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Sample records for large effect greatly

  1. The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures...

  2. Large object investigation by digital holography with effective spectrum multiplexing under single-exposure approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning Zhang, Yingying; Xie, Jun

    2014-10-13

    We present a method to investigate large object by digital holography with effective spectrum multiplexing under single-exposure approach. This method splits the original reference beam and redirects one of its branches as a second object beam. Through the modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the two object beams can illuminate different parts of the large object and create a spectrum multiplexed hologram onto the focal plane array of the charge-coupled device/complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera. After correct spectrum extraction and image reconstruction, the large object can be fully observed within only one single snap-shot. The flexibility and great performance make our method a very attractive and promising technique for large object investigation under common 632.8 nm illumination.

  3. Anomalously large isotope effect in the glass transition of water

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gainaru, Catalin; Agapov, Alexander L.; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Nelson, Helge; Köster, Karsten W.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Böhmer, Roland; et al

    2014-11-24

    Here we present the discovery of an unusually large isotope effect in the structural relaxation and the glass transition temperature Tg of water. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of low-density as well as of vapor deposited amorphous water reveal Tg differences of 10±2K between H2O and D2O, sharply contrasting with other hydrogen bonded liquids for which H/D exchange increases Tg by typically less than 1K. We show that the large isotope effect and the unusual variation of relaxation times in water at low temperatures can be explained in terms of quantum effects. Thus, our findings shed new light on water's peculiar low-temperaturemore » dynamics and the possible role of quantum effects in its structural relaxation, and possibly in dynamics of other low molecular weight liquids.« less

  4. Large scale obscuration and related climate effects open literature bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, N.A.; Geitgey, J.; Behl, Y.K.; Zak, B.D.

    1994-05-01

    Large scale obscuration and related climate effects of nuclear detonations first became a matter of concern in connection with the so-called ``Nuclear Winter Controversy`` in the early 1980`s. Since then, the world has changed. Nevertheless, concern remains about the atmospheric effects of nuclear detonations, but the source of concern has shifted. Now it focuses less on global, and more on regional effects and their resulting impacts on the performance of electro-optical and other defense-related systems. This bibliography reflects the modified interest.

  5. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ? 106c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations ?(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order ?(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ? 0.24h Mpc1.

  6. Large Scale Obscuration and Related Climate Effects Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zak, B.D.; Russell, N.A.; Church, H.W.; Einfeld, W.; Yoon, D.; Behl, Y.K.

    1994-05-01

    A Workshop on Large Scale Obsurcation and Related Climate Effects was held 29--31 January, 1992, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The objectives of the workshop were: to determine through the use of expert judgement the current state of understanding of regional and global obscuration and related climate effects associated with nuclear weapons detonations; to estimate how large the uncertainties are in the parameters associated with these phenomena (given specific scenarios); to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on obscuration predictions; and to develop an approach for the prioritization of further work on newly-available data sets to reduce the uncertainties. The workshop consisted of formal presentations by the 35 participants, and subsequent topical working sessions on: the source term; aerosol optical properties; atmospheric processes; and electro-optical systems performance and climatic impacts. Summaries of the conclusions reached in the working sessions are presented in the body of the report. Copies of the transparencies shown as part of each formal presentation are contained in the appendices (microfiche).

  7. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2015-03-09

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm³ that is almost one order ofmore » larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.« less

  8. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2015-03-09

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm³ that is almost one order of larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.

  9. Large piezoresistive effect in surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, S. D. Haenen, K.; Drijkoningen, S.

    2014-09-08

    Surface conductivity in hydrogen-terminated single crystal diamond is an intriguing phenomenon for fundamental reasons as well as for application driven research. Surface conductivity is also observed in hydrogen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond although the electronic transport mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, the piezoresistive properties of intrinsic surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond are investigated. A gauge factor of 35 is calculated from bulging a diamond membrane of 350 nm thick, with a diameter of 656 μm and a sheet resistance of 1.45 MΩ/sq. The large piezoresistive effect is reasoned to originate directly from strain-induced changes in the resistivity of the grain boundaries. Additionally, we ascribe a small time-dependent fraction of the piezoresistive effect to charge trapping of charge carriers at grain boundaries. In conclusion, time-dependent piezoresistive effect measurements act as a tool for deeper understanding the complex electronic transport mechanisms induced by grain boundaries in a polycrystalline material or nanocomposite.

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ACRF Instrument Team Meets at SGP The ARM Program has had unprecedented success in operating a large array of sophisticated

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-01 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ARM Archive Sets Record for User Accounts The ARM Archive stores and distributes the large quantities of data generated by routine

  12. Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    around large or full scale MHK machines in the field. In this study three synchronized acoustic Doppler velocimeters ... The SAFL Main Channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) Carriage, ...

  13. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures We present a ...

  14. Comparison of the effects in the rock mass of large-scale chemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comparison of the effects in the rock mass of large-scale chemical and nuclear explosions. ... Title: Comparison of the effects in the rock mass of large-scale chemical and nuclear ...

  15. Energy and water in the Great Lakes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2011-11-01

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains ... Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy ... and their daughters Allison Moore (husband ...

  17. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Marble Drop Learning objective: for students to analyze a problem, and test and refine solutions. This will demonstrate a key skill needed in engineering and scientific...

  18. Effects of experimental warming and clipping on metabolic change of microbial community in a US Great Plains tallgrass prairie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Jianping; Liu, Xinxing; Liu, Xueduan; Nostrand, Joy D. Van; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qiu, Guanzhou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    While more and more studies are being conducted on the effects of global warming, little is known regarding the response of metabolic change of whole soil microbial communities to this phenomenon. In this study, functional gene changes at the mRNA level were analyzed by our new developed GeoChip 3.0. Soil samples were taken from a long-term climate warming experiment site, which has been conducted for ~;;8 years at the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory, a 137.6-ha farm located in the Central Redbed Plains, in McClain County, Oklahoma. The experiment uses a paired factorial design with warming as the primary factor nested with clipping as a secondary factor. An infrared heater was used to simulate global warming, and clipping was used to mimic mowing hay. Twelve 2m x 2m plots were divided into six pairs of warmed and control plots. The heater generates a constant output of ~;;100 Watts m-2 to approximately 2 oC increase in soil temperature above the ambient plots, which is at the low range of the projected climate warming by IPCC. Soil whole microbial communities? mRNA was extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized with our GeoChip 3.0, a functional gene array covering genes involved in N, C, P, and S cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation, to examine expressed genes. The results showed that a greater number and higher diversity of genes were expressed under warmed plots compared to control. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that the soil microbial communities were clearly altered by warming, with or without clipping. The dissimilarity of the communities based on functional genes was tested and results showed that warming and control communities were significantly different (P<0.05), with or without clipping. Most genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling were expressed at higher levels in warming samples compared to control samples. All of the results demonstrated that the whole microbial communities increase functional

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    African Researcher Visits Oklahoma As a follow-up to the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) ... Niamey, Niger, to the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. Dr. ...

  20. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANLEVSNL-06-04 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains...

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site has helped to correct problems related to signal interference. The WACR is a 95-GHz system designed for a unique purpose -...

  2. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteers - Sign Up About Science Bowl Curriculum and Activities How to Build a Motor The Great Marble Drop How to Build a Turbine How to Build a Tower Classroom...

  3. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesSouthern Great Plains SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Southern Great Plains SGP Central Facility, Lamont, OK 36° 36' 18.0" N, 97° 29' 6.0" W Altitude: 320 meters

  4. Large Polarization-Dependent Exciton Optical Stark Effect in Lead Iodide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Perovskites (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Large Polarization-Dependent Exciton Optical Stark Effect in Lead Iodide Perovskites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large Polarization-Dependent Exciton Optical Stark Effect in Lead Iodide Perovskites A strong interaction of a semiconductor with a below-bandgap laser pulse causes a blue-shift of the bandgap transition energy, known as the optical Stark effect. The energy shift persists only during the pulse duration with an

  5. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-04 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Site Operations Manager to Retire Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operations manager Jim Teske has announced that he will retire in October

  6. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  7. Toxic effects in C57B1/6 and DBA/2 mice following consumption of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated Great Lakes coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch Walbaum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleland, G.B.; Leatherland, J.F.; Sonstegard, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    Diets containing coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch Walbaum) from the Pacific Ocean or from Lakes Erie, Michigan, and Ontario (containing a gradation from low to high of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, (HAHs)) were fed to C57B1/6 and DBA/2 mice. Following a 4-month dietary exposure to Lake Ontario salmon, both strains of mice demonstrated hepatomegaly. The ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (ERR) enzyme levels were elevated in livers of C57B1/6 mice fed diets of salmon from all of the Great Lakes studied, with exceptionally high levels detected in C57B1/6 mice fed Lake Ontario salmon. Induction of ERR enzyme levels was detected in DBA/2 mice only following dietary exposure to Lake Ontario salmon. Serum levels of L-thyroxine (T4) and triiodo-L-thryonine (T3) were suppressed in C57B1/6 mice following consumption of Lake Ontario coho salmon, but T3 and T4 levels remained unchanged in DBA/2 mice. In general, pathobiological effects correlated with both dietary HAH exposure level and Ah receptor status.

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. SGP Hosts Instrument Team Meeting The SGP central facility hosted the biennial ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Instrument Team Meeting on August 2-4, 2005. Almost 50 instrument mentors, site

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb./Mar. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-02 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. New Shipping and Receiving Building Dedicated The SGP central facility is operating more efficiently with a newly completed Shipping and Receiving building. The SGP Shipping and

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-07 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Infrared Sky Imager Takes a Shot in the Dark Imaging technologies help scientists correlate and compare visual data with the non-visual data retrieved by

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-09 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Multifilter Radiometer Added to Cessna Payload Downward-facing multifilter radiometers (MFRs) are instruments used to measure the

  12. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-07 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Global Dimming: A Hot Climate Topic Global dimming, also referred to as solar dimming, is a new buzz word in the scientific community. Coined

  13. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-03 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. 2004 ARM Science Team Meeting Sets Attendance Record A record-breaking 316 scientists and researchers from 22 different

  14. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-11 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Flare Field Campaign Aims to Rid Data of Clutter A series of aircraft flares were ignited on the ground at the SGP on October 19 and 20,

  15. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-09 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Mobile Facility Will Explore New Locales For some time, scientists have wanted to expand the reach of the ARM Program to additional

  16. Investigating the Effects of Flatback Airfoils and Blade Slenderness on Large Wind Turbine Blades

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF FLATBACK AIRFOILS AND BLADE SLENDERNESS ON THE DESIGN OF LARGE WIND TURBINE BLADES D. Todd Griffith Sandia National Laboratories Wind Energy Technology Department dgriffi@sandia.gov Phillip W. Richards Sandia National Laboratories Wind Energy Technology Department pwricha@sandia.gov Abstract: Design and development of large blades is very challenging due to economics, logistics, and technical barriers. Regarding the technical barriers, designs must satisfy

  17. Angola: a great future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The companies represented in Angola and their concessions by area are tabulated, including offshore leases. The government of this only recently independent country puts great emphasis on petroleum development and welcomes foreign companies. The major portion of the production comes from the fields in the Cabinda area. In the future, the reserves in the Congo basin will become more important. Exploration activity is intense and concentrated on the near offshore area of the country. The gas reserves are still not entirely known; present production serves only the needs of petroleum production, including a gas injection project in the Cabinda area and the production of LPG. A map of the offshore concession blocks also is shown.

  18. The effect of gettering on areal inhomogeneities in large-area multicrystalline-silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.M.; Sopori, B.L.

    1997-10-01

    Multicrystalline-silicon (mc-Si) materials and cells feature large areal variations in material and junction quality. The regions with poor device quality have been predicted to have more recombination current at forward bias than a simple area-weighted average due to the parallel interconnection of the good and bad regions by the front junction. The authors have examined the effect of gettering on areal inhomogeneities in large-area mc-Si cells. Cells with large areal inhomogeneities were found to have increased non-ideal recombination current, which is in line with theoretical predictions. Phosphorus-diffusion and aluminum-alloy gettering of mc-Si was found to reduce the areal inhomogeneities and improve large-area mc-Si device performance.

  19. Analytical study of the effects of the Low-Level Jet on moisture convergence and vertical motion fields at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bian, X.; Zhong, S.; Whiteman, C.D.; Stage, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) is located in a region that is strongly affected by a prominent meteorological phenomenon--the Great Plains Low-Level Jet (LLJ). Observations have shown that the LLJ plays a vital role in spring and summertime cloud formation and precipitation over the Great Plains. An improved understanding of the LLJ characteristics and its impact on the environment is necessary for addressing the fundamental issue of development and testing of radiational transfer and cloud parameterization schemes for the general circulation models (GCMs) using data from the SGP CART site. A climatological analysis of the summertime LLJ over the SGP has been carried out using hourly observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wind Profiler Demonstration Network and from the ARM June 1993 Intensive Observation Period (IOP). The hourly data provide an enhanced temporal and spatial resolution relative to earlier studies which used 6- and 12-hourly rawinsonde observations at fewer stations.

  20. Hall effect in the extremely large magnetoresistance semimetal WTe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yongkang Dai, Y. M.; Taylor, A. J.; Yarotski, D. A.; Prasankumar, R. P.; Thompson, J. D.; Li, H.; Miao, H.; Shi, Y. G.; Ding, H.

    2015-11-02

    We systematically measured the Hall effect in the extremely large magnetoresistance semimetal WTe{sub 2}. By carefully fitting the Hall resistivity to a two-band model, the temperature dependencies of the carrier density and mobility for both electron- and hole-type carriers were determined. We observed a sudden increase in the hole density below ∼160 K, which is likely associated with the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition reported by a previous photoemission study. In addition, a more pronounced reduction in electron density occurs below 50 K, giving rise to comparable electron and hole densities at low temperature. Our observations indicate a possible electronic structure change below 50 K, which might be the direct driving force of the electron-hole “compensation” and the extremely large magnetoresistance as well. Numerical simulations imply that this material is unlikely to be a perfectly compensated system.

  1. Simultaneous effect of modified gravity and primordial non-Gaussianity in large scale structure observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirzatuny, Nareg; Khosravi, Shahram; Baghram, Shant; Moshafi, Hossein E-mail: khosravi@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: hosseinmoshafi@iasbs.ac.ir

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study the simultaneous effect of primordial non-Gaussianity and the modification of the gravity in f(R) framework on large scale structure observations. We show that non-Gaussianity and modified gravity introduce a scale dependent bias and growth rate functions. The deviation from ΛCDM in the case of primordial non-Gaussian models is in large scales, while the growth rate deviates from ΛCDM in small scales for modified gravity theories. We show that the redshift space distortion can be used to distinguish positive and negative f{sub NL} in standard background, while in f(R) theories they are not easily distinguishable. The galaxy power spectrum is generally enhanced in presence of non-Gaussianity and modified gravity. We also obtain the scale dependence of this enhancement. Finally we define galaxy growth rate and galaxy growth rate bias as new observational parameters to constrain cosmology.

  2. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djikaev, Y. S. Ruckenstein, E.

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  3. Effect of secondary emission on the argon plasma afterglow with large dust density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Burmaka, G. P.; Stefanovi?, I.

    2015-02-15

    A zero-dimensional, space-averaged model for argon plasma afterglow with large dust density is developed. In the model, three groups of electrons in the plasma afterglow are assumed: (i) thermal electrons with Maxwellian distribution, (ii) energetic electrons generated by metastable-metastable collisions (metastable pooling), and (iii) secondary electrons generated at collisions of ions with the electrodes, which have sufficiently large negative voltages in the afterglow. The model calculates the time-dependencies for electron densities in plasma afterglow based on experimental decay times for metastable density and electrode bias. The effect of secondary emission on electron density in the afterglow is estimated by varying secondary emission yields. It is found that this effect is less important than metastable pooling. The case of dust-free plasma afterglow is considered also, and it is found that in the afterglow the effect of secondary emission may be more important than metastable pooling. The secondary emission may increase thermal electron density n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows on a few ten percentages. The calculated time dependencies for n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows describe well the experimental results.

  4. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.

    2014-04-07

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2 nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  5. Anomalously Large Polarization Effect Responsible for Excitonic Red Shifts in PbSe Quantum Dot Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Wolcott; V Doyeux; C Nelson; R Gearba; K Lei; K Yager; A dolocan; K Williams; D Nguyen; X Zhu

    2011-12-31

    The formation of solid thin films from colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is often accompanied by red shifts in excitonic transitions, but the mechanisms responsible for the red shifts are under debate. We quantitatively address this issue using optical absorption spectroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of PbSe QDs with controlled inter-QD distance, which was determined by the length of alkanedithiol linking molecules. With decreasing inter-QD distance, the first and second exciton absorption peaks show increasing red shifts. Using thin films consisting of large and isolated QDs embedded in a matrix of small QDs, we determine that a dominant contribution to the observed red shift is due to changes in polarization of the dielectric environment surrounding each QD ({approx}88%), while electronic or transition dipole coupling plays a lesser role. However, the observed red shifts are more than 1 order of magnitude larger than theoretical predictions based on the dielectric polarization effect for spherical QDs. We attribute this anomalously large polarization effect to deviations of the exciton wave functions from eigenfunctions of the idealized spherical quantum well model.

  6. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) intensive observation period (IOP)-4 and simulations of land use pattern effect on the LLJ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Raman, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is an important element of the low-level atmospheric circulation. It transports water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn affects the development of weather over the Great Plains of the central United States. The LLJ is generally recognized as a complex response of the atmospheric boundary layer to the diurnal cycle of thermal forcing. Early studies have attributed the Great Plains LLJ to the diurnal oscillations of frictional effect, buoyancy over sloping terrain, and the blocking effects of the Rocky Mountains. Recent investigations show that the speed of the LLJ is also affected by the soil type and soil moisture. Some studies also suggest that synoptic patterns may play an important role in the development of the LLJ. Land surface heterogeneties significantly affect mesoscale circulations by generating strong contrasts in surface thermal fluxes. Thus one would expect that the land use pattern should have effects on the LLJ`s development and structure. In this study, we try to determine the relative roles of the synoptic forcing, planetary boundary layers (PBL) processes, and the land use pattern in the formation of the LLJ using the observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Intensive Operation Period (IOP)-4 and numerical sensitivity tests.

  7. The Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porto, Rafael A.; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory (LEFT) formalism for the study of cosmological large scale structures. Unlike the previous Eulerian-space construction, it is naturally formulated as an effective field theory of extended objects in Lagrangian space. In LEFT the resulting finite size effects are described using a multipole expansion parameterized by a set of time dependent coefficients and organized in powers of the ratio of the wavenumber of interest k over the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. The multipoles encode the effects of the short distance modes on the long-wavelength universe and absorb UV divergences when present. There are no IR divergences in LEFT. Some of the parameters that control the perturbative approach are not assumed to be small and can be automatically resummed. We present an illustrative one-loop calculation for a power law universe. We describe the dynamics both at the level of the equations of motion and through an action formalism.

  8. Large area InN terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallauer, Jan Grumber, Christian; Walther, Markus; Polyakov, Vladimir; Iannucci, Robert; Cimalla, Volker; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-09-14

    Large area terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect in InN (indium nitride) are presented. The formation of lateral photo-Dember currents is induced by laser-illumination through a microstructured metal cover processed onto the InN substrate, causing an asymmetry in the lateral photogenerated charge carrier distribution. Our design uses simple metal structures, which are produced by conventional two-dimensional micro-structuring techniques. Having favoring properties as a photo-Dember material InN is particularly well-suited as a substrate for our emitters. We demonstrate that the emission intensity of the emitters can be significantly influenced by the structure of the metal cover leaving room for improvement by optimizing the masking structures.

  9. Combined Climate and Carbon-Cycle Effects of Large-Scale Deforestation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Wickett, M; Phillips, T J; Lobell, D B; Delire, C; Mirin, A

    2006-10-17

    The prevention of deforestation and promotion of afforestation have often been cited as strategies to slow global warming. Deforestation releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, which exerts a warming influence on Earth's climate. However, biophysical effects of deforestation, which include changes in land surface albedo, evapotranspiration, and cloud cover also affect climate. Here we present results from several large-scale deforestation experiments performed with a three-dimensional coupled global carbon-cycle and climate model. These are the first such simulations performed using a fully three-dimensional model representing physical and biogeochemical interactions among land, atmosphere, and ocean. We find that global-scale deforestation has a net cooling influence on Earth's climate, since the warming carbon-cycle effects of deforestation are overwhelmed by the net cooling associated with changes in albedo and evapotranspiration. Latitude-specific deforestation experiments indicate that afforestation projects in the tropics would be clearly beneficial in mitigating global-scale warming, but would be counterproductive if implemented at high latitudes and would offer only marginal benefits in temperate regions. While these results question the efficacy of mid- and high-latitude afforestation projects for climate mitigation, forests remain environmentally valuable resources for many reasons unrelated to climate.

  10. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  11. Large anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic insulator-topological insulator heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alegria, L. D.; Petta, J. R.; Ji, H.; Cava, R. J.; Yao, N.; Clarke, J. J.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(001)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and (110)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(100)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The 61 K Curie temperature of Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE.

  12. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichinger, F.T.; Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  13. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  14. Observation of large magnetocaloric effect in HoRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paramanik, Tapas Das, Kalipada; Das, I.

    2014-02-28

    Detailed magnetic, magnetotransport, and magnetocaloric measurements on HoRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} have been performed. In this Letter, we report presence of spin reorientation transition below paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic transition temperature (T{sub N} = 19 K). Large magnetic entropy change 9.1 J/kg K and large negative magnetoresistance ∼21% in a magnetic field of 5 T has been observed around T{sub N}, which is associated with field induced spin-flip metamagnetic transition.

  15. Summertime Low-Level Jets over the Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stensrud, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The sky over the southern Great Plains Cloud and Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program during the predawn and early morning hours often is partially obstructed by stratocumulus, stratus fractus, or cumulus fractus that are moving rapidly to the north, even through the surface winds are weak. This cloud movement is evidence of the low-level jet (LLJ), a wind speed maximum that occurs in the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere. Owing to the wide spacing between upper-air sounding sites and the relatively infrequent sounding launches, LLJ evolution has been difficult to observe adequately, even though the effects of LLJs on moisture flux into North America are large. Model simulation of the LLJ is described.

  16. Great Plains Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Plains Wind Farm Facility Great Plains Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  17. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Basin Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Basin Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  18. Reduction of reabsorption effects in scintillators by employing solutes with large Stokes shifts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrah, L.A.; Renschler, C.L.

    1984-08-01

    A radiation or high energy particle responsive system useful as a scintillator comprises, a first component which interacts with radiation or high energy particles to emit photons in a certain first wavelength range, and at least one additional solute component which absorbs the photons in said first wavelength range and thereupon emits photons in another wavelength range higher than said first range. An improvement is provided wherein at least one of said components absorbs substantially no photons in the wavelength range in which it emits photons, due to a large Stokes shift caused by an excited state intramolecular rearrangement.

  19. Reduction of reabsorption effects in scintillators by employing solutes with large Stokes shifts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrah, Larry A.; Renschler, Clifford L.

    1986-01-01

    In a radiation or high energy particle responsive system useful as a scintillator, and comprising, a first component which interacts with said radiation or high energy particle to emit photons in a certain first wavelength range; and at least one additional solute component which absorbs the photons in said first wavelength range and thereupon emits photons in another wavelength range higher than said first range; an improvement is provided wherein at least one of said components absorbs substantially no photons in said wavelength range in which it emits photons, due to a large Stokes shift caused by an excited state intramolecular rearrangement.

  20. Radio Frequency Noise Effects on the CERN Large Hadron Collider Beam Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastoridis, T.; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-30

    Radio frequency (rf) accelerating system noise can have a detrimental impact on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) performance through longitudinal motion and longitudinal emittance growth. A theoretical formalism has been developed to relate the beam and rf station dynamics with the bunch length growth. Measurements were conducted at LHC to determine the performance limiting rf components and validate the formalism through studies of the beam diffusion dependence on rf noise. As a result, a noise threshold was established for acceptable performance which provides the foundation for beam diffusion estimates for higher energies and intensities. Measurements were also conducted to determine the low level rf noise spectrum and its major contributions, as well as to validate models and simulations of this system.

  1. Assessing the Vulnerability of Large Critical Infrastructure Using Fully-Coupled Blast Effects Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, L D; Noble, C R; Margraf, J D; Glascoe, L G

    2009-03-26

    Structural failures, such as the MacArthur Maze I-880 overpass in Oakland, California and the I-35 bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, are recent examples of our national infrastructure's fragility and serve as an important reminder of such infrastructure in our everyday lives. These two failures, as well as the World Trade Center's collapse and the levee failures in New Orleans, highlight the national importance of protecting our infrastructure as much as possible against acts of terrorism and natural hazards. This paper describes a process for evaluating the vulnerability of critical infrastructure to large blast loads using a fully-coupled finite element approach. A description of the finite element software and modeling technique is discussed along with the experimental validation of the numerical tools. We discuss how such an approach can be used for specific problems such as modeling the progressive collapse of a building.

  2. Effects of large laser bandwidth on stimulated Raman scattering instability in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yao; Yu, Lu-Le; Zheng, Jun; Weng, Su-Ming; Ren, Chuang; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Sheng, Zheng-Ming E-mail: zhengming.sheng@strath.ac.uk

    2015-05-15

    The effects of laser bandwidth on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) instability in underdense plasma are studied by particle-in-cell simulations. In the simulations, sinusoidal frequency modulation of the incident laser pulse is used. By changing the size of bandwidth, it is shown that the linear growth of SRS can be suppressed considerably, provided the laser bandwidth is much larger than the SRS linear growth rate. Simulations also show that by choosing the proper frequency modulation parameters or decreasing the linear growth rate of SRS, the inhibitory effects become more obvious. The plasma electron temperature tends to weaken the bandwidth effects especially when it is over a keV level. The laser bandwidth can only increase the time duration for linear growth but cannot diminish the instability completely.

  3. Study of Cost Effective Large Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors that Employ Passive Safety Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, J. W.; Corletti, M. M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2003-11-12

    A report of DOE sponsored portions of AP1000 Design Certification effort. On December 16, 1999, The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Design Certification of the AP600 standard nuclear reactor design. This culminated an 8-year review of the AP600 design, safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment. The AP600 is a 600 MWe reactor that utilizes passive safety features that, once actuated, depend only on natural forces such as gravity and natural circulation to perform all required safety functions. These passive safety systems result in increased plant safety and have also significantly simplified plant systems and equipment, resulting in simplified plant operation and maintenance. The AP600 meets NRC deterministic safety criteria and probabilistic risk criteria with large margins. A summary comparison of key passive safety system design features is provided in Table 1. These key features are discussed due to their importance in affecting the key thermal-hydraulic phenomenon exhibited by the passive safety systems in critical areas. The scope of some of the design changes to the AP600 is described. These changes are the ones that are important in evaluating the passive plant design features embodied in the certified AP600 standard plant design. These design changes are incorporated into the AP1000 standard plant design that Westinghouse is certifying under 10 CFR Part 52. In conclusion, this report describes the results of the representative design certification activities that were partially supported by the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. These activities are unique to AP1000, but are representative of research activities that must be driven to conclusion to realize successful licensing of the next generation of nuclear power plants in the United States.

  4. Great Lakes Energy Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: Great Lakes Energy Coop Name: Great Lakes Energy Coop Address: PO Box 70 Place: Boyne City, MI Zip: 49712 Service Territory: Michigan Phone Number: 1-800-678-0411 Website:...

  5. ITC Great Plains, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ITC Great Plains, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: ITC Great Plains, LLC Place: Kansas Phone Number: Topeka (785) 783-2226 or Dodge City (620) 371-6534 or (785) 783-2226...

  6. Measuring the effectiveness of infrastructure-level detection of large-scale botnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Guanhua; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Zeng, Yuanyuan; Shin, Kang G

    2010-12-16

    Botnets are one of the most serious security threats to the Internet and its end users. In recent years, utilizing P2P as a Command and Control (C&C) protocol has gained popularity due to its decentralized nature that can help hide the hotmaster's identity. Most bot detection approaches targeting P2P botnets either rely on behavior monitoring or traffic flow and packet analysis, requiring fine-grained information collected locally. This requirement limits the scale of detection. In this paper, we consider detection of P2P botnets at a high-level - the infrastructure level - by exploiting their structural properties from a graph analysis perspective. Using three different P2P overlay structures, we measure the effectiveness of detecting each structure at various locations (the Autonomous System (AS), the Point of Presence (PoP), and the router rendezvous) in the Internet infrastructure.

  7. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  8. Nuclear structure effects of the nuclei {sup 152,154,156}Dy at high excitation energy and large angular momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, V.; Egido, J.L.

    1995-06-01

    Using the finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov formalism we analyze the properties of the nuclei {sup 152,154,156}Dy at the quasicontinuum region from {ital I}=0{h_bar} to 70{h_bar} and excitation energy up to approximately 16 MeV. We discuss energy gaps, shapes, moments of inertia, and entropy among others. The role of shape fluctuations is studied in the frame of classical statistics and we find large effects on several observables. A very rich structure is found in terms of excitation energy and angular momentum.

  9. Metallic transport and large anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Xi; Shigematsu, Kei; Chikamatsu, Akira Fukumura, Tomoteru; Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-08-18

    We report the electrical transport properties of ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N (001) epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The Mn{sub 4}N thin films were tetragonally distorted with a ratio of out-of-plane to in-plane lattice constants of 0.987 and showed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with an effective magnetic anisotropy constant of 0.16 MJ/m{sup 3}, which is comparable with that of a recently reported molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown film. The thin films exhibited metallic transport with a room temperature resistivity of 125 μΩ cm in addition to a large anomalous Hall effect with a Hall angle tangent of 0.023.

  10. Great Lakes Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Lakes Biofuels LLC Place: Madison, Wisconsin Zip: 53704 Sector: Services Product: Biodiesel research, consulting, management distribution and services company. Coordinates:...

  11. GreatPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: GreatPoint Energy Address: 222 Third Street Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip: 02142 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Biomass Product:...

  12. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign ...

  13. Great Plains Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains Ethanol Place: Chancellor, South Dakota Zip: 57015 Product: Limited liability company owned by its 500 members which owns and...

  14. Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Valley Ethanol LLC Place: Bakersfield, California Product: Developing a 63m gallon ethanol plant in Hanford, CA...

  15. Effects of river discharge on hyporheic exchange flows in salmon spawning areas of a large gravel-bed river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    The flow magnitude and timing from hydroelectric dams in the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States is managed in part for the benefit of salmon. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of current Hells Canyon Dam discharge operations on hydrologic exchange flows between the river and riverbed in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. Interactions between river water and pore water within the upper 1 m of the riverbed were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. The data were recorded at 20 min intervals over a period of 200 days when the mean daily discharge was 218–605 m3 s–1, with hourly stage changes as large as 1.9 m. Differences in head pressure between the river and riverbed were small, often within ±2 cm. Measured temperature gradients in the riverbed indicated significant interactions between the surface and subsurface water. Neither hydraulic nor temperature gradients at most sites were significantly affected by either short- or long-term changes in discharge operations from Hells Canyon Dam. Only 2 out of 14 study sites exhibited acute flux reversals between the river and riverbed resulting from short-term, large magnitude changes in discharge. The findings suggest small-scale piezometric head differences play a minor role in the hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed at the study sites. The processes controlling hydrologic exchange at the study sites are likely to be bedform-induced advective pumping, turbulence at the riverbed surface, and large-scale hydraulic gradients along the longitudinal profile of the riverbed. By incorporating the knowledge of hydrologic exchange processes into water management planning, regional agencies will be better prepared to manage the limited water resources among competing priorities that include salmon recovery, flood control, irrigation supply, hydropower production, and

  16. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120{sup 0}F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin. 68 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  17. QSO ABSORPTION SYSTEMS DETECTED IN Ne VIII: HIGH-METALLICITY CLOUDS WITH A LARGE EFFECTIVE CROSS SECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Werk, J. K.; Prochaska, J. X. [University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Howk, J. C. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jenkins, E. B. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Lehner, N.; Sembach, K. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ultraviolet spectra of the z{sub em} = 0.9754 quasar PG1148+549 obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, we study the physical conditions and abundances of Ne VIII+O VI absorption line systems at z{sub abs} = 0.68381, 0.70152, 0.72478. In addition to Ne VIII and O VI, absorption lines from multiple ionization stages of oxygen (O II, O III, O IV) are detected and are well aligned with the more highly ionized species. We show that these absorbers are multiphase systems including hot gas (T Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5.7} K) that produces Ne VIII and O VI, and the gas metallicity of the cool phase ranges from Z = 0.3 Z{sub Sun} to supersolar. The cool ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4} K) phases have densities n{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} and small sizes (<4 kpc); these cool clouds are likely to expand and dissipate, and the Ne VIII may be within a transition layer between the cool gas and a surrounding, much hotter medium. The Ne VIII redshift density, dN/dz{approx}7{sup +7}{sub -3}, requires a large number of these clouds for every L > 0.1 L* galaxy and a large effective absorption cross section ({approx}> 100 kpc), and indeed, we find a star-forming {approx}L {sup *} galaxy at the redshift of the z{sub abs} = 0.72478 system, at an impact parameter of 217 kpc. Multiphase absorbers like these Ne VIII systems are likely to be an important reservoir of baryons and metals in the circumgalactic media of galaxies.

  18. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  19. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothermal Resources Project Officer: Eric Hass Total Project Funding: $1.2 million April 24, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Principal Investigator Stuart F Simmons Colorado School of Mines 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research * Determine fundamental controls on fluid-mineral equilibria in six geothermal systems across the Great Basin to

  20. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protections Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL

  1. ARM - Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HomeroomPublicationsSouthern Great Plains Newsletter Archive Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive 2011 March PDF - 2.7MB 2010 September PDF - 1.6MB 2009 January PDF - 472KB February PDF - 472KB 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 January PDF - 7.4MB

  2. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Ying; Lu, Qingyou; Hou, Yubin

    2014-05-15

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is <10% of the total static friction force, which can help increase output force greatly. The piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope.

  3. SE Great Basin Play Fairway Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a Na/K geothermometer probability greater than 200 deg C map, as well as two play fairway analysis (PFA) models. The probability map acts as a composite risk segment for the PFA models. The PFA models differ in their application of magnetotelluric conductors as composite risk segments. These PFA models map out the geothermal potential in the region of SE Great Basin, Utah.

  4. HUBZone, Great Opportunity for Small Businesses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Immediate Release HUBZone, Great Opportunity for Small Businesses CARLSBAD, N.M., March 25, 2003 - To help the region's small businesses attract federal and state work, Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) will offer a Small Business Fair on May 2 in Carlsbad to introduce the U.S. Small Business Administration's (SBA) HUBZone concept and other socioeconomic programs. WTS is the prime contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A HUBZone

  5. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative | Department of Energy Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative October 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the

  6. Shadowing effects on J/ψ and Υ production at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogt, R.

    2015-09-17

    Proton-nucleus collisions have been used as a intermediate baseline for the determination of cold medium effects. They lie between proton-proton collisions in vacuum and nucleus-nucleus collisions which are expected to be dominated by hot matter effects. Modifications of the quark densities in nuclei relative to those of the proton are well established although those of the gluons in the nucleus are not well understood. We focus on the effect of these on quarkonium production in proton-lead collisions at the LHC at a center of mass energy of 5.02 TeV.

  7. Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United ... Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United ...

  8. Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  9. Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment...

  10. Naturener USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Naturener USA, LLC (formerly Great Plains Wind & Energy) Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94111...

  11. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions October 1, 2013 - ...

  12. Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Science Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm Facility Great Lakes Science Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind...

  13. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin C.

    2016-01-06

    Underwaternoise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels and natural underwater sound sources in static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where soundsmore » created by flowing water are part of all measurements, both natural ambient and anthropogenic sources. Vessel sizes ranged from a small fishing boat with 60 hp outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, which were, on average, 40 dB greater than the sound created by an operating hydrokinetic turbine. As a result, a comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed sound attenuation.« less

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to be unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to bemore » unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.« less

  16. Effects of composition and temperature on the large field behavior of [011]{sub C} relaxor ferroelectric single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, John A.; Lynch, Christopher S.; Tian, Jian

    2014-08-04

    The large field behavior of [011]{sub C} cut relaxor ferroelectric lead indium niobate–lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate, xPb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-(1-x-y)Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-yPbTiO{sub 3}, single crystals was experimentally characterized in the piezoelectric d{sub 322}-mode configuration under combined mechanical, electrical, and thermal loading. Increasing the concentration of lead indium niobate and decreasing the concentration of lead titanate in compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary resulted in a decrease of mechanical compliance, dielectric permittivity, and piezoelectric coefficients as well as a shift from a continuous to a discontinuous transformation.

  17. Apparatus and Method for Rapid Cooling of Large Area Substrates in Vacuum -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Apparatus and Method for Rapid Cooling of Large Area Substrates in Vacuum Colorado State University Contact CSU About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary This innovation facilitates rapid cooling in a vacuum (from 200 oC to 25 oC) and greatly diminishes the time required to produce complex thin films requiring multiple deposition steps. Description Thin film deposition in vacuum requires careful control of substrate temperature, as this has a large effect on

  18. Geomechanical effects on CO{sub 2} leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, A.P.; Rutqvist, J.; Cappa, F.

    2013-09-01

    The importance of geomechanicsincluding the potential for faults to reactivate during large scale geologic carbon sequestration operationshas recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO{sub 2} to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO{sub 2} to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO{sub 2} injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO{sub 2} will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

  19. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the

  20. The effect of large amplitude motions on the transition frequency redshift in hydrogen bonded complexes: A physical picture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.; Salmi, Teemu; Hnninen, Vesa; Halonen, Lauri

    2014-05-14

    We describe the vibrational transitions of the donor unit in water dimer with an approach that is based on a three-dimensional local mode model. We perform a perturbative treatment of the intermolecular vibrational modes to improve the transition wavenumber of the hydrogen bonded OH-stretching transition. The model accurately predicts the transition wavenumbers of the vibrations in water dimer compared to experimental values and provides a physical picture that explains the redshift of the hydrogen bonded OH-oscillator. We find that it is unnecessary to include all six intermolecular modes in the vibrational model and that their effect can, to a good approximation, be computed using a potential energy surface calculated at a lower level electronic structure method than that used for the unperturbed model.

  1. Effect of non-uniform electron energy distribution function on plasma production in large arc driven negative ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibata, T.; Koga, S.; Terasaki, R.; Hatayama, A.; Inoue, T.; Dairaku, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Tobari, H.; Tsuchida, K.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.

    2012-02-15

    Spatially non-uniform electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an arc driven negative ion source (JAEA 10A negative ion source: 10 A NIS) is calculated numerically by a three-dimensional Monte Carlo kinetic model for electrons to understand spatial distribution of plasma production (such as atomic and ionic hydrogen (H{sup 0}/H{sup +}) production) in source chamber. The local EEDFs were directly calculated from electron orbits including electromagnetic effects and elastic/inelastic collision forces. From the EEDF, spatial distributions of H{sup 0}/H{sup +} production rate were obtained. The results suggest that spatial non-uniformity of H{sup 0}/H{sup +} productions is enhanced by high energy component of EEDF.

  2. Effects of the scatter in sunspot group tilt angles on the large-scale magnetic field at the solar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, J.; Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2014-08-10

    The tilt angles of sunspot groups represent the poloidal field source in Babcock-Leighton-type models of the solar dynamo and are crucial for the build-up and reversals of the polar fields in surface flux transport (SFT) simulations. The evolution of the polar field is a consequence of Hale's polarity rules, together with the tilt angle distribution which has a systematic component (Joy's law) and a random component (tilt-angle scatter). We determine the scatter using the observed tilt angle data and study the effects of this scatter on the evolution of the solar surface field using SFT simulations with flux input based upon the recorded sunspot groups. The tilt angle scatter is described in our simulations by a random component according to the observed distributions for different ranges of sunspot group size (total umbral area). By performing simulations with a number of different realizations of the scatter we study the effect of the tilt angle scatter on the global magnetic field, especially on the evolution of the axial dipole moment. The average axial dipole moment at the end of cycle 17 (a medium-amplitude cycle) from our simulations was 2.73 G. The tilt angle scatter leads to an uncertainty of 0.78 G (standard deviation). We also considered cycle 14 (a weak cycle) and cycle 19 (a strong cycle) and show that the standard deviation of the axial dipole moment is similar for all three cycles. The uncertainty mainly results from the big sunspot groups which emerge near the equator. In the framework of Babcock-Leighton dynamo models, the tilt angle scatter therefore constitutes a significant random factor in the cycle-to-cycle amplitude variability, which strongly limits the predictability of solar activity.

  3. Effect of large additions of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn, to cement raw meal on the composition and the properties of the clinker and the cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat, M.; Sorrentino, F.

    1996-03-01

    The utilization of hydraulic binders to solidify and to stabilize industrial wastes and municipal garbage is presently recognized as one of the solutions to the problem of environment protection. Te addition of important quantities of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn to raw meals of Portland and calcium aluminate cement modifies the mineralogical composition and the properties of the final cement. Portland cement can absorb a large amount of Cd and Zn. This absorption leads to an increase of setting time and a decrease of strengths of the cement. It also can trap chromium with a short setting time and high strengths. Calcium aluminate cements easily trap Cd and Cr with a delayed setting and good strength but also Pb with normal setting time and strengths. Large quantities of zinc oxide have a deleterious effect on calcium aluminate strengths.

  4. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-007389: Categorical Exclusion Determination R & D Supercritiacl CO2 Rock Chemicals Interactions Properties of CO2-Rich Pore Fluids and Their Effect on Porosity Evolution in EGS ...

  5. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Arm, S.T.; Guzman-Leong, C.E.; Jagoda, L.K.; Stewart, C.W.; Wells, B.E.; Yokuda, S.T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Previous testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was as much as 10 times higher than in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a 1/4-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas generation rates. Results from the 1/4-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, holdup in the chemical waste simulant with AFA was not so greatly increased compared to gas holdup in clay without AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions. (authors)

  6. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; ,

    2011-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  7. Observation of the large magnetocaloric effect and suppression of orbital entropy change in Fe-doped MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Z. H.; Luo, X. E-mail: ypsun@issp.ac.cn; Hu, L.; Tan, S. G.; Liu, Y.; Yuan, B.; Chen, J.; Song, W. H.; Sun, Y. P. E-mail: ypsun@issp.ac.cn

    2014-01-21

    We present the structural and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}V{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3), and investigate the magnetocaloric effect in those compounds. The ferrimagnetic spin ordering is enhanced with the Fe doping at Mn site of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4}, while the orbital ordering is suppressed. Large magnetic entropy changes up to 3.8 J/kg K as well as the relative cooling power up to 110 J/kg at the field change of 0-2 T for Mn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}V{sub 2}O{sub 4} are calculated from the isothermal magnetization measurements. The large orbital entropy change of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4} is suppressed by the Fe doping, while the spin entropy contribution arising from the strong spin-orbit coupling remains. Moreover, the doping of Fe broadens the temperature span of the large magnetic entropy change and increases the relative cooling power of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4} by 2.4 times.

  8. Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin...

  9. WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE April 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis An operator uses ...

  10. JW Great Lakes Wind LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JW Great Lakes Wind LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: JW Great Lakes Wind LLC Place: Cleveland, Ohio Zip: 44114-4420 Sector: Wind energy Product: Ohio based subsidiary of Juwi...

  11. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  12. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  13. The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, John

    2014-01-31

    This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

  14. Large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers for pH measurement at the Nernstian limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fakih, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.fakih@mail.mcgill.ca; Sabri, Shadi; Szkopek, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.szkopek@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Mahvash, Farzaneh [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Dpartement de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Qubec Montral, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Nannini, Matthieu [McGill Nanotools Microfab, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Siaj, Mohamed [Dpartement de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Qubec Montral, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2014-08-25

    We have fabricated and characterized large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers and demonstrated pH sensitivities approaching the Nernstian limit. Low temperature atomic layer deposition was used to deposit tantalum pentoxide atop large area graphene ISFETs. The charge neutrality point of graphene, inferred from quantum capacitance or channel conductance, was used to monitor surface potential in the presence of an electrolyte with varying pH. Bare graphene ISFETs exhibit negligible response, while graphene ISFETs with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers show increased sensitivity reaching up to 55?mV/pH over pH 3 through pH 8. Applying the Bergveld model, which accounts for site binding and a Guoy-Chapman-Stern picture of the surface-electrolyte interface, the increased pH sensitivity can be attributed to an increased buffer capacity reaching up to 10{sup 14} sites/cm{sup 2}. ISFET response was found to be stable to better than 0.05 pH units over the course of two weeks.

  15. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds

  16. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  17. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  18. Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technology Marketing Summaries -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technology Marketing Summaries Here you'll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC). The summaries provide descriptions of the technologies including their benefits, applications and industries, and development stage. Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center 43 Technology Marketing Summaries Category Title and Abstract Laboratories Date Biomass and

  19. Great China New Energy Technology Services Co Ltd GCNETS | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Energy Technology Services Co Ltd GCNETS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great China New Energy Technology Services Co Ltd (GCNETS) Place: China Product: China-based...

  20. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of ...

  1. North Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great River, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.756272, -73.170087 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  2. Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great River, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.7212097, -73.1576139 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  3. Great Plains The Camelina Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Camelina Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains (The Camelina Company) Place: Montana Zip: MT 59911 Product: Manufacturer and marketer of biodiesel from...

  4. Great Bend, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Bend, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.1538473, -96.8020228 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  5. Lanzhou Great Wall Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wall Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lanzhou Great Wall Development Co., Ltd. Place: Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China Zip: 730000 Sector: Hydro Product:...

  6. EIS-0499: Great Northern Transmission Line Project, Minnesota...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0499: Great Northern Transmission Line Project, Minnesota Summary This EIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to ...

  7. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  8. The Great Lakes Insitute for Energy Innovation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Insitute for Energy Innovation Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Great Lakes Insitute for Energy Innovation Place: Cleveland, Ohio Zip: 44106 Website: energy.case.edu...

  9. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstrationn Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  10. GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region J. Braun, T. Van ... and characterize the four-dimensional distribution of water vapor within the atmosphere. ...

  11. Early science with the large millimeter telescope: exploring the effect of AGN activity on the relationships between molecular gas, dust, and star formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Calzetti, Daniela; Narayanan, Gopal; Schloerb, F. Peter; Yun, Min S.; Aretxaga, Itziar; Montaa, Alfredo; Vega, Olga; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Shi, Yong

    2014-12-01

    The molecular gas, H{sub 2}, that fuels star formation in galaxies is difficult to observe directly. As such, the ratio of L {sub IR} to L{sub CO}{sup ?} is an observational estimate of the star formation rate compared with the amount of molecular gas available to form stars, which is related to the star formation efficiency and the inverse of the gas consumption timescale. We test what effect an IR luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN) has on the ratio L{sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ?} in a sample of 24 intermediate redshift galaxies from the 5 mJy Unbiased Spitzer Extragalactic Survey (5MUSES). We obtain new CO(1-0) observations with the Redshift Search Receiver on the Large Millimeter Telescope. We diagnose the presence and strength of an AGN using Spitzer IRS spectroscopy. We find that removing the AGN contribution to L{sub IR}{sup tot} results in a mean L{sub IR}{sup SF}/L{sub CO}{sup ?} for our entire sample consistent with the mean L{sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ?} derived for a large sample of star forming galaxies from z ? 0-3. We also include in our comparison the relative amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission for our sample and a literature sample of local and high-redshift ultra luminous infrared galaxies and find a consistent trend between L{sub 6.2}/L{sub IR}{sup SF} and L{sub IR}{sup SF}/L{sub CO}{sup ?}, such that small dust grain emission decreases with increasing L{sub IR}{sup SF}/L{sub CO}{sup ?} for both local and high-redshift dusty galaxies.

  12. Great Northern Transmission Line Floodplain and Wetland Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Floodplain and Wetland Assessment Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability January 2016 Great Northern Transmission Line Floodplain and Wetland Assessment Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability January 2016 i Great Northern Transmission Line Floodplain and Wetland Assessment January 2016 Contents 1.0 Introduction

  13. Weather pattern climatology of the Great Plains and the related wind regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barchet, W.R.

    1982-11-01

    The meteorology of the Great Plains can be described as a constant progression of air masses, fronts and cyclonic storm systems. Each of these meteorological conditions can be characterized by identifiable isobaric and related weather parameter patterns. Nine such patterns have been defined to type the weather patterns in the Great Plains. Time series of weather pattern types were produced for 62 stations on the Great Plains. Statistical analyses of these time series produced annual and seasonal frequencies of occurrence of the weather pattern types. Maps of the annual and seasonal frequency of occurrence of weather pattern type are presented for the Great Plains. Persistence and alternation frequencies match what is expected for traveling temperate latitude cyclones, anticyclones and fronts. The wind regime for stations at which the anemometer height and location was constant (and known) for a minimum of three consecutive years was stratified by weather pattern type. Statistical analyses were made to show the response of the wind to the large-scale distribution of air pressure associated with a weather pattern type. The response of the wind to the weather pattern is a site-specific result of the interaction of the large-scale meteorology with local terrain, surface roughness and atmospheric stability. Mean wind speed discriminates between pairs of weather pattern types with better than 75% confidence for more than two-thirds of the possible pairs of weather pattern types.

  14. Low-Risk and Cost-Effective Prior Savings Estimates for Large-Scale Energy Conservation Projects in Housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A; Hughes, Patrick; Thornton, Jeff W.

    1997-08-01

    totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Our analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data (Shonder and Hughes, 1997) indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper. Using the method outlined, we have been able to predict this savings within 0.1% of its measured value, using only pre-construction energy consumption data, and data from one pilot test site. It is well-known that predictions of savings from energy conservation programs are often optimistic, especially in the case of residential retrofits. Fels and keating (1993) cite several examples of programs which achieved as little as 20% of the predicted energy savings. Factors which influence the sometimes large discrepancies between actual and predicted savings include changes in occupancy, take-back effects (in which more efficient system operation leads occupants to choose higher levels of comfort), and changes in base energy use (e.g. through purchase of additional appliances such as washing machines and clothes dryers). An even larger factor, perhaps, is the inaccuracy inherent in the engineering models (BLAST, DOE-2, etc.) commonly used to estimate building energy consumption, if these models are not first calibrated to site-monitored data. For example, prior estimates of base-wide savings from the Fort Polk ESPC were on the order of 40% of pre-retrofit electrical use; our analysis has shown the true savings for the entire project (which includes

  15. Gyrokinetic large eddy simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morel, P.; Navarro, A. Banon; Albrecht-Marc, M.; Carati, D.; Merz, F.; Goerler, T.; Jenko, F.

    2011-07-15

    The large eddy simulation approach is adapted to the study of plasma microturbulence in a fully three-dimensional gyrokinetic system. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is studied with the GENE code for both a standard resolution and a reduced resolution with a model for the sub-grid scale turbulence. A simple dissipative model for representing the effect of the sub-grid scales on the resolved scales is proposed and tested. Once calibrated, the model appears to be able to reproduce most of the features of the free energy spectra for various values of the ion temperature gradient.

  16. Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) ...

  17. EIS-0106: Great Falls-Conrad Transmission Line Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of a 230-kilovolt transmission line from Great Falls, Montana, to Conrad, Montana.

  18. Title Geology of the Great Basin. Copyright Issue Entire Book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fiero, B. 101084 Document Date 1186 Document Type Book ERC Index number 05.09.128 Box Number 1672-1 Recipients Unversity of Nevada Reno Press ADI " Geology of the Great...

  19. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of ... on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the siting of offshore wind power in the Great Lakes. ...

  20. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 4-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change....

  1. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS Summary Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a ...

  2. Great Power Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Power Battery Co., Ltd Place: China Product: Guangzhou - based maker of Li-Ion, Li-Polymer, LiFePO4, NiCd, and NiMH...

  3. Great Falls, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Great Falls is a census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia.1 Registered Energy...

  4. Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the...

  5. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy (MIE) Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  6. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations...

  7. COLLOQUIUM: Ocean Acoustic Ecology: Great Whales, Ocean Scales...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 23, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Ocean Acoustic Ecology: Great Whales, Ocean Scales, Big Data Dr. Christopher Clark Cornell University ...

  8. Great opportunity for Native American-owned businesses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great opportunity for Native American-owned businesses Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Great opportunity for Native American-owned businesses Proposals for Native American Venture Acceleration Fund due October 18. September 1, 2016 Phoebe Suina of High Water Mark, LLC, was a Native American VAF winner in 2015. Phoebe Suina of High Water Mark, LLC, was a Native American

  9. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regions | Department of Energy Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions October 1, 2013 - 1:41pm Addthis 2012 detector deployment at Matinicus Rock Light Station located 18 miles off the coast of Maine. Photo by Stantec 2012 detector deployment at Matinicus Rock Light Station located 18 miles off the coast of Maine. Photo by Stantec This is an excerpt from the Third Quarter

  10. Great Basin semi-arid woodland dynamics during the late quaternary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.; Hemphill, M.L.; Sharpe, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Semi-arid woodlands have dominated the middle elevations of Great Basin mountain ranges during the Holocene where subalpine woodlands prevailed during the Pleistocene. Ancient woodrat middens, and in a few cases pollen records indicate in the late Pleistocene and early Holocene woodland history lowered elevation of subalpine woodland species. After a middle Holocene retrenchment at elevations in excess of 500 meters above today, Juniper-dominated semi-arid woodland reached its late Holocene maximum areal extent during the Neoglacial (2 to 4 ka). These records, along with others indicate contracting semi-arid woodland after the Neoglacial about 1.9 ka. Desert shrub community expansion coupled with increased precariousness of wetland areas in the southern Great Basin between 1.9 and 1.5 ka coincide with shrinking wet-lands in the west-central and northern Great Basin. Coincident greater grass abundance in northern Great Basin sagebrush steppe, reaching its maximum between 1.5 and 1.2 ka, corresponds to dramatic increases in bison remains in the archaeological sites of the northern Intermontane West. Pollen and woodrat midden records indicate that this drought ended about 1.5 ka. Succeeding ameliorating conditions resulted in the sudden northward and downward expansion of pinon into areas that had been dominated by juniper during the Neoglacial. Maximum areal extent of pinon dominated semi-arid woodland in west-central Nevada was centered at 1.2 ka. This followed by 100 years the shift in dominance from juniper to pinon in southern Nevada semi-arid woodlands. Great Basin woodlands suffered from renewed severe droughts between .5 to .6 ka. Effectively wetter conditions during the {open_quotes}Little Ice Age{close_quotes} resulted in re-expansion of semi-arid woodland. Activities related to European settlement in the Great Basin have modified prehistoric factors or imposed new ones that are affecting woodland response to climate.

  11. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are: a review of a greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered home, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution for solar greenhouses, and the future of solar greenhouses.

  12. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are a review of greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered house, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution from solar greenhouses, and the future for solar greenhouses.

  13. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison through Coursera, this four-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change.

  14. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527

  15. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527

  16. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  17. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Large Scale Jobs Running Large Scale Jobs Users face various challenges with running and scaling large scale jobs on peta-scale production systems. For example, certain applications may not have enough memory per core, the default environment variables may need to be adjusted, or I/O dominates run time. This page lists some available programming and run time tuning options and tips users can try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers

  18. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along‐fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson‐Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin

  19. Parameterizing atmosphere-land surface exchange for climate models with satellite data: A case study for the Southern Great Plains CART site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, W.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution satellite data provide detailed, quantitative descriptions of land surface characteristics over large areas so that objective scale linkage becomes feasible. With the aid of satellite data, Sellers et al. and Wood and Lakshmi examined the linearity of processes scaled up from 30 m to 15 km. If the phenomenon is scale invariant, then the aggregated value of a function or flux is equivalent to the function computed from aggregated values of controlling variables. The linear relation may be realistic for limited land areas having no large surface contrasts to cause significant horizontal exchange. However, for areas with sharp surface contrasts, horizontal exchange and different dynamics in the atmospheric boundary may induce nonlinear interactions, such as at interfaces of land-water, forest-farm land, and irrigated crops-desert steppe. The linear approach, however, represents the simplest scenario, and is useful for developing an effective scheme for incorporating subgrid land surface processes into large-scale models. Our studies focus on coupling satellite data and ground measurements with a satellite-data-driven land surface model to parameterize surface fluxes for large-scale climate models. In this case study, we used surface spectral reflectance data from satellite remote sensing to characterize spatial and temporal changes in vegetation and associated surface parameters in an area of about 350 {times} 400 km covering the southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program.

  20. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  1. PPPL: Great story, Bright Future | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL: Great story, Bright Future By Kitta MacPherson May 12, 2011 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Perspective on: The future of fusion Name: Stewart Prager Title: Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Administrative focus:Prager, a well-known plasma physicist and fusion scientist with a distinguished career and a record of discovery at the University

  2. Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

    1981-12-23

    The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

  3. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers and compiler options The available compilers on Hopper are PGI, Cray, Intel, GNU,...

  4. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to...

  5. Federal interagency ecosystem management initiative: Great Lakes ecosystem case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordle, S.

    1995-12-01

    In August 1994 a team of representatives from six Federal agencies conducted a case study of ecosystem management practices in the Great Lakes. Its report was based on interviews carried out in Chicago, Illinois, and Ann Arbor, Michigan; on phone interviews; and on written materials provided by Federal and State officials as well as representatives of Tribal organizations, non-governmental organizations, academia, industry, and the International Joint Commission. The report describes mainly what the participants told or provided to the survey team, with a few explicit conclusions and recommendations from the team. The issues covered by the survey included Legal, Institutional, Science and Information, Budget, and Public Participation.

  6. Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willcox, Karen; Marzouk, Youssef

    2013-11-12

    The SAGUARO (Scalable Algorithms for Groundwater Uncertainty Analysis and Robust Optimization) Project focused on the development of scalable numerical algorithms for large-scale Bayesian inversion in complex systems that capitalize on advances in large-scale simulation-based optimization and inversion methods. The project was a collaborative effort among MIT, the University of Texas at Austin, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Sandia National Laboratories. The research was directed in three complementary areas: efficient approximations of the Hessian operator, reductions in complexity of forward simulations via stochastic spectral approximations and model reduction, and employing large-scale optimization concepts to accelerate sampling. The MIT--Sandia component of the SAGUARO Project addressed the intractability of conventional sampling methods for large-scale statistical inverse problems by devising reduced-order models that are faithful to the full-order model over a wide range of parameter values; sampling then employs the reduced model rather than the full model, resulting in very large computational savings. Results indicate little effect on the computed posterior distribution. On the other hand, in the Texas--Georgia Tech component of the project, we retain the full-order model, but exploit inverse problem structure (adjoint-based gradients and partial Hessian information of the parameter-to-observation map) to implicitly extract lower dimensional information on the posterior distribution; this greatly speeds up sampling methods, so that fewer sampling points are needed. We can think of these two approaches as ``reduce then sample'' and ``sample then reduce.'' In fact, these two approaches are complementary, and can be used in conjunction with each other. Moreover, they both exploit deterministic inverse problem structure, in the form of adjoint-based gradient and Hessian information of the underlying parameter-to-observation map, to achieve their

  7. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Applicaiton from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice. EA-389 Great Bay Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export...

  8. Low-risk and cost-effective prior savings estimates for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.; Thornton, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, the authors have collected energy use data which allowed them to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. They believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights. The analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper.

  9. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 8280

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Arm, Stuart T.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-06-03

    The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Prior testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was up to 10 times that in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a -scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas gen geration rates. Results from the -scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, gas holdup in clay without AFA is comparable to that in the chemical waste simulant with AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions.

  10. Quantitative interlake comparison of thyroid pathology in Great Lakes coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moccia, R.D.; Leatherland, J.F.; Sonstegard, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Lakes Ontario, Michigan, Erie, or Huron were found to suffer epizootics of thyroid hyperplasia and goiters which appeared to have an environmental etiology. There were 13-fold differences in goiter prevalence within the Great Lakes, and the differences in goiter frequency were correlated with the degree of thyroid hyperplasia. A means of assessing the degree of thyroid hyperplasia (thyroid index) is described, and the derived index was used to facilitate statistical interlake and interspecies comparisons. Despite the hyperplastic (or goitered) condition in all prespawning or spawning Great Lakes salmon, serum thyroid hormone levels were generally higher than in prespawning coho salmon from the Fraser River, British Columbia, indicating that the Great Lakes fish were not necessarily hypothyroid. The hyperplastic lesions appear to undergo progressive changes: (a) large follicles, partly colloid depleted, surrounded by cuboidal epithelial cells; (b) small follicles, largely colloid depleted, surrounded by columnar epithelial cells (in this form, the follicles commonly assume a trabeculate arrangement); (c) ''microfollicles'' with greatly enlarged columnar epithelial cells encompassing very small follicles; (d) apparently afollicular lesions with little or no colloid in evidence. There was some evidence of benign invasiveness, although the lesions generally resembled simple hyperplastic parenchymatous goiters seen in humans.

  11. Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzel, Frederic

    2009-09-01

    The Council of Great Lakes Governors administered the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This Partnership grew out of the existing Regional Biomass Energy Program which the Council had administered since 1983. The GLBSRP includes the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. The GLBSRP's overall goal is to facilitate the increased production and use of bioenergy and biobased products throughout the region. The GLBSRP has traditionally addressed its goals and objectives through a three-pronged approach: providing grants to the States; undertaking region-wide education, outreach and technology transfer projects; and, providing in-house management, support and information dissemination. At the direction of US Department of Energy, the primary emphasis of the GLBSRP in recent years has been education and outreach. Therefore, most activities have centered on developing educational materials, hosting workshops and conferences, and providing technical assistance. This report summarizes a selection of activities that were accomplished under this cooperative agreement.

  12. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Coolbaugh, Mark F

    2010-11-01

    Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

  13. Shallow Water Offshore Wind Optimization for the Great Lakes (DE-FOA-0000415) Final Report: A Conceptual Design for Wind Energy in the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wissemann, Chris; White, Stanley M

    2014-02-28

    The primary objective of the project was to develop a innovative Gravity Base Foundation (GBF) concepts, including fabrication yards, launching systems and installation equipment, for a 500MW utility scale project in the Great Lakes (Lake Erie). The goal was to lower the LCOE by 25%. The project was the first to investigate an offshore wind project in the Great Lakes and it has furthered the body of knowledge for foundations and installation methods within Lake Erie. The project collected historical geotechnical information for Lake Erie and also used recently obtained data from the LEEDCo Icebreaker Project (FOA DE-EE0005989) geotechnical program to develop the conceptual designs. Using these data-sets, the project developed design wind and wave conditions from actual buoy data in order to develop a concept that would de-risk a project using a GBF. These wind and wave conditions were then utilized to create reference designs for various foundations specific to installation in Lake Erie. A project partner on the project (Weeks Marine) provided input for construction and costing the GBF fabrication and installation. By having a marine contractor with experience with large marine projects as part of the team provides credibility to the LCOE developed by NREL. NREL then utilized the design and construction costing information as part of the LCOE model. The report summarizes the findings of the project. • Developed a cost model and “baseline” LCOE • Documented Site Conditions within Lake Erie • Developed Fabrication, Installation and Foundations Innovative Concept Designs • Evaluated LCOE Impact of Innovations • Developed Assembly line “Rail System” for GBF Construction and Staging • Developed Transit-Inspired Foundation Designs which incorporated: Semi-Floating Transit with Supplemental Pontoons Barge mounted Winch System • Developed GBF with “Penetration Skirt” • Developed Integrated GBF with Turbine Tower • Developed Turbine, Plant

  14. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  15. The effect of large-scale model time step and multiscale coupling frequency on cloud climatology, vertical structure, and rainfall extremes in a superparameterized GCM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sungduk; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2015-12-17

    The effect of global climate model (GCM) time step—which also controls how frequently global and embedded cloud resolving scales are coupled—is examined in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model ver 3.0. Systematic bias reductions of time-mean shortwave cloud forcing (~10 W/m2) and longwave cloud forcing (~5 W/m2) occur as scale coupling frequency increases, but with systematically increasing rainfall variance and extremes throughout the tropics. An overarching change in the vertical structure of deep tropical convection, favoring more bottom-heavy deep convection as a global model time step is reduced may help orchestrate these responses. The weak temperature gradient approximation is more faithfully satisfied when a high scale coupling frequency (a short global model time step) is used. These findings are distinct from the global model time step sensitivities of conventionally parameterized GCMs and have implications for understanding emergent behaviors of multiscale deep convective organization in superparameterized GCMs. Lastly, the results may also be useful for helping to tune them.

  16. The effect of large-scale model time step and multiscale coupling frequency on cloud climatology, vertical structure, and rainfall extremes in a superparameterized GCM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Sungduk; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2015-12-17

    The effect of global climate model (GCM) time step—which also controls how frequently global and embedded cloud resolving scales are coupled—is examined in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model ver 3.0. Systematic bias reductions of time-mean shortwave cloud forcing (~10 W/m2) and longwave cloud forcing (~5 W/m2) occur as scale coupling frequency increases, but with systematically increasing rainfall variance and extremes throughout the tropics. An overarching change in the vertical structure of deep tropical convection, favoring more bottom-heavy deep convection as a global model time step is reduced may help orchestrate these responses. The weak temperature gradient approximation is more faithfullymore » satisfied when a high scale coupling frequency (a short global model time step) is used. These findings are distinct from the global model time step sensitivities of conventionally parameterized GCMs and have implications for understanding emergent behaviors of multiscale deep convective organization in superparameterized GCMs. Lastly, the results may also be useful for helping to tune them.« less

  17. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region.

  18. Mass Estinctions Caused by Large Bolide Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavarez, Luis W.

    1987-01-01

    In this talk, I will describe the wealth of evidence that has forced my colleagues and me to conclude that the great mass extinctions, 65 million years ago, were caused by a large bolide impact on the earth. Bolide is a new word to most people, and it means any piece of solar system debris, such as a meteorite, asteroid, or comet nucleus. As I will show, the bolide responsible for the extinction of most of the then existing species, including the dinosaurs, was about 10 kilometers in diameter.

  19. A one-year climatology using data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site micropulse lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P.; Spinhirne, J.; Scott, S.

    1996-04-01

    The micropulse lidar (MPL) has been operational at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program for the past 15 months. The compact MPL is unique among research lidar systems in that it is eye-safe and operates continuously, except during precipitation. The MPL is capable of detecting cloud base throughout the entire depth of the troposphere. The MPL data set is an unprecedented time series of cloud heights. It is a vital resource for understanding the frequency of cloud ocurrence and the impact of clouds on the surface radiation budget, as well as for large-scale model validation and satellite retrieval verification. The raw lidar data are processed for cloud base height at a temporal frequency of one minute and a vertical resolution of 270 m. The resultant time series of cloud base is used to generate histograms as a function of month and time of day. Sample results are described.

  20. Large Group Visits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Group Visits Large Group Visits All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Contact Us thumbnail of 1350 Central Avenue (505) 667-4444 Email Let us know if you plan to bring a group of 10 or more. All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Parking for buses and RVs is available on Iris Street behind the Museum off of 15th St. See attached map (pdf). Contact

  1. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  2. DRAMATIC CHANGE IN JUPITER'S GREAT RED SPOT FROM SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; De Pater, Imke; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Marcus, Philip S.

    2014-12-20

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500nm, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630nm. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  3. Extra-Large Memory Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extra-Large Memory Nodes Extra-Large Memory Nodes Extra-Large Memory Nodes Overview Carver has two "extra-large" memory nodes; each node has four 8-core Intel X7550 ("Nehalem EX")...

  4. Large Eddy Simulations: Where

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eddy Simulations: Where observations and modeling collides July 18, 2015 Cascade of Models ⌅ General Circulation Models ⌅ Regional Models ⌅ Large-Eddy Simulations ⌅ Direct Numerical Simulations LES GCM vs LES History Theory What if? Using LES together with Observations Testbed LES 2 / 37 Cascade of Models General Circulation Models ⌅ Domain size: Entire Earth ⌅ Horizontal Boundary conditions: None ⌅ Horizontal grid spacing: 50km ⌅ Total number of points: about 400 ⇥ 400 ⇥ 100

  5. Meet with Large Businesses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meet with Large Businesses and learn about upcoming acquisitions! * Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) * National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) * Small Business Administration (SBA) * U.S. Department of Energy / Energy, Efficiency, and Renewable Energy (EERE) * U.S. Department of Energy / Golden Field Office (GFO) * Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) * Colorado Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) SMALL BUSINESS OUTREACH "Federal Contracting with Small

  6. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; Fenech Conti, Ian; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gentile, Marc; Gill, Mandeep S. S.; Hogg, David W.; Huff, Eric M.; Jee, M. James; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Kilbinger, Martin; Kuntzer, Thibault; Lang, Dustin; Luo, Wentao; March, Marisa C.; Marshall, Philip J.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Miller, Lance; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Ngole Mboula, Fred Maurice; Nurbaeva, Guldariya; Okura, Yuki; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Rhodes, Jason; Schneider, Michael D.; Shan, Huanyuan; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simet, Melanie; Starck, Jean -Luc; Sureau, Florent; Tewes, Malte; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Zhang, Jun; Zuntz, Joe

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.

  7. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; et al

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty aboutmore » a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.« less

  8. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; Fenech Conti, Ian; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gentile, Marc; Gill, Mandeep S. S.; Hogg, David W.; Huff, Eric M.; Jee, M. James; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Kilbinger, Martin; Kuntzer, Thibault; Lang, Dustin; Luo, Wentao; March, Marisa C.; Marshall, Philip J.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Miller, Lance; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Ngole Mboula, Fred Maurice; Nurbaeva, Guldariya; Okura, Yuki; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Rhodes, Jason; Schneider, Michael D.; Shan, Huanyuan; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simet, Melanie; Starck, Jean -Luc; Sureau, Florent; Tewes, Malte; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Zhang, Jun; Zuntz, Joe

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Srsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.

  9. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  10. Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines February ...

  11. EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rescission of export authorization to export electric energy to Canada. EA-389-A Great Bay ... Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada

  12. EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in ...

  13. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for ...

  14. Large Particle Titanate Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-08

    This research project was aimed at developing a synthesis technique for producing large particle size monosodium titanate (MST) to benefit high level waste (HLW) processing at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Two applications were targeted, first increasing the size of the powdered MST used in batch contact processing to improve the filtration performance of the material, and second preparing a form of MST suitable for deployment in a column configuration. Increasing the particle size should lead to improvements in filtration flux, and decreased frequency of filter cleaning leading to improved throughput. Deployment of MST in a column configuration would allow for movement from a batch process to a more continuous process. Modifications to the typical MST synthesis led to an increase in the average particle size. Filtration testing on dead-end filters showed improved filtration rates with the larger particle material; however, no improvement in filtration rate was realized on a crossflow filter. In order to produce materials suitable for column deployment several approaches were examined. First, attempts were made to coat zirconium oxide microspheres (196 µm) with a layer of MST. This proved largely unsuccessful. An alternate approach was then taken synthesizing a porous monolith of MST which could be used as a column. Several parameters were tested, and conditions were found that were able to produce a continuous structure versus an agglomeration of particles. This monolith material showed Sr uptake comparable to that of previously evaluated samples of engineered MST in batch contact testing.

  15. Sean Large | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sean Large Sean Large Sean Large - Intern with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Most Recent Be Part of the Solution! June 22 What's Up With Fuel Cells? June 8

  16. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VI, LLC | Department of Energy 89 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, (CN).pdf (579.86 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-327-A DC Energy,

  17. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  18. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. -K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Lieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the "Market Characterization" project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University, and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within the Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as "archetypes" by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market.

  19. Large forging manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thamboo, Samuel V.; Yang, Ling

    2002-01-01

    A process for forging large components of Alloy 718 material so that the components do not exhibit abnormal grain growth includes the steps of: a) providing a billet with an average grain size between ASTM 0 and ASTM 3; b) heating the billet to a temperature of between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; c) upsetting the billet to obtain a component part with a minimum strain of 0.125 in at least selected areas of the part; d) reheating the component part to a temperature between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; e) upsetting the component part to a final configuration such that said selected areas receive no strains between 0.01 and 0.125; f) solution treating the component part at a temperature of between 1725.degree. F. and 1750.degree. F.; and g) aging the component part over predetermined times at different temperatures. A modified process achieves abnormal grain growth in selected areas of a component where desirable.

  20. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  1. EM Active Sites (large) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Active Sites (large) EM Active Sites (large) Center

  2. Total and methyl mercury in selected Great Lakes tributaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurley, J.P.; Cowell, S.E.; Shafer, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    Eleven Lake Michigan tributaries were chosen to investigate the effects of chemical and physical conditions in rivers on mercury partitioning and transport. Preliminary results from 1994 indicate that mean unfiltered Hg{sub T} ranged from about 1-2 ng L{sup -1} in the Manistique and Muskegon R. to 10-30 ng L{sup -1} in the St. Joseph and Fox R. Highest Hg{sub T} fluxes were generally associated with increased particle loads. Preliminary estimates from a subset of Lake Michigan tributaries also suggest that methylmercury loading from riverine inputs may be important. Additional work on 19 Lake Superior tributaries in Spring 1993 reveal that MeHg and DOC are correlated. Results from these tributaries are consistent with our {open_quotes}Background Trace Metals in Wisconsin Rivers{close_quotes} study, where greater yields of Hg{sub T} were observed with increased particle loading and elevated MeHg yields were observed from watersheds with significant forest and wetland regions.

  3. The great ``retail wheeling`` illusion, and more productive energy futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanagh, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper sets out the reasons why many environmental and public interest organizations oppose retail wheeling. Cavanagh argues that retail wheeling would destroy incentives for energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation--benefits that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. The current debate over the competitive restructuring of the electric power industry is critical from both economic and environmental perspectives. All attempts to introduce broad-scale retail wheeling in the United States have failed; instead, state regulators are choosing a path that emphasizes competition and choice, but acknowledges fundamental differences between wholesale and retail markets. Given the physical laws governing the movement of power over centrally controlled grids, the choice offered to customers through retail wheeling of electricity is a fiction -- a re-allocation of costs is all that is really possible. Everyone wants to be able to claim the cheapest electricity on the system; unfortunately, there is not enough to go around. By endorsing the fiction of retail wheeling for certain types of customers, regulators would be recasting the retail electricity business as a kind of commodity exchange. That would reward suppliers who could minimize near-term unit costs of electricity while simultaneously destroying incentives for many investments, including cost-effective energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation, that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. This result, which has been analogized unpersuasively to trends in telecommunications and natural gas regulation, is neither desirable nor inevitable. States should go on saying no to retail wheeling in order to be able to create something better: regulatory reforms that align utility and societal interests in pursuing a least-cost energy future. An appendix contains notes on some recent Retail Wheeling Campaigns.

  4. EO 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes (2010)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This order establishes a national policy to ensure the protection, maintenance, and restoration of the health of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes ecosystems and resources, enhance the sustainability...

  5. Executive Order 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This order establishes a national policy to ensure the protection, maintenance, and restoration of the health of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes ecosystems and resources, enhance the sustainability...

  6. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    applicationpdf) Description Eastern Great Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  7. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-398 Minnesota Power- Great Northern Transmission Line

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Application from Great Northern  (GNTL) to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border.

  8. Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Under Varying Meteorological Conditions: Southern Great Plains Vs. Pt. Reyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M.; Schwartz, S.; Kim, B.-G.; Miller, M.; Liu, Y.; Min, Q.

    2008-03-10

    Several studies have demonstrated that cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. For example, entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by enhancing drop evaporation. However, the effect of entrainment mixing and other forms or turbulence is still quite uncertain. Although these factors and aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered together when evaluating the efficacy of aerosol indirect effects, the underlying mechanisms appear to be dependent upon each other. In addition, accounting for them is impossible with the current understanding of aerosol indirect effect. Therefore, careful objective screening and analysis of observations are needed to determine the extent to which mixing related properties affect cloud optical properties, apart from the aerosol first indirect effect. This study addresses the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the context of varying meteorological conditions based on ARM data obtained at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma and at Pt. Reyes, California. Previous analyses of the continental stratiform clouds at the SGP site have shown that the thicker clouds of high liquid water path (LWP) tend to contain sub adiabatic LWPs. These sub adiabatic LWPs, which result from active mixing processes, correspond to a lower susceptibility of the clouds to aerosol-cloud interactions, and, hence, to reduced aerosol indirect effects. In contrast, the consistently steady and thin maritime stratus clouds observed at Pt. Reyes are much closer to adiabatic. These clouds provide an excellent benchmark for the study of the aerosol influence on modified marine clouds relative to continental clouds, since they form in a much more homogeneous meteorological environment than those at the continental site.

  9. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grasses (prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.

  10. Look At (Search) Large Files

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-07-13

    Scanning large files for information can be time consuming and expensive when using edit utilities on large mainframe computers. The reason is that editors must usually load the file into a buffer.

  11. Reduction of fire hazards on large mining equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maria I. De Rosa

    2008-09-15

    Although standards and regulations are in place to prevent large mining equipment fires, recent analyses of mine accident data show that mining equipment fires still occur with alarming frequency and grave consequences, particularly at all surface mines and in underground metal/nonmetal mines. Recently technological advances in fire protection, combined with the statistical data on equipment fires, led NIOSH to reinvestigate this and to improve operator safety. NIOSH demonstrated that newly developed technologies, such as dual cab fire inerting systems and engine compartment fire barriers, can greatly enhance operator safety and lessen the damage of property during large mobile equipment fires. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Extra-Large Memory Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extra-Large Memory Nodes Extra-Large Memory Nodes Extra-Large Memory Nodes Overview Carver has two "extra-large" memory nodes; each node has four 8-core Intel X7550 ("Nehalem EX") 2.0 GHz processors (32 cores total) and 1TB memory. These nodes are available through the queue "reg_xlmem". They can be used for interactive and batch jobs that require large amount of memory (16GB per core or more). reg_xlmem queue Please refer to the "Queues and Policies" page

  13. Modal Dynamics and Stability of Large Multi-megawatt Deepwater...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) rotor configuration offers a potential transformative ... The effect of the large rotating structure on the rigid body modes of the turbineplatform ...

  14. Great Lakes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to a changing global environment; (v) support sustainable, safe, secure, and ... uses, and preserve critical ecosystem services to meet economic, environmental, ...

  15. Large

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... at the beginning of the discharge, which could damage the detectors. The shutter has a finite opening time of 3 ms. After laser fire is given to the laser, roughly 1.25 ms are ...

  16. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River. Annual report, September 7, 1995--September 8, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.L.; Miller, M.C.; Moller, B.J.; Marsh, S.L.

    1996-03-01

    Fish were collected, using electroshocking techniques, from three sites in the Great Miami River (GMR) (September 7 and 8, 1995) as part of an annual survey for Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO). The objective was to collect fish fillets for uranium analysis and examine the health of the fish community in comparison to data collected during the past eleven years. Samples were taken from upstream (river mile = RM; RM 38) and downstream (RM 19) of the Fernald site as well as from near the Fernald effluent line (RM 24). RM 38 is isolated from upstream fish migration by two dams located near Hamilton, Ohio and fish collected from this site should not be influenced by processes at the downstream sites. Samples of 549 fish from 29 species belonging to nine families provided seventy-two samples for uranium analysis by an independent laboratory. Chemical analysis of water samples collected at each site was used to determine the effect of chemical parameters on the fish community. This study focused on comparison of the density, biomass and diversity of the fish community between sites and between years.

  17. Simulation of oil-slick transport in Great Lakes connecting channels. Theory and model formulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, H.T.; Yapa, P.D.; Petroski, M.E.

    1990-02-01

    Two-dimensional computer models for simulating oil slick movement in rivers and lakes were developed and then applied to the connecting channels of the upper Great Lakes. In these models the oil slick is considered to be a collection of discrete oil patches. The transformation of an oil slick due to advection, spreading, evaporation and dissolution are considered. In open-water regions the advection of oil patches in the slick are determined by the water current and wind using the drifting factor formulation. Formulas consider the balance of inertia, gravity, viscous and surface tension forces. The oil slick transformation model developed in this study contains as many processes as can be effectively and analytically modeled. The model has several special features, including the ability to model instantaneous and continuous spills, the ability to realistically describe the irregular shapes of an oil slick and the ability to account for the time-dependent variation of the flow conditions. The computer programs are designed so that it will be easy to refine the model elements and expand the model to include additional slick transformation processes.

  18. A boundary-layer cloud study using Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation testbed (CART) data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, B.; Mace, G.; Dong, X.; Syrett, W.

    1996-04-01

    Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus - are closely coupled involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds and to provide descriptions of cloud and boundary layer structure that can be used to test parameterizations used in climate models. But before the CART data can be used for process studies and parameterization testing, it is necessary to evaluate and validate data and to develop techniques for effectively combining the data to provide meaningful descriptions of cloud and boundary layer characteristics. In this study we use measurements made during an intensive observing period we consider a case where low-level stratus were observed at the site for about 18 hours. This case is being used to examine the temporal evolution of cloud base, cloud top, cloud liquid water content, surface radiative fluxes, and boundary layer structure. A method for inferring cloud microphysics from these parameters is currently being evaluated.

  19. Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

    2011-07-19

    This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

  20. Final Report: Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghattas, Omar

    2013-10-15

    The SAGUARO (Scalable Algorithms for Groundwater Uncertainty Analysis and Robust Optimiza- tion) Project focuses on the development of scalable numerical algorithms for large-scale Bayesian inversion in complex systems that capitalize on advances in large-scale simulation-based optimiza- tion and inversion methods. Our research is directed in three complementary areas: efficient approximations of the Hessian operator, reductions in complexity of forward simulations via stochastic spectral approximations and model reduction, and employing large-scale optimization concepts to accelerate sampling. Our efforts are integrated in the context of a challenging testbed problem that considers subsurface reacting flow and transport. The MIT component of the SAGUARO Project addresses the intractability of conventional sampling methods for large-scale statistical inverse problems by devising reduced-order models that are faithful to the full-order model over a wide range of parameter values; sampling then employs the reduced model rather than the full model, resulting in very large computational savings. Results indicate little effect on the computed posterior distribution. On the other hand, in the Texas-Georgia Tech component of the project, we retain the full-order model, but exploit inverse problem structure (adjoint-based gradients and partial Hessian information of the parameter-to- observation map) to implicitly extract lower dimensional information on the posterior distribution; this greatly speeds up sampling methods, so that fewer sampling points are needed. We can think of these two approaches as "reduce then sample" and "sample then reduce." In fact, these two approaches are complementary, and can be used in conjunction with each other. Moreover, they both exploit deterministic inverse problem structure, in the form of adjoint-based gradient and Hessian information of the underlying parameter-to-observation map, to achieve their speedups.

  1. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1994 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocker, L.E.; Miller, M.C.; Evans, R.L.; Koch, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Fish sampling by electroshocking in the Great Miami River upstream and downstream the Fernald site (September 25 and 26, 1994) was designed to determine changes in the health of the fish community compared to the previous ten years and to collect samples for uranium analyses in fish fillets. Samples of 853 fish, from 27 species, eight families and three sites at river mile (RM) 38, RM 24, and RM 19 provided seventy-eight samples for uranium analyses by an independent laboratory. The biomass of fish caught per hour was greatest at RM 24 > RM 19 > RM 3 8. The diversity index and the heaviest fish community was RM 24 > RM 38 > RM 19. The pooled site at RM 38 near Hamilton was diagnostically separated from the other sites by the young-of-the-year (YOY) golden redhorse, smallmouth bass and golden shiner. The darns at Hamilton acted as an effective barrier against fish migration upriver. Larger freshwater drum, gizzard shad, channel catfish and flathead catfish, which might be expected in rapid current reaches of mid-sized rivers characterize RM 24. The pool at RM 19 was distinguished from the others by YOY gizzard shad, bluegill, and longear sunfish. Thus the fish community in 1994 was separated ecologically by the physical features of the habitat more than by water quality differences between sites. These data suggest that the Fernald effluents in September were having no detectable effects on the distribution of fishes, independent of changes in habitat quality separated on physical attributes of the river channel at each site.

  2. Have a great idea about how to cut the cost of solar panel installatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Have a great idea about how to cut the cost of solar panel installation? Home > Groups > Buildings Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor 7 November, 2014 - 12:13 As prices...

  3. AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont. Site Description - Central facility tower crop field

  4. FIA-14-0066- In the Matter of Great Lakes Wind Truth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 7,  2014, OHA issued a decision granting an Appeal filed by Great Lakes Wind Truth (the Appellant) of a determination that the DOE’s Golden Field Office issued to it regarding the...

  5. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment (October 2007) (497.87 KB) More Documents & Publications J.R. Simplot: ...

  6. Y-12 and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park ? a grand partnershi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    having hiked every one of the 900 miles of trails in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. When he first arrived at Y-12, I gave him a trail map of the Smokies. A few years...

  7. Two Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring Two Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring August 17, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis Two scientists got engaged in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. | Video from The Daily Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Communications Specialist (detailee) The work of the Energy Department has led to many scientific and technological breakthroughs. Today, we're highlighting a different

  8. Five Things That Make a Good Tribal Energy Project Great | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Things That Make a Good Tribal Energy Project Great Five Things That Make a Good Tribal Energy Project Great May 10, 2016 - 4:00pm Addthis Solar installation supervisors (blue shirts) from GRID worked with tribal volunteers (white shirts) to complete five residential solar PV system installations on the Bishop Paiute Reservation in March 2016. Photo from Gary Bacock, Bishop Paiute Tribe. Solar installation supervisors (blue shirts) from GRID worked with tribal volunteers (white

  9. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Great Plains The Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma, is the world's largest and most extensive climate research facility. SGP data are providing details about cloud, aerosol, and atmospheric processes that have never before been available for computer models that simulate Earth's climate. Scientists use these data to dramatically improve the representation of radiative and cloud processes in global climate models. Being able to understand and accurately predict these

  10. Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters | Department of Energy Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information

  11. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumption After Energy Assessment | Department of Energy Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment This case study describes how Terra Nitrogen Company saved 497,000 MMBtu and $3.5 million yearly after upgrading the steam system in its ammonia plant in Verdigris, Oklahoma. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GREAT LAKES CARBON CORP. ( IL.21 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 333 North Michigan Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.21-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.21-1 Site Operations: Facility performed a limited amount of nuclear fuel fabrication in the 1950s. Facility also developed graphite production under an AEC contract. IL.21-1 IL.21-3 Site Disposition:

  13. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grassesmore » (prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.« less

  14. A case study of the Great Plains low-level jet using wind profiler network data and a high resolution mesoscale model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, S.; Fast, J.D.; Bian, X.; Stage, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) has important effects on the life cycle of clouds and on radiative and surface heat and moisture fluxes at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. This diurnal phenomenon governs the transport and convergence of low-level moisture into the region and often leads to the development of clouds and precipitation. A full understanding of the life cycle of clouds at the SGP CART site and their proper representation in single column and global climate models cannot be obtained without an improved understanding of this important phenomenon.

  15. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile element. Now, another use has been found: magnets. One would not expect pure...

  16. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Bieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the 'Market Characterization' project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as 'archetypes' by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market. Key research activities included; literature review, statistical analysis of national and regional data of the American Housing Survey (AHS) collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, analysis of Michigan specific data, development of a housing taxonomy of architectural styles, case studies of two local markets (i.e., Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids in Michigan) and development of a suggested framework (or process) for characterizing local markets. In order to gain a high level perspective, national and regional data from the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed using cross tabulations, multiple regression models, and logistic regression to characterize the housing stock and determine dominant house types using 21 variables.

  17. Ferroelectric opening switches for large-scale pulsed power drivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Glover, Steven Frank

    2009-11-01

    Fast electrical energy storage or Voltage-Driven Technology (VDT) has dominated fast, high-voltage pulsed power systems for the past six decades. Fast magnetic energy storage or Current-Driven Technology (CDT) is characterized by 10,000 X higher energy density than VDT and has a great number of other substantial advantages, but it has all but been neglected for all of these decades. The uniform explanation for neglect of CDT technology is invariably that the industry has never been able to make an effective opening switch, which is essential for the use of CDT. Most approaches to opening switches have involved plasma of one sort or another. On a large scale, gaseous plasmas have been used as a conductor to bridge the switch electrodes that provides an opening function when the current wave front propagates through to the output end of the plasma and fully magnetizes the plasma - this is called a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Opening can be triggered in a POS using a magnetic field to push the plasma out of the A-K gap - this is called a Magnetically Controlled Plasma Opening Switch (MCPOS). On a small scale, depletion of electron plasmas in semiconductor devices is used to affect opening switch behavior, but these devices are relatively low voltage and low current compared to the hundreds of kilo-volts and tens of kilo-amperes of interest to pulsed power. This work is an investigation into an entirely new approach to opening switch technology that utilizes new materials in new ways. The new materials are Ferroelectrics and using them as an opening switch is a stark contrast to their traditional applications in optics and transducer applications. Emphasis is on use of high performance ferroelectrics with the objective of developing an opening switch that would be suitable for large scale pulsed power applications. Over the course of exploring this new ground, we have discovered new behaviors and properties of these materials that were here to fore unknown. Some of

  18. Structural Inventory of Great Basin Geothermal Systems and Definition of Favorable Structural Settings

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Over the course of the entire project, field visits were made to 117 geothermal systems in the Great Basin region. Major field excursions, incorporating visits to large groups of systems, were conducted in western Nevada, central Nevada, northwestern Nevada, northeastern Nevada, east‐central Nevada, eastern California, southern Oregon, and western Utah. For example, field excursions to the following areas included visits of multiple geothermal systems: - Northwestern Nevada: Baltazor Hot Spring, Blue Mountain, Bog Hot Spring, Dyke Hot Springs, Howard Hot Spring, MacFarlane Hot Spring, McGee Mountain, and Pinto Hot Springs in northwest Nevada. - North‐central to northeastern Nevada: Beowawe, Crescent Valley (Hot Springs Point), Dann Ranch (Hand‐me‐Down Hot Springs), Golconda, and Pumpernickel Valley (Tipton Hot Springs) in north‐central to northeast Nevada. - Eastern Nevada: Ash Springs, Chimney Hot Spring, Duckwater, Hiko Hot Spring, Hot Creek Butte, Iverson Spring, Moon River Hot Spring, Moorman Spring, Railroad Valley, and Williams Hot Spring in eastern Nevada. - Southwestern Nevada‐eastern California: Walley’s Hot Spring, Antelope Valley, Fales Hot Springs, Buckeye Hot Springs, Travertine Hot Springs, Teels Marsh, Rhodes Marsh, Columbus Marsh, Alum‐Silver Peak, Fish Lake Valley, Gabbs Valley, Wild Rose, Rawhide‐ Wedell Hot Springs, Alkali Hot Springs, and Baileys/Hicks/Burrell Hot Springs. - Southern Oregon: Alvord Hot Spring, Antelope Hot Spring‐Hart Mountain, Borax Lake, Crump Geyser, and Mickey Hot Spring in southern Oregon. - Western Utah: Newcastle, Veyo Hot Spring, Dixie Hot Spring, Thermo, Roosevelt, Cove Fort, Red Hill Hot Spring, Joseph Hot Spring, Hatton Hot Spring, and Abraham‐Baker Hot Springs. Structural controls of 426 geothermal systems were analyzed with literature research, air photos, google‐Earth imagery, and/or field reviews (Figures 1 and 2). Of the systems analyzed, we were able to determine the structural settings

  19. Great circle solution to polarization-based quantum communication (QC) in optical fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Peterson, Charles Glen; Newell, Raymond Thorson; Hughes, Richard John

    2016-03-15

    Birefringence in optical fibers is compensated by applying polarization modulation at a receiver. Polarization modulation is applied so that a transmitted optical signal has states of polarization (SOPs) that are equally spaced on the Poincare sphere. Fiber birefringence encountered in propagation between a transmitter and a receiver rotates the great circle on the Poincare sphere that represents the polarization bases used for modulation. By adjusting received polarizations, polarization components of the received optical signal can be directed to corresponding detectors for decoding, regardless of the magnitude and orientation of the fiber birefringence. A transmitter can be configured to transmit in conjugate polarization bases whose SOPs can be represented as equidistant points on a great circle so that the received SOPs are mapped to equidistant points on a great circle and routed to corresponding detectors.

  20. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile element. Now, another use has been found: magnets. One would not expect pure carbon to be magnetic, but for more than ten years scientists have suspected that carbon can be made to be magnetic by doping it with nonmagnetic materials, changing its order ever so slightly. Years ago, the first x-ray images obtained using the

  1. Y-12 completes 20th year of volunteering at Great Smoky Mountains National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Park | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) completes 20th year of volunteering at Great Smoky Mountains National Park Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 9:43am Tom Richey of the Y-12 National Security Complex, left, and his son Austin put a bench in place at the Elkmont Campground amphitheater as project leader Al Roberson and Scott Underwood, both of Y-12, look on. The groups recent refurbishment of the amphitheater carries on a 20-year tradition of supporting the Great Smoky

  2. EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines | Department of Energy Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines February 26, 2015 - 11:47am Addthis Multi-mode RCCI (Reactivity-Controlled Compression Ignition), a promising advanced combustion process, has the potential to improve fuel economy of passenger cars by at least 15%, according to a recent

  3. SuomiNet efforts in the U. S. Southern Great Plains.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R. A.; Carr, F. H.; Ahern, J. L.; Liljegren, J. C.; Eagan, R. C.; Smith, J. J.

    2000-10-10

    SuomiNet provides great promise for advancing research at the University of Oklahoma in numerical weather prediction and plate tectonics studies, and will further help the U.S. DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Program better specify the measurement of water vapor over the Southern Great Plains. The SuomiNet program is also allowing ARM to upgrade its data collection infrastructure to provide more reliable and near real-time observations not only to SuomiNet but also to other researchers.

  4. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  5. Passive load control for large wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-05-01

    Wind energy research activities at Sandia National Laboratories focus on developing large rotors that are lighter and more cost-effective than those designed with current technologies. Because gravity scales as the cube of the blade length, gravity loads become a constraining design factor for very large blades. Efforts to passively reduce turbulent loading has shown significant potential to reduce blade weight and capture more energy. Research in passive load reduction for wind turbines began at Sandia in the late 1990's and has moved from analytical studies to blade applications. This paper discusses the test results of two Sandia prototype research blades that incorporate load reduction techniques. The TX-100 is a 9-m long blade that induces bend-twist coupling with the use of off-axis carbon in the skin. The STAR blade is a 27-m long blade that induces bend-twist coupling by sweeping the blade in a geometric fashion.

  6. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  7. STAR FORMATION AROUND SUPERGIANT SHELLS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Book, Laura G.; Chu Youhua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Fukui, Yasuo

    2009-03-15

    We examine the recent star formation associated with four supergiant shells in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC): LMC 1, 4, 5, and 6, which have been shown to have simple expanding-shell structures. H II regions and OB associations are used to infer star formation in the last few Myr, while massive young stellar objects reveal the current ongoing star formation. Distributions of ionized H I and molecular components of the interstellar gas are compared with the sites of recent and current star formation to determine whether triggering has taken place. We find that a great majority of the current star formation has occurred in gravitationally unstable regions, and that evidence of triggered star formation is prevalent at both large and local scales.

  8. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun; Choe, Kun Hyung

    2014-01-29

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

  9. Advanced Offshore Wind Turbine/Foundation Concept for the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Windpower, Nautica; Marrone, Joseph; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-08-29

    This project investigated a conceptual 2-bladed rotor wind turbine design and assessed its feasibility for installation in the Great Lakes. The levelized cost of energy was used for this purpose. A location in Lake Erie near the coast of Cleveland, Ohio was selected as the application site. The loading environment was defined using wind and wave data collected at a weather station in Lake Erie near Cleveland. In addition, the probability distributions of the annual significant wave height and wind speed were determined. A model of the dependence of the above two quantities was also developed and used in the study of wind turbine system loads. Loads from ice floes and ridges were also included.The NREL 5 MW 3-bladed rotor wind turbine concept was used as the baseline design. The proposed turbine design employs variable pitch blade control with tip-brakes and a teeter mechanism. The rotor diameter, rated power and the tower dimensions were selected to closely match those of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine.A semi-floating gravity base foundation was designed for this project primarily to adapt to regional logistical constraints to transport and install the gravity base foundation. This foundation consists of, from bottom to top, a base plate, a buoyancy chamber, a taper zone, a column (with ice cone), and a service platform. A compound upward-downward ice cone was selected to secure the foundation from moving because of ice impact.The turbine loads analysis was based on International ElectroTechnical Committee (IEC) Standard 61400-1, Class III winds. The NREL software FAST was the primary computational tool used in this study to determine all design load cases. An initial set of studies of the dynamics of wind turbines using Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) demonstrated that FAST and ADAMS load predictions were comparable. Because of its relative simplicity and short run times, FAST was selected for this study. For ice load calculations, a method

  10. EVALUATING SHORT-TERM CLIMATE VARIABILITY IN THE LATE HOLOCENE OF THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph H. Hartman

    1999-09-01

    This literature study investigated methods and areas to deduce climate change and climate patterns, looking for short-term cycle phenomena and the means to interpret them. Many groups are actively engaged in intensive climate-related research. Ongoing research might be (overly) simplified into three categories: (1) historic data on weather that can be used for trend analysis and modeling; (2) detailed geological, biological (subfossil), and analytical (geochemical, radiocarbon, etc.) studies covering the last 10,000 years (about since last glaciation); and (3) geological, paleontological, and analytical (geochemical, radiometric, etc.) studies over millions of years. Of importance is our ultimate ability to join these various lines of inquiry into an effective means of interpretation. At this point, the process of integration is fraught with methodological troubles and misconceptions about what each group can contribute. This project has met its goals to the extent that it provided an opportunity to study resource materials and consider options for future effort toward the goal of understanding the natural climate variation that has shaped our current civilization. A further outcome of this project is a proposed methodology based on ''climate sections'' that provides spatial and temporal correlation within a region. The method would integrate cultural and climate data to establish the climate history of a region with increasing accuracy with progressive study and scientific advancement (e. g., better integration of regional and global models). The goal of this project is to better understand natural climatic variations in the recent past (last 5000 years). The information generated by this work is intended to provide better context within which to examine global climate change. The ongoing project will help to establish a basis upon which to interpret late Holocene short-term climate variability as evidenced in various studies in the northern Great Plains, northern