior distribution plays a critical role in the anthropic prediction of the cosmological constant. In a previous paper we analytically calculated the distribution for the cosmological constant, including the prior and anthropic selection effects, in a large toy ``single-jump'' landscape model. We showed that it is possible for the fractal prior distribution we found to behave as an effectively flat distribution in a wide class of landscapes, but only if the single jump size is large enough. We extend this work here by investigating a large ($N \\sim 10^{500}$) toy ``multi-jump'' landscape model. The jump sizes range over three orders of magnitude and an overall free parameter $c$ determines the absolute size of the jumps. We will show that for ``large'' $c$ the distribution of probabilities of vacua in the anthropic range is effectively flat, and thus the successful anthropic prediction is validated. However, we argue that for small $c$, the distribution may not be smooth.

  12. Large margin classification in infinite neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saul, Lawrence K.

    Large margin classification in infinite neural networks Youngmin Cho and Lawrence K. Saul, CA 92093-0404 Abstract We introduce a new family of positive-definite kernels for large margin classi- fication in support vector machines (SVMs). These kernels mimic the computation in large neural networks

  13. Large-Scale Manifold Learning Ameet Talwalkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Large-Scale Manifold Learning Ameet Talwalkar Courant Institute New York, NY ameet on spectral decom- position, we first analyze two approximate spectral decom- position techniques for large-dimensional embeddings for two large face datasets: CMU-PIE (35 thousand faces) and a web dataset (18 million faces). Our

  14. Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar introduces the “Large Scale Renewable Energy Guide." The webinar will provide an overview of this important FEMP guide, which describes FEMP's approach to large-scale renewable energy projects and provides guidance to Federal agencies and the private sector on how to develop a common process for large-scale renewable projects.

  15. Conundrum of the Large Scale Streaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Malm

    1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The etiology of the large scale peculiar velocity (large scale streaming motion) of clusters would increasingly seem more tenuous, within the context of the gravitational instability hypothesis. Are there any alternative testable models possibly accounting for such large scale streaming of clusters?

  16. Developing Optimal Growth Parameters for the Green Microalgae Nannochloris oculata and the Diatom Nitzschia sp. for Large scale Raceway Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luedecke, Phillip Ryan

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae produce large quantities of lipids that can be used for biofuel feedstock. The goal of this project was to determine the effect of several engineering and management parameters on the productivity of microalgae cultivated in large...

  17. Compensating effect of the coherent synchrotron radiation in bunch compressors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jing, Yichao; Hao, Yue; Litvinenko, Vladimir N.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical bunch compression for a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) requires a large compression ratio. Frequently, this compression is distributed in multiple stages along the beam transport line. However, for a high-gain FEL driven by an energy recovery linac (ERL), compression must be accomplished in a single strong compressor located at the beam line’s end; otherwise the electron beam would be affected severely by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the ERL’s arcs. In such a scheme, the CSR originating from the strong compressors could greatly degrade the quality of the electron beam. In this paper, we present our design for a bunch compressor that will limit the effect of CSR on the e-beam’s quality. We discuss our findings from a study of such a compressor, and detail its potential for an FEL driven by a multipass ERL developed for the electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  18. Effective interactions and shell model studies of heavy tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Kartamyshev; T. Engeland; M. Hjorth-Jensen; E. Osnes

    2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from large-scale shell-model calculations of even and odd tin isotopes from 134Sn to 142}Sn with a shell-model space defined by the 1f7/2,2p3/2,0h9/2,2p1/2,1f5/2,0i13/2 single-particle orbits. An effective two-body interaction based on modern nucleon-nucleon interactions is employed. The shell-model results are in turn analyzed for their pairing content using a generalized seniority approach. Our results indicate that a pairing-model picture captures a great deal of the structure and the correlations of the lowest lying states for even and odd isotopes.

  19. Mixing device for materials with large density differences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, David W. (Moraga, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An auger-tube pump mixing device for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided.

  20. Mixing device for materials with large density differences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, D.W.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An auger-tube pump mixing device is disclosed for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided. 2 figs.

  1. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  2. Monitoring Soil Erosion on a Burned Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Final Report for the Jacob Fire Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Julianne [DRI] DRI; Etyemezian, Vic [DRI] DRI; Cablk, Mary E. [DRI] DRI; Shillito, Rose [DRI] DRI; Shafer, David [DOE Grand Junction, Colorado] DOE Grand Junction, Colorado

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in the U.S. southwestern deserts is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. The shortened return interval, which translates to an increase in fires, has implications for management of Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) and Corrective Action Sites (CASs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office has responsibility. A series of studies was initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob Fire site approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) north of Hiko, Nevada. A lightning-caused fire burned approximately 200 hectares during August 6-8, 2008. The site is representative of a transition between Mojave and Great Basin desert ecoregions on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where the largest number of Soil CAUs/CASs are located. The area that burned at the Jacob Fire site was primarily a Coleogyne ramosissima (blackbrush) and Ephedra nevadensis (Mormon tea) community, also an abundant shrub assemblage in the similar transition zone on the NNSS. This report summarizes three years of measurements after the fire. Seven measurement campaigns at the Jacob Fire site were completed. Measurements were made on burned ridge (upland) and drainage sites, and on burned and unburned sites beneath and between vegetation. A Portable In-Situ Wind Erosion Lab (PI-SWERL) was used to estimate emissions of suspended particles at different wind speeds. Context for these measurements was provided through a meteorological tower that was installed at the Jacob Fire site to obtain local, relevant environmental parameters. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Runoff and water erosion were quantified through a series of rainfall/runoff simulation tests in which controlled amounts of water were delivered to the soil surface in a specified amount of time. Runoff data were collected from understory and interspace soils on burned ridge and drainage areas. Runoff volume and suspended sediment in the runoff were sampled; the particle size distribution of the sediment was determined by laboratory analysis. Several land surface and soil characteristics associated with runoff were integrated by the calculation of site-specific curve numbers. Several vegetation surveys were conducted to assess post-burn recovery. Data from plots in both burned and unburned areas included species identification, counts, and location. Characterization of fire-affected area included measures at both the landscape scale and at specific sites. Although wind erosion measurements indicate that there are seasonal influences on almost all parameters measured, several trends were observed. PI-SWERL measurements indicated the potential for PM10 windblown dust emissions was higher on areas that were burned compared to areas that were not. Among the burned areas, understory soils in drainage areas were the most emissive, and interspace soils along burned ridges were least emissive. By 34 months after the burn (MAB), at the end of the study, emissions from all burned soil sites were virtually indistinguishable from unburned levels. Like the amount of emissions, the chemical signature of the fire (indicated by the EC-Soil ratio) was elevated immediately after the fire and approached pre-burn levels by 24 MAB. Thus, the potential for wind erosion at the Jacob Fire site, as measured by the amount and type of emissions, increased significantly after the fire and returned to unburned levels by 24 MAB. The effect of fire on the potential for water erosion at the Jacob Fire site was more ambiguous. Runoff and sediment from ridge interspace soils and unburned interspace soils were similar throughout the study period. Seldom, if ever, did runoff and sediment occur in burned drainage area soils. Fo

  3. Effects of screening on the optical absorption in graphene and in metallic monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablan, Marinko

    Screening is one of the fundamental concepts in solid-state physics. It has a great impact on the electronic properties of graphene, where huge mobilities were observed in spite of the large concentration of charged ...

  4. Viewing Systems for Large Underground Storage Tanks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heckendorn, F.M., Robinson, C.W., Anderson, E.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)], Pardini, A.F. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialized remote video systems have been successfully developed and deployed in a number of large radiological Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)that tolerate the hostile tank interior, while providing high resolution video to a remotely located operator. The deployment is through 100 mm (4 in) tank openings, while incorporating full video functions of the camera, lights, and zoom lens. The usage of remote video minimizes the potential for personnel exposure to radiological and hazardous conditions, and maximizes the quality of the visual data used to assess the interior conditions of both tank and contents. The robustness of this type of remote system has a direct effect on the potential for radiological exposure that personnel may encounter. The USTs typical of the Savannah River and Hanford Department Of Energy - (DOE) sites are typically 4.5 million liter (1.2 million gal) units under earth. or concrete overburden with limited openings to the surface. The interior is both highly contaminated and radioactive with a wide variety of nuclear processing waste material. Some of the tanks are -flammable rated -to Class 1, Division 1,and personnel presence at or near the openings should be minimized. The interior of these USTs must be assessed periodically as part of the ongoing management of the tanks and as a step towards tank remediation. The systems are unique in their deployment technology, which virtually eliminates the potential for entrapment in a tank, and their ability to withstand flammable environments. A multiplicity of components used within a common packaging allow for cost effective and appropriate levels of technology, with radiation hardened components on some units and lesser requirements on other units. All units are completely self contained for video, zoom lens, lighting, deployment,as well as being self purging, and modular in construction.

  5. 14 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 A Medium-Grain Reconfigurable Architecture for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado-Frias, José G.

    14 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 benchmarks, ranging from floating-point arithmetic to a radix-4 fast fourier transform. The results-intensive algorithms place great demands on the processing power of the underlying hardware. As tech- nology continues

  6. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union, Vol. 91, No.5, 2 February 2010, P-Jges 41-42 Severe Ice Cover on Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Cover on Great Lakes DuringWinter 2008-2009 The North American Great Lakes contain about 95. Because of this concentration of pop- ulation, the ice cover that forms on the Great Lakes each winter and its year-la-year vari- ability affect the regional economy [Niimi, 1982]. Ice cover also affects

  7. Nonequilibrium Markov processes conditioned on large deviations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Chetrite; Hugo Touchette

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of conditioning a Markov process on a rare event and of representing this conditioned process by a conditioning-free process, called the effective or driven process. The basic assumption is that the rare event used in the conditioning is a large deviation-type event, characterized by a convex rate function. Under this assumption, we construct the driven process via a generalization of Doob's $h$-transform, used in the context of bridge processes, and show that this process is equivalent to the conditioned process in the long-time limit. The notion of equivalence that we consider is based on the logarithmic equivalence of path measures and implies that the two processes have the same typical states. In constructing the driven process, we also prove equivalence with the so-called exponential tilting of the Markov process, which is used with importance sampling to simulate rare events, and which gives rise, from the point of view of statistical mechanics, to a nonequilibrium version of the canonical ensemble. Other links between our results and the topics of bridge processes, quasi-stationary distributions, stochastic control, and conditional limit theorems are mentioned.

  8. Large Field Inflation from Axion Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiu, Gary; Ye, Fang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the general multi-axion systems, focusing on the possibility of large field inflation driven by axions. We find that through axion mixing from a non-diagonal metric on the moduli space and/or from St\\"uckelberg coupling to a U(1) gauge field, an effectively super-Planckian decay constant can be generated without the need of "alignment" in the axion decay constants. We also investigate the consistency conditions related to the gauge symmetries in the multi-axion systems, such as vanishing gauge anomalies and the potential presence of generalized Chern-Simons terms. Our scenario applies generally to field theory models whose axion periodicities are intrinsically sub-Planckian, but it is most naturally realized in string theory. The types of axion mixings invoked in our scenario appear quite commonly in D-brane models, and we present its implementation in type II superstring theory. Explicit stringy models exhibiting all the characteristics of our ideas are constructed within the frameworks of Type IIA ...

  9. J. Fluid Mech. (1983), vol. 127, pp. 2744 Printed in Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    a grid is towed horizontally along a large tank filled first with water and then with a stably stratified Mw'lv of the turbulence was about lo3,where v is the kinematic viscosity. The vertical velocity-scale internal wave motion was not evident from the observations within about 50 mesh lengths of the grid

  10. Spectroscopic diagnostic for the mineralogy of large dust grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Min; C. Dominik; L. B. F. M. Waters

    2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the thermal infrared spectra of large dust grains of different chemical composition and mineralogy. Strong resonances in the optical properties result in detectable spectral structure even when the grain is much larger than the wavelength at which it radiates. We apply this to the thermal infrared spectra of compact amorphous and crystalline silicates. The weak resonances of amorphous silicates at 9.7 and 18 micron virtually disappear for grains larger than about 10 micron. In contrast, the strong resonances of crystalline silicates produce emission dips in the infrared spectra of large grains; these emission dips are shifted in wavelength compared to the emission peaks commonly seen in small crystalline silicate grains. We discuss the effect of a fluffy or compact grain structure on the infrared emission spectra of large grains, and apply our theory to the dust shell surrounding Vega.

  11. Microwave Absorption and Radiation from Large-area Multilayer CVD Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bian; Tuncer, Hatice M.; Katsounaros, Anestis; Wu, Weiping; Cole, Matthew T.; Ying, Kai; Zhang, Lianhong; Milne, William I.; Hao, Yang

    the emergence of reproducible large-area synthesis of graphene by chemical coplanar waveguides [21–23], rectangular waveguides [24], ve been carried out in the microwave transisto t and dyn osed [36]. multilayer graphene is also of great interest as a h... metamaterial in the THz regime [37]. Microwave absorption of graphene composites have been experimentally studied to design microwave absorbing mate- * Corresponding author. C A R B O N 7 7 ( 2 0 1 4 ) 8 1 4 –8 2 2 Avai lab le at www.sc iencedi rect .com...

  12. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  13. The United States after the great recession: the challenge of sustainable growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meltzer, Joshua [The Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (United States); Steven, David (The Brookings Institution Center and the Center on International Cooperation at New York University (United States)); Langley, Claire (The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper outlines the strengths and weaknesses of the U.S. economic growth model, assesses its’ ability to respond to the key economic, environmental and social challenges currently facing the U.S. and proposes policies that if adopted would move the U.S. onto a more sustainable growth path. The paper provides scenarios of projected future growth trajectories, as well as recommendations for specific policies in key areas: employment, infrastructure, energy and fiscal rebalancing. To reach this goal this paper focuses on four areas for action: Increasing employment, which is the most urgent priority to accelerate recovery from the Great Recession, while addressing underlying structural issues that have led to a decade of poor economic outcomes for most citizens; Investing in the future, as the key marker of whether the United States is prepared to make farsighted decisions to improve education, build new infrastructure and increase innovation; Maximizing an increased energy endowment in a way that grows the economy, while reinforcing the trend towards reducing resource demand and reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and, Fiscal rebalancing, where the United States must insulate economic recovery from the process of fiscal reform while reducing and stabilizing debt over the long term. Finally, we argue that President Obama can re-energize America’s global leadership if he builds on a platform of domestic actions that enhance the sustainability of America’s society and economy.

  14. Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

  15. Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. Tolerance to cadmium and cadmium-binding ligands in Great Salt Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayasekara, S.; Drown, D.B.; Sharma, R.P.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on the accumulation of cadmium in cytosolic proteins of Great Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina) was obtained from animals collected directly from the lake and also from animal hatched and maintained in three sublethal concentrations of cadmium (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 ppm) in saltwater aquaria. Brine shrimp growth under these conditions was monitored by measuring body lengths during a 7-day exposure period. Heat-stable, cadmium-binding ligands were isolated and identified by Sephadex G-75 chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cadmium was found to be equally distributed between high and low molecular weight proteins in animals collected from the lake and the 0.5 ppm cadmium group. There was also a slight growth stimulation noted in the 0.5-pm group. Higher cadmium incorporation was noted in low molecular weight fractions with increasing cadmium concentration in the exposure media. Low molecular weight fractions were also found to have high uv absorption characteristics at 250 nm and low absorption at 280 nm. Molecular weight of the cadmium-binding ligands was found to be 11,000 as estimated by the gel filtration method. De novo synthesis of this protein was increased as a function of cadmium concentration in the media. However, slow accumulation of cadmium in other protein fractions was also noticed in higher cadmium exposure groups, suggesting the existence of possible tolerance mechanisms in brine shrimp exposed to suspected acute cadmium concentrations.

  17. Large Data Visualization on Distributed Memory Mulit-GPU Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Henry R.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data sets of immense size are regularly generated on large scale computing resources. Even among more traditional methods for acquisition of volume data, such as MRI and CT scanners, data which is too large to be effectively visualization on standard workstations is now commonplace. One solution to this problem is to employ a 'visualization cluster,' a small to medium scale cluster dedicated to performing visualization and analysis of massive data sets generated on larger scale supercomputers. These clusters are designed to fit a different need than traditional supercomputers, and therefore their design mandates different hardware choices, such as increased memory, and more recently, graphics processing units (GPUs). While there has been much previous work on distributed memory visualization as well as GPU visualization, there is a relative dearth of algorithms which effectively use GPUs at a large scale in a distributed memory environment. In this work, we study a common visualization technique in a GPU-accelerated, distributed memory setting, and present performance characteristics when scaling to extremely large data sets.

  18. Challenges for Large-Field Inflation and Moduli Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilfried Buchmuller; Emilian Dudas; Lucien Heurtier; Alexander Westphal; Clemens Wieck; Martin Wolfgang Winkler

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the interplay between K\\"ahler moduli stabilization and chaotic inflation in supergravity. While heavy moduli decouple from inflation in the supersymmetric limit, supersymmetry breaking generically introduces non-decoupling effects. These lead to inflation driven by a soft mass term, $m_\\varphi^2 \\sim m m_{3/2}$, where $m$ is a supersymmetric mass parameter. This scenario needs no stabilizer field, but the stability of moduli during inflation imposes a large supersymmetry breaking scale, $m_{3/2} \\gg H$, and a careful choice of initial conditions. This is illustrated in three prominent examples of moduli stabilization: KKLT stabilization, K\\"ahler Uplifting, and the Large Volume Scenario. Remarkably, all models have a universal effective inflaton potential which is flattened compared to quadratic inflation. Hence, they share universal predictions for the CMB observables, in particular a lower bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r \\gtrsim 0.05$.

  19. Large $N$ Phases of Chiral QCD_2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Crescimanno; W. Taylor

    1994-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A matrix model is constructed which describes a chiral version of the large $N$ $U(N)$ gauge theory on a two-dimensional sphere of area $A$. This theory has three separate phases. The large area phase describes the associated chiral string theory. An exact expression for the free energy in the large area phase is used to derive a remarkably simple formula for the number of topologically inequivalent covering maps of a sphere with fixed branch points and degree $n$.

  20. Emission Line Properties of the Large Bright Quasar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Forster; Paul J. Green; Thomas L. Aldcroft; Marianne Vestergaard; Craig B. Foltz; Paul C. Hewett

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the optical/UV emission lines for a large homogeneous sample of 993 quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey. Our largely automated technique accounts for continuum breaks and galactic reddening, and we perform multicomponent fits to emission line profiles, including the effects of blended iron emission, and of absorption lines both galactic and intrinsic. Here we describe the fitting algorithm and present the results of line fits to the LBQS sample, including upper limits to line equivalent widths when warranted. The distribution of measured line parameters, principally equivalent width and FWHM, are detailed for a variety of lines, including upper limits. We thus initiate a large-scale investigation of correlations between the high energy continuum and emission lines in quasars, to be extended to complementary samples using similar techniques. High quality, reproducible measurements of emission lines for uniformly selected samples will advance our understanding of active galaxies, especially in a new era of large surveys selected by a variety of complementary methods.

  1. A Database Index to Large Biological Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, E.

    Hunt,E. Atkinson,M.P. Irving,R.W. Proceedings of the 27th Conference on Very Large Databases pp 139-148 Morgan Kaufmann

  2. Fractal Approach to Large-Scale Galaxy Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yurij Baryshev; Pekka Teerikorpi

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a review of the history and the present state of the fractal approach to the large-scale distribution of galaxies. Angular correlation function was used as a general instrument for the structure analysis. It was realized later that a normalization condition for the reduced correlation function estimator results in distorted values for both R_{hom} and fractal dimension D. Moreover, according to a theorem on projections of fractals, galaxy angular catalogues can not be used for detecting a structure with the fractal dimension D>2. For this 3-d maps are required, and indeed modern extensive redshift-based 3-d maps have revealed the ``hidden'' fractal dimension of about 2, and have confirmed superclustering at scales even up to 500 Mpc (e.g. the Sloan Great Wall). On scales, where the fractal analysis is possible in completely embedded spheres, a power--law density field has been found. The fractal dimension D =2.2 +- 0.2 was directly obtained from 3-d maps and R_{hom} has expanded from 10 Mpc to scales approaching 100 Mpc. In concordance with the 3-d map results, modern all sky galaxy counts in the interval 10^m - 15^m give a 0.44m-law which corresponds to D=2.2 within a radius of 100h^{-1}_{100} Mpc. We emphasize that the fractal mass--radius law of galaxy clustering has become a key phenomenon in observational cosmology.

  3. GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

  4. Water with a Nebulous Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : they are not good at taking into account how global warming affects clouds and, conversely, how changes in different that they greatly impact the rate at which the Earth radiatively cools. But low-level clouds are more compact than at more than 6,000 meters above sea level. The altitude of the clouds deter- mines their effect

  5. On interaction of large dust grains with fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smirnov, R. D. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    So far the models used to study dust grain-plasma interactions in fusion plasmas neglect the effects of dust material vapor, which is always present around dust in rather hot and dense edge plasma environment in fusion devices. However, when the vapor density and/or the amount of ionized vapor atoms become large enough, they can alter the grain-plasma interactions. Somewhat similar processes occur during pellet injection in fusion plasma. In this brief communication the applicability limits of the models ignoring vapor effects in grain-plasma interactions are obtained.

  6. Transition from Large-Scale to Small-Scale Dynamo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponty, Y. [Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, Nice cedex 04 (France); Plunian, F. [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamo equations are solved numerically with a helical forcing corresponding to the Roberts flow. In the fully turbulent regime the flow behaves as a Roberts flow on long time scales, plus turbulent fluctuations at short time scales. The dynamo onset is controlled by the long time scales of the flow, in agreement with the former Karlsruhe experimental results. The is governed by a generalized {alpha} effect, which includes both the usual {alpha} effect and turbulent diffusion, plus all higher order effects. Beyond the onset we find that this generalized {alpha} effect scales as O(Rm{sup -1}), suggesting the takeover of small-scale dynamo action. This is confirmed by simulations in which dynamo occurs even if the large-scale field is artificially suppressed.

  7. Probing the imprint of interacting dark energy on very large scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duniya, Didam; Maartens, Roy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed galaxy power spectrum acquires relativistic corrections from lightcone effects, and these corrections grow on very large scales. Future galaxy surveys in optical, infrared and radio bands will probe increasingly large wavelength modes and reach higher redshifts. In order to exploit the new data on large scales, an accurate analysis requires inclusion of the relativistic effects. This is especially the case for primordial non-Gaussianity and for extending tests of dark energy models to horizon scales. Here we investigate the latter, focusing on models where the dark energy interacts non-gravitationally with dark matter. Interaction in the dark sector can also lead to large-scale deviations in the power spectrum. If the relativistic effects are ignored, the imprint of interacting dark energy will be incorrectly identified and thus lead to a bias in constraints on interacting dark energy on very large scales.

  8. An inexact accelerated proximal gradient method for large scale ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    projected gradient method, and usually has good practical performance on .... conditioned, the conjugate gradient (CG) method would have great difficulty in ...

  9. Network Coding for Large Scale Content Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Network Coding for Large Scale Content Distribution IEEE Infocom 2005 Christos Gkantsidis College propose a new scheme for content distribution of large files that is based on network coding. With network coding, each node of the distribution network is able to generate and transmit encoded blocks

  10. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  11. Factors Influencing Succession: Lessons from Large, Infrequent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    intense disturbances of large and small extent. Key words: disturbance frequency; disturbance intensityFactors Influencing Succession: Lessons from Large, Infrequent Natural Disturbances Monica G ABSTRACT Disturbance events vary in intensity, size, and fre- quency, but few opportunities exist to study

  12. 1. Introduction Great progress has recently been achieved in SiGe HBT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieh, Jae-Sung

    operation including self-heating effects. Device simulations were performed on an intrinsic region indicated by the rectangle of Figure 1, including low electrical and thermal resistance connections in locations shown

  13. The effect of dissipation in direct communication scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu Li; Jun-Xiang Zhang; Shi-Yao Zhu

    2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the dissipation and finite number of beam splitters are discussed. A method using balanced dissipation to improve the communication for finite beam splitters, which greatly increases communication reliability with an expense of decreasing communication efficiency.

  14. A COMPARISON OF THE AQUATIC IMPACTS OF LARGE HYDRO AND SMALL HYDRO PROJECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A COMPARISON OF THE AQUATIC IMPACTS OF LARGE HYDRO AND SMALL HYDRO PROJECTS by Lara A. Taylor, P Project: A Comparison of the Aquatic Impacts of Large Hydro and Small Hydro Projects Project No.: 501 of small hydro development in British Columbia has raised concerns surrounding the effects

  15. The Dynamics of Health Behavior Sentiments on a Large Online Social Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salathé, Marcel

    The Dynamics of Health Behavior Sentiments on a Large Online Social Network Marcel Salathé* 1 behaviors affecting health outcomes are increasingly modulated by social networks, for example through, a large online social network. We find that the effects of neighborhood size and exposure intensity

  16. Deep-Sell Rtsearch. Vol. 38. Suppl I, pp S32}-S343. 1991. Pnnted In Great Britam.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    -Benguela Front. separates the cyclonic gyre regime from that of the subtropical gyre. Using the regionalDeep-Sell Rtsearch. Vol. 38. Suppl I, pp S32}-S343. 1991. Pnnted In Great Britam. Cyclonic gyre-A cyclonic gyre within the eastern tropical South Atlantic is resolved by an extensive oceanographic station

  17. The 2012 summertime drought over the Central Great Plains--the most severe seasonal drought in 117 years--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through summer 2012. This greatly improved their soil moisture balance, and the U.S. Drought Monitor estimated that northeast Texas was drought free by May 2012. Oklahoma City also showed strong signsMAr And Mo--NOAA/Climate Prediction Center, Camp Springs, Maryland; leung--Department of Energy, Pacific

  18. Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great by symptoms of foliar ozone injury. Abstract The goals of this study were to document the development of ozone-induced foliar injury, on a leaf-by-leaf basis, and to develop ozone exposure relationships for leaf cohorts

  19. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT LAKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT of such products is not authorized. ii #12;CONTENTS Abstract 1. INTRODUCTION 2. THE THEORETICAL BASIS OF THE ICE GROWTH EQUATION 3. THE INFLUENCE OF SNOW COVER 4. THE DEGREE-DAY LINEAR MODEL 5. THE DATA SETS 5.1 Ice

  20. Located in the heart of South America, the Pantanal (meaning"great swamp"in Portuguese) is an immense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Michael C.

    and the Atlantic Ocean. It is also an integral part of the hy- drologic cycle of South America because of its size and the direct connection with neighboring South American phytogeographic regions also produce a remarkableLocated in the heart of South America, the Pantanal (meaning"great swamp"in Portuguese