National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for large combustors energy

  1. Large-eddy simulation of evaporating spray in a coaxial combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    Large-eddy simulation of evaporating spray in a coaxial combustor Sourabh V. Apte a,*, Krishnan, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Abstract Large-eddy simulation of an evaporating isopropyl alcohol spray Mahesh b , Parviz Moin c a School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State

  2. Large-eddy Simulation of Realistic Gas Turbine Combustors , & Apte, S. V.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    Large-eddy Simulation of Realistic Gas Turbine Combustors Moin, P. , & Apte, S. V. Center of reacting multiphase flows in practical gas-turbine combustion chambers involving complex physical phe specifically for gas-turbine applications. The non-dissipative, yet ro- bust numerical scheme for arbitrary

  3. Massively-Parallel Spectral Element Large Eddy Simulation of a Ring-Type Gas Turbine Combustor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camp, Joshua Lane

    2012-07-16

    The average and fluctuating components in a model ring-type gas turbine combustor are characterized using a Large Eddy Simulation at a Reynolds number of 11,000, based on the bulk velocity and the mean channel height. A spatial filter is applied...

  4. Large-Eddy Simulation of Evaporating Spray in a Coaxial Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    Large-Eddy Simulation of Evaporating Spray in a Coaxial Combustor Sourabh V. Apte School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 Krishnan Mahesh Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455

  5. DOE/EIA-0304 Survey of Large Combustors:

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use under the directorship of Wray Smith (252-8544). Overall direct report supervision was provided by Kenneth A. Vagts...

  6. Thermal and Economic Analyses of Energy Saving by Enclosing Gas Turbine Combustor Section 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Wang, T.; Day, B.

    2006-01-01

    of Energy Saving by Enclosing Gas Turbine Combustor Section Xianchang Li, Ting Wang Benjamin Day ? Research Engineer Professor Engineer Energy Conversion and Conservation Center Venice Natural Gas... a high-temperature area (500~560°F) at the combustor section of the GE Frame 5 gas turbine of Dynegy Gas Processing Plant at Venice, Louisiana. To improve the thermal efficiency and reduce energy cost, thermal and economic analyses are conducted...

  7. Flame Stability Analysis in an Ultra Compact Combustor Using Large-Eddy Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Venkat

    . Introduction The placement of inter-turbine burners (ITB) between the high and low pressure turbine stages as a conven- tional combustor path. In order to reduce the penalty due to increased weight of these burners-turbine burners using conventional combustion technology for aerospace applications would face similar size

  8. Large-eddy simulation of swirling particle-laden flows in a coaxial-jet combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    combustion engines, liquid and solid propellant rocket motors, gas-turbine aircraft engines, International. In gas turbine combustors, for example, the liquid fuel jet undergoes primary and secondary atomization is performed. A mixture of air and lightly loaded, spherical, glass-particles with a prescribed size

  9. Design, installation and operation of the Wainwright regional waste-to-energy authority combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cieslak, J.P. [Basic Envirotech Inc., Glen Ellyn, IL (United States); Ryan, M.T. [Trotter and Morton Environmental Services, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Brinckman, G.A. [W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., Elkton, MD (United States)

    1996-09-01

    A state-of-the-art municipal Waste-to-Energy (WTE) combustor began operation in the town of Wainwright, Alberta, Canada in 1995. The combustor design utilizes a radiant waterwall, multichamber, multi-stage combustor design, followed by a convective boiler section, a flue gas economizer and an air to air heat exchanger. The air pollution control system consists of an all dry lime injection system followed by a fabric filter collector. The system has the capability for delivering activated carbon, if needed, for the control of various pollutants. The pulse-jet fabric filter collector utilizes GORE-TEX{reg_sign} membrane/TEFLON{reg_sign} B fiberglass filter bags for highly efficient capture of the Particulate Matter (PM), which includes lime reaction and absorbent products, unreacted lime, and fly ash which is rich in trace metals and other fine particulates. Compliance testing revealed that the system is providing low outlet emission levels and would meet the proposed US EPA New Source Performance Specifications for Municipal Waste Combustor`s in the US for all categories. This includes acid gases, trace heavy metals, including Pb, Cd, Hg, and PCDD/PCDF as measured by toxic equivalency factors. PM levels were measured at 9.8 mg/Rm{sup 3}. Lead, cadmium and mercury emission levels were measured at 0.37 {micro}g/Rm{sup 3}, < 0.001 {micro}g/Rm{sup 3}, and 0.24 {micro}g/Rm{sup 3} respectively. PCDD/PCDF emissions were measured to be 0.044 {micro}g/Rm{sup 3} (TEQ). Finally, HCl and SO{sub 2} emissions were measured to be 11 mg/Rm{sup 3} and 13 mg/Rm{sup 3} respectively.

  10. Combustion and direct energy conversion in a micro-combustor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Yafeng

    2006-10-30

    . Since batteries have low specific energy (~200 kJ/kg) and liquid hydrocarbon fuels have a very high specific energy (~50000 kJ/kg), a miniaturized power-generating device, even with a relatively inefficient conversion of hydrocarbon fuels to power, would...

  11. Scramjet combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harshman, D.L.

    1991-12-17

    This patent describes a scramjet combustor having a longitudinal axis and two spaced-apart, generally opposing, and generally longitudinally extending walls, with at least one of the walls having an aft-facing step. The combustor also having a fuel injector disposed proximate the step at an acute positive angle with respect to the longitudinal axis, and wherein the improvement comprises means for varying the fuel injector angle during supersonic flight.

  12. Scramjet combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harshman, D.L.

    1991-12-17

    This patent describes an improvement in a scramjet combustor having a longitudinal axis and two spaced-apart, generally opposing, and generally longitudinally extending walls, with each of the walls having an aft-facing step, the steps being a longitudinal distance apart, the combustor also having a fuel injector disposed proximate a the step at an acute positive angle with respect to the longitudinal axis. The improvement comprises: means for varying the longitudinal distance during supersonic flight; means for varying the fuel injector angle during supersonic flight; and means for varying the transverse distance between the walls during supersonic flight.

  13. Combustor and combustor screech mitigation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Kwanwoo; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Uhm, Jong Ho; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto

    2014-05-27

    The present application provides for a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a cap member and a number of fuel nozzles extending through the cap member. One or more of the fuel nozzles may be provided in a non-flush position with respect to the cap member.

  14. CSP Tower Air Brayton Combustor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a concentrating solar power tower air Brayton combustor project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot CSP R&D award program. The team, led by the Southwest Research Institute, is working to develop an external combustor that allows for the mixing of CSP-heated air with natural gas in hybridized power plants. This project aims to increase the temperature capabilities of the CSP tower air receiver and gas turbine to 1,000ºC and achieve energy conversion efficiencies greater than 50%.

  15. Fuel cell system combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pettit, William Henry (Rochester, NY)

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell system including a fuel reformer heated by a catalytic combustor fired by anode and cathode effluents. The combustor includes a turbulator section at its input end for intimately mixing the anode and cathode effluents before they contact the combustors primary catalyst bed. The turbulator comprises at least one porous bed of mixing media that provides a tortuous path therethrough for creating turbulent flow and intimate mixing of the anode and cathode effluents therein.

  16. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coslow, Billy Joe (Winter Park, FL); Whidden, Graydon Lane (Great Blue, CT)

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  17. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  18. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1992-09-11

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

  19. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  20. Circulating Fluid Bed Combustor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraley, L. D.; Do, L. N.; Hsiao, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    The circulating bed combustor represents an alternative concept of burning coal in fluid bed technology, which offers distinct advantages over both the current conventional fluidized bed combustion system and the pulverized coal boilers equipped...

  1. Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development; Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollis, Rebecca

    2013-03-31

    Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in 2005 to study and develop a competing technology for use in future fossil-fueled power generation facilities that could operate with near zero emissions. CES’s background in oxy-fuel (O-F) rocket technology lead to the award of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42645, “Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development,” where CES was to first evaluate the potential of these O-F power cycles, then develop the detailed design of a commercial-scale O-F combustor for use in these clean burning fossil-fueled plants. Throughout the studies, CES found that in order to operate at competitive cycle efficiencies a high-temperature intermediate pressure turbine was required. This led to an extension of the Agreement for, “Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications” where CES was to also develop an intermediate-pressure O-F turbine (OFT) that could be deployed in O-F industrial plants that capture and sequester >99% of produced CO2, at competitive cycle efficiencies using diverse fuels. The following report details CES’ activities from October 2005 through March 2013, to evaluate O-F power cycles, develop and validate detailed designs of O-F combustors (main and reheat), and to design, manufacture, and test a commercial-scale OFT, under the three-phase Cooperative Agreement.

  2. Induction time effects in pulse combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, J B; Marcus, D L; Pember, R B

    1999-04-09

    Combustion systems that take advantage of a periodic combustion process have many advantages over conventional systems. Their rate of heat transfer is greatly enhanced and their pollutant emissions are lower. They draw in their own supply of fuel and air and they are self-venting. They have few moving parts. The most common type of pulse combustor is based on a Helmholtz resonator - a burning cycle drives a resonant pressure wave, which in turn enhances the rate of combustion, resulting in a self-sustaining, large-scale oscillation. Although the basic physical mechanisms controlling such a process were explained by Rayleigh over a century ago, a full understanding of the operation of a pulse combustor still does not exist. The dominant processes in such a system--combustion, turbulent fluid dynamics, acoustics--are highly coupled and interact nonlinearly, which has reduced the design process to a costly and inefficient trial-and-error procedure. Several recent numerical and experimental studies, however, have been focused towards a better understanding of the basic underlying physics. Barr et al. [l] have elucidated the relative roles of the time scales governing the energy release, the turbulent mixing, and the acoustics. Keller et al. [5] have demonstrated the importance of the phase relation between the resonant pressure field in the tailpipe and the periodic energy release. Marcus et al. [6] have developed the capability for a fully three-dimensional simulation of the reacting flow in a pulse combustor. This paper is an application of that methodology to a detailed investigation of the frequency response of the model to changes in the chemical kinetics. The methodology consists of a fully conservative second-order Godunov algorithm for the inviscid, reacting gas dynamics equations coupled to an adaptive mesh refinement procedure[2]. The axisymmetric and three-dimensional simulations allow us to explore in detail the interaction between the transient fluid dynamics phenomena and the energy release associated with the combustion. For these simulations, we couple a second-order, unsplit Godunov algorithm for the inviscid, reacting gas dynamics equations to an adaptive Cartesian grid scheme[7]. In order to keep computational costs relatively low, we have developed a ''bootstrap'' procedure to initialize progressively higher-dimensional calculations. The quasi-one-dimensional code is run until transient phenomena have subsided and a desirable quasi-steady state has been achieved. The state data is then extrapolated to axisymmetric coordinates and these conditions used to initialize an axisymmetric calculation. The axisymmetric code is then run through several full combustion cycles and the data mapped to initialize a three-dimensional calculation.

  3. Low NO.sub.x combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jack R. (Cincinnati, OH)

    1987-01-01

    A combustor having an annular first stage, a generally cylindrically-shaped second stage, and an annular conduit communicably connecting the first and second stages. The conduit has a relatively small annular height and a large number of quench holes in the walls thereof such that quench air injected into the conduit through the quench holes will mix rapidly with, or quench, the combustion gases flowing through the conduit. The rapid quenching reduces the amount of NO.sub.x produced in the combustor.

  4. Large Energy Users Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The program is administered by the NJ Board of Public Utilities and is under management by TRC Energy Solutions.

  5. Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, R.G. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Williams, J.T. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Steele, R.C. (EPRI); Straub, D.L.; Casleton, K.H.; Bining, Avtar (California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA)

    2008-05-01

    A lean-premixed advanced vortex combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown, WV. All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx /CO/unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions corrected to 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated marked acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions, which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean-premixed combustion approaches. In addition, the measured 1.75% pressure drop is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors, which could translate into an overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvement. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drop achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

  6. Combustor burner vanelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin (Greer, SC); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Loveland, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); Yilmaz, Ertan (Albany, NY); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-02-14

    The present application provides a burner for use with a combustor of a gas turbine engine. The burner may include a center hub, a shroud, a pair of fuel vanes extending from the center hub to the shroud, and a vanelet extending from the center hub and/or the shroud and positioned between the pair of fuel vanes.

  7. Achieving improved cycle efficiency via pressure gain combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemmen, R.S.; Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.; Norton, T.S. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Rogers, W.A. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1995-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Program, an investigation is being performed to evaluate ``pressure gain`` combustion systems for gas turbine applications. This paper presents experimental pressure gain and pollutant emission data from such combustion systems. Numerical predictions for certain combustor geometries are also presented. It is reported that for suitable aerovalved pulse combustor geometries studied experimentally, an overall combustor pressure gain of nearly 1 percent can be achieved. It is also shown that for one combustion system operating under typical gas turbine conditions, NO{sub x} and CO emmissions, are about 30 ppmv and 8 ppmv, respectively.

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Building Survey Information Database of Buildings over 100 Energy Systems: Productivity and Building Science Program. This program was funded by the California of Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Project Management: Cathy Higgins, Program Director for New Buildings

  9. Gas turbine topping combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, J.; Dowdy, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1997-06-10

    A combustor is described for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone. 14 figs.

  10. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  11. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  12. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  13. Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems Wednesday October 26, 2011, Babbio energy storage devices. Specifically, this talk discusses 1) the challenges for grid scale of emergent technologies with ultralow costs on new energy storage materials and mechanisms. Dr. Jun Liu

  14. Probabilistic aerothermal design of gas turbine combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Sean D. (Sean Darien), 1978-

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a probability-based framework for assessing the impact of manufacturing variability on combustor liner durability. Simplified models are used to link combustor liner life, liner temperature variability, ...

  15. Radial midframe baffle for can-annular combustor arrangement having tangentially oriented combustor cans

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Jose L.

    2015-09-15

    A can-annular gas turbine engine combustion arrangement (10), including: a combustor can (12) comprising a combustor inlet (38) and a combustor outlet circumferentially and axially offset from the combustor inlet; an outer casing (24) defining a plenum (22) in which the combustor can is disposed; and baffles (70) configured to divide the plenum into radial sectors (72) and configured to inhibit circumferential motion of compressed air (16) within the plenum.

  16. Pulse Combustor Design, A DOE Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-07-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Pulse Combustor Design Qualification Test, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Pulse combustion is a method intended to increase the heat-transfer rate in a fired heater. The desire to demonstrate the use of pulse combustion as a source of heat for the gasification of coal, thus avoiding the need for an oxygen plant, prompted ThermoChem, Inc. (TCI), to submit a proposal for this project. In October 1992, TCI entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. In 1998, the project was restructured and scaled down, and in September 1998, a new cooperative agreement was signed. The site of the revised project was TCI's facilities in Baltimore, Maryland. The original purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate a unit that would employ ten identical 253-resonance tube combustors in a coal gasification unit. The objective of the scaled-down project was to test a single 253-resonance-tube combustor in a fluidized sand bed, with gasification being studied in a process development unit (PDU). DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding of $8.6 million. The design for the demonstration unit was completed in February 1999, and construction was completed in November 2000. Operations were conducted in March 2001.

  17. Pulse combustor with controllable oscillations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Welter, Michael J. (Columbiana, OH); Morris, Gary J. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01

    A pulse combustor having thermally induced pulse combustion in a continuously flowing system is described. The pulse combustor is fitted with at lease one elongated ceramic body which significantly increases the heat transfer area in the combustion chamber of the combustor. The ceramic body or bodies possess sufficient mass and heat capacity to ignite the fuel-air charge once the ceramic body or bodies are heated by conventional spark plug initiated combustion so as to provide repetitive ignition and combustion of sequentially introduced fuel-air charges without the assistance of the spark plug and the rapid quenching of the flame after each ignition in a controlled manner so as to provide a selective control over the oscillation frequency and amplitude. Additional control over the heat transfer in the combustion chamber is provided by employing heat exchange mechanisms for selectively heating or cooling the elongated ceramic body or bodies and/or the walls of the combustion chamber.

  18. Pulse combustor with controllable oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, G.A.; Morris, G.J.; Welter, M.J.

    1991-12-31

    A pulse combustor having thermally induced pulse combustion in a continuously flowing system is described. The pulse combustor is fitted with at lease one elongated ceramic body which significantly increases the heat transfer area in the combustion chamber of the combustor. The ceramic body or bodies possess sufficient mass and heat capacity to ignite the fuel-air charge once the ceramic body or bodies are heated by conventional spark plug initiated combustion so as to provide repetitive ignition and combustion of sequentially introduced fuel-air charges without the assistance of the spark plug and the rapid quenching of the flame after each ignition in a controlled manner so as to provide a selective control over the oscillation frequency and amplitude. Additional control over the heat transfer in the combustion chamber is provided by employing heat exchange mechanisms for selectively heating or cooling the elongated ceramic body or bodies and/or the walls of the combustion chamber.

  19. Flame Dynamics and Structure Within Sub-Millimeter Combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of micro-and mesoscale portable heat and power sources, and systems for a myriad of applications,1 of micro- and mesoscale heat sources through development of micro- combustors, engines, heaters) in confined spaces with a large surface-area-to-volume ratio.8,9 Relatively lower temperature devices

  20. Combined fluidized bed retort and combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shang, Jer-Yu (Fairfax, VA); Notestein, John E. (Morgantown, WV); Mei, Joseph S. (Morgantown, WV); Zeng, Li-Wen (Morgantown, WV)

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a combined fluidized bed retorting and combustion system particularly useful for extracting energy values from oil shale. The oil-shale retort and combustor are disposed side-by-side and in registry with one another through passageways in a partition therebetween. The passageways in the partition are submerged below the top of the respective fluid beds to preclude admixing or the product gases from the two chambers. The solid oil shale or bed material is transported through the chambers by inclining or slanting the fluidizing medium distributor so that the solid bed material, when fluidized, moves in the direction of the downward slope of the distributor.

  1. Methanol tailgas combustor control method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart-Predmore, David J. (Rochester, NY); Pettit, William H. (Rochester, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A method for controlling the power and temperature and fuel source of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to supply heat to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual fuel inlet streams including a first fuel stream, and a second fuel stream of anode effluent from the fuel cell and reformate from the fuel processor. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is determined by regulating the amount of the first and/or second fuel streams and the quantity of the first air flow stream to support fuel processor power requirements.

  2. Low NO.sub.x multistage combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Breault, Ronald W. (Newington, NH); Litka, Anthony F. (Hanover, MA); McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Shukla, Kailash (Boxborough, MA)

    2000-01-01

    A high efficiency, Vortex Inertial Staged Air (VIStA) combustor provides ultra-low NO.sub.X production of about 20 ppmvd or less with CO emissions of less than 50 ppmvd, both at 3% O.sub.2. Prompt NO.sub.X production is reduced by partially reforming the fuel in a first combustion stage to CO and H.sub.2. This is achieved in the first stage by operating with a fuel rich mixture, and by recirculating partially oxidized combustion products, with control over stoichiometry, recirculation rate and residence time. Thermal NO.sub.X production is reduced in the first stage by reducing the occurrence of high temperature combustion gas regions. This is achieved by providing the first stage burner with a thoroughly pre-mixed fuel/oxidant composition, and by recirculating part of the combustion products to further mix the gases and provide a more uniform temperature in the first stage. In a second stage combustor thermal NO.sub.X production is controlled by inducing a large flow of flue gas recirculation in the second stage combustion zone to minimize the ultimate temperature of the flame. One or both of the first and second stage burners can be cooled to further reduce the combustion temperature and to improve the recirculation efficiency. Both of these factors tend to reduce production of NO.sub.X.

  3. 100 Hour test of the pressurized woodchip-fired gravel bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragland, K.W.; Aerts, D.J.

    1992-08-01

    In this project a downdraft, packed bed combustor for a gas turbine cogeneration system using woodchips is being developed. The combustor is designed to promote intense combustion in a thin reaction zone and to control particulate growth by using high excess air. The combustor contains a magnesia and alumina gravel bed on top of which woodchips are fed. The following test objectives were established for the 100 hr test: (a) demonstrate preliminary durability of the combustor; (b) demonstrate steady operation of the system; (c) investigate combustor pressure drop; (d) investigate bed ash cake buildup; (e) expose metal alloy coupons for corrosion examination; (f) obtain closure within 10% on mass and energy balances; and (g) obtain emissions data. The plan for the 100 hr test was to operate the combustor at the following conditions: day 1, 4 atm (absolute) pressure and 700--800 C outlet temperature; day 2, 4 atm pressure and 800--900 C outlet temperature; day 3, 5 atm pressure and 800--900 C outlet temperature; days 4 and 5, repeat day 3. The inlet air was not preheated. The paper gives test results and discusses fuel characterization, combustor performance, mass and energy balance, emissions, composition of ash and deposits, and metal coupons representing turbine blade material.

  4. Optimization and neural modelling of pulse combustors for drying applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zbicinski, I.; Smucerowicz, I.; Strumillo, C.; Kasznia, J.; Stawczyk, J.; Murlikiewicz, K. [Technical Univ. of Lodz (Poland). Faculty of Process and Environmental Engineering

    1999-03-01

    Results of investigations of a valved pulse combustor to choose optimal geometry, which covered measurements of the flow rates of air and fuel, pressure oscillations, including pressure amplitude and frequency and flue gas composition are presented in the paper. Experimental studies comparing the operation of the pulse combustor coupled with a drying chamber and working separately are described. It was found that coupling of the pulse combustor with a drying chamber had no significant effect on the pulse combustion process. Smoother runs of pressure oscillations in the combustion chamber, lower noise level and slightly higher NO{sub x} emission were observed. The velocity flow field inside the drying chamber was measured by LDA technique. Results confirmed a complex character of pulsating flow in the chamber. A large experimental data set obtained from measurements enabled developing a neural model of pulse combustion process. Artificial neural networks were trained to predict amplitudes and frequencies of pressure oscillations, temperatures in the combustion chamber and emission of toxic substances. An excellent mapping performance of the developed neural models was obtained. Due to complex character of the pulse combustion process, the application of artificial neural networks seems to be the best way to predict inlet parameters of drying agent produced by the pulse combustor.

  5. Combustor with multistage internal vortices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shang, Jer Yu; Harrington, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    A fluidized bed combustor is provided with a multistage arrangement of vortex generators in the freeboard area. The vortex generators are provided by nozzle means which extend into the interior of the freeboard for forming vortices within the freeboard areas to enhance the combustion of particulate material entrained in product gases ascending into the freeboard from the fluidized bed. Each of the nozzles are radially inwardly spaced from the combustor walls defining the freeboard to provide for the formation of an essentially vortex-free, vertically extending annulus about the vortices whereby the particulate material centrifuged from the vortices against the inner walls of the combustor is returned through the annulus to the fluidized bed. By adjusting the vortex pattern within the freeboard, a significant portion of the full cross-sectional area of the freeboard except for the peripheral annulus can be contacted with the turbulent vortical flow for removing the particulate material from the gaseous products and also for enhancing the combustion thereof within the freeboard. 2 figs.

  6. An investigation of the gas-fired pulsating combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The work reported here was mainly experimental although a methodology was developed for determining the combustion efficiency from the analysis of the exhaust gases, and also, simple, linear and non-linear models were developed to predict the pulsation frequency and the level of the boost pressure in the pulse combustor. The performance measurements indicated that the pulse frequency and the performance of the gas fired, valved pulse combustor depends upon the volume of the combustion chamber and the size of the tailpipe. Combustion efficiencies are extremely high and CO and NO{sub x} emissions are very low for fuel lean conditions. Visualization showed the fuel jet entering the mixing chamber followed by a wide air jet. Highly turbulent combustion then takes place in small pockets moving in two counter rotating vortices. The early heat release under very fuel lean conditions results in much of the combustion energy being released out of phase with pressure pulsations causing damping and, therefore, leading to the existence of a fuel lean limit. On the other hand, the delay in heat release near stoichiometric conditions caused by the belated entry of the air jet seems to prevent sufficient heat to be released during the remainder of the cycle, in phase with the pressure oscillations to provide enough driving to overcome the inherent losses in the pulse combustor. A fuel rich limit of operation of the pulse combustor is, therefore, reached as the equivalence ratio approaches one. LDV measurements confirmed the existence of an axial vortex and the pair of counter rotating vortices during the combustion part of the cycle. Very high turbulence intensity levels were observed throughout the combustor at all instances during the cycle.

  7. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor. Final report, March 15, 1990--July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1992-09-11

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

  8. Slagging retrofit pulsed coal combustor: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    A concept for a novel form of slagging retrofit pulsed coal combustor was tested in the laboratory. The combustor is based on controlled use of a form of high pressure amplitude combustion instability. The approach adopted was to resolve, in single pulse experiments, the basic technical issues arising in the development of the combustor. In a cold flow device, the issues of coal spatial distribution were addressed and a combustor and solids disperser configuration was developed to give uniform coal distribution in the combustor. Single pulse ignition experiments were conducted to determine the pressure rise in combustor, pressure rise-decay times, and coal conversion a function of various operating variables. Coal injection, flame propagation, and blowdown times leading to potential combustor size reduction of three times over steady flow combustors were demonstrated. The results give high pressure exhaust leading to potentially improved downstream heat transfer and reduced boiler size. Finally, zero-, one-, and two-dimensional mathematical models were developed in support of the experiments and also to provide design capability. 11 refs., 43 figs.

  9. Combustor for fine particulate coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, L.W.

    1988-01-26

    A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

  10. Combustor for fine particulate coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover.

  11. Combustor for fine particulate coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, L.W.

    1988-11-08

    A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

  12. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, J.E.; Holsapple, A.C.

    1997-06-10

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures. 7 figs.

  13. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL); Holsapple, Allan C. (Poway, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures.

  14. OH-Planar Fluorescence Measurements of Pressurized, Hydrogen Premixed Flames in the SimVal Combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strakey, P.A.; Woodruff, S.D.; Williams, T.C.; Schefer, R.W.

    2008-07-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the hydroxyl radical in lean, premixed natural gas flames augmented with hydrogen are presented. The experiments were conducted in the Simulation Validation combustor at the National Energy Technology Laboratory at operating pressures from 1 to 8 atmospheres. The data, which were collected in a combustor with well-controlled boundary conditions, are intended to be used for validating computational fluid dynamics models under conditions directly relevant to land-based gas turbine engines. The images, which show significant effects of hydrogen on local flame quenching, are discussed in terms of a turbulent premixed combustion regime and nondimensional parameters such as Karlovitz number. Pressure was found to thin the OH region, but only had a secondary effect on overall flame shape compared with the effects of hydrogen addition, which was found to decrease local quenching and shorten the turbulent flame brush. A method to process the individual images based on local gradients of fluorescence intensity is proposed, and results are presented. Finally, the results of several large eddy simulations are presented and compared with the experimental data in an effort to understand the issues related to model validation, especially for simulations that do not include OH as an intermediate species.

  15. Investigation and demonstration of a rich combustor cold-start device for alcohol-fueled engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, J.W.; Irick, D.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The authors have completed a study in which they investigated the use of a rich combustor to aid in cold starting spark-ignition engines fueled with either neat ethanol or neat methanol. The rich combustor burns the alcohol fuel outside the engine under fuel-rich conditions to produce a combustible product stream that is fed to the engine for cold starting. The rich combustor approach significantly extends the cold starting capability of alcohol-fueled engines. A design tool was developed that simulates the operation of the combustor and couples it to an engine/vehicle model. This tool allows the user to determine the fuel requirements of the rich combustor as the vehicle executes a given driving mission. The design tool was used to design and fabricate a rich combustor for use on a 2.8 L automotive engine. The system was tested using a unique cold room that allows the engine to be coupled to an electric dynamometer. The engine was fitted with an aftermarket engine control system that permitted the fuel flow to the rich combustor to be programmed as a function of engine speed and intake manifold pressure. Testing indicated that reliable cold starts were achieved on both neat methanol and neat ethanol at temperatures as low as {minus}20 C. Although starts were experienced at temperatures as low as {minus}30 C, these were erratic. They believe that an important factor at the very low temperatures is the balance between the high mechanical friction of the engine and the low energy density of the combustible mixture fed to the engine from the rich combustor.

  16. Fuel cell system with combustor-heated reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pettit, William Henry (Rochester, NY)

    2000-01-01

    A fuel cell system including a fuel reformer heated by a catalytic combustor fired by anode effluent and/or fuel from a liquid fuel supply providing fuel for the fuel cell. The combustor includes a vaporizer section heated by the combustor exhaust gases for vaporizing the fuel before feeding it into the combustor. Cathode effluent is used as the principle oxidant for the combustor.

  17. Pulse Combustor CRADA PC91-001 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none

    1992-08-31

    As outlined in the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between BO Technical Developments, Ltd. (BO Tech) and the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Coal Combustion Division, a BO Tech designed pulse-blade combustor was studied at PETC. Phase 1 involved limited tests of a single-blade pulsed-combustor module to evaluate the suitability of a gas-designed unit for firing coal for use in residential, commercial, or industrial sectors. During the course of the project, three different pulsed blade burners were designed and fabricated by BO Tech and subsequently delivered to PETC for evaluation. These units were designed to allow modification of the furnace dimensions, which would give PETC a means to take simple steps to improve coal firing performance is required. No major furnace design changes were to be included as part of the phase 1 activities.

  18. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gemmen, Randall S. (Morgantown, WV); Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Yip, Mui-Tong Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Robey, Edward H. (Westover, WV); Cully, Scott R. (Morgantown, WV); Addis, Richard E. (Smithfield, PA)

    1998-01-01

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time.

  19. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabiraj, Lipika Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian O.; Karimi, Nader; Sailor, Anna; Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P.

    2015-02-15

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration.

  20. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.H.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1998-08-11

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time. 7 figs.

  1. Large Energy Users Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety StandardsLabor Relations ActAvenue, S.W.Site|Commercial

  2. Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L.

    2011-07-15

    In recent years, with the deployment of renewable energy sources, advances in electrified transportation, and development in smart grids, the markets for large-scale stationary energy storage have grown rapidly. Electrochemical energy storage methods are strong candidate solutions due to their high energy density, flexibility, and scalability. This review provides an overview of mature and emerging technologies for secondary and redox flow batteries. New developments in the chemistry of secondary and flow batteries as well as regenerative fuel cells are also considered. Advantages and disadvantages of current and prospective electrochemical energy storage options are discussed. The most promising technologies in the short term are high-temperature sodium batteries with ?”-alumina electrolyte, lithium-ion batteries, and flow batteries. Regenerative fuel cells and lithium metal batteries with high energy density require further research to become practical.

  3. Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

  4. Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2013-02-19

    A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine. The combustor assembly includes a combustor device coupled to a main engine casing, a first fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner disposed radially inwardly from the flow sleeve. The first fuel injection system provides fuel that is ignited with the pressurized air creating first working gases. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct and defines a path for the first working gases to flow from the liner to the transition duct. An intermediate duct inlet portion is associated with a liner outlet and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the liner. An intermediate duct outlet portion is associated with a transition duct inlet section and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the transition duct.

  5. Combustor technology for broadened-properties fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to increase the availability and reduce the cost of future fuels for aircraft gas turbine engines, it may be necessary to broaden fuel specifications. Anticipated changes in fuel properties, and the effects of these changes on combustion system performance, operating characteristics, durability, and emissions are briefly reviewed, and results to date of a program being conducted to develop and demonstrate combustor technology required to utilize broadened-properties fuels in current and next-generation engines are described. Combustion system design considerations and tradeoffs for burning broadened-properties fuels are discussed, and test experience with several applicable combustor design modifications to the G.E. CF6-80A combustion system is reviewed. Modifications have been demonstrated to improve liner cooling and reduce smoke in the conventional annular combustor, thereby reducing effects of variations in fuel hydrogen content. Advanced staged and variable geometry combustor concepts for burning broadened-properties fuels have also been demonstrated.

  6. NOx reduction in gas turbine combustors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Nak Won

    1976-01-01

    NOx REDUCTION IN GAS TURBINE COMBUSTORS A Thesis by Nak Won Sung Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fullfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Mechanical... Engineering NOx REDUCTION IN GAS TURBINE COMBUSTORS A Thesis by Nak Won Sung Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committe (Head of Department) (Member) August 1976 "40308 (Member) 1 1. 1 ABSTRACT NOx Reduction in Gas Turbine...

  7. Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production at the Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated...

  8. Rolling contact mounting arrangement for a ceramic combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (328 Sneath Way, Alpine, CA 91901); Shaffer, James E. (1780 Geronimo Tr., Maitland, FL 32751)

    1995-01-01

    A combustor assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is mounted within a gas turbine engine housing having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the combustor assembly. The combustor assembly is constructed of a inlet end portion, a outlet end portion and a plurality of combustor ring segments positioned between the end portions. A mounting assembly is positioned between the combustor assembly and the gas turbine engine housing to allow for the difference in the rate of thermal expansion while maintaining axially compressive force on the combustor assembly to maintain contact between the separate components.

  9. Rolling contact mounting arrangement for a ceramic combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, G.L.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-10-17

    A combustor assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is mounted within a gas turbine engine housing having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the combustor assembly. The combustor assembly is constructed of a inlet end portion, a outlet end portion and a plurality of combustor ring segments positioned between the end portions. A mounting assembly is positioned between the combustor assembly and the gas turbine engine housing to allow for the difference in the rate of thermal expansion while maintaining axially compressive force on the combustor assembly to maintain contact between the separate components. 3 figs.

  10. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION/EULERIAN PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTION APPROACH FOR SIMULATING HYDROGEN-ENRICHED GAS TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Venkat

    LARGE EDDY SIMULATION/EULERIAN PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTION APPROACH FOR SIMULATING HYDROGEN 78712 Email: v.raman@mail.utexas.edu Scott Martin Siemens Energy Corp. Orlando, Florida Email:scott.m.martin@siemens.com ABSTRACT To describe partially-premixed combustion inside hydrogen- rich combustors, a novel quadrature

  11. Autonomie Large Scale Deployment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartmentAuditsDepartment of(TEG)of Energy1Large

  12. Penn Large Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina:ParamountEnergy GroupPeetzPenescalLarge

  13. Micro-combustor for gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Scott M. (Oviedo, FL)

    2010-11-30

    An improved gas turbine combustor (20) including a basket (26) and a multiplicity of micro openings (29) arrayed across an inlet wall (27) for passage of a fuel/air mixture for ignition within the combustor. The openings preferably have a diameter on the order of the quenching diameter; i.e. the port diameter for which the flame is self-extinguishing, which is a function of the fuel mixture, temperature and pressure. The basket may have a curved rectangular shape that approximates the shape of the curved rectangular shape of the intake manifolds of the turbine.

  14. System and method for controlling a combustor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2013-03-05

    A system and method for controlling a combustor assembly are disclosed. The system includes a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly includes a combustor and a fuel nozzle assembly. The combustor includes a casing. The fuel nozzle assembly is positioned at least partially within the casing and includes a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle assembly further defines a head end. The system further includes a viewing device configured for capturing an image of at least a portion of the head end, and a processor communicatively coupled to the viewing device, the processor configured to compare the image to a standard image for the head end.

  15. Combustor for a low-emissions gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glezer, Boris (Del Mar, CA); Greenwood, Stuart A. (San Diego, CA); Dutta, Partha (San Diego, CA); Moon, Hee-Koo (San Diego, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Many government entities regulated emission from gas turbine engines including CO. CO production is generally reduced when CO reacts with excess oxygen at elevated temperatures to form CO2. Many manufactures use film cooling of a combustor liner adjacent to a combustion zone to increase durability of the combustion liner. Film cooling quenches reactions of CO with excess oxygen to form CO2. Cooling the combustor liner on a cold side (backside) away from the combustion zone reduces quenching. Furthermore, placing a plurality of concavities on the cold side enhances the cooling of the combustor liner. Concavities result in very little pressure reduction such that air used to cool the combustor liner may also be used in the combustion zone. An expandable combustor housing maintains a predetermined distance between the combustor housing and combustor liner.

  16. Stably operating pulse combustor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zinn, Ben T. (Atlanta, GA); Reiner, David (Haifa, IL)

    1990-01-01

    A pulse combustor apparatus adapted to burn either a liquid fuel or a pulverized solid fuel within a preselected volume of the combustion chamber. The combustion process is substantially restricted to an optimum combustion zone in order to attain effective pulse combustion operation.

  17. Stably operating pulse combustor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zinn, B.T.; Reiner, D.

    1990-05-29

    A pulse combustor apparatus is described which is adapted to burn either a liquid fuel or a pulverized solid fuel within a preselected volume of the combustion chamber. The combustion process is substantially restricted to an optimum combustion zone in order to attain effective pulse combustion operation. 4 figs.

  18. Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects Map of the United States...

  19. FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects August 21, 2013 - 12:00am...

  20. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE...

  1. CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF THE ROTARY COMBUSTOR FOR REFIRING PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray F. Abbott; Jamal B. Mereb; Simon P. Hanson; Michael J. Virr

    2000-11-01

    The Rotary Combustor is a novel concept for burning coal with low SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. It burns crushed coal in a fluid bed where the bed is maintained in a rotating drum by centripetal force. Since this force may be varied, the combustor may be very compact, and thus be a direct replacement for a p.c. burner on existing boilers. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate that a typical industrial boiler can be refired with the modified prototype Rotary Combustor to burn Ohio high-sulfur coal with low emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. The primary problem that must be resolved to demonstrate sustained operations with coal is temperature control in the rotating fluid bed. The prototype Rotary Combustor was assembled and installed on the T-850P CNB boiler at the CONSOL Energy site in South Park, Pennsylvania. Several design improvements were investigated and implemented during the assembly to improve the prototype Rotary Combustor operations compared to prior tests at Detroit Stoker in Monroe, Michigan. An Operating Manual and Safety Review were completed. The shakedown test phase was initiated. Two major problems were initially encountered: binding of the rotating drum at operating temperatures, and reduced fluid-bed pressure drop after short periods of operation. Plating the brush seal rotary land ring with a chrome carbide plasma spray and lubricating the seal prior to each test sufficiently resolved these problems to permit a limited number of operations tests. Unlike previous tests at Detroit Stoker, sustained operation of the prototype Rotary Combustor was accomplished burning a high-Btu fuel, metallurgical coke. The prototype Rotary Combustor was operated with coke in gasifier mode on two occasions. Fluid-bed temperature spiking was minimized with manual control of the feeds (coke, air and steam), and no clinker formation problems were encountered in either test. Emission levels of NO{sub x} were measured at about 270 ppmv which were higher those targeted for the device which were 100 ppmv. This was assumed to be because of the aforementioned temperature spiking. The primary operating problem remains control of the fluid-bed temperature. Although improvements were made, steam flow control was manual, and very coarse. To accomplish this will require finer control of the steam flow to the rotary drum air plenum, and development of an algorithm for automatic control using the Moore APACS{trademark}. This is the recommended succeeding step in the development of the Rotary Combustor for industrial or utility use.

  2. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

    1993-10-26

    A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g., organic and medical waste, drying materials, heating air, calcining and the like.

  3. Controlling cycle-by-cycle variation in a pulse combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, C.S.; Thomas, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rhode, M.A.; Rollins, R.W. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Markworth, A.J. [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-06-01

    We describe a method for controlling chaos-generated cyclic variations in a pulse combustor. The method is applied to a recently developed thermal pulse combustor model and utilizes a map-based, adaptive proportional feedback algorithm. With this technique we show that it is possible to greatly reduce cycle-by-cycle pulse variation. We further show that minimizing cyclic variation allows combustor operation at conditions well beyond the normal flameout limit.

  4. Rapid-quench axially staged combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feitelberg, Alan S. (Niskayuna, NY); Schmidt, Mark Christopher (Niskayuna, NY); Goebel, Steven George (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A combustor cooperating with a compressor in driving a gas turbine includes a cylindrical outer combustor casing. A combustion liner, having an upstream rich section, a quench section and a downstream lean section, is disposed within the outer combustor casing defining a combustion chamber having at least a core quench region and an outer quench region. A first plurality of quench holes are disposed within the liner at the quench section having a first diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to the core region of the quench section of the combustion chamber. A second plurality of quench holes are disposed within the liner at the quench section having a second diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to the outer region of the quench section of the combustion chamber. In an alternative embodiment, the combustion chamber quench section further includes at least one middle region and at least a third plurality of quench holes disposed within the liner at the quench section having a third diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to at least one middle region of the quench section of the combustion chamber.

  5. Information Delivery in Large Wireless Networks with Minimum Energy Expense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenye

    Information Delivery in Large Wireless Networks with Minimum Energy Expense Yi Xu and Wenye Wang in large-scale multihop wireless networks because of the limited energy supplies from batteries. We and strategies that reduce energy consumption in wireless net- works to extend network lifetimes. Examples

  6. Controlled pilot oxidizer for a gas turbine combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laster, Walter R. (Oviedo, FL); Bandaru, Ramarao V. (Greer, SC)

    2010-07-13

    A combustor (22) for a gas turbine (10) includes a main burner oxidizer flow path (34) delivering a first portion (32) of an oxidizer flow (e.g., 16) to a main burner (28) of the combustor and a pilot oxidizer flow path (38) delivering a second portion (36) of the oxidizer flow to a pilot (30) of the combustor. The combustor also includes a flow controller (42) disposed in the pilot oxidizer flow path for controlling an amount of the second portion delivered to the pilot.

  7. Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to develop a unique, fuel-flexible catalytic combustor capable of enabling ultra-low emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide range of gaseous opportunity fuels. Fact...

  8. Apparatus and method for cooling a combustor cap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuo, Baifang; Washam, Roy Marshall; Wu, Chunyang

    2014-04-29

    A combustor includes an end cap having a perforated downstream plate and a combustion chamber downstream of the downstream plate. A plenum is in fluid communication with the downstream plate and supplies a cooling medium to the combustion chamber through the perforations in the downstream plate. A method for cooling a combustor includes flowing a cooling medium into a combustor end cap and impinging the cooling medium on a downstream plate in the combustor end cap. The method further includes flowing the cooling medium into a combustion chamber through perforations in the downstream plate.

  9. Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Next Generation Manufacturing Processes project to develop a unique, fuel-flexible catalytic combustor capable of enabling ultra-low emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide...

  10. Energy Department Loan Guarantee Would Support Large-Scale Rooftop...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Loan Guarantee Would Support Large-Scale Rooftop Solar Power for U.S. Military Housing Energy Department Loan Guarantee Would Support Large-Scale Rooftop Solar Power for U.S....

  11. Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks Gu, Yi; Wu, Qishi; Rao, Nageswara S. V. Hindawi Publishing Corporation None...

  12. Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    clustering is generally considered as an efficient and scalable way to facilitate the management and operation of such large-scale networks and minimize the total energy...

  13. Large-Eddy Simulation for Green Energy and Propulsion Systems...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large-Eddy Simulation for Green Energy and Propulsion Systems PI Name: Umesh Paliath PI Email: paliath@ge.com Institution: General Electric Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation...

  14. Panel 1, Towards Sustainable Energy Systems: The Role of Large...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Towards sustainable energy systems - The role of large scale hydrogen storage in Germany May 14th, 2014 | Sacramento Political background for the transition to renewable...

  15. Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program (New Brunswick)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning January 1, 2012 the Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program allows NB Power to purchase renewable energy generated by its largest customers at a rate of $95/MWh. This...

  16. Ignition methods and apparatus using microwave energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeFreitas, Dennis Michael (Oxford, NY); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An ignition apparatus for a combustor includes a microwave energy source that emits microwave energy into the combustor at a frequency within a resonant response of the combustor, the combustor functioning as a resonant cavity for the microwave energy so that a plasma is produced that ignites a combustible mixture therein. The plasma preferably is a non-contact plasma produced in free space within the resonant cavity spaced away from with the cavity wall structure and spaced from the microwave emitter.

  17. Serial cooling of a combustor for a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abreu, Mario E. (Poway, CA); Kielczyk, Janusz J. (Escondido, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine uses compressed air to cool a combustor liner and uses at least a portion of the same compressed air for combustion air. A flow diverting mechanism regulates compressed air flow entering a combustion air plenum feeding combustion air to a plurality of fuel nozzles. The flow diverting mechanism adjusts combustion air according to engine loading.

  18. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Ultra Low Emissions Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzman, Jerry M.

    1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics T Ultra Low Emissions Combustor with Non-premixed modes of combustion with ultra low NOx emissions. The combustor consists of a tube with open and closed low temperatures with ultra low NOx emission in the 1 ppm range and below. It is also shown

  19. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Joel Meier (Niskayuna, NY); Mosbacher, David Matthew (Cohoes, NY); Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian (Troy, NY); Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan (Mason, OH)

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  20. NHC Large Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:EnergyNARI JumpNEXTGen Syndicate

  1. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Mowery, Kenneth D. (Noblesville, IN); Ripley, Eugene V. (Russiaville, IN)

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  2. Radial inlet guide vanes for a combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuo, Baifang; Simons, Derrick; York, William; Ziminsky, Willy S

    2013-02-12

    A combustor may include an interior flow path therethrough, a number of fuel nozzles in communication with the interior flow path, and an inlet guide vane system positioned about the interior flow path to create a swirled flow therein. The inlet guide vane system may include a number of windows positioned circumferentially around the fuel nozzles. The inlet guide vane system may also include a number of inlet guide vanes positioned circumferentially around the fuel nozzles and adjacent to the windows to create a swirled flow within the interior flow path.

  3. Large Energy Superpositions via Rydberg Dressing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadsadegh Khazali; Hon Wai Lau; Adam Humeniuk; Christoph Simon

    2015-09-03

    We propose to create superposition states of over 100 Strontium atoms being in a ground state or metastable clock state, using the Kerr-type interaction due to Rydberg state dressing in an optical lattice. The two components of the superposition can differ by of order 250 eV in energy, allowing highly sensitive tests of energy decoherence models. We take into account the effects of higher-order nonlinearities, spatial inhomogeneity of the interaction, decay from the Rydberg state, and diminishing Rydberg level separation for increasing principal number.

  4. EM Active Sites (large) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergy (AZ, CA, CO,DepartmentDepartment ofResourceDraft DOE

  5. Alden Large Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy ResourcesAirAlamoCalifornia: EnergyLea,AlchemixAlcoa

  6. Conte Large Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans, Et Al.,InformationMinorConte Large Flume

  7. Process Energy Audit for Large Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chari, S.

    1993-01-01

    of the auditor, process improvements would be identified. A systems approach would be used in identifying process improvement. Task 12 ? Identification of Demand Side Management Technologies A derivative of Task 12 would be the identification of DSM... will consist of results of all the tasks. Example Audits. Having discussed the general audit procedure for a comprehensive audit, the following on a few energy intensive industries such as: ? cement ? chloralkalies ? foundry ? paper manufacturing...

  8. Energy Modeling of Supercomputers and Large-Scale Scientific Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pakin, Scott

    include 1) the presentation of a practical, regression model that expresses energy consumption consumption, 2) a validation of the model's ability to describe the energy consumption of a few large needed for an application to reduce its energy consumption and an identification of the CPU frequency

  9. Unicyclic graphs with large energy Eric Ould Dadah Andriantiana 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    Unicyclic graphs with large energy Eric Ould Dadah Andriantiana 1 and Stephan Wagner 2 Department Abstract We study the energy (i.e., the sum of the absolute values of all eigenvalues) of so- called on the largest and second-largest energy of a unicyclic graph due to Caporossi, Cvetkovi´c, Gutman and Hansen

  10. Energy aware RAID Configuration for Large Storage Systems Norifumi Nishikawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butt, Ali R.

    configurations have been pursued from an energy saving perspective. We first investigate how different RAID for performance, capacity, and efficiency. Such RAID groups, however, might not be efficient for energy saving because the unit of power control becomes large. Aiming to realize storage energy saving, it is important

  11. Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yongho, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosocha, Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on research necessary to develop a novel, high-efficiency, low-emissions (near-zero, or as low as reasonably achievable), advanced combustion technology for electricity and heat production from biofuels and fuels derived from MSW. For any type of combustion technology, including the advanced technology of this project, two problems of special interest must be addressed: developing and optimizing the combustion chambers and the systems for igniting and sustaining the fuel-burning process. For MSW in particular, there are new challenges over gaseous or liquid fuels because solid fuels must be ground into fine particulates ({approx} 10 {micro}m diameter), fed into the advanced combustor, and combusted under plasma-assisted conditions that are quite different than gaseous or liquid fuels. The principal idea of the combustion chamber design is to use so-called reverse vortex gas flow, which allows efficient cooling of the chamber wall and flame stabilization in the central area of the combustor (Tornado chamber). Considerable progress has been made in design ing an advanced, reverse vortex flow combustion chamber for biofuels, although it was not tested on biofuels and a system that could be fully commercialized has never been completed.

  12. Carderock Large Cavitation Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy ResourcesRanchCirculating Water Channel

  13. Measurement and Capture of Fine and Ultrafine Particles from a Pilot-Scale Pulverized Coal Combustor with an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ying

    Measurement and Capture of Fine and Ultrafine Particles from a Pilot-Scale Pulverized Coal out in a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor at the Energy and Environmental Re- search Center (EERC) burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS

  14. Large Hospital 50% Energy Savings: Technical Support Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Studer, D.; Parker, A.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2010-09-01

    This Technical Support Document documents the technical analysis and design guidance for large hospitals to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 and represents a step toward determining how to provide design guidance for aggressive energy savings targets. This report documents the modeling methods used to demonstrate that the design recommendations meet or exceed the 50% goal. EnergyPlus was used to model the predicted energy performance of the baseline and low-energy buildings to verify that 50% energy savings are achievable. Percent energy savings are based on a nominal minimally code-compliant building and whole-building, net site energy use intensity. The report defines architectural-program characteristics for typical large hospitals, thereby defining a prototype model; creates baseline energy models for each climate zone that are elaborations of the prototype models and are minimally compliant with Standard 90.1-2004; creates a list of energy design measures that can be applied to the prototype model to create low-energy models; uses industry feedback to strengthen inputs for baseline energy models and energy design measures; and simulates low-energy models for each climate zone to show that when the energy design measures are applied to the prototype model, 50% energy savings (or more) are achieved.

  15. Development of a coal burning pulsating combustor for industrial power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinn, B.T.; Wang, M.R.; Daniel, B.R.

    1983-11-01

    The research conducted under this program investigated the performance characteristics of a previously developed coal burning pulsating combustor whose design is based upon the Rijke tube principles. The combustor consists of a vertical tube opened at both ends with a fuel burning bed located in the middle of its lower half. Coal is supplied to the bed by a rotating auger-type feed system located 1 ft above the bed. Following ignition, the interaction between the combustion process and the combustor flow results in the excitation of high amplitude (up to 165 dB) fundamental, longitudinal acoustic mode oscillations with frequencies in the range 75 to 90 Hz in the combustor. Maximum amplitudes occurred near stoichiometric air/fuel ratio operation, suggesting that systems utilizing the developed combustor should possess high thermal efficiencies, as they could operate with relatively litle excess air. Both bituminous and subbituminous coals with sizes in the range 1/4'' to 1/2'' were burned in the developed pulsating combustor. The CO, CO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, O/sub 2/ and particulates concentrations in the exhaust flow were measured to evaluate the combustor performance. In tests with bituminous coal, combustion efficiencies higher than 95% for coal feed rates in the range 42 to 60 lb/ft/sup 2/hr were achieved with only 13% excess air while NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/ concentrations were comparable to those obtained with other steady state combustors. A higher performance was attained in initial tests with subbituminous coal. Finally, pulsating operation was possible under fuel rich conditions suggesting that the developed pulsating combustor could be possibly used as a gasifier.

  16. An evaluation of a pre-charging pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quimby, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this test program is the performance and economic evaluation of a pre-charged-pulse jet filter as the principal particulate control device for a commercial or industrial scale coal fired combustor. Performance factors that will be considered are the effects of particle charge, air/cloth ratio, fabric types, percent humidity and inlet particulate loading on fine particle collection efficiency, and pressure drop. Economic factors that will be considered are capital costs, energy and other operating costs, and maintenance costs. The program will result in a recommendation regarding the relative suitability of the pre charged pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control, as compared to other control devices. Fine particle control capability, ease of operation, and overall economics will be taken into consideration in making comparisons.

  17. An evaluation of a pre-charging pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Quimby, J.M.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this test program was the performance and economic evaluation of a pre-charged pulse-jet filter as the principal particulate control device for a commercial- or industrial-scale coal-fired combustor. Performance factors that were considered were the effects of particle charge, air/cloth ratio, pulse frequency, pulse pressure, fabric types, humidity, and inlet particulate loading on fine particle collection efficiency and pressure drop. Economic factors that were considered included capital costs, energy requirements, and operating and maintenance costs. The program resulted in a recommendation regarding the relative suitability of the pre-charged pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control, as compared to a pulse-jet filter without pre-charging. Fine particle control capability, ease of operation, and overall economics were taken into consideration in making comparisons. 23 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Journal of Computational Physics, Large Scale Computing andRequirements for High Energy Physics [3] A. S. Almgren, J.Journal of Computational Physics, 87:171–200, 1990. [7] G.

  19. Systems and methods for detection of blowout precursors in combustors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Tim C.; Nair, Suraj

    2006-08-15

    The present invention comprises systems and methods for detecting flame blowout precursors in combustors. The blowout precursor detection system comprises a combustor, a pressure measuring device, and blowout precursor detection unit. A combustion controller may also be used to control combustor parameters. The methods of the present invention comprise receiving pressure data measured by an acoustic pressure measuring device, performing one or a combination of spectral analysis, statistical analysis, and wavelet analysis on received pressure data, and determining the existence of a blowout precursor based on such analyses. The spectral analysis, statistical analysis, and wavelet analysis further comprise their respective sub-methods to determine the existence of blowout precursors.

  20. Coordinated Price-Maker Operation of Large Energy Storage Units in Nodal Energy Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    1 Coordinated Price-Maker Operation of Large Energy Storage Units in Nodal Energy Markets Hamed to coordinate the operation of large, price-maker, and geographically dispersed energy storage / battery systems in a nodal transmission-constrained energy market. The energy storage units are assumed to be investor

  1. NO{sub x} and CO emissions from an aerovalve pulse combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, T.S.; Richards, G.A.; Casleton, K.H.; Jenkins, L.C.

    1993-12-31

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has an ongoing research program to investigate the benefits of pulse combustion in advanced energy systems. The overall goals are to study and improve the pressure-gain performance of pulse combustors, to investigate the effects of pressure on operating characteristics, and ultimately to determine the feasibility of using pulse combustors in gas turbine applications [Gemmen et al., 1992, 1993]. An additional goal is to ensure that the combustor designs under consideration produce low levels of NO{sub x} and CO pollutant emissions. The gas sampling and analysis system is currently under development. Preliminary data on NO{sub x} and CO emissions concentrations have been obtained and appear encouraging. After further leak checking, system debugging, and calibrating are completed, new experimental data should be available to be reported at the conference. In addition, a modeling effort is being initiated to aid in the interpretation of the experimental results. Some details of the experimental and modeling approaches are given below.

  2. Response of a pulse combustor to changes in total ignition delay time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.O.; Westbrook, C.K.; Bramlette, T.T.; Dec, J.E.

    1987-03-31

    The response of a valved pulse combustor to changes in the relative timing between the resonant pressure wave and the energy release rate is examined. Experiments were performed in which measurements of combustion chamber pressure, operating frequency, and spatially-integrated, time-resolved ensemble-averaged chemiluminescence were made. The total time interval required for energy release is divided into a fluid dynamic species mixing time, a second fluid dynamic mixing time between cold reactants and hot reaction products, and a homogeneous chemical kinetic ignition delay time. Each of these time scales is varied independently, as well as the characteristic resonance time of the pulse combustor. It is shown that each time scale can be varied separately to optimize the operation of the pulse combustor. All of these system responses are interpreted in terms of Rayleigh's Criterion. In addition, theoretical models for the fluid dynamic mixing process and the chemical kinetic ignition delay are used to determine actual values for the time scales for some of these subprocesses.

  3. Large-Scale Eucalyptus Energy Farms and Power Cogeneration1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large-Scale Eucalyptus Energy Farms and Power Cogeneration1 Robert C. Noronla2 The initiation of a large-scale cogeneration project, especially one that combines construction of the power generation supplemental fuel source must be sought if the cogeneration facility will consume more fuel than

  4. Large Scale Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Weller; A. M. Lewis

    2003-08-29

    In this note we investigate the effects of perturbations in a dark energy component with a constant equation of state on large scale cosmic microwave background anisotropies. The inclusion of perturbations increases the large scale power. We investigate more speculative dark energy models with w<-1 and find the opposite behaviour. Overall the inclusion of perturbations in the dark energy component increases the degeneracies. We generalise the parameterization of the dark energy fluctuations to allow for an arbitrary const ant sound speeds and show how constraints from cosmic microwave background experiments change if this is included. Combining cosmic microwave background with large scale structure, Hubble parameter and Supernovae observations we obtain w=-1.02+-0.16 (1 sigma) as a constraint on the equation of state, which is almost independent of the sound speed chosen. With the presented analysis we find no significant constraint on the constant speed of sound of the dark energy component.

  5. A valveless pulse combustor with wide operation range and low noise level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohiwa, N.; Yamaguchi, S. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya (JP))

    1989-09-01

    The possibility of a valveless pulse combustor with wide range and low noise level was experimentally examined by introducing two practical approaches simultaneously: one is the rich mixture supply outside the flammability limit, instead of the ordinary fuel supply without any primary air; the other is forced secondary air ventilation. An overall evaluation of pulsation limits was also made in terms of the volumetric efficiency of the pulse combustor. Fuel used was a commercial grade gaseous propane. The results show that, under a constant total of equivalence ratios of 0.9, a large turn-down ratio of 9.4-11.5 and a high combustion intensity of 55-67MW/m/sup 3/ could be obtained by setting the rich mixture equivalence ratio equal to 3.0. Also, the proposed valveless pulse combustor could operate more silently than the flapper-valued one by 3-8dB(A), being indicative of noise radiation due to valve flapping.

  6. Large Eddy Simulations of Combustor Liner Flows | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    barrels of oil per day, or about 6 percent of the world's total oil usage. Aviation gas turbine engines are also significant producers of CO2 and other harmful greenhouse gas...

  7. DOE/EIA-0304 Survey of Large Combustors:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1 0 0 0 0 0 2013304 Survey of

  8. Large Eddy Simulations of Combustor Liner Flows | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratory program LabsDesign

  9. Method for operating a combustor in a fuel cell system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chalfant, Robert W. (West Henrietta, NY); Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A method of operating a combustor to heat a fuel processor in a fuel cell system, in which the fuel processor generates a hydrogen-rich stream a portion of which is consumed in a fuel cell stack and a portion of which is discharged from the fuel cell stack and supplied to the combustor, and wherein first and second streams are supplied to the combustor, the first stream being a hydrocarbon fuel stream and the second stream consisting of said hydrogen-rich stream, the method comprising the steps of monitoring the temperature of the fuel processor; regulating the quantity of the first stream to the combustor according to the temperature of the fuel processor; and comparing said quantity of said first stream to a predetermined value or range of predetermined values.

  10. Investigation of the mechanism in Rijke pulse combustors with tangential air and fuel injection. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinn, B.T.; Jagoda, J.I.; Daniel, B.R.; Bai, T.

    1993-03-01

    To study the mechanisms that control the operation of this combustor, an experimental setup is developed with access for detailed optical measurements. Propane is employed as fuel because the absence of liquid drops and combustion generated particulates in the combustion region significantly simplifies the optical diagnostics. The experimental techniques utilized include acoustic pressure measurements, space and time resolved radiation measurements, steady temperature measurements, exhaust flow chemical analysis, high speed video and intensified images of the reacting flow field by a computer based CCD camera imaging system. Flow visualization by the imaging system and the results from radiation intensity distribution measurements suggest that the periodic combustion processes caused by periodic vortex shedding and impingement provide the energy required to sustain the pressure oscillations. High radiation intensity occurs during a relatively short period of time and is in phase with the pressure oscillations, indicating that Rayleigh`s criterion is satisfied. Periodic variations of the air and fuel flow rates and, consequently, the air/fuel ratio of the reacting mixture inside the combustor appear to be another mechanism that contributes to the occurrence of periodic combustion and heat release processes. The presence of this mechanism has been uncovered by acoustic pressure measurements that revealed the presence of traveling pressure waves inside the air and fuel feed lines. These traveling waves produce periodic fuel and air feed rates which, in turn, result in periodic combustion and heat release processes within the combustor.

  11. Characterization of supersonic mixing in a nonreacting Mach 2 combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollo, S.D.; Mcdaniel, J.C.; Hartfield, R.J., JR. )

    1992-01-01

    Planar measurements of the injection mole fraction distribution and the velocity field within a nonreacting model SCRAMJET combustor have been made using laser-induced iodine fluorescence. The combustor geometry investigated in this work is staged transverse injection of air into a Mach 2 freestream. A complete three-dimensional survey of the injectant mole fraction distribution has been generated and a single planar velocity measurement has been completed. The measurements reveal the dramatic effect of streamwise vortices on the mixing of the injectant in the near field of the injectors, as well as the rapid mixing generated by staging two field injectors. Analysis of the downstream decay of the maximum injectant mole fraction in this and other nonreacting combustor geometries indicates that the relative rate of injectant mixing well downstream of the injectors is independent of combustor geometry, combustor Mach number, and injectant molecular weight. Mixing within this region of the combustor is dominated by turbulent diffusion within the injectant plume. The transition of the dominant mixing mechanism, from vortex-driven mixing in the near field to turbulent diffusion in the far field, was found to occur in the region between 10 and 20 jet diameters downstream of the injectors. 22 refs.

  12. Time-resolved heat transfer in the oscillating turbulent flow of a pulse-combustor tail pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dec, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The need for efficient combustion systems has led to active research in pulse combustion. One advantage of pulse combustor heating systems is a high rate of heat transfer in the tail pipe. These high heat transfer rates result from large velocity oscillations, which occur in the tailpipe as a result of the acoustic resonance of the pulse combustor. Past research on the effects of flow oscillations on heat transfer rates is inconclusive; however, some oscillating turbulent flows have been shown to have Nusselt numbers, which are much higher than those to steady turbulent flow at the same mean Reynolds number. An experimental study of the heat transfer rates and convective transport processes in a pulse combustor tail pipe was conducted. A test combustor was used, in which the oscillation frequencies could be varied from 54 to 101 Hz, with peak-to-peak velocity oscillations from zero (steady flow) to 10 times the mean velocity, and mean Reynolds numbers from 3100 to 4750. Nusselt numbers in the tail pipe are enhanced by the oscillations up to a factor of 2.5 times the expected value for steady turbulent flow. The Nusselt number enhancement increases with both oscillation frequency and velocity oscillation amplitude. Increases in the mean Reynolds number decreased the enhancement. Possible causes for the heat-transfer enhancement in oscillating flows are discussed. The data indicate that the heat transfer enhancement results from a combination of increased turbulence intensity and transverse flows generated during the streamwise velocity reversals.

  13. Radiative Energy Loss in Small and Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolbe, Isobel

    2015-01-01

    We use perturbative quantum chromodynamics to compute the corrections to the energy loss of a hard particle due to short separation distances between the creation of the particle and the in-medium scattering center that stimulates bremsstrahlung radiation. The result has several surprising features. The correction 1) does not go to zero for large path lengths; 2) breaks color triviality; 3) is formally zero in the large formation time approximation, but numerically dominates at large ~100 GeV parent parton energies out to long ~3 fm paths. Although motivated by the recent shocking evidence of collectivity in small systems, 1) and 3) mean our result has critically important implications for \\emph{all} energy loss model comparisons to data. In particular, 3) shows that a large fraction of the gluons radiated do not have a formation time that is large compared to the Debye screening length of the medium, violating a core approximation used in the derivations of all pQCD-based radiative energy loss formulae.

  14. Flow conditioner for fuel injector for combustor and method for low-NO.sub.x combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Partha; Smith, Kenneth O.; Ritz, Frank J.

    2013-09-10

    An injector for a gas turbine combustor including a catalyst coated surface forming a passage for feed gas flow and a channel for oxidant gas flow establishing an axial gas flow through a flow conditioner disposed at least partially within an inner wall of the injector. The flow conditioner includes a length with an interior passage opening into upstream and downstream ends for passage of the axial gas flow. An interior diameter of the interior passage smoothly reduces and then increases from upstream to downstream ends.

  15. Electrochemical cells for medium- and large-scale energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Wei, Xiaoliang; Choi, Daiwon; Lu, Xiaochuan; Yang, G.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-12

    This is one of the chapters in the book titled “Advances in batteries for large- and medium-scale energy storage: Applications in power systems and electric vehicles” that will be published by the Woodhead Publishing Limited. The chapter discusses the basic electrochemical fundamentals of electrochemical energy storage devices with a focus on the rechargeable batteries. Several practical secondary battery systems are also discussed as examples

  16. Energy Cost Control Strategies: What Do Large Energy Consumers Do and Why? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    2006-01-01

    : What Do Large Energy Consumers Do, and Why? Christopher Russell, Senior Program Manager, Alliance to Save Energy, Washington, DC ABSTRACT What are the most common energy management strategies? The Alliance to Save Energy discovered... the results from a small industry sample. This article shares some insight on the pros and cons of each strategy. INTRODUCTION Large energy consumers took a blow to the chin in the wake of the 2005 hurricane season. Fuel shortages and the resulting...

  17. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David R. (Newport News, VA); Benson, Stephen V. (Yorktown, VA)

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  18. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  19. Experimental studies on methane-fuel laboratory scale ram combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Y.; Kitajima, J.; Seki, Y.; Tatara, A.

    1995-07-01

    The laboratory scale ram combustor test program has been investigating fundamental combustion characteristics of a ram combustor, which operates from Mach 2.5 to 5 for the super/hypersonic transport propulsion system. In the previous study, combustion efficiency had been found poor, less than 70 percent, due to a low inlet air temperature and a high velocity at Mach 3 condition. To improve the low combustion efficiency, a fuel zoning combustion concept was investigated by using a subscale combustor model first. Combustion efficiency more than 90 percent was achieved and the concept was found very effective. Then a laboratory scale ram combustor was fabricated and combustion tests were carried out mainly at the simulated condition of Mach 5. A vitiation technique wa used to simulate a high temperature of 1,263 K. The test results indicate that ignition, flame stability, and combustion efficiency were not significant, but the NO{sub x} emissions are a critical problem for the ram combustor at Mach 5 condition.

  20. Development of a pulse coal combustor for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-31

    This report presents the results of the first phase of a program for the development of a retrofit pulse coal combustor for industrial applications. This phase was comprised of laboratory-scale (approximately 2 MMBtu/hr) combustor design optimization testing and the preparation of an integrated prototype combustor system design at approximately 3.5 to 5.0 MMBtu/hr scale for further development in Phase IA. The program objective was to develop an advanced pulse coal combustor system at the required scale that has high carbon utilization, high ash rejection, low flue gas emissions and low sensitivity to variations in fuels specifications. An optimized tandem advanced refractory chamber unit was designed and fabricate during October and November 1987. The unit logged approximately 100 hours of operation burning pulverized coals, micronized coals, coal-water slurries made of pulverized coal, and micronized coal. Sulfur capturing sorbents lime/limestone were injected into the combustor system to evaluate sulfur capturing efficiency. Staged air injections were also investigated. 42 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S.Leadership on Clean Energy | DepartmentDepartment

  2. Large-scale cosmic flows and moving dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Beltran Jimenez; Antonio L. Maroto

    2009-02-24

    Large-scale matter bulk flows with respect to the cosmic microwave background have very recently been detected on scales 100 Mpc/h and 300 Mpc/h by using two different techniques showing an excellent agreement in the motion direction. However, the unexpectedly large measured amplitudes are difficult to understand within the context of standard LCDM cosmology. In this work we show that the existence of such a flow could be signaling the presence of moving dark energy at the time when photons decoupled from matter. We also comment on the relation between the direction of the CMB dipole and the preferred axis observed in the quadrupole in this scenario.

  3. Anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors using symbolic time series analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    pulse combustor. Results are presented to exemplify early detection of combustion instability due339 Anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors using symbolic time series analysis S Gupta1 for anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors. The anomaly detection method has been tested on the time

  4. LES-based Eulerian PDF approach for the simulation of scramjet combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Venkat

    . The computational tool is used to simulate a cavity-stabilized Mach 2.2 supersonic combustor. The LESLES-based Eulerian PDF approach for the simulation of scramjet combustors Heeseok Koo , Pratik to oscillatory motions of the shock-system inside the combustor. Detailed analyses of the LES data are used

  5. Lean Blow-Out Prediction in Gas Turbine Combustors Using Symbolic Time Series Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    Lean Blow-Out Prediction in Gas Turbine Combustors Using Symbolic Time Series Analysis Achintya of lean blowout in gas turbine combustors based on symbolic analysis of time series data from optical. For the purpose of detecting lean blowout in gas turbine combustors, the state probability vector obtained

  6. Pulse combustor modeling demonstration of the importance of characteristic times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, P.K.; Keller, J.O.; Bramlette, T.T.; Dec, J.E. (Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (US)); Westbrook, C.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (US))

    1990-12-01

    A numerical model has been developed to study the sensitivity of a pulse combustor's performance to changes in the relative timing between several of the dominant physical processes. The model is used to demonstrate the importance of the characteristic times associated with acoustics, fluid mixing, and chemical kinetics, which have been identified from both theoretical and experimental evidence. The combination of submodels for acoustics, injection, and combustion produces a pulse combustor model that is dynamic in that it fully couples the injection and mixing processes to the acoustic waves. Comparisons of simulations with experimental results show good agreement, verifying the model over a wide range of operating conditions. Because the model provides more control of the dominant processes than can be obtained in experiments, the parametric study establishes the cause-effect relations between the characteristic times and the resulting combustor performance.

  7. Gas turbine engine combustor can with trapped vortex cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrus, David Louis; Joshi, Narendra Digamber; Haynes, Joel Meier; Feitelberg, Alan S.

    2005-10-04

    A gas turbine engine combustor can downstream of a pre-mixer has a pre-mixer flowpath therein and circumferentially spaced apart swirling vanes disposed across the pre-mixer flowpath. A primary fuel injector is positioned for injecting fuel into the pre-mixer flowpath. A combustion chamber surrounded by an annular combustor liner disposed in supply flow communication with the pre-mixer. An annular trapped dual vortex cavity located at an upstream end of the combustor liner is defined between an annular aft wall, an annular forward wall, and a circular radially outer wall formed therebetween. A cavity opening at a radially inner end of the cavity is spaced apart from the radially outer wall. Air injection first holes are disposed through the forward wall and air injection second holes are disposed through the aft wall. Fuel injection holes are disposed through at least one of the forward and aft walls.

  8. Wyoming's At-large congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie, Texas: Energy Resources JumpInformation

  9. Large-Scale Federal Renewable Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety StandardsLabor Relations ActAvenue,Workshop | Department

  10. Alaska's At-large congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy ResourcesAirAlamo Heights,Game JumpInformation

  11. Combustor with two stage primary fuel assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharifi, Mehran (Winter Springs, FL); Zolyomi, Wendel (Oviedo, FL); Whidden, Graydon Lane (Orlando, FL)

    2000-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine having first and second passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air supplied to a primary combustion zone. The flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages is separately regulated using a single annular fuel distribution ring having first and second row of fuel discharge ports. The interior portion of the fuel distribution ring is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel distribution manifolds and is located upstream of the inlets to the two pre-mixing passages. The annular fuel distribution ring is supplied with fuel by an annular fuel supply manifold, the interior portion of which is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel supply manifolds. A first flow of fuel is regulated by a first control valve and directed to the first fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to first fuel supply tubes that direct it to the first fuel distribution manifold. From the first fuel distribution manifold, the first flow of fuel is distributed to the first row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the first pre-mixing passage. A second flow of fuel is regulated by a second control valve and directed to the second fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to second fuel supply tubes that direct it to the second fuel distribution manifold. From the second fuel distribution manifold, the second flow of fuel is distributed to the second row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the second pre-mixing passage.

  12. An evaluation of a pre-charging pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quimby, J.M.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this test program is the performance and economic evaluation of a pre charged-pulse jet filter as the principal particulate control device for a commercial or industrial scale coal fired combustor. Performance factors that will be considered are the effects of particle charge, air/cloth ratio, fabric types, percent humidity and inlet particulate loading on fine particle collection efficiency, and pressure drop. Economic factors that will be considered are capital costs, energy and other operating costs, and maintenance costs.

  13. Modeling sulfur dioxide capture in a pulverized coal combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, R.B.; Yavuzkurt, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The formation and capture of sulfur dioxide in a pulverized coal combustor is investigated. A two-dimensional, steady, axisymmetric code, PCGC-2 (Pulverized Coal Gasification and Combustion-two Dimensional), originally developed at Brigham Young University, has been used to simulate combustion of the pulverized coal. This paper represents part of a project to investigate simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration in combustor effluents. Results from the code have been compared to experimental data obtained from MTCI`s (Manufacturing Technology and Conversion International) test pulse combustor, which generates sound pressure levels of {approximately}180 dB. The overall goal behind the pulse combustor program at MTCI is to develop combustors for stationary gas turbines that use relatively inexpensive coal-based fuels. This study attempts to model the capture of sulfur dioxide when injected into a pulse combustor firing micronized coal. While this work does not presume to model the complex gas flow-field generated by the pulsating flow, the effects of the acoustic field are expressed by increased heat and mass transfer to the particles (coal/sorbent) in question. A comprehensive calcination-sintering-sulfation model for single particles was used to model the capture of sulfur dioxide by limestone sorbent. Processes controlling sulfation are external heat and mass transfer, pore diffusion, diffusion through the product layer of CaSO{sub 4}, sintering, and calcination. The model was incorporated into the PCGC-2 program. Comparisons of exit concentrations of SO{sub 2} showed a fairly good agreement (within {approximately}10 percent) with the experimental results from MTCI.

  14. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: Dark Energy Science Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    This white paper describes the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC), whose goal is the study of dark energy and related topics in fundamental physics with data from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). It provides an overview of dark energy science and describes the current and anticipated state of the field. It makes the case for the DESC by laying out a robust analytical framework for dark energy science that has been defined by its members and the comprehensive three-year work plan they have developed for implementing that framework. The analysis working groups cover five key probes of dark energy: weak lensing, large scale structure, galaxy clusters, Type Ia supernovae, and strong lensing. The computing working groups span cosmological simulations, galaxy catalogs, photon simulations and a systematic software and computational framework for LSST dark energy data analysis. The technical working groups make the connection between dark energy science and the LSST system. The working groups have close linkages, especially through the use of the photon simulations to study the impact of instrument design and survey strategy on analysis methodology and cosmological parameter estimation. The white paper describes several high priority tasks identified by each of the 16 working groups. Over the next three years these tasks will help prepare for LSST analysis, make synergistic connections with ongoing cosmological surveys and provide the dark energy community with state of the art analysis tools. Members of the community are invited to join the LSST DESC, according to the membership policies described in the white paper. Applications to sign up for associate membership may be made by submitting the Web form at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/lsst/desc/signup.html with a short statement of the work they wish to pursue that is relevant to the LSST DESC.

  15. Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy ResourcesProject | Open Energy Information Large Scale

  16. Waste incineration through pulsating combustion. Part I. Combustor characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Tiejun; Yeboah, Y.D.; Wang, Zhicheng [Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes work performed under the 1st phase of an on-going effort to develop pulsating combustion waste incineration technology. The primary objective of the effort is to study the effect of pulsating combustion upon the incineration of wastes, especially medical wastes, and to develop a laboratory scale experimental pulsating combustion medical waste incinerator. In this paper, the characteristics of the developed combustor are discussed. Specifically, emission measurement under various operating conditions of the combustor is discussed. The numerical analysis of the fluid flow is also presented.

  17. Method for operating a combustor in a fuel cell system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Mowery, Kenneth D. (Noblesville, IN)

    2002-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention provides a method of operating a combustor to heat a fuel processor to a desired temperature in a fuel cell system, wherein the fuel processor generates hydrogen (H.sub.2) from a hydrocarbon for reaction within a fuel cell to generate electricity. More particularly, the invention provides a method and select system design features which cooperate to provide a start up mode of operation and a smooth transition from start-up of the combustor and fuel processor to a running mode.

  18. Holography, Dark Energy and Entropy of Large Cosmic Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2013-03-15

    As is well known, black hole entropy is proportional to the area of the horizon suggesting a holographic principle wherein all degrees of freedom contributing to the entropy reside on the surface. In this note, we point out that large scale dark energy (such as a cosmological constant) constraining cosmic structures can imply a similar situation for the entropy of a hierarchy of such objects.

  19. Design and fabrication of a meso-scale stirling engine and combustor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echekki, Tarek (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo Martin; Mills, Bernice E.; Liu, Shiling; Lee, Jeremiah C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Karpetis, Adionos N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Chen, Jacqueline H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ceremuga, Joseph T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Raber, Thomas N.; Hekmuuaty, Michelle A.

    2005-05-01

    Power sources capable of supplying tens of watts are needed for a wide variety of applications including portable electronics, sensors, micro aerial vehicles, and mini-robotics systems. The utility of these devices is often limited by the energy and power density capabilities of batteries. A small combustion engine using liquid hydrocarbon fuel could potentially increase both power and energy density by an order of magnitude or more. This report describes initial development work on a meso-scale external combustion engine based on the Stirling cycle. Although other engine designs perform better at macro-scales, we believe the Stirling engine cycle is better suited to small-scale applications. The ideal Stirling cycle requires efficient heat transfer. Consequently, unlike other thermodynamic cycles, the high heat transfer rates that are inherent with miniature devices are an advantage for the Stirling cycle. Furthermore, since the Stirling engine uses external combustion, the combustor and engine can be scaled and optimized semi-independently. Continuous combustion minimizes issues with flame initiation and propagation. It also allows consideration of a variety of techniques to promote combustion that would be difficult in a miniature internal combustion engine. The project included design and fabrication of both the engine and the combustor. Two engine designs were developed. The first used a cylindrical piston design fabricated with conventional machining processes. The second design, based on the Wankel rotor geometry, was fabricated by through-mold electroforming of nickel in SU8 and LIGA micromolds. These technologies provided the requisite precision and tight tolerances needed for efficient micro-engine operation. Electroformed nickel is ideal for micro-engine applications because of its high strength and ductility. A rotary geometry was chosen because its planar geometry was more compatible with the fabrication process. SU8 lithography provided rapid prototypes to verify the design. A final high precision engine was created via LIGA. The micro-combustor was based on an excess enthalpy concept. Development of a micro-combustor included both modeling and experiments. We developed a suite of simulation tools both in support of the design of the prototype combustors, and to investigate more fundamental aspects of combustion at small scales. Issues of heat management and integration with the micro-scale Stirling engine were pursued using CFD simulations. We found that by choice of the operating conditions and channel dimensions energy conversion occurs by catalysis-dominated or catalysis-then-homogeneous phase combustion. The purpose of the experimental effort in micro-combustion was to study the feasibility and explore the design parameters of excess enthalpy combustors. The efforts were guided by the necessity for a practical device that could be implemented in a miniature power generator, or as a stand-alone device used for heat generation. Several devices were fabricated and successfully tested using methane as the fuel.

  20. Turbine combustor with fuel nozzles having inner and outer fuel circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

    2013-12-24

    A combustor cap assembly for a turbine engine includes a combustor cap and a plurality of fuel nozzles mounted on the combustor cap. One or more of the fuel nozzles would include two separate fuel circuits which are individually controllable. The combustor cap assembly would be controlled so that individual fuel circuits of the fuel nozzles are operated or deliberately shut off to provide for physical separation between the flow of fuel delivered by adjacent fuel nozzles and/or so that adjacent fuel nozzles operate at different pressure differentials. Operating a combustor cap assembly in this fashion helps to reduce or eliminate the generation of undesirable and potentially harmful noise.

  1. Economic evaluation of a novel fuel-saver hybrid combining a solar receiver with a combustor for a solar power tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    achieves the same combus- tion efficiency as the boiler for twice the capital cost of a solar receiverEconomic evaluation of a novel fuel-saver hybrid combining a solar receiver with a combustor for a solar power tower G.J. Nathan a, , D.L. Battye b , P.J. Ashman b a Centre for Energy Technology, Schools

  2. Fluidized bed combustor and coal gun-tube assembly therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hosek, William S. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Garruto, Edward J. (Wayne, NJ)

    1984-01-01

    A coal supply gun assembly for a fluidized bed combustor which includes heat exchange elements extending above the bed's distributor plate assembly and in which the gun's nozzles are disposed relative to the heat exchange elements to only discharge granular coal material between adjacent heat exchange elements and in a path which is substantially equidistant from adjacent heat exchange elements.

  3. Coanda injection system for axially staged low emission combustors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evulet, Andrei Tristan (Clifton Park, NY); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Cincinnati, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); ElKady, Ahmed Mostafa (Niskayuna, NY); Lacy, Benjamin Paul (Greer, SC)

    2012-05-15

    The low emission combustor includes a combustor housing defining a combustion chamber having a plurality of combustion zones. A liner sleeve is disposed in the combustion housing with a gap formed between the liner sleeve and the combustor housing. A secondary nozzle is disposed along a centerline of the combustion chamber and configured to inject a first fluid comprising air, at least one diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to a downstream side of a first combustion zone among the plurality of combustion zones. A plurality of primary fuel nozzles is disposed proximate to an upstream side of the combustion chamber and located around the secondary nozzle and configured to inject a second fluid comprising air and fuel to an upstream side of the first combustion zone. The combustor also includes a plurality of tertiary coanda nozzles. Each tertiary coanda nozzle is coupled to a respective dilution hole. The tertiary coanda nozzles are configured to inject a third fluid comprising air, at least one other diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to one or more remaining combustion zones among the plurality of combustion zones.

  4. Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

    2008-12-16

    A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

  5. Hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic energy spectra from large eddy simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. E. L. Haugen; A. Brandenburg

    2006-06-29

    Direct and large eddy simulations of hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic turbulence have been performed in an attempt to isolate artifacts from real and possibly asymptotic features in the energy spectra. It is shown that in a hydrodynamic turbulence simulation with a Smagorinsky subgrid scale model using 512^3 meshpoints two important features of the 4096^3 simulation on the Earth simulator (Kaneda et al. 2003, Phys. Fluids 15, L21) are reproduced: a k^{-0.1} correction to the inertial range with a k^{-5/3} Kolmogorov slope and the form of the bottleneck just before the dissipative subrange. Furthermore, it is shown that, while a Smagorinsky-type model for the induction equation causes an artificial and unacceptable reduction in the dynamo efficiency, hyper-resistivity yields good agreement with direct simulations. In the large-scale part of the inertial range, an excess of the spectral magnetic energy over the spectral kinetic energy is confirmed. However, a trend towards spectral equipartition at smaller scales in the inertial range can be identified. With magnetic fields, no explicit bottleneck effect is seen.

  6. Flame-vortex interaction driven combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altay, H. Murat; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2009-05-15

    The combustion dynamics of propane-hydrogen mixtures are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We systematically vary the equivalence ratio, inlet temperature and fuel composition to determine the stability map of the combustor. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio entering the flame is temporally and spatially uniform, and the combustion dynamics are governed only by flame-vortex interactions. Four distinct dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. At high but lean equivalence ratios, the flame is unstable and oscillates strongly as it is wrapped around the large unsteady wake vortex. At intermediate equivalence ratios, weakly oscillating quasi-stable flames are observed. Near the lean blowout limit, long stable flames extending from the corner of the step are formed. At atmospheric inlet temperature, the unstable mode resonates at the 1/4 wavemode of the combustor. As the inlet temperature is increased, the 5/4 wavemode of the combustor is excited at high but lean equivalence ratios, forming the high-frequency unstable flames. Higher hydrogen concentration in the fuel and higher inlet temperatures reduce the equivalence ratios at which the transitions between regimes are observed. We plot combustion dynamics maps or the response curves, that is the overall sound pressure level as a function of the equivalence ratio, for different operating conditions. We demonstrate that numerical results of strained premixed flames can be used to collapse the response curves describing the transitions among the dynamic modes onto a function of the heat release rate parameter alone, rather than a function dependent on the equivalence ratio, inlet temperature and fuel composition separately. We formulate a theory for predicting the critical values of the heat release parameter at which quasi-stable to unstable and unstable to high-frequency unstable modes take place. (author)

  7. Large-Scale Magnetic Fields, Dark Energy and QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federico R. Urban; Ariel R. Zhitnitsky

    2010-08-20

    Cosmological magnetic fields are being observed with ever increasing correlation lengths, possibly reaching the size of superclusters, therefore disfavouring the conventional picture of generation through primordial seeds later amplified by galaxy-bound dynamo mechanisms. In this paper we put forward a fundamentally different approach that links such large-scale magnetic fields to the cosmological vacuum energy. In our scenario the dark energy is due to the Veneziano ghost (which solves the $U(1)_A$ problem in QCD). The Veneziano ghost couples through the triangle anomaly to the electromagnetic field with a constant which is unambiguously fixed in the standard model. While this interaction does not produce any physical effects in Minkowski space, it triggers the generation of a magnetic field in an expanding universe at every epoch. The induced energy of the magnetic field is thus proportional to cosmological vacuum energy: $\\rho_{EM}\\simeq B^2 \\simeq (\\frac{\\alpha}{4\\pi})^2 \\rho_{DE}$, $\\rho_{DE}$ hence acting as a source for the magnetic energy $\\rho_{EM}$. The corresponding numerical estimate leads to a magnitude in the nG range. There are two unique and distinctive predictions of our proposal: an uninterrupted active generation of Hubble size correlated magnetic fields throughout the evolution of the universe; the presence of parity violation on the enormous scales $1/H$, which apparently has been already observed in CMB. These predictions are entirely rooted into the standard model of particle physics.

  8. Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Singh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute Gwahangno 113, Yu-seong-gu, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (B{sub x}) of 100?G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (B{sub z} ? 6.2?G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1?G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (n{sub e} ? 2 × 10{sup 11}?cm{sup ?3} and T{sub e} ? 2?eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50?and?600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

  9. Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide: Developing Renewable Energy Projects Larger Than 10 MWs at Federal Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide: Developing Renewable Energy Projects Larger Than 10 MWs at Federal Facilities provides best practices and other helpful guidance for federal agencies developing large-scale renewable energy projects.

  10. Heat release timing in a nonpremixed Helmholtz pulse combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.M. (Tam Kang Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)); Waldherr, G.; Jagoda, J.I.; Zinn, B.T. (Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Lab. for Pulse Combustion Processing)

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanism by which heat release fluctuations drive pressure pulsations in Helmholtz pulse combustors with nonpremixed fuel and air injection, similar to those used in commercialized pulse furnaces. Flow and flame spread in the mixing chamber were mapped using high-speed shadowgraphy, extensive laser Doppler velocimetry, and radical imaging. Flow visualization and velocity measurements showed that a fuel jet followed by an air jet enter the pulse combustor as soon as the combustor pressure drops below the reactants' supply pressures. If most of the heat were released at that time, the heat release and pressure fluctuations would be out of phase, which according to Rayleigh's criterion, would prevent pulse combustion operation. In practice, pulse combustion operation is attained through the interaction of several processes. First, the fuel jet is ignited as soon as it enters the mixing chamber, generating pockets of burning gas. This reacting flow is entrained and convected by the air jet, which follows the fuel jet into the combustor, first downstream and then upstream in the mixing chamber. Simultaneously, fuel and air continue to enter the combustor, but are not immediately ignited, either because of excessive flame stretch caused by the fast moving fuel and air jets or because the air stream has displaced any hot gases that could act as ignition sources. Once the reacting gas pockets return to the upstream half of the mixing chamber, they ignite the combustible mixture that has collected there. This causes a rapid increase in heat release rate, which leads the pressure oscillation by around 30[degree]. This investigation showed that the interaction between complex flow and combustion process within the mixing chamber causes the time delay needed to produce heat release oscillations that are nearly in phase with the pressure oscillations, thus assuring pulse combustion operation.

  11. Sandia Energy - Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of Engines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power ProgramLarge Eddy Simulation (LES) of

  12. Sandia Energy - Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of Engines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power ProgramLarge Eddy Simulation (LES)

  13. Sandia Energy - Large-Scale Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power ProgramLarge Eddy Simulation

  14. Large

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and mastheadLakeLanguage of a fly provesLarge

  15. Room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage Huilin Pan attention particularly in large- scale electric energy storage applications for renewable energy and smart, such as the wind and the sun, large-scale electric energy storage systems are becoming extremely important

  16. For economic energy, we need: tritium, large size to obtain hot fusing plasma; high fields and large currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 For economic energy, we need: tritium, large size to obtain hot fusing plasma; high fields: a Component Test Facility is much needed; ST appears simplest and most economic in tritium: BUT the high cost

  17. Independent components in acoustic emission energy signals from large diesel engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent components in acoustic emission energy signals from large diesel engines Niels Henrik-Sørensen et al. [5], to acoustic emission (AE) energy signals obtained from a large diesel engine

  18. An Operational Energy Consumption Evaluation Index System for Large Public Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01

    Large public buildings have been the emphasis of energy conservation in China. In this paper, the design and operational energy consumption evaluation indices for large public buildings are generalized, their differences and deficiencies...

  19. Department of Energy assessment of the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report summarizes the conclusions of the committee that assessed the cost estimate for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This proton-proton collider will be built at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics near Geneva, Switzerland. The committee found the accelerator-project cost estimate of 2.3 billion in 1995 Swiss francs, or about $2 billion US, to be adequate and reasonable. The planned project completion date of 2005 also appears achievable, assuming the resources are available when needed. The cost estimate was made using established European accounting procedures. In particular, the cost estimate does not include R and D, prototyping and testing, spare parts, and most of the engineering labor. Also excluded are costs for decommissioning the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) that now occupies the tunnel, modifications to the injector system, the experimental areas, preoperations costs, and CERN manpower. All these items are assumed by CERN to be included in the normal annual operations budget rather than the construction budget. Finally, contingency is built into the base estimate, in contrast to Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that explicitly identify contingency. The committee`s charge, given by Dr. James F. Decker, Deputy Directory of the DOE Office of Energy Research, was to understand the basis for the LHC cost estimate, identify uncertainties, and judge the overall validity of the estimate, proposed schedule, and related issues. The committee met at CERN April 22--26, 1996. The assessment was based on the October 1995 LHC Conceptual Design Report or ``Yellow Book,`` cost estimates and formal presentations made by the CERN staff, site inspection, detailed discussions with LHC technical experts, and the committee members` considerable experience.

  20. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-LH) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-LH is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in large hospitals over levels achieved by following Standard 90.1-2004. The AEDG-LH was created for a 'standard' mid- to large-size hospital, typically at least 100,000 ft2, but the strategies apply to all sizes and classifications of new construction hospital buildings. Its primary focus is new construction, but recommendations may be applicable to facilities undergoing total renovation, and in part to many other hospital renovation, addition, remodeling, and modernization projects (including changes to one or more systems in existing buildings).

  1. Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Robert C. (Woodinville, WA); Edmonds, Ryan G. (Renton, WA); Williams, Joseph T. (Kirkland, WA); Baldwin, Stephen P. (Winchester, MA)

    2009-10-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  2. Investigation of the characteristics of liquid fuel burning, Rijke type, pulsating combustors, Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinn, B.T.; Daniel, B.R.; Katz, U.; Xu, T.S.; Su, A.

    1986-11-01

    This report describes the results obtained during the first year of a DOE sponsored research program entitled ''Investigation of the Characteristics of Liquid Fuel Burning, Rijke Type, Pulse Combustors''. This research has been concerned with the development of an efficient, nonpolluting, pulse combustor which burns liquid fuels. The design of the developed combustor is based upon principles of the acoustic Rijke tube which had been previously used, by the principal investigators of this study, to guide the development of a highly efficient, coal burning pulse combustor. The present study was initiated with the objective of determining whether the high performance achieved with the coal burning pulse combustor can be duplicated with the liquid fuel burning, Rijke type, pulse combustors. This document also describes the development of the experimental set-up and its subsequent modifications which resulted in improved performance. These studies revealed that pulse combustion operation can be maintained by more than one mechanism.

  3. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  4. Modeling scramjet combustor flowfields with a grid adaptation scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Singh, D.J. )

    1994-05-01

    The accurate description of flow features associated with the normal injection of fuel into supersonic primary flows is essential in the design of efficient engines for hypervelocity aerospace vehicles. The flow features in such injections are complex with multiple interactions between shocks and between shocks and boundary layers. Numerical studies of perpendicular sonic N2 injection and mixing in a Mach 3.8 scramjet combustor environment are discussed. A dynamic grid adaptation procedure based on the equilibration of spring-mass systems is employed to enhance the description of the complicated flow features. Numerical results are compared with experimental measurements and indicate that the adaptation procedure enhances the capability of the modeling procedure to describe the flow features associated with scramjet combustor components. 14 refs.

  5. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Zuo, Baifang; York, William David

    2013-08-20

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes an end cap having an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface, and tube bundles extend through the end cap. A diluent supply in fluid communication with the end cap provides diluent flow to the end cap. Diluent distributors circumferentially arranged inside at least one tube bundle extend downstream from the downstream surface and provide fluid communication for the diluent flow through the end cap. A method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes flowing fuel through tube bundles that extend axially through an end cap, flowing a diluent through diluent distributors into a combustion chamber, wherein the diluent distributors are circumferentially arranged inside at least one tube bundle and each diluent distributor extends downstream from the end cap, and forming a diluent barrier in the combustion chamber between at least one pair of adjacent tube bundles.

  6. Self-regulating fuel staging port for turbine combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Nieuwenhuizen, William F.; Fox, Timothy A.; Williams, Steven

    2014-07-08

    A port (60) for axially staging fuel and air into a combustion gas flow path 28 of a turbine combustor (10A). A port enclosure (63) forms an air path through a combustor wall (30). Fuel injectors (64) in the enclosure provide convergent fuel streams (72) that oppose each other, thus converting velocity pressure to static pressure. This forms a flow stagnation zone (74) that acts as a valve on airflow (40, 41) through the port, in which the air outflow (41) is inversely proportion to the fuel flow (25). The fuel flow rate is controlled (65) in proportion to engine load. At high loads, more fuel and less air flow through the port, making more air available to the premixing assemblies (36).

  7. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g. organic and medical waste, drying, calcining and the like.

  8. Testing coupled dark energy with large scale structure observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Weiqiang; Xu, Lixin, E-mail: d11102004@mail.dlut.edu.cn, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2014-08-01

    The coupling between the dark components provides a new approach to mitigate the coincidence problem of cosmological standard model. In this paper, dark energy is treated as a fluid with a constant equation of state, whose coupling with dark matter is Q-bar =3H?{sub x}?-bar {sub x}. In the frame of dark energy, we derive the evolution equations for the density and velocity perturbations. According to the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we constrain the model by currently available cosmic observations which include cosmic microwave background radiation, baryon acoustic oscillation, type Ia supernovae, and f?{sub 8}(z) data points from redshift-space distortion. The results show the interaction rate in ? regions: ?{sub x} = 0.00328{sub -0.00328-0.00328-0.00328}{sup +0.000736+0.00549+0.00816}, which means that the recently cosmic observations favor a small interaction rate which is up to the order of 10{sup -2}, meanwhile, the measurement of redshift-space distortion could rule out the large interaction rate in the ? region.

  9. Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-01-01

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

  10. Strategies to Finance Large-Scale Deployment of Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Infrastructure Approach AgencyCompany Organization: International Energy Agency (IEA) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Policies...

  11. High temperature degradation by erosion-corrosion in bubbling fluidized bed combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Peggy Y.; MacAdam, S.; Niu, Y.; Stringer, J.

    2003-01-01

    a Laboratory Simulated Bubbling Fluidized Bed", Wear. 235,Tube Wastage in Bubbling Fluidized Bed, a Laboratory StudyWheeldon, "Wastage in bubbling fluidized-bed combustors: an

  12. Method and apparatus for controlling combustor temperature during transient load changes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Chalfant, Robert W. (West Henrietta, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus includes a fast acting air bypass valve connected in parallel with an air inlet to the combustor. A predetermined excess quantity of air is supplied from an air source to a series connected fuel cell and combustor. The predetermined excess quantity of air is provided in a sufficient amount to control the temperature of the combustor during start-up of the fuel processor when the load on the fuel cell is zero and to accommodate any temperature transients during operation of the fuel cell.

  13. Maintenance of chaos in a computational model of a thermal pulse combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    In, V.; Spano, M.L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Laboratory, West Bethesda, Maryland 20817 (United States)] [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Laboratory, West Bethesda, Maryland 20817 (United States); Neff, J.D.; Ditto, W.L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Daw, C.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Edwards, K.D.; Nguyen, K. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The dynamics of a thermal pulse combustor model are examined. It is found that, as a parameter related to the fuel flow rate is varied, the combustor will undergo a transition from periodic pulsing to chaotic pulsing to a chaotic transient leading to flameout. Results from the numerical model are compared to those obtained from a laboratory-scale thermal pulse combustor. Finally the technique of maintenance (or anticontrol) of chaos is successfully applied to the model, with the result that the operation of the combustor can be continued well into the flameout regime. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. 100 Hour test of the pressurized woodchip-fired gravel bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragland, K.W.; Aerts, D.J.

    1994-08-01

    Combustion of wood chips in a packed bed combustor for a gas turbine cogeneration system is described. A discussion on flue gas emissions and mass balances is included.

  15. Harvesting Clean Energy How California Can Deploy Large-Scale Renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Harvesting Clean Energy How California Can Deploy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects Harvesting Clean Energy: How California Can Deploy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects on Appropriate acres of impaired lands in the Westlands Water District in the Central Valley may soon have

  16. EMCS and time-series energy data analysis in a large government office building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Friedman, Hannah

    2001-01-01

    th EMCS and Time-Series Energy Data Analysis in a LargeEMCS and Time-Series Energy Data Analysis in a Largeyears of utility bill energy data to evaluate whole-building

  17. Membraneless hydrogen bromine laminar flow battery for large-scale energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braff, William Allan

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical energy storage systems have been considered for a range of potential large-scale energy storage applications. These applications vary widely, both in the order of magnitude of energy storage that is required ...

  18. Energy Dispersed Large Data Wave Maps in 2 + 1 Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterbenz, Jacob; Tataru, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    of Finite S Norm Wave-Maps and Energy Dispersion 10.1renormalization of large energy wave maps. In: Journées “of Finite S Norm Wave-Maps and Energy Dispersion In this

  19. Computer Energy Modeling Techniques for Simulation Large Scale Correctional Institutes in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heneghan, T.; Haberl, J. S.; Saman, N.; Bou-Saada, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    Building energy simulation programs have undergone an increase in use for evaluating energy consumption and energy conservation retrofits in buildings. Utilization of computer simulation programs for large facilities with multiple buildings, however...

  20. Mesoscale and Large-Eddy Simulations for Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marjanovic, N

    2011-02-22

    Operational wind power forecasting, turbine micrositing, and turbine design require high-resolution simulations of atmospheric flow over complex terrain. The use of both Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and large-eddy (LES) simulations is explored for wind energy applications using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. To adequately resolve terrain and turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, grid nesting is used to refine the grid from mesoscale to finer scales. This paper examines the performance of the grid nesting configuration, turbulence closures, and resolution (up to as fine as 100 m horizontal spacing) for simulations of synoptically and locally driven wind ramping events at a West Coast North American wind farm. Interestingly, little improvement is found when using higher resolution simulations or better resolved turbulence closures in comparison to observation data available for this particular site. This is true for week-long simulations as well, where finer resolution runs show only small changes in the distribution of wind speeds or turbulence intensities. It appears that the relatively simple topography of this site is adequately resolved by all model grids (even as coarse as 2.7 km) so that all resolutions are able to model the physics at similar accuracy. The accuracy of the results is shown in this paper to be more dependent on the parameterization of the land-surface characteristics such as soil moisture rather than on grid resolution.

  1. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes a section that describes efforts already underway or planned at NERSC that address requirements collected at the workshop. NERSC has many initiatives in progress that address key workshop findings and are aligned with NERSC's strategic plans.

  2. Investigation of the characteristics of liquid fuel burning, Rijke type, pulse combustors; Progress report, July 1, 1988--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinn, B.T.; Daniel, B.R.; Shani, S.; Bai, T.; Zhang, Z.

    1988-10-01

    This research program consists of three tasks. The objectives of Task A are to determine the performance characteristics of an uninsulated and an insulated, Rijke type, pulse combustors when burning different liquid fuels under different operating conditions. Task B is concerned with the elucidation of the mechanisms responsible for driving the pulsations in the developed combustors and Task C is concerned with the determination dependence of the performance of the combustor upon the amplitude of pulsations. The performance characteristics of this pulse combustor design were investigated extensively earlier under this program and the results are described in previous progress reports. In order to determine the effect of thermal conditions inside the combustor, a second insulated combustor was developed having the same design as the uninsulated combustor. The performance of this combustor was investigated this quarter. 21 figs.

  3. Large-Scale Federal Renewable Energy Projects | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable energy projects larger than 10 megawatts (MW), also known as utility-scale projects, are complex and typically require private-sector financing. The Federal Energy...

  4. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-01-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  5. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-07-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  6. Second generation PFBC systems research and development: Phase 2, Topping combustor testing at UTSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johanson, N.R.; Foote, J.P.

    1992-12-01

    This report describes a second generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant. The topping combustor testing is briefly described. The topping combustor burns low BTU gas produced from substoichiometric combustion of coal in a pressurized carbonizer. Char produced is burned in a PFBC.

  7. Development of a low NO/sub x/ lean premixed annular combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, P.B.; Kubasco, A.J.; Sekas, N.J.

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric test program was conducted to define a low NOx annular combustor concept suitable for a supersonic, high-altitude aircraft application. The lean premixed combustor, known as the Vortex Air Blast (VAB) concept, was tested as a 22.0 cm diameter model in the early development phases to arrive at basic design and performance criteria. 9 refs.

  8. Second generation PFBC systems research and development: Phase 2, Topping combustor testing at UTSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johanson, N.R.; Foote, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a second generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant. The topping combustor testing is briefly described. The topping combustor burns low BTU gas produced from substoichiometric combustion of coal in a pressurized carbonizer. Char produced is burned in a PFBC.

  9. Comparison of direct and indirect combustion noise mechanisms in a model combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    the combustor 1 quantity downstream from the combustor and upstream from the nozzle 2 quantity downstream from by the unsteady heat release from the turbulent flame propagate either upstream or downstream through/s wS dimensionless entropy wave w+ dimensionless acoustic wave propagating downstream w- dimensionless

  10. Investigation of the characteristics of a coal burning Rijke type pulsating combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, J.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The evaluation of the performance characteristics of a coal burning Rijke type pulsating combustor was studied. The combustor consists of an open ended vertical tube with a coal burning bed located in the middle of its lower half. The liberation of heat by the combustion process at this location results in spontaneous excitation of the fundamental, longitudinal, acoustic mode of the tube and the acoustic oscillations lead to significant intensification of the combustion process. An 108 inch long 5.5 inch internal diameter combustor was constructed and instrumented for this investigation. The measurements performed during a series of experiments conducted at various air/fuel ratios and coal feed rates include: dB level of pulsations at the mid section of the combustor, frequency of oscillations, temperature at different locations inside the combustor, mass emission rates of generated particulates, and CO, CO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, and SP/sub 2/ concentrations in the exhaust products of the combustor. The study demonstrated that the developed pulsating combustor can burn coal stably and continuously under a variety of air/fuel ratios and that maximum amplitudes of acoustic pressure occur when operation is conducted near stoichiometric conditions. It was also verified that the presence of pulsations resulted in a very efficient and intense combustion process. The measured CO and CO/sub 2/ concentrations were used to determine the combustion efficiencies of the combustor which were higher than 95%.

  11. Free energy and surface tension of arbitrarily large Mackay icosahedral clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Free energy and surface tension of arbitrarily large Mackay icosahedral clusters Richard B. Mc for predicting the free energy of arbitrarily large Mackay icosahedral clusters. van der Waals clusters free energies for larger clusters 561 atoms . Combining these predictions with correlations

  12. Energy-Aware Routing in Sensor Networks: A Large System Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srikant, Rayadurgam

    Energy-Aware Routing in Sensor Networks: A Large System Approach Longbi Lin a , Ness B. Shroff a, Sensor Network, Large System, Mathematical Programming/Optimization, Simulations 1 Introduction Energy re- plenishment. Energy sources, e.g., solar cells, can be attached to sensor nodes to prolong

  13. An Energy-Efficient Framework for Large-Scale Parallel Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    An Energy-Efficient Framework for Large-Scale Parallel Storage Systems Ziliang Zong, Matt Briggs-scale and energy-efficient parallel storage systems. To validate the efficiency of the proposed framework, a buffer that this new framework can significantly improves the energy efficiency of large-scale parallel storage systems

  14. Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction The 15,000 square-foot sustainably designed National Sequestration Education Center, located at Richland...

  15. Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    today's groundbreaking for construction of the nation's first large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage (ICCS) facility in Decatur, Illinois. Supported by the 2009...

  16. Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    technologies, and remove the farming business risk associated with fluctuating fuel prices. PI Xu has many years experience in large scale GSHP for commercial and industrial...

  17. Piloted rich-catalytic lean-burn hybrid combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newburry, Donald Maurice (Orlando, FL)

    2002-01-01

    A catalytic combustor assembly which includes, an air source, a fuel delivery means, a catalytic reactor assembly, a mixing chamber, and a means for igniting a fuel/air mixture. The catalytic reactor assembly is in fluid communication with the air source and fuel delivery means and has a fuel/air plenum which is coated with a catalytic material. The fuel/air plenum has cooling air conduits passing therethrough which have an upstream end. The upstream end of the cooling conduits is in fluid communication with the air source but not the fuel delivery means.

  18. Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Milligan, M.

    2012-06-01

    In general, large-scale integration studies in Europe and the United States find that high penetrations of renewable generation are technically feasible with operational changes and increased access to transmission. This paper describes other key findings such as the need for fast markets, large balancing areas, system flexibility, and the use of advanced forecasting.

  19. Corporate Energy Management: A Survey of Large Manufacturing Companies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norland, D. L.; Lind, L.

    2000-01-01

    Corporate practices regarding energy management vary substantially from one company to another. Some companies pay close attention to energy use throughout the corporation while others pay scant attention. This paper first describes what we call...

  20. Orientation Estimation for Multiple Large Fractures by Scattering Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    2006-01-01

    We have done the numerical modeling of seismic response to multiple sets of vertical large fractures by using finite-difference method (FD), which can easily handle media with monoclinic anisotropy. We consider three types ...

  1. Glendale Water and Power- Large Business Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glendale Water and Power (GWP) offers a rebate to its medium and large business customers with electric bills of more than $3000 per month (electric usage of 250,000 kWh annually ~ $36,000 per year...

  2. Large Scale Renewable Energy Property Tax Abatement (Nevada State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    renewable energy resources including solar, wind, biomass*, fuel cells, geothermal or hydro. Generation facilities must have a capacity of at least 10 megawatts (MW). Facilities...

  3. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    number modeling of type ia supernovae. I. Hydrodynamics.number modeling of type ia supernovae. II. Energy evolution.Mach number modeling of type ia supernovae. III. Reactions.

  4. Bounding Energy Consumption in Large-Scale MPI Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funk, Shelby Hyatt

    can execute parts of a program at a slower CPU speed to achieve energy savings with a relatively small savings is NP-complete, which has led to many heuristic energy- saving algorithms. To determine how closely these algorithms approach optimal savings, we developed a system that determines a bound on the en

  5. Energy Efficiency for Large-Scale MapReduce Workloads with Significant Interactive Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Energy Efficiency for Large-Scale MapReduce Workloads with Significant Interactive Analysis Yanpei make energy efficiency a critical concern. Prior works on MapReduce energy efficiency have not yet con to achieve for MIA workloads. These concerns lead us to develop BEEMR (Berkeley Energy Efficient Map

  6. Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High-Hydrogen Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santavicca, Dom; Lieuwen, Tim

    2013-09-30

    Actual gas turbine combustors for power generation applications employ multi-nozzle combustor configurations. Researchers at Penn State and Georgia Tech have extended previous work on the flame response in single-nozzle combustors to the more realistic case of multi-nozzle combustors. Research at Georgia Tech has shown that asymmetry of both the flow field and the acoustic forcing can have a significant effect on flame response and that such behavior is important in multi-flame configurations. As a result, the structure of the flame and its response to forcing is three-dimensional. Research at Penn State has led to the development of a three-dimensional chemiluminescence flame imaging technique that can be used to characterize the unforced (steady) and forced (unsteady) flame structure of multi-nozzle combustors. Important aspects of the flame response in multi-nozzle combustors which are being studied include flame-flame and flame-wall interactions. Research at Penn State using the recently developed three-dimensional flame imaging technique has shown that spatial variations in local flame confinement must be accounted for to accurately predict global flame response in a multi-nozzle can combustor.

  7. Investigation of the combustion of liquid fuels in Rijke type pulse combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinn, B.T.; Daniel, B.R.; Bai, T.

    1990-01-01

    The synopsis summarizes the accomplishments of DOE Contract NO. AS04-85AL31881, which investigated the combustion of different liquid fuels in Rijke type pulse combustors. Interest in the development of a Rijke pulse combustor capable of burning liquid fuels was stimulated by earlier studies by the investigators of this program which had demonstrated that various coals can be burned efficiently and with low pollutant emissions in Rijke type pulse combustors. This research program consisted of three tasks. Task A was concerned with the development of a Rijke pulse combustor design capable of burning different liquid fuels, and determination of the performances of uninsulated and insulated versions of the developed Rijke pulse combustor when burning different liquid fuels under different operating conditions. Task B was concerned with the elucidation of the mechanisms responsible for driving the pulsations in the developed combustors, and Task C was concerned with the determination of the dependence of the combustor performance upon the amplitude of pulsations. The results of these studies are briefly discussed in the remainder of this document. 2 figs.

  8. Slagging retrofit pulsed coal combustor. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    Design and fabrication of an experimental facility for cold flow studies in a pulsed combustor have been completed. The major units in the facility include a transparent combustor cold flow device, a solids injection system, an air injection system, and an expansion tank. Figure 1 is a schematic of the experimental set up. The experimental approach at this stage is aimed at resolving the basic technical issues and not at building an apparatus which is a functional pulsed combustor. The plexiglass combustor device contains elements to disperse injected solids (spherical target), swirl the inlet air (a plate with angled orifices), and control the flow rate (variable exhaust orifices). The solids and air injection systems are presently set up to permit single pulse inputs to the combustor. The main feature of these systems are fast acting ball valves that allow precisely controlled amounts of solids and air to pass through them to the combustor model. The speed of valve actuation, and hence the quantities of substances passed, is adjustable. In the cold flow experiments, the expansion tank serves as a chamber where the solids can be collected. This tank will also serve as a cooling tank during the ignition experiments. Diagnostics to be used on the combustor include high speed photography, fast acting sampling units, optical probes, pressure transducers and temperature probes.

  9. Web-based energy information systems for large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-03-29

    Energy Information Systems (EIS), which monitor and organize building energy consumption and related trend data over the Internet, have been evolving over the past decade. This technology helps perform key energy management functions such as organizing energy use data, identifying energy consumption anomalies, managing energy costs, and automating demand response strategies. During recent years numerous developers and vendors of EIS have been deploying these products in a highly competitive market. EIS offer various software applications and services for a variety of purposes. Costs for such system vary greatly depending on the system's capabilities and how they are marketed. Some products are marketed directly to end users while others are made available as part of electric utility programs. EIS can be a useful tool in building commissioning and retro-commissioning. This paper reviews more than a dozen EIS. We have developed an analytical framework to characterize the main features of these products, which are developed for a variety of utility programs and end-use markets. The purpose of this research is to evaluate EIS capabilities and limitations, plus examine longer-term opportunities for utilizing such technology to improve building energy efficiency and load management.

  10. Copyright 2014 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission from: CERTS Microgrid Demonstration With Large-Scale Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright © 2014 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission from: CERTS Microgrid Demonstration With Large GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 2, MARCH 2014 937 CERTS Microgrid Demonstration With Large-Scale Energy Storage (CERTS) Microgrid concept captures the emerging po- tential of Distributed Energy Resource (DER) using

  11. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE & RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bert Zauderer

    2003-04-21

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. The reacted particles impact and melt in the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall by the centrifugal force of the swirling combustion gases. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Prior analyses and laboratory scale data indicated that for Coal Tech's 20 MMBtu/hour, air-cooled, slagging coal combustor slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to validate this sulfur-in-slag model in a group of combustor tests. A total of 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed during the period of performance of this project. This was more that double the 16 test days that were required in the original work statement. The extra tests were made possible by cost saving innovations that were made in the operation of the combustor test facility and in additional investment of Coal Tech resources in the test effort. The original project plan called for two groups of tests. The first group of tests involved the injection of calcium sulfate particles in the form of gypsum or plaster of Paris with the coal into the 20 MMBtu/hour-combustor. The second group of tests consisted of the entire two-step process, in which lime or limestone is co-injected with coal and reacts with the sulfur gas released during combustion to form calcium sulfate particles that impact and dissolve in the slag layer. Since this sulfur capture process has been validated in numerous prior tests in this combustor, the primary effort in the present project was on achieving the high slag flow rates needed to retain the sulfur in the slag.

  12. An Energy Conservation Program at a Large Cable Manufacturing Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reale, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Atlanta Works is the largest telephone cable manufacturing plant in the world plus the manufacturing center for fiber optic cable for the Western Electric Company and exemplifies how an effective energy conservation program can work...

  13. Spatial Energy Balancing in Large-scale Wireless Multihop Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Veciana, Gustavo

    communications systems and/or distributed sensing ap- plications, where energy storage and availability may be quite limited. There are many levels at which one can address this problem. Advances in silicon

  14. Quantitative characterization of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor flowfield using unified, laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, D.G.; McDaniel, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    A calibrated, nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence (LIIF) was used to quantify the steady, compressible flowfield of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor. The combustor was configured with single and staged, transverse-air injection into a supersonic-air freestream behind a rearward-facing step. Pressure, temperature, two-velocity components, and injectant mole fraction were measured with high spatial resolution in the three-dimensional flowfields. These experimental results provide a benchmark set of data for validation of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes being developed to model supersonic combustor flowfields. 8 refs.

  15. Dark energy properties from large future galaxy surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basse, Tobias; Bjælde, Ole Eggers; Hannestad, Steen; Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: oeb@phys.au.dk E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2014-05-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a Euclid-like survey will be able to constrain dark energy and neutrino parameters from a combination of its cosmic shear power spectrum, galaxy power spectrum, and cluster mass function measurements. We find that the combination of these three probes vastly improves the survey's potential to measure the time evolution of dark energy. In terms of a dark energy figure-of-merit defined as (?(w{sub p})?(w{sub a})){sup ?1}, we find a value of 690 for Euclid-like data combined with Planck-like measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies in a 10-dimensional cosmological parameter space, assuming a ?CDM fiducial cosmology. For the more commonly used 7-parameter model, we find a figure-of-merit of 1900 for the same data combination. We consider also the survey's potential to measure dark energy perturbations in models wherein the dark energy is parameterised as a fluid with a nonstandard non-adiabatic sound speed, and find that in an optimistic scenario in which w{sub 0} deviates from -1 by as much as is currently observationally allowed, models with c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 10{sup ?6} and c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 1 can be distinguished from one another at more than 2? significance. We emphasise that constraints on the dark energy sound speed from cluster measurements are strongly dependent on the modelling of the cluster mass function; significantly weaker sensitivities ensue if we modify our model to include fewer features of nonlinear dark energy clustering. Finally, we find that the sum of neutrino masses can be measured with a 1? precision of 0.015 eV, even in complex cosmological models in which the dark energy equation of state varies with time. The 1? sensitivity to the effective number of relativistic species N{sub eff}{sup ml} is approximately 0.03, meaning that the small deviation of 0.046 from 3 in the standard value of N{sub eff}{sup ml} due to non-instantaneous decoupling and finite temperature effects can be probed with 1? precision for the first time.

  16. Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,DepartmentFederalJuly 8,toDepartment ofin STEMCapture and

  17. Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergy (AZ,LocalEfficiency |< BackHeating ApplicationsProductionWind

  18. Closed-Loop Energy Management Control of Large Industrial Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    providing steam to the process. A Sell Advisor calculates Make-Buy decisions based on real-time electrical prices, fuel prices and boiler loads. Condensing turbines are coordinated with closed-loop control to provide the lowest energy cost to the plant. When...

  19. Solar energy teaching lab with large scale working model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, J.; Cook, T.

    1980-01-01

    An active solar energy retrofit has been added to an engineering building at John Brown University. A new system dependent evaluation procedure incorporating the f-chart method was used for panel selection. The system is designed and instrumented in order to provide various laboratory experiences and data collection capability. Data collection and system control are provided by a microcomputer. 7 refs.

  20. Development of a pressure gain combustor for improved cycle efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Janus, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents results from an experimental research program attempting to improve the thermodynamic efficiencies of gas-turbine combustors. An elementary thermodynamic analysis shows that the thermodynamic cycle efficiencies of gas turbines can be significantly improved by using unsteady combustion that achieves quasi-constant-volume combustion. The ability to produce the so-called pressure gain via this process has already been demonstrated by others for pressures less than 3 atmospheres. This paper presents experimental results for pressures up to 11 atmospheres, compares certain process parameters to a numerical simulation, and briefly examines the problem of scale-up. Results of pollutant measurements over the 2--11 atmospheric range of operation are also included.

  1. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratory programTarget 2014 Large

  2. Texas Large Construction Site Notice for Secondary Operators | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSetIdaho: Energy

  3. Large-Scale Liquid Hydrogen Handling Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S.Leadership on Clean Energy | Department

  4. Day-Ahead and Real-Time Models for Large-Scale Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;DayDay-Ahead and Real-Time Models for Large-Scale Energy Storage Final Project Report Power Systems of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering P.O. BOX 875706 Tempe, AZ 85287-5706 Phone: 480 965-1276 Fax

  5. Numerical Evaluation of the Energy for Upstream Opportunistic Large Array-based Transmissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, Mary Ann

    protocols [1]. Even though the network is Ad Hoc in nature, one can optimize energy usage by judicious the upstream behavior of OLACRA-FT, in terms of the energy usage. This upstream routing back to the sink hasNumerical Evaluation of the Energy for Upstream Opportunistic Large Array-based Transmissions R

  6. Assessing the Role of Energy in Development and Climate Policies in Large Developing Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing the Role of Energy in Development and Climate Policies in Large Developing Countries Amit conceptual issues related to the role of energy in development and its potential synergies and tradeoffs with climate change. The relationship between economic development and energy over time is discussed

  7. Effects of large-scale distribution of wind energy in and around Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of large-scale distribution of wind energy in and around Europe Gregor Giebel Niels Gylling Mortensen Risø National Laboratory Gregor Czisch ISET #12;Outline · How to achieve high penetrations of wind energy in Europe? · Distribution of wind energy all over Europe leads to smoothing of the wind power

  8. The Association of Large-Scale Climate Variability and Teleconnections on Wind Energy Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Association of Large-Scale Climate Variability and Teleconnections on Wind Energy Resource over on Wind Energy Resource over Europe and its Intermittency Pascal Kriesche* and Adam Schlosser* Abstract In times of increasing importance of wind power in the world's energy mix, this study focuses on a better

  9. A Scalable Model for Energy Load Balancing in Large-scale Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Veciana, Gustavo

    A Scalable Model for Energy Load Balancing in Large-scale Sensor Networks Seung Jun Baek we consider how one might achieve more balanced energy burdens across the network by spreading sinks change their locations to balance the energy burdens incurred accross the network nodes [1

  10. Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe Miguel Á energy, that proposes that richness will be best described by energy inputs into an area (e.g., Turner et and amphibian species richness in Europe and 11 environmental variables related to five hypotheses

  11. INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

  12. Suppression of thermoacoustic instabilities in a swirl combustor through microjet air injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaBry, Zachary Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Thermoacoustic or combustion instability, a positive feedback loop coupling heat release rate and acoustic oscillations in a combustor, is one of the greatest challenges currently facing the development of new gas turbine ...

  13. A physics-based emissions model for aircraft gas turbine combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allaire, Douglas L

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, a physics-based model of an aircraft gas turbine combustor is developed for predicting NO. and CO emissions. The objective of the model is to predict the emissions of current and potential future gas turbine ...

  14. Deterministic quantities characterizing noise driven Hopf bifurcations in gas turbine combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    Deterministic quantities characterizing noise driven Hopf bifurcations in gas turbine combustors Nicolas Noiray, Bruno Schuermans Alstom Power, Baden, Switzerland Abstract Lean premix gas turbine observed in gas turbines is used to validate the proposed identification methods. In a second step

  15. Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

    1999-06-07

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

  16. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Numerical Simulation of a Gas Turbine Combustor Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Numerical Simulation of a Gas Turbine of combustion by using nanosecond pulsed plasma actuators for a gas turbine combustor. Moreau [2] and Corke et

  17. Numerical Simulation of Enhanced Mixing in Scramjet Combustor Using Ramp, Tabs and Suction Collar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Seung-Jae

    2011-06-09

    injection) and normal fuel injection (wall injection) schemes. Incorporated in the scramjet combustors are delta tabs and suction collars of two types as means of mixing enhancement. The main mechanism of the tabs and suction collars for mixing enhancement...

  18. First Beam for Large Hadron Collider | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report to CongressApril 6,Final9Reportjobs can0 3:00PM

  19. Large-Scale Hydropower Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRDEnergyTurbine blades beingLM Executive2014) | Departmentscale

  20. South Dakota's At-large congressional district: Energy Resources | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSolo EnergySouth Carolina/WindChestnut Jump

  1. Texas Large Construction Site Notice for Primary Operators | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSetIdaho: Energy ResourcesTexasHistorical

  2. LARGE INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES BY STATE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety Standards Implementation JulyTheKEY07-97# . L I172

  3. Large Wind Property Tax Reduction | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety StandardsLabor Relations ActAvenue,

  4. Performance of an industrial type combustor burning simulated fuels of medium BTU content 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goehring, Howard Lee

    1983-01-01

    I I ~ THEORETICAL CON SIDERAT IQN S Page v1 A. COMBUSTION CHAMBER OPERATING PRINCIPLES, . 4 B. PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS C. AFFECT QF CHANGING ENGINE CONDITIONS ON COMBUSTOR PERFORMANCE D. HOW LOW BTU FUELS AFFECT COMBUSTOR PERFO RMAN C E... CHAPTER III . EXPERIMENTATION A. INTRODUCTION 15 20 28 B. CONDITIONS TO BE TESTED C. EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP D. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE CHAPTER IV . SUMMARY A. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS B. RECOMMENDAT ION S RE FEREN CE S 75 TABLE OF CONTENTS...

  5. Second generation PFBC system research and development: Phase 2, Topping combustor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domeracki, W.; Pillsbury, P.W.; Dowdy, T.E.; Foote, J.

    1992-12-01

    The use of a Circulating Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor (CPFBC) as the primary combustion system for a combustion turbine requires transporting compressor air to the CPFBC and vitiated air/flue gas back to the turbine. In addition, the topping combustion system must be located in the returning vitiated airflow path. The conventional fuel system and turbine center section require major change for the applications. The selected arrangement, which utilizes two topping combustor assemblies, one on each side of the unit, is shown in Figure 1. Half of the vitiated air from the CPFBC enters an intemal plenum chamber in which topping combustors are mounted. Fuel gas enters the assembly via the fuel nozzles at the head end of the combustor. Combustion occurs, and the products of combustion are ducted into the main shell for distribution to the first-stage turbine vanes. Compressor discharge air leaves the main shell, flowing around the annular duct into the adjacent combustion shells. The air flows around the vitiated air plenums and leaves each combustion assembly via nozzles and is ducted to the CPFBC and carbonizer. Because the air entering the combustor is at 1600{degrees}F rather than the 700{degrees}F usual for gas turbines, the conventional type of combustor is not suitable. Both emissions and wall cooling problems preclude the use of the conventional design. Therefore, a combustor that will meet the requirements of utilizing the higher temperature air for both wall cooling and combustion is required. In selecting a combustor design that will withstand the conditions expected in the topping application, the effective utilization of the 1600{degrees}F air mentioned above could satisfy the wall cooling challenge by maintaining a cooling air layer of substantial thickness.

  6. A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage Yuan Yang,a Guangyuan Zhengb and Yi Cui*ac Large-scale energy storage represents a key challenge for renewable energy develop a new lithium/ polysulfide (Li/PS) semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage

  7. Using existing technologies, designers and operators of large buildings could slash national energy use across a broad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using existing technologies, designers and operators of large buildings could slash national energy of large office buildings and hospitals achieve at least a 50% energy savings using existing technology. Strategies for 50% Energy Savings in Large Office Buildings found that a 50% energy savings can be realized

  8. A feasibility study of oil shale fired pulse combustors with applications to oil shale retorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, G.J.; Johnson, E.K.; Zhang, G.Q.; Roach, R.A.

    1992-07-01

    The results of the experimental investigation performed to determine the feasibility of using pulverized Colorado oil shale to fuel a bench scale pulse combustor reveal that oil shale cannot sustain pulsations when used alone as fuel. Trace amounts of propane mixed with the oil shale enabled the pulsations, however. Up to 80% of the organic material in the oil shale was consumed when it was mixed with propane in the combustor. Beyond the feasibility objectives, the operating conditions of the combustor fuel with propane and mixtures of oil shale and propane were characterized with respect to pulsation amplitude and frequency and the internal combustor wall temperature over fuel lean and fuel rich stoichiometries. Maximum pressure excursions of 12.5 kPa were experienced in the combustor. Pulsation frequencies ranged from 50 to nearly 80 Hz. Cycle resolved laser Doppler anemometry velocities were measured at the tail pipe exit plane. Injecting inert mineral matter (limestone) into the pulse combustor while using propane fuel had only a slight effect on the pulsation frequency for the feed rates tested.

  9. A Comprehensive Energy Audit of a Large Production Unit in Six Weeks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korich, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Past energy audits of petrochemical plant production units at Union Carbide have demonstrated that the key to an effective, comprehensive audit of a large production unit is to minimize the time period requirement for the team activity. This paper...

  10. ISSUANCE 2015-12-17: Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment and Commercial Warm Air Furnaces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment and Commercial Warm Air Furnaces, Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  11. ISSUANCE 2015-12-17: Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment and Commercial Warm Air Furnaces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment and Commercial Warm Air Furnaces

  12. U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Large-Scale Integrated Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Large-Scale Integrated Smart Grid Solutions with High: LargeScale Integrated Smart Grid Solutions with High Penetration of Renewable Resources, Dispersed- ing electricity grid. Much attention is being given to smart grid development in the U.S. and around

  13. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

    2009-09-30

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOEâ??s goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines, Incorporated Saturn engine rig. High pressure single-injector rig and modified engine rig tests demonstrated NOx less than 2 ppm and CO less than 10 ppm over a wide flame temperature operating regime with low combustion noise (<0.15% peak-to-peak). Minimum NOx for the optimized engine retrofit Full RCL® designs was less than 1 ppm with CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Durability testing of the substrate and catalyst material was successfully demonstrated at pressure and temperature showing long term stable performance of the catalytic reactor element. Stable performance of the reactor element was achieved when subjected to durability tests (>5000 hours) at simulated engine conditions (P=15 atm, Tin=400C/750F.). Cyclic tests simulating engine trips was also demonstrated for catalyst reliability. In addition to catalyst tests, substrate oxidation testing was also performed for downselected substrate candidates for over 25,000 hours. At the end of the program, an RCL® catalytic pilot system has been developed and demonstrated to produce NOx emissions of less than 3 ppm (corrected to 15% O2) for 100% and 50% load operation in a production engine operating on natural gas. In addition, a Full RCL® combustor has been designed and demonstrated less than 2 ppm NOx (with potential to achieve 1 ppm) in single injector and modified engine testing. The catalyst/substrate combination has been shown to be stable up to 5500 hrs in simulated engine conditions.

  14. A Large-scale Study on Predicting and Contextualizing Building Energy Usage J. Zico Kolter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolter, J. Zico

    Joseph Ferreira Jr. Department of Urban Studies and Planning Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyA Large-scale Study on Predicting and Contextualizing Building Energy Usage J. Zico Kolter Computer Cambridge, MA 02139 Abstract In this paper we present a data-driven approach to mod- eling end user energy

  15. Low energy neutrino astronomy with the large liquid scintillation detector LENA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Marrodan Undagoitia; F. von Feilitzsch; M. Goeger-Neff; K. A. Hochmuth; L. Oberauer; W. Potzel; M. Wurm

    2006-05-22

    The detection of low energy neutrinos in a large scintillation detector may provide further important information on astrophysical processes as supernova physics, solar physics and elementary particle physics as well as geophysics. In this contribution, a new project for Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) consisting of a 50kt scintillation detector is presented.

  16. Mesoporous Hydrous Manganese Dioxide Nanowall Arrays with Large Lithium Ion Energy Storage Capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Mesoporous Hydrous Manganese Dioxide Nanowall Arrays with Large Lithium Ion Energy Storage Capacities By Dawei Liu, Betzaida Battalla Garcia, Qifeng Zhang, Qing Guo, Yunhuai Zhang, Saghar Sepehri and alkaline batteries for decades, is a well accepted electrode material for clean energy storage because

  17. Exploring Adaptive Reconfiguration to Optimize Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale Battery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with hundreds or thousands of batteries are now widely used in electric vehicles [33], [36], energy storageExploring Adaptive Reconfiguration to Optimize Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale Battery Systems systems such as electric vehicles and smart micro-grids. For many applications, the load requirements

  18. Membraneless Hydrogen Bromine Laminar Flow Battery for Large-Scale Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poonen, Bjorn

    Membraneless Hydrogen Bromine Laminar Flow Battery for Large-Scale Energy Storage by William Allan and examined for its potential to provide low cost energy storage using the rapid reaction kinetics of hydrogen by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David E. Hardt Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Theses #12;2 #12;Membraneless Hydrogen Bromine

  19. Large-scale Probabilistic Forecasting in Energy Systems using Sparse Gaussian Conditional Random Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolter, J. Zico

    in a wide range of energy systems, including forecasting demand, renewable generation, and electricityLarge-scale Probabilistic Forecasting in Energy Systems using Sparse Gaussian Conditional Random demonstrated that in the context of electrical demand and wind power, probabilistic forecasts can offer

  20. Development of a retrofit coal combustor for industrial applications, (Phase 1-A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    During this past quarter, two tandem-fired pulse combustors were designed to fire at a nominal rate of 3.5 to 5.5 MMBtu/hr under continuation of Phase I work on DOE project DE-AC22-87PC79654. In prior work, MTCI demonstrated the operation of a 1--2 MMBtu/h coal-fired tandem pulse combustor that is intended for small industrial applications. These component tests emphasized verification of key design issues such as combustor coupling, slag rejection, and staged air addition. The current work, which represents an extension of the Phase I effort, focuses on integrated testing of the tandem pulse combustor with a fire-tube boiler, and the addition of a slag quench vessel. A tandem-fired pulse combustion unit designed to fire at a nominal rate of 3.5-5 MMBtu/hr was designed and fabricated. The configuration includes two combustion chambers cast in a single monolith, tailpipes cast separately with annular air preheating capability, and a cyclonic decoupler. Design analysis and evaluations were performed to optimize the system with respect to minimizing heat losses, size, and cost. Heat losses from the combustor and decoupler walls are predicted to be approximately 3 percent. The final designs for the ancillary items (slag quench, tertiary air addition, scrubber and sampling system) were completed and fabrication and installation initiated. A Cleaver-Brooks 150 hp-4 pass boiler was delivered and installed and modifications for interfacing with the retrofit pulse combustor unit completed. A below-ground slag collection pit was excavated to permit direct in-line coupling of the combustor to the boiler and to reduce head-room requirements. The pit is 30 inches deep and lined with waterproof and fireproof siding.

  1. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Lemmon, John P.; Imhoff, Carl H.; Graff, Gordon L.; Li, Liyu; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Chong M.; Xiao, Jie; Xia, Guanguang; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Baskaran, Suresh; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Schwenzer, Birgit

    2013-02-15

    Large-scale electrical energy storage has become more important than ever for reducing fossil energy consumption in transportation and for the widespread deployment of intermittent renewable energy in electric grid. However, significant challenges exist for its applications. Here, the status and challenges are reviewed from the perspective of materials science and materials chemistry in electrochemical energy storage technologies, such as Li-ion batteries, sodium (sulfur and metal halide) batteries, Pb-acid battery, redox flow batteries, and supercapacitors. Perspectives and approaches are introduced for emerging battery designs and new chemistry combinations to reduce the cost of energy storage devices.

  2. Investigations of swirl flames in a gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.; Duan, X.R.; Weigand, P.

    2006-01-01

    The thermochemical states of three swirling CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flames, stabilized in a gas turbine model combustor, were investigated using laser Raman scattering. The flames were operated at different thermal powers and air/fuel ratios and exhibited different flame behavior with respect to flame instabilities. They had previously been characterized with respect to their flame structures, velocity fields, and mean values of temperature, major species concentrations, and mixture fraction. The single-pulse multispecies measurements presented in this article revealed very rapid mixing of fuel and air, accompanied by strong effects of turbulence-chemistry interactions in the form of local flame extinction and ignition delay. Flame stabilization is accomplished mainly by hot and relatively fuel-rich combustion products, which are transported back to the flame root within an inner recirculation zone. The flames are not attached to the fuel nozzle, and are stabilized approximately 10 mm above the fuel nozzle, where fuel and air are partially premixed before ignition. The mixing and reaction progress in this area are discussed in detail. The flames are short (<50 mm), especially that exhibiting thermoacoustic oscillations, and reach a thermochemical state close to adiabatic equilibrium at the flame tip. The main goals of this article are to outline results that yield deeper insight into the combustion of gas turbine flames and to establish an experimental database for the validation of numerical models.

  3. Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leto, Anthony (Franklin Lakes, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

  4. ARRA-Multi-Level Energy Storage and Controls for Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Wenzhong Gao

    2012-09-30

    The Project Objective is to design innovative energy storage architecture and associated controls for high wind penetration to increase reliability and market acceptance of wind power. The project goals are to facilitate wind energy integration at different levels by design and control of suitable energy storage systems. The three levels of wind power system are: Balancing Control Center level, Wind Power Plant level, and Wind Power Generator level. Our scopes are to smooth the wind power fluctuation and also ensure adequate battery life. In the new hybrid energy storage system (HESS) design for wind power generation application, the boundary levels of the state of charge of the battery and that of the supercapacitor are used in the control strategy. In the controller, some logic gates are also used to control the operating time durations of the battery. The sizing method is based on the average fluctuation of wind profiles of a specific wind station. The calculated battery size is dependent on the size of the supercapacitor, state of charge of the supercapacitor and battery wear. To accommodate the wind power fluctuation, a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) consisting of battery energy system (BESS) and super-capacitor is adopted in this project. A probability-based power capacity specification approach for the BESS and super-capacitors is proposed. Through this method the capacities of BESS and super-capacitor are properly designed to combine the characteristics of high energy density of BESS and the characteristics of high power density of super-capacitor. It turns out that the super-capacitor within HESS deals with the high power fluctuations, which contributes to the extension of BESS lifetime, and the super-capacitor can handle the peaks in wind power fluctuations without the severe penalty of round trip losses associated with a BESS. The proposed approach has been verified based on the real wind data from an existing wind power plant in Iowa. An intelligent controller that increases battery life within hybrid energy storage systems for wind application was developed. Comprehensive studies have been conducted and simulation results are analyzed. A permanent magnet synchronous generator, coupled with a variable speed wind turbine, is connected to a power grid (14-bus system). A rectifier, a DC-DC converter and an inverter are used to provide a complete model of the wind system. An Energy Storage System (ESS) is connected to a DC-link through a DC-DC converter. An intelligent controller is applied to the DC-DC converter to help the Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) to regulate output power and also to control the operation of the battery and supercapacitor. This ensures a longer life time for the batteries. The detailed model is simulated in PSCAD/EMTP. Additionally, economic analysis has been done for different methods that can reduce the wind power output fluctuation. These methods are, wind power curtailment, dumping loads, battery energy storage system and hybrid energy storage system. From the results, application of single advanced HESS can save more money for wind turbines owners. Generally the income would be the same for most of methods because the wind does not change and maximum power point tracking can be applied to most systems. On the other hand, the cost is the key point. For short term and small wind turbine, the BESS is the cheapest and applicable method while for large scale wind turbines and wind farms the application of advanced HESS would be the best method to reduce the power fluctuation. The key outcomes of this project include a new intelligent controller that can reduce energy exchanged between the battery and DC-link, reduce charging/discharging cycles, reduce depth of discharge and increase time interval between charge/discharge, and lower battery temperature. This improves the overall lifetime of battery energy storages. Additionally, a new design method based on probability help optimize the power capacity specification for BESS and super-capacitors. Recommendations include experimental imp

  5. Development of an industrial l-star pulsed gas combustor. Final report, April 1986-December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotidis, P.A.

    1990-08-01

    A pulsed gas combustor has been developed based on the L-Star pulsed combustion principle. This concept is quite different from that of the more conventional acoustic pulsed combustor. In the L-Star system, there is no resonator, and the combustor volume and exhaust orifice area are chosen such that the time for pressure decay is greater than or equal to the time for combustion, in order to achieve high combustion pressures. A bench scale unit was constructed and tested. Maximum average peak pressure and combustion efficiency were realized for stoichiometric fuel/air ratio at 11.7 Hz, combustor volume of 0.2 cu ft, and air flow (steady) of 200 CFM. The combustor at these conditions produced 10 to the 6th power BTU/hr. Two backflow prevention configurations were tested: fluidic-aerodynamic valve and flapper valve. Peak pressures of 25 and 39 psig, respectively, were achieved. CO and combustibles emissions were high for both schemes (1000-3000 ppm); however, NOx emissions were as low as 10 ppm.

  6. Pulse combustor NO/sub x/ as affected by fuel-bound nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putnam, A.A.; Merryman, L.

    1985-10-01

    A short series of tests were run using nitrogen-doped liquid fuel in a gasoline fired pulse combustor and a similar capacity steady-state combustor. Four different fuel mixtures were used, white gasoline, and white gasoline doped with 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 weight percent nitrogen in the form of pyridine. The pulse combustor used was a Golden Eagle Model 2610 Dyna-Fog insecticide fog generator. For comparison purposes, a Coleman range-top type burner, modified to include a chimney vent, was used. The Coleman data indicate a decreasing efficiency of conversion of fuel nitrogen to NO/sub x/ as the amount of fuel nitrogen increases. While the pulse combustor NO/sub x/ lies in the same region, there is very little deviation from a constant conversion rate of about 42 percent of the fuel-bound nitrogen. A pulse combustor system might have some advantages for studying the conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO and NO/sub 2/. 4 references, 1 figure.

  7. Disk Accretion Flow Driven by Large-Scale Magnetic Fields: Solutions with Constant Specific Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Xin Li

    2003-05-29

    (Abridged) We study the dynamical evolution of a stationary, axisymmetric, and perfectly conducting cold accretion disk containing a large-scale magnetic field around a Kerr black hole, trying to understand the relation between accretion and the transportation of angular momentum and energy. We solve the radial momentum equation for solutions corresponding to an accretion flow that starts from a subsonic state at infinity, smoothly passes the fast critical point, then supersonically falls into the horizon of the black hole. The solutions always have the following features: 1) The specific energy of fluid particles remains constant but the specific angular momentum is effectively removed by the magnetic field. 2) At large radii, where the disk motion is dominantly rotational, the energy density of the magnetic field is equipartitioned with the rotational energy density of the disk. 3) Inside the fast critical point, where radial motion becomes important, the ratio of the electromagnetic energy density to the kinetic energy density drops quickly. The results indicate that: 1) Disk accretion does not necessarily imply energy dissipation since magnetic fields do not have to transport or dissipate a lot of energy as they effectively transport angular momentum. 2) When resistivity is small, the large-scale magnetic field is amplified by the shearing rotation of the disk until the magnetic energy density is equipartitioned with the rotational energy density, ending up with a geometrically thick disk. This is in contrast with the evolution of small-scale magnetic fields where if the resistivity is nonzero the magnetic energy density is likely to be equipartitioned with the kinetic energy density associated with local random motions (e.g., turbulence), making a thin Keplerian disk possible.

  8. Fuels generated from renewable energy: a possible solution for large scale energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    To perform leading fundamental research in the fields of fusion energy and solar fuels, New Mission DIFFER, energy infrastructure essential #12;4/22/2012 3 Theoretical potential energy sources Solar energy....... solar generation ...energy demand Storage and transport is part of the challenge! #12;4/22/2012 6 PV

  9. Large N Free Energy of 3d N=4 SCFTs and AdS/CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Assel; John Estes; Masahito Yamazaki

    2012-09-24

    We provide a non-trivial check of the AdS_4/CFT_3 correspondence recently proposed in arXiv:1106.4253 by verifying the GKPW relation in the large N limit. The CFT free energy is obtained from the previous works (arXiv:1105.2551, arXiv:1105.4390) on the S^3 partition function for 3-dimensional N=4 SCFT T[SU(N)]. This is matched with the computation of the type IIB action on the corresponding gravity background. We unexpectedly find that the leading behavior of the free energy at large N is 1/2 N^2 ln N. We also extend our results to richer theories and argue that 1/2 N^2 ln N is the maximal free energy at large N in this class of gauge theories.

  10. Resummation of the transverse-energy distribution in Higgs boson production at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimiliano Grazzini; Andreas Papaefstathiou; Jennifer M. Smillie; Bryan R. Webber

    2014-08-25

    We compute the resummed hadronic transverse-energy ($E_T$) distribution due to initial-state QCD radiation in the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson of mass 126 GeV by gluon fusion at the Large Hadron Collider, with matching to next-to-leading order calculations at large $E_T$. Effects of hadronization, underlying event and limited detector acceptance are estimated using aMC@NLO with the Herwig++ and Pythia 8 event generators.

  11. Technical Support Document: Strategies for 50% Energy Savings in Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Lobato, C.; Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2010-09-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) documents technical analysis that informs design guidance for designing and constructing large office buildings that achieve 50% net site energy savings over baseline buildings defined by minimal compliance with respect to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. This report also represents a step toward developing a methodology for using energy modeling in the design process to achieve aggressive energy savings targets. This report documents the modeling and analysis methods used to identify design recommendations for six climate zones that capture the range of U.S. climate variability; demonstrates how energy savings change between ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 and Standard 90.1-2004 to determine baseline energy use; uses a four-story 'low-rise' prototype to analyze the effect of building aspect ratio on energy use intensity; explores comparisons between baseline and low-energy building energy use for alternate energy metrics (net source energy, energy emissions, and energy cost); and examines the extent to which glass curtain construction limits achieve energy savings by using a 12-story 'high-rise' prototype.

  12. The Energy DataBus: NREL's Open-Source Application for Large-Scale Energy Data Collection and Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NREL’s Energy DataBus is used for tracking and analyzing energy use on its own campus. The system is applicable to other facilities—including anything from a single building to a large military base or college campus—or for other energy data management needs. Managing and minimizing energy consumption on a large campus is usually a difficult task for facility managers: There may be hundreds of energy meters spread across a campus, and the meter data are often recorded by hand. Even when data are captured electronically, there may be measurement issues or time periods that may not coincide. Making sense of this limited and often confusing data can be a challenge that makes the assessment of building performance a struggle for many facility managers. The Energy DataBus software was developed by NREL to address these issues on its own campus, but with an eye toward offering its software solutions to other facilities. Key features include the software's ability to store large amounts of data collected at high frequencies—NREL collects some of its energy data every second—and rich functionality to integrate this wide variety of data into a single database [copied from http://en.openei.org/wiki/NREL_Energy_DataBus].

  13. Mass transfer in oscillating flows: Efficient drying via pulse combustors. Final report, January 1988-September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arpaci, V.S.; Gemmen, R.

    1992-04-01

    Pulse combustors are known to have high rates of heat and mass transfer in the tailpipe because of velocity oscillations created by the acoustic resonance of the combustor. The results so far reported in the literature are inconclusive. A study of the mass transfer rates in a pulse combustor tailpipe has been conducted. The significant parameters including mean flow rate, frequency and amplitude of pulsation were varied nearly independently and their effects on the mass transfer were investigated. The mass transfer in the tailpipe is found to be enhanced by the oscillations up to a factor of 2 over steady turbulent flow. A correlation for mass transfer in pulsating turbulent flow is developed using a novel approach based on the appropriate microscales of turbulence and guided by the physical insight gained from experiments. The final form of the correlation will be available upon the completion of a doctoral thesis which is being written.

  14. Large-x connections of nuclear and high-energy physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Accardi, Alberto [Hampton U., JLAB

    2013-11-01

    I discuss how global QCD fits of parton distribution functions can make the somewhat separated fields of high-energy particle physics and lower energy hadronic and nuclear physics interact to the benefit of both. I review specific examples of this interplay from recent works of the CTEQ-Jefferson Lab collaboration, including hadron structure at large parton momentum and gauge boson production at colliders. I devote particular attention to quantifying theoretical uncertainties arising in the treatment of large partonic momentum contributions to deep inelastic scattering observables, and to discussing the experimental progress needed to reduce these.

  15. Large-x connections of nuclear and high-energy physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Accardi, Alberto

    2013-11-20

    I discuss how global QCD fits of parton distribution functions can make the somewhat separated fields of high-energy particle physics and lower energy hadronic and nuclear physics interact to the benefit of both. I review specific examples of this interplay from recent works of the CTEQ-Jefferson Lab collaboration, including hadron structure at large parton momentum and gauge boson production at colliders. Particular attention is devoted to quantifying theoretical uncertainties arising in the treatment of large partonic momentum contributions to deep inelastic scattering observables, and to discussing the experimental progress needed to reduce these.

  16. Combustion dynamics of a low-swirl combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, D.M.; Culick, F.E.C.; Ratner, A.

    2007-11-15

    The methodology for the measurement of dynamic combustor behavior has never been clearly established, due to the complexities associated with unsteady premixed flames and the difficulties in their measurement. The global and local distribution of Rayleigh index and the flame response functions are the main parameters normally employed to quantify and describe combustion dynamics. The Rayleigh index quantifies the thermoacoustic coupling, while the flame response function is a measure of the response of the system to outside disturbances. The primary objective of this work is to investigate the combustion dynamics of a commonly used low-swirl burner and to develop tools and methods for examining the dynamics of a combustion system. To this end, the effect of acoustic forcing at various frequencies on flame heat release behavior has been investigated. The current work uses OH-PLIF imaging of the flame region to produce phase-resolved measurements of flame behavior at each frequency. The response of the flame to the imposed acoustic field over the range of 22-400 Hz is then calculated from the processed images. This provides a starting point for an extension/extrapolation to practical acoustic ranges ({proportional_to}5000 Hz). It was found that the thermoacoustic coupling was mainly evident in the shear mixing zone, producing a toroidal Rayleigh index distribution pattern. The phase shift of the flame fluctuation from the imposed acoustic wave seems to be very closely coupled to the vortices generated at the flame boundary due to shear mixing (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability), thus inducing the alternating toroidal structures. The peak value of the flame response function coincides with the peak absolute value of the Rayleigh index. (author)

  17. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  18. Time-resolved gas temperatures in the oscillating turbulent flow of a pulse combustor tail pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dec, J.E. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Keller, J.O. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA). Combustion Research Faclity)

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports the cyclic behavior of the gas temperature in the oscillating turbulent flow in a pulse combustor tail pipe studied using two-line atomic fluorescence. In this flow, the oscillations result from an acoustic resonance, and have amplitudes of up to 5 times the mean velocity. Oscillation frequencies were varied from 67 to 101 Hz. Spatially resolved temperature measurements were made to within 400 {mu}m of the wall, providing cycle-resolved profiles of the temperature and the random temperature fluctuations. The combustor-cycle phase relationships among the gas temperature, random-temperature-fluctuation intensity, velocity, and combustion chamber pressure, are compared.

  19. The effect of fuel injection angle and pressure on combustor performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael Lee

    1976-01-01

    TIIE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ANGLE AND PRESSURE ON COMBUSTOR PERI ORMANCE A Thos is by Mi?hael Lee Brown Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AI1M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIFNCE December 1976 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ANGLE AND PRESSURE ON COMBUSTOR PERFORMANCE A Thesis by Michael Lee Brown Approved as to style and content by: C airman o ommrttee / Hea o epartment Mm er...

  20. Apparatus and filtering systems relating to combustors in combustion turbine engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Thomas Edward (Greer, SC); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC); Stevenson, Christian Xavier (Inman, SC)

    2012-07-24

    A combustor for a combustion turbine engine, the combustor that includes: a chamber defined by an outer wall and forming a channel between windows defined through the outer wall toward a forward end of the chamber and at least one fuel injector positioned toward an aft end of the chamber; a screen; and a standoff comprising a raised area on an outer surface of the outer wall near the periphery of the windows; wherein the screen extends over the windows and is supported by the standoff in a raised position in relation to the outer surface of the outer wall and the windows.

  1. Funding for Large-Scale Sustainable Energy Projects Combining Expert Opinions to Support Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Funding for Large-Scale Sustainable Energy Projects Combining Expert Opinions to Support Decisions technologies: solar, carbon capture, nuclear, biofuels, and electricity from biomass. The challenge a probability distribution over outcomes dependent on R&D funding amounts. This probability distribution

  2. Energy Policy 34 (2006) 395410 The economics of large-scale wind power in a carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlaz, Morton A.

    2006-01-01

    Energy Policy 34 (2006) 395­410 The economics of large-scale wind power in a carbon constrained to supplement variable wind power output to meet a time-varying load. We find that, with somewhat optimistic cost of delivered wind power. Due to residual CO2 emissions, compressed air storage is surprisingly

  3. Energy Policy 35 (2007) 15841598 Public opinion about large offshore wind power: Underlying factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Energy Policy 35 (2007) 1584­1598 Public opinion about large offshore wind power: Underlying opinion regarding offshore wind power based on a survey of residents near a proposed development off Cape, the first offshore wind proposal in North America, in Nantucket Sound (MA, USA) has generated a strong

  4. Identification of Market Power in Large-Scale Electric Energy Markets Bernard C. Lesieutre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Market Power in Large-Scale Electric Energy Markets Bernard C. Lesieutre Hyung and competitive operation of centrally- dispatched electricity markets. Traditional measures for market power demand and reserve requirements, a centrally-dispatched electricity market provides a transparent

  5. Investigations of swirl flames in a gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weigand, P.; Meier, W.; Duan, X.R.; Stricker, W.; Aigner, M.

    2006-01-01

    A gas turbine model combustor for swirling CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure with good optical access for detailed laser measurements is discussed. Three flames with thermal powers between 7.6 and 34.9 kW and overall equivalence ratios between 0.55 and 0.75 were investigated. These behave differently with respect to combustion instabilities: Flame A burned stably, flame B exhibited pronounced thermoacoustic oscillations, and flame C, operated near the lean extinction limit, was subject to sudden liftoff with partial extinction and reanchoring. One aim of the studies was a detailed experimental characterization of flame behavior to better understand the underlying physical and chemical processes leading to instabilities. The second goal of the work was the establishment of a comprehensive database that can be used for validation and improvement of numerical combustion models. The flow field was measured by laser Doppler velocimetry, the flame structures were visualized by planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH and CH radicals, and the major species concentrations, temperature, and mixture fraction were determined by laser Raman scattering. The flow fields of the three flames were quite similar, with high velocities in the region of the injected gases, a pronounced inner recirculation zone, and an outer recirculation zone with low velocities. The flames were not attached to the fuel nozzle and thus were partially premixed before ignition. The near field of the flames was characterized by fast mixing and considerable finite-rate chemistry effects. CH PLIF images revealed that the reaction zones were thin (=<0.5 mm) and strongly corrugated and that the flame zones were short (h=<50 mm). Despite the similar flow fields of the three flames, the oscillating flame B was flatter and opened more widely than the others. In the current article, the flow field, structures, and mean and rms values of the temperature, mixture fraction, and species concentrations are discussed. Turbulence intensities, mixing, heat release, and reaction progress are addressed. In a second article, the turbulence-chemistry interactions in the three flames are treated.

  6. Large Eddy Simulation Analysis of Flow Field Inside a High-g Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Venkat

    Base, Ohio 45433 Inter-turbine burners are useful devices for increasing engine power. To enable inter. Introduction Inter-turbine burners (ITBs) are emerging as a useful concept for increasing aircraft engine power

  7. Assessment of combustion noise in a premixed swirled combustor via Large-Eddy Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    in the study of aerodynamical generated noise of numerous practical cases that range from air jets, high [1,2]. On the contrary, thermoacoustics is less understood than aeroacoustics. This is caused with thermoacoustics since the transport equation of each species must be considered in order to solve the problem

  8. Large-eddy simulation of swirling particle-laden flows in a coaxial-jet combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    , the resulting droplets evaporate/condense and collide/coalesce, fuel and oxidizer then mix yielding spray. Mahesh b , P. Moin c , J.C. Oefelein d a Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Bldg

  9. ISSUANCE 2015-07-27: Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  10. Using calibrated engineering models to predict energy savings in large-scale geothermal heat pump projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.; Thornton, J.W.

    1998-10-01

    Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention as a means of implementing large-scale energy conservation projects in housing. Opportunities for such projects exist for military housing, federally subsidized low-income housing, and planned communities (condominiums, townhomes, senior centers), to name a few. Accurate prior (to construction) estimates of the energy savings in these projects reduce risk, decrease financing costs, and help avoid post-construction disputes over performance contract baseline adjustments. This paper demonstrates an improved method of estimating energy savings before construction takes place. Using an engineering model calibrated to pre-construction energy-use data collected in the field, this method is able to predict actual energy savings to a high degree of accuracy. This is verified with post-construction energy-use data from a geothermal heat pump ESPC at Fort Polk, Louisiana. This method also allows determination of the relative impact of the various energy conservation measures installed in a comprehensive energy conservation project. As an example, the breakout of savings at Fort Polk for the geothermal heat pumps, desuperheaters, lighting retrofits, and low-flow hot water outlets is provided.

  11. Using Calibrated Engineering Models To Predict Energy Savings In Large-Scale Geothermal Heat Pump Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A; Hughes, Patrick; Thornton, Jeff W.

    1998-01-01

    Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention as a means of implementing large-scale energy conservation projects in housing. Opportunities for such projects exist for military housing, federally subsidized low-income housing, and planned communities (condominiums, townhomes, senior centers), to name a few. Accurate prior (to construction) estimates of the energy savings in these projects reduce risk, decrease financing costs, and help avoid post-construction disputes over performance contract baseline adjustments. This paper demonstrates an improved method of estimating energy savings before construction takes place. Using an engineering model calibrated to pre-construction energy-use data collected in the field, this method is able to predict actual energy savings to a high degree of accuracy. This is verified with post-construction energy-use data from a geothermal heat pump ESPC at Fort Polk, Louisiana. This method also allows determination of the relative impact of the various energy conservation measures installed in a comprehensive energy conservation project. As an example, the breakout of savings at Fort Polk for the geothermal heat pumps, desuperheaters, lighting retrofits, and low-flow hot water outlets is provided.

  12. Plasma assisted NO{sub x} reduction in existing coal combustors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, S.C.; Russell, T.

    1991-12-31

    The feasibility of NO{sub x} reduction using plasma injection has been investigated. Both numerical and experimental methods were used in the development of this new NO{sub x}reduction technique. The numerical analysis was used to investigate various flow mechanisms in order to provide fundamental support in the development of this new NO{sub x} control technique. The calculations using this approach can give the information of the particle trajectories and distributions which are important for the design of the in-flame plasma injection configuration. The group model also established the necessary ground for further complete modeling of the whole process including the chemical kinetics. Numerical calculations were also performed for a turbulent gas flow field with variable properties. The results provided fundamental understanding of mixing effects encountered in the experiments at Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. A small scale experiment facility was designed and constructed at the heterogeneous combustion laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University. A series of tests were conducted in this setup to investigate the potential of the ammonia plasma injection for NO{sub x} reduction and parametric effects of this process. The experimental results are very promising. About 86% NO{sub x} reduction was achieved using ammonia radicals produced by argon plasma within the present test range. The total percentage of NO{sub x} reduction increases when ammonia flowrate, argon flow rate and initial NO concentration increase and when plasma power and the amount of excess air in the combustor decrease. A combined transport and reaction model was postulated for understanding the mechanism of NO{sub x} reduction using the plasma injection.

  13. A tool to study azimuthal standing and spinning modes in annular combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    combustion insta- bilities which can occur in annular combustors is proposed in this work. A thermoacoustic or rotating azimuthal eigenmodes depending on parameters n and . 1 INTRODUCTION Although thermo-acoustic thermoacoustic model tool to compute azimuthal thermoacoustic instabilities, which can oc- cur in annular

  14. Thermoacoustic limit cycles in a premixed laboratory combustor with open and choked exits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hield, Peter A.; Brear, Michael J.; Jin, Seong Ho

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of the response of a turbulent premixed flame during thermoacoustic limit cycle in a simple, laboratory combustor. The flame dynamics are examined using high-speed pressure transducers and CH* chemiluminescence. The so-called 'interaction index' and time delay between the acoustic velocity fluctuations at the flame holder and the flame's overall heat release fluctuations are then determined. A wide range of operating conditions, traversing the combustor's flammability limits in Mach number and equivalence ratio, are studied for four different combustor exits, including one where the exit is choked. In all cases the time delay correlates very well with the amplitude of the velocity fluctuations. There is also some correlation between the interaction index and these velocity fluctuations, but this is less clear. These results suggest a novel, nonlinear flame model, derived entirely empirically. An existing low-order thermoacoustic model is then extended to include convection and dispersion of entropy fluctuations downstream of the flame, enabling the effect of the choked nozzle to be examined. The novel nonlinear flame model is integrated into the low-order thermoacoustic model, and used to investigate the experimentally observed thermoacoustic limit cycles. The model correctly simulates the observed switch to a low-frequency, entropically driven instability observed when the combustor exit is choked. (author)

  15. Micro Catalytic Combustor with Pd/Nano-porous Alumina for High-Temperature Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    . A heat exchanger with a temperature efficiency of 0.78 is assumed for heat recirculation. Thus as high as 850 o C and extremely high heat generation density of 2-5x108 W/m3 has been achieved been made for radial-flow-type combustors using Fluent 6 (Fluent Inc.). Figure 1 shows a radial-flow-type

  16. ==================== !"#$%&'()*+,-+./,0)12 Development of Micro Ejector for Butane Catalytic Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    . 3 Effect of total pressure on the primary flow rate. (c)(b)(a) 42 µm 60 µm Rough Heat Exchanger pressure of ejector is set as 11.6 Pa. Yong FAN, Yuji SUZUKI and Nobuhide KASAGI Department of Mechanical Combustor, Convergent-divergent Nozzle, Ejector, Back pressure. Fig. 1 Configuration of micro heat

  17. Lire la premire partie de la thse LES of combustor-turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    Lire la première partie de la thèse #12;Part II LES of combustor-turbine interactions 89 #12;#12;Chapter 5 Indirect combustion noise generation in a high-pressure turbine Contents 5.1 Motivation case: 2D entropy spot propagation in a periodic channel . . 95 5.4 Turbine stage simulation set

  18. Investigation of heat transfer and combustion in the advanced fluidized bed combustor (FBC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Seong W. Lee

    1998-10-01

    The objective of this project is to predict the heat transfer and combustion performance in newly-designed fluidized bed combustor (FBC) and to provide the design guide lines and innovative concept for small-scale boiler and furnace. The major accomplishments are summarized.

  19. Reduction of NO sub x and SO sub 2 emissions from coal burning pulse combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, E.A.; Zinn, B.T.; Miller, N.; Chen, F.

    1990-12-01

    In this investigation, a Rijke pulse combustor was constructed, in which unpulverized coal was burned on a rotating bed where the presence of acoustic velocity oscillations resulted in bed fluidization and intensification of the combustion process. The objectives of this investigation were to determine (1) if the nitrogen oxides emissions of the experimental Rijke pulse combustor could be reduced by air staging the combustion process and (2) if the sulfur dioxide emissions of this pulse combustor could be reduced by the addition of sorbent materials such as limestone to the coal bed or to the gas stream above the bed. Air staging experiments were conducted for total dimensionless air fuel ratios ranging from 1.0 to 1.4 and primary dimensionless air/fuel ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.9. Injection heights ranged from 20 cm to 52 cm above the coal bed. Air staging was effective in reducing the nitrogen oxides emissions of coal burning Rijke type pulse combustors under the proper conditions. Another series of experiments was conducted using sorbent addition to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions. In some of these experiments, pulverized dolomitic limestone was introduced along with the coal through the coal delivery tube just above the bed, while in the remainder of the experiments, the sorbent was dispersed in an air stream and injected at 15 cm or 23 cm above the coal bed. 9 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. The interaction of liquid reacting droplets with the pulsating flow in a Rijke-tube combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, J.A.; Gotac, P.R. [Inst. Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Combustao e Propulsao] [Inst. Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Combustao e Propulsao; McQuay, M.Q. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.] [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical investigation on the characteristics of a reacting liquid droplet in the self-generated oscillatory flow of a Rijke-pulse combustor. The droplet motion equation, accounting for droplet evaporation due to combustion, was solved using a fourth-order, Runge-Kutta method. The model was applied to a Rijke-type, alcohol-fired combustor for which experimental data exist to be used as entrance parameters. The main conclusions derived from this study are (1) for a range of droplet initial velocity, pulsating flames of liquid fuels are shorter than the corresponding steady flames because of a reduction in lifetime of droplets with the same initial diameter in the pulsating flow, (2) for a range of droplet initial diameter, time-resolved heat generation rates from pulsating sprays exhibit a preferred frequency equal to twice the frequency of the pulsating flow, and (3) droplet initial diameter, droplet initial velocity, and location of the spray in the tube influence the excitation and maintenance of acoustic oscillations in a Rijke-type combustor based on evaluation of the Rayleigh integral over time and volume in the combustor. The theoretical results presented and discussed herein are supported by experimental observations.

  1. Effects of Combustor Rig Exposure on a Porous-Matrix Oxide Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    Effects of Combustor Rig Exposure on a Porous-Matrix Oxide Composite Michael A. Mattoni, James Y composite. The material consists of a porous mullite­alumina matrix and Nextel 720 fibers in an eight for aircraft engines have spurred the development of continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs). Ma- terials

  2. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1981-01-01

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  3. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-02-12

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  4. Using an Energy Performance Based Design-Build Process to Procure a Large Scale Low-Energy Building: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.; Shelton, D.

    2011-05-01

    This paper will review a procurement, acquisition, and contract process of a large-scale replicable net zero energy (ZEB) office building. The owners developed and implemented an energy performance based design-build process to procure a 220,000 ft2 office building with contractual requirements to meet demand side energy and LEED goals. We will outline the key procurement steps needed to ensure achievement of our energy efficiency and ZEB goals. The development of a clear and comprehensive Request for Proposals (RFP) that includes specific and measurable energy use intensity goals is critical to ensure energy goals are met in a cost effective manner. The RFP includes a contractual requirement to meet an absolute demand side energy use requirement of 25 kBtu/ft2, with specific calculation methods on what loads are included, how to normalize the energy goal based on increased space efficiency and data center allocation, specific plug loads and schedules, and calculation details on how to account for energy used from the campus hot and chilled water supply. Additional advantages of integrating energy requirements into this procurement process include leveraging the voluntary incentive program, which is a financial incentive based on how well the owner feels the design-build team is meeting the RFP goals.

  5. Large Hybrid Energy Systems for Making Low CO2 Load-Following Power and Synthetic Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cherry; Richard D. Boardman; Steven Aumeier

    2012-02-01

    Hybrid energy systems using nuclear heat sources can economically produce load-following electrical power by exploiting the surplus generation capacity available at night or seasonally to make synthetic fuel. Vehicle fuel is the only current energy use large enough to absorb all the energy capacity that might be diverted from the power industry, and its ease of storage obviates problems with discontinuous synfuel production. The potential benefits and challenges of synfuels integration are illustrated by the production of methanol from natural gas (as a source of carbon) using steam from a light water nuclear power reactor which is assumed to be available in accord with a year's worth of power demand data. Methanol's synthesis process is easily adapted to using 300 C heat from a light water reactor and this simple compound can be further processed into gasoline, biodiesel, or dimethyl ether, fuels which can be used with the current vehicle fleet. A supplemental feed to the methanol process of natural gas (for energy) allows operation at constant full rate when the nuclear heat is being used to produce electrical power. The higher capital costs of such a system are offset by a lower cost of heat and power production from a large base load type of plant and by reduced costs associated with much lower CO2 emissions. Other less tangible economic benefits of this and similar hybrid systems include better use of natural resource for fuels and greater energy services security from the domestic production of vehicle fuel.

  6. Large deviation generating function for energy transport in the Pauli-Fierz model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech De Roeck

    2007-11-14

    We consider a finite quantum system coupled to quasifree thermal reservoirs at different temperatures. Under the assumptions of small coupling and exponential decay of the reservoir correlation function, the large deviation generating function of energy transport into the reservoirs is shown to be analytic on a bounded set. Our method is different from the spectral deformation technique which was employed recently in the study of spin-boson-like models. As a corollary, we derive the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation for the entropy production and a central limit theorem for energy transport.

  7. Energy Savings Modeling of Standard Commercial Building Re-tuning Measures: Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Katipamula, Srinivas; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Liu, Guopeng

    2012-06-01

    Today, many large commercial buildings use sophisticated building automation systems (BASs) to manage a wide range of building equipment. While the capabilities of BASs have increased over time, many buildings still do not fully use the BAS's capabilities and are not properly commissioned, operated or maintained, which leads to inefficient operation, increased energy use, and reduced lifetimes of the equipment. This report investigates the energy savings potential of several common HVAC system retuning measures on a typical large office building prototype model, using the Department of Energy's building energy modeling software, EnergyPlus. The baseline prototype model uses roughly as much energy as an average large office building in existing building stock, but does not utilize any re-tuning measures. Individual re-tuning measures simulated against this baseline include automatic schedule adjustments, damper minimum flow adjustments, thermostat adjustments, as well as dynamic resets (set points that change continuously with building and/or outdoor conditions) to static pressure, supply air temperature, condenser water temperature, chilled and hot water temperature, and chilled and hot water differential pressure set points. Six combinations of these individual measures have been formulated - each designed to conform to limitations to implementation of certain individual measures that might exist in typical buildings. All of these measures and combinations were simulated in 16 cities representative of specific U.S. climate zones. The modeling results suggest that the most effective energy savings measures are those that affect the demand-side of the building (air-systems and schedules). Many of the demand-side individual measures were capable of reducing annual HVAC system energy consumption by over 20% in most cities that were modeled. Supply side measures affecting HVAC plant conditions were only modestly successful (less than 5% annual HVAC energy savings for most cities for all measures). Combining many of the retuning measures revealed deep savings potential. Some of the more aggressive combinations revealed 35-75% reductions in annual HVAC energy consumption, depending on climate and building vintage.

  8. Energy Efficiency of large Cryogenic Systems: the LHC Case and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2013-01-01

    Research infrastructures for high-energy and nuclear physics, nuclear fusion and production of high magnetic fields are increasingly based on applied superconductivity and associated cryogenics in their quest for scientific breakthroughs at affordable capital and operation costs, a condition for their acceptance and sustained funding by society. The thermodynamic penalty for operating at low temperature makes energy efficiency a key requirement for their large cryogenic systems, from conceptual design to procurement, construction and operation. Meeting this requirement takes a combined approach on several fronts in parallel: management of heat loads and sizing of cooling duties, distribution of cooling power matching the needs of the superconducting devices, efficient production of refrigeration, optimal control resting on precise instrumentation and diagnostics, as well as a targeted industrial procurement policy. The case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is presented. Potential improvements for fu...

  9. Measuring and tuning energy efficiency on large scale high performance computing platforms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laros, James H., III

    2011-08-01

    Recognition of the importance of power in the field of High Performance Computing, whether it be as an obstacle, expense or design consideration, has never been greater and more pervasive. While research has been conducted on many related aspects, there is a stark absence of work focused on large scale High Performance Computing. Part of the reason is the lack of measurement capability currently available on small or large platforms. Typically, research is conducted using coarse methods of measurement such as inserting a power meter between the power source and the platform, or fine grained measurements using custom instrumented boards (with obvious limitations in scale). To collect the measurements necessary to analyze real scientific computing applications at large scale, an in-situ measurement capability must exist on a large scale capability class platform. In response to this challenge, we exploit the unique power measurement capabilities of the Cray XT architecture to gain an understanding of power use and the effects of tuning. We apply these capabilities at the operating system level by deterministically halting cores when idle. At the application level, we gain an understanding of the power requirements of a range of important DOE/NNSA production scientific computing applications running at large scale (thousands of nodes), while simultaneously collecting current and voltage measurements on the hosting nodes. We examine the effects of both CPU and network bandwidth tuning and demonstrate energy savings opportunities of up to 39% with little or no impact on run-time performance. Capturing scale effects in our experimental results was key. Our results provide strong evidence that next generation large-scale platforms should not only approach CPU frequency scaling differently, but could also benefit from the capability to tune other platform components, such as the network, to achieve energy efficient performance.

  10. Brownfields to green energy : redeveloping contaminated lands with large-scale renewable energy facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Bjorn B. (Bjorn Benjamin)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis uses case studies of one unsuccessful, and three successful brownfield-to-renewable energy projects to identify common barriers such projects face and how those barriers can be overcome. The most significant ...

  11. The ? infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. I. Background and justification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. T.; Mullan, B.; Sigurdsson, S.; Povich, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    We motivate the ? infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. We discuss some philosophical difficulties of the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), and how communication SETI circumvents them. We review 'Dysonian SETI', the search for artifacts of alien civilizations, and find that it is highly complementary to traditional communication SETI; the two together might succeed where either one alone has not. We discuss the argument of Hart that spacefaring life in the Milky Way should be either galaxy-spanning or non-existent, and examine a portion of his argument that we call the 'monocultural fallacy'. We discuss some rebuttals to Hart that invoke sustainability and predict long Galaxy colonization timescales. We find that the maximum Galaxy colonization timescale is actually much shorter than previous work has found (<10{sup 9} yr), and that many 'sustainability' counter-arguments to Hart's thesis suffer from the monocultural fallacy. We extend Hart's argument to alien energy supplies and argue that detectably large energy supplies can plausibly be expected to exist because life has the potential for exponential growth until checked by resources or other limitations, and intelligence implies the ability to overcome such limitations. As such, if Hart's thesis is correct, then searches for large alien civilizations in other galaxies may be fruitful; if it is incorrect, then searches for civilizations within the Milky Way are more likely to succeed than Hart argued. We review some past Dysonian SETI efforts and discuss the promise of new mid-infrared surveys, such as that of WISE.

  12. New Directions: A facelift for the picture of the global energy balance Earth's climate is largely regulated by the global energy balance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    New Directions: A facelift for the picture of the global energy balance Earth's climate is largely regulated by the global energy balance, which considers the energy flows within the climate system a perturbation of this energy balance, through a modification of the energy flows in the polluted atmosphere

  13. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a high-fidelity large-eddy simulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a high-fidelity large-eddy simulation model designed to predict the performance of large wind plants with a higher degree of accuracy than current models. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind plants are becoming

  14. A Study of Strain Rate Effects for Turbulent Premixed Flames with Application to LES of a Gas Turbine Combustor Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kemenov, Konstantin A.; Calhoon, William H.

    2015-03-24

    Large-scale strain rate field, a resolved quantity which is easily computable in large-eddy simulations (LES), could have profound effects on the premixed flame properties by altering the turbulent flame speed and inducing local extinction. The role of the resolved strain rate has been investigated in a posterior LES study of GE lean premixed dry low NOx emissions LM6000 gas turbine combustor model. A novel approach which is based on the coupling of the lineareddy model with a one-dimensional counter-flow solver has been applied to obtain the parameterizations of the resolved premixed flame properties in terms of the reactive progress variable,more »the local strain rate measure, and local Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. The strain rate effects have been analyzed by comparing LES statistics for several models of the turbulent flame speed, i.e, with and without accounting for the local strain rate effects, with available experimental data. The sensitivity of the simulation results to the inflow velocity conditions as well as the grid resolution have been also studied. Overall, the results suggest the necessity to represent the strain rate effects accurately in order to improve LES modeling of the turbulent flame speed.« less

  15. A Study of Strain Rate Effects for Turbulent Premixed Flames with Application to LES of a Gas Turbine Combustor Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kemenov, Konstantin A.; Calhoon, William H.

    2015-03-24

    Large-scale strain rate field, a resolved quantity which is easily computable in large-eddy simulations (LES), could have profound effects on the premixed flame properties by altering the turbulent flame speed and inducing local extinction. The role of the resolved strain rate has been investigated in a posterior LES study of GE lean premixed dry low NOx emissions LM6000 gas turbine combustor model. A novel approach which is based on the coupling of the lineareddy model with a one-dimensional counter-flow solver has been applied to obtain the parameterizations of the resolved premixed flame properties in terms of the reactive progress variable, the local strain rate measure, and local Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. The strain rate effects have been analyzed by comparing LES statistics for several models of the turbulent flame speed, i.e, with and without accounting for the local strain rate effects, with available experimental data. The sensitivity of the simulation results to the inflow velocity conditions as well as the grid resolution have been also studied. Overall, the results suggest the necessity to represent the strain rate effects accurately in order to improve LES modeling of the turbulent flame speed.

  16. Thermal performance of a scramjet combustor operating at Mach 5.6 flight conditions. Final report, May 1996--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stouffer, S.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Emmer, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the experimental data and the procedures used in acquiring and reducing the thermal loads data during tests of a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor at United Technologies Research Center (UTRC). This research effort is part of the UTRC effort to develop dual-mode scramjet combustor technology to support the development of Mach S missile technology. The objective of the thermal loads testing was to map the thermal and mechanical loads, including heat transfer, dynamic and static pressures, and skin friction in a scramjet combustor during direct-connect scramjet tests. The tests were conducted at the UTRC Ramject/Scramjet direct-connect combustor test facility in East Hartford, CT.

  17. Field testing of a pulse combustor in a cement plant. Final report, April 1, 1993-November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plavnik, Z.Z.; Daniel, B.R.; Zinn, B.T.; Shekhter, M.Y.; Geskin, O.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes work performed under GRI Contract No. 5091-236-2251 during the period April 1, 1993, to November 30, 1995. This project was entitled `Field Testing of a Pulse Combustor in a Cement Plant.` The main objective of this program was to determine the effect of pulsations excited by a tunable pulse combustor upon the performance of a cement calciner located in a Holnam Cement plant in La Porte, Colorado. A 12.5 MMbtu/hr tunable pulse combustor was retrofitted to a cement calciner and number of tests were conducted under similar operating conditions with the pulse combustor on and off and the calciner`s performance in these tests was compared. Comparisons of the calciner`s performance with the PCRS on and off showed that the pulsations increased the calcination rate by 2.2 - 3.7 percent.

  18. Covariance of dark energy parameters and sound speed constraints from large HI surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Torres-Rodriguez; C. M. Cress; K. Moodley

    2008-04-15

    An interesting probe of the nature of dark energy is the measure of its sound speed, $c_s$. We review the significance for constraining sound speed models of dark energy using large neutral hydrogen (HI) surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Our analysis considers the effect on the sound speed measurement that arises from the covariance of $c_s$ with the dark energy density, $\\Omega_\\LLambda$, and a time-varying equation of state, $w(a)=w_0+(1-a)w_a$. We find that the approximate degeneracy between dark energy parameters that arises in power spectrum observations is lifted through redshift tomography of the HI-galaxy angular power spectrum, resulting in sound speed constraints that are not severely degraded. The cross-correlation of the galaxy and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect spectra contributes approximately 10 percent of the information that is needed to distinguish variations in the dark energy parameters, and most of the discriminating signal comes from the galaxy auto-correlation spectrum. We also find that the sound speed constraints are weakly sensitive to the HI bias model. These constraints do not improve substantially for a significantly deeper HI survey since most of the clustering sensitivity to sound speed variations arises from $z \\lsim 1.5$. A detection of models with sound speeds close to zero, $c_s \\lsim 0.01,$ is possible for dark energy models with $w\\gsim -0.9$.

  19. The development of a cyclonic combustor for high particulate, low caloric value gas produced by a fluidized bed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardenas, Manuel Moises

    1985-01-01

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A CYCLONIC COMBUSTOR FOR HIGH PARTICULATE, LOW CALORIC VALUE GAS PRODUCED BY A FLUIDIZED BED A Thesis by MANUEL MOISES CARDENAS JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A CYCLONIC COMBUSTOR FOR HIGH PARTICULATE, LOW CALORIC VALUE GAS PRODUCED BY A FLUIDIZED BED A Thesis MANUEL MOISES CARDENAS JR...

  20. Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, Yi; Wu, Qishi; Rao, Nageswara S. V.

    2010-01-01

    Many complex sensor network applications require deploying a large number of inexpensive and small sensors in a vast geographical region to achieve quality through quantity. Hierarchical clustering is generally considered as an efficient and scalable way to facilitate the management and operation of such large-scale networks and minimize the total energy consumption for prolonged lifetime. Judicious selection of cluster heads for data integration and communication is critical to the success of applications based on hierarchical sensor networks organized as layered clusters. We investigate the problem of selecting sensor nodes in a predeployed sensor network to be the cluster headsmore »to minimize the total energy needed for data gathering. We rigorously derive an analytical formula to optimize the number of cluster heads in sensor networks under uniform node distribution, and propose a Distance-based Crowdedness Clustering algorithm to determine the cluster heads in sensor networks under general node distribution. The results from an extensive set of experiments on a large number of simulated sensor networks illustrate the performance superiority of the proposed solution over the clustering schemes based on k -means algorithm. « less

  1. Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-01-25

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

  2. A feasibility study of oil shale fired pulse combustors with applications to oil shale retorting. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, G.J.; Johnson, E.K.; Zhang, G.Q.; Roach, R.A.

    1992-07-01

    The results of the experimental investigation performed to determine the feasibility of using pulverized Colorado oil shale to fuel a bench scale pulse combustor reveal that oil shale cannot sustain pulsations when used alone as fuel. Trace amounts of propane mixed with the oil shale enabled the pulsations, however. Up to 80% of the organic material in the oil shale was consumed when it was mixed with propane in the combustor. Beyond the feasibility objectives, the operating conditions of the combustor fuel with propane and mixtures of oil shale and propane were characterized with respect to pulsation amplitude and frequency and the internal combustor wall temperature over fuel lean and fuel rich stoichiometries. Maximum pressure excursions of 12.5 kPa were experienced in the combustor. Pulsation frequencies ranged from 50 to nearly 80 Hz. Cycle resolved laser Doppler anemometry velocities were measured at the tail pipe exit plane. Injecting inert mineral matter (limestone) into the pulse combustor while using propane fuel had only a slight effect on the pulsation frequency for the feed rates tested.

  3. Utilizing Type Ia Supernovae in a Large, Fast, Imaging Survey to Constrain Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew R. Zentner; Suman Bhattacharya

    2008-12-01

    We study the utility of a large sample of type Ia supernovae that might be observed in an imaging survey that rapidly scans a large fraction of the sky for constraining dark energy. We consider information from the traditional luminosity distance test as well as the spread in SNeIa fluxes at fixed redshift induced by gravitational lensing. We include a treatment of photometric redshift uncertainties in our analysis. Our primary result is that the information contained in the mean distance moduli of SNeIa and the dispersion among SNeIa distance moduli complement each other, breaking a degeneracy between the present dark energy equation of state and its time variation without the need for a high-redshift supernova sample. To address photometric redshift uncertainties, we present dark energy constraints as a function of the size of an external set of spectroscopically-observed SNeIa that may be used for redshift calibration, nspec. We find that an imaging survey can constrain the dark energy equation of state at the epoch where it is best constrained with a 1-sigma error of sigma(wpiv)~0.03-0.09$, depending upon various assumptions. In addition, the marginal improvement in the error sigma(wpiv) from an increase in the spectroscopic calibration sample drops once nspec ~ 10^3. This result is important because it is of the order of the size of calibration samples likely to be compiled in the coming decade and because, for samples of this size, the spectroscopic and imaging surveys individually place comparable constraints on the dark energy equation of state. In all cases, it is best to calibrate photometric redshifts with a set of spectroscopically-observed SNeIa with relatively more objects at high redshift than the parent sample of imaging SNeIa.

  4. The Future of the Local Large Scale Structure: the roles of Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yehuda Hoffman; Ofer Lahav; Gustavo Yepes; Yaniv Dover

    2007-10-10

    We study the distinct effects of Dark Matter and Dark Energy on the future evolution of nearby large scale structures using constrained N-body simulations. We contrast a model of Cold Dark Matter and a Cosmological Constant (LCDM) with an Open CDM (OCDM) model with the same matter density Omega_m =0.3 and the same Hubble constant h=0.7. Already by the time the scale factor increased by a factor of 6 (29 Gyr from now in LCDM; 78 Gyr from now in OCDM) the comoving position of the Local Group is frozen. Well before that epoch the two most massive members of the Local Group, the Milky Way and Andromeda, will merge. However, as the expansion rates of the scale factor in the two models are different, the Local Group will be receding in physical coordinates from Virgo exponentially in a LCDM model and at a roughly constant velocity in an OCDM model. More generally, in comoving coordinates the future large scale structure will look like a sharpened image of the present structure: the skeleton of the cosmic web will remain the same, but clusters will be more `isolated' and the filaments will become thinner. This implies that the long-term fate of large scale structure as seen in comoving coordinates is determined primarily by the matter density. We conclude that although the LCDM model is accelerating at present due to its Dark Energy component while the OCDM model is non accelerating, their large scale structure in the future will look very similar in comoving coordinates.

  5. Method and apparatus for the control of fluid dynamic mixing in pulse combustors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1992-06-02

    In a method and apparatus for controlling total ignition delay time in a pulse combustor, and thus controlling the mixing characteristics of the combustion reactants and the combustion products in the combustor, the total ignition delay time is controlled by adjusting the inlet geometry of the inlet to the combustion chamber. The inlet geometry may be fixed or variable for controlling the mixing characteristics. A feedback loop may be employed to sense actual combustion characteristics, and, in response to the sensed combustion characteristics, the inlet geometry may be varied to obtain the total ignition delay time necessary to achieve the desired combustion characteristics. Various embodiments relate to the varying of the mass flow rate of reactants while holding the radius/velocity ratio constant. 10 figs.

  6. Method and apparatus for the control of fluid dynamic mixing in pulse combustors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T. Tazwell (San Ramon, CA); Keller, Jay O. (Oakland, CA)

    1992-06-02

    In a method and apparatus for controlling total ignition delay time in a pulse combustor, and thus controlling the mixing characteristics of the combustion reactants and the combustion products in the combustor, the total ignition delay time is controlled by adjusting the inlet geometry of the inlet to the combustion chamber. The inlet geometry may be fixed or variable for controlling the mixing characteristics. A feedback loop may be employed to sense actual combustion characteristics, and, in response to the sensed combustion characteristics, the inlet geometry may be varied to obtain the total ignition delay time necessary to achieve the desired combustion characteristics. Various embodiments relate to the varying of the mass flow rate of reactants while holding the radius/velocity ratio constant.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Combustion and Rotor-Stator Interaction in a Turbine Combustor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Isvoranu, Dragos D.; Cizmas, Paul G. A.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the development of a numerical algorithm for the computation of flow and combustion in a turbine combustor. The flow and combustion are modeled by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the species-conservation equations. The chemistry model used herein is a two-step, global, finite-rate combustion model for methane and combustion gases. The governing equations are written in the strong conservation form and solved using a fully implicit, finite-difference approximation. The gas dynamics and chemistry equations are fully decoupled. A correction technique has been developed to enforce the conservation of mass fractions. The numerical algorithm developed herein has beenmore »used to investigate the flow and combustion in a one-stage turbine combustor.« less

  8. Ultra low injection angle fuel holes in a combustor fuel nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    York, William David

    2012-10-23

    A fuel nozzle for a combustor includes a mixing passage through which fluid is directed toward a combustion area and a plurality of swirler vanes disposed in the mixing passage. Each swirler vane of the plurality of swirler vanes includes at least one fuel hole through which fuel enters the mixing passage in an injection direction substantially parallel to an outer surface of the plurality of swirler vanes thereby decreasing a flameholding tendency of the fuel nozzle. A method of operating a fuel nozzle for a combustor includes flowing a fluid through a mixing passage past a plurality of swirler vanes and injecting a fuel into the mixing passage in an injection direction substantially parallel to an outer surface of the plurality of swirler vanes.

  9. High-Energy Physics Strategies and Future Large-Scale Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, F

    2014-01-01

    We sketch the actual European and international strategies and possible future facilities. In the near term the High Energy Physics (HEP) community will fully exploit the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). Post-LHC options include a linear e+e- collider in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), as well as circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with linear and circular acceleration approaches based on crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  10. 2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Small, Large, and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 of 8 3 of 8Air ConditionersVery Large

  11. Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-11-01

    Precision Combustion, Inc. will develop a unique, fuel-flexible Rich Catalytic Lean-Burn (RCL®) injector with catalytic combustor capable of enabling ultralow-emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide range of gaseous opportunity fuels. This will broaden the range of opportunity fuels that can be utilized to include low- and ultralow-Btu gases, such as digester and blast furnace gases, and fuels containing reactive species, such as refinery, wellhead, and industrial byproduct gases.

  12. Report covering examination of parts from downhole steam generators. [Combustor head and sleeve parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettit, F. S.; Meier, G. H.

    1983-08-01

    Combustor head and sleeve parts were examined by using optical and scanning electron metallography after use in oxygen/diesel and air/diesel downhole steam generators. The degradation of the different alloy components is described in terms of reactions with oxygen, sulfur and carbon in the presence of cyclic stresses, all generated by the combustion process. Recommendations are presented for component materials (alloys and coatings) to extend component lives in the downhole steam generators. 9 references, 22 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Development of a retrofit coal combustor for industrial applications, (Phase 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The objective of Phase I of the program for the development of a retrofit pulse coal combustor for industrial applications was to design, fabricate, test and evaluate advanced chamber designs at the laboratory-scale utilizing several fuels (Task 1). The activities were structured to provide design criteria for scaling up to the pilot-scale level for the demonstration of a pulse combustor fired with coal-water mixtures for industrial boiler and process heater retrofit applications. The design data and information acquired during Task I of the initial phase was to develop scale-up design criteria for scaling the laboratory-scale design to pilot-scale including interface requirements for the field demonstration. The scale-up pilot unit design was to be sufficiently developed to allow fabrication of the unit for testing in the existing test facility upon DOE exercising its option for the follow-on activities of this program. These follow-on activities (Phase II) included the fabrication, test, and engineering evaluation of the pilot-scale combustor as well as technical and laboratory test support activities for reducing the technical risks and costs of development at the pilot-scale. Based on the information, test, data and technical support activities, a retrofit combustor system was to be designed for field demonstration. An additional effort - Phase IA - was added to the contract by modification A005. This modification added a Phase IA in place of the original Task 2 of Phase I activity. This interim phase consisted of three technical tasks described in previous quarterly reports. Phase II was initiated in April 1989.

  14. Development of a retrofit coal combustor for industrial applications, (Phase 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    The objective of Phase I of the program for the development of a retrofit pulse coal combustor for industrial applications was to design, fabricate, test and evaluate advanced chamber designs at the laboratory-scale utilizing several fuels (Task 1). The activities were structured to provide design criteria for scaling up to the pilot-scale level for the demonstration of a pulse combustor fired with coal-water mixtures for industrial boiler and process heater retrofit applications. The design data and information acquired during Task 1 of the initial phase was to develop scale-up design criteria for scaling the laboratory-scale design to pilot-scale including interface requirements for the field demonstration. The scale-up pilot unit design was to be sufficiently developed to allow fabrication of the unit for testing in the existing test facility upon DOE exercising its option for the follow-on activities of this program. These follow-on activities (Phase II) included the fabrication, test, and engineering evaluation of the pilot-scale combustor as well as technical and laboratory test support activities for reducing the technical risks and costs of development at the pilot-scale. Based on the information, test, data and technical support activities, a retrofit combustor system was to be designed for field demonstration. An additional effort was added to the contract by modification A005. This modification added a Phase IA in place of the original Task 2 of Phase I activity. This interim phase consisted of three technical tasks described in previous quarterly reports. Phase II was initiated in April 1989.

  15. The effect of acoustics on an ethanol spray flame in a propane-fired pulse combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubey, R.K.; Black, D.L.; McQuay, M.Q. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.] [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr. [Inst. Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Comubustao e Propulsao] [Inst. Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Comubustao e Propulsao

    1997-07-01

    The influence of an acoustic field on the combustion characteristics of a hydrogen-stabilized ethanol spray flame has been experimentally investigated using a phase-Doppler particle analyzer in a propane-fired, Rijke-tube, pulse combustor. The controlled sinusoidal acoustic field in the combustor had a sound pressure level of 155 dB and a frequency of 80 Hz. Experiments were performed to study the effect of oscillations on Sauter-mean and arithmetic-mean diameters, droplet velocity, and droplet number density for the present operating conditions of the Rijke-tube combustor. Similar measurements were also performed on a water spray in the propane-fired reactor to study the effect of the acoustic field on the atomization process for the nozzle type used. Spectral analysis of the droplet axial velocity component for the oscillating conditions revealed a dominant frequency equal to the frequency of the sinusoidal acoustic wave in the combustor. The Sauter-mean diameter of the ethanol spray decreased by 15%, on average, in the presence of the acoustic field because of enhanced evaporation, while the droplet arrival rate at the probe volume increased due to changes in the flame structure. Analysis of the measured size distributions indicated that under an oscillating flow there was a larger population of droplets in the diameter range of 3--20 {micro}m. Experiments conducted with the water spray indicated that the oscillations did affect droplet size distributions in the ethanol spray due to enhanced evaporation caused by the relocation of the flame front inside and around the spray cone.

  16. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Variability of Power from Large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat Renewable Energy World India Brian ParsonsNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Variability of Power from Large

  17. Search for squarks and gluinos in events containing jets and a large imbalance in transverse energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Alves, G.A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E.W.; Baarmand, M.M.; Babintsev, V.V.; Babukhadia, Levan R.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.F.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Andes U., Bogota /DAPNIA, Saclay /Panjab U. /Delhi U. /Tata Inst. /Kyungsung U. /Seoul Natl. U. /CINVESTAV, IPN /Cracow, INP /Moscow, ITEP /Moscow State U. /Serpukhov, IHEP /Arizona U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /UC, Davis /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside

    1999-02-01

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 79 pb{sup -1}, D0 has searched for events containing multiple jets and large missing transverse energy in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Observing no significant excess beyond what is expected from the standard model, they set limits on the masses of squarks and gluinos and on the model parameters m{sub 0} and m{sub 1/2}, in the framework of the minimal low-energy supergravity models of supersymmetry. For tan {beta} = 2 and A{sub 0} = 0, with {mu} < 0, they exclude all models with m{sub q} {approx} < 250 GeV/c{sup 2}. For models with equal squark and gluino masses, they exclude m < 260 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. How CMB and large-scale structure constrain chameleon interacting dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boriero; Subinoy Das; Yvonne Y. Y. Wong

    2015-05-12

    We explore a chameleon type of interacting dark matter-dark energy scenario in which a scalar field adiabatically traces the minimum of an effective potential sourced by the dark matter density. We discuss extensively the effect of this coupling on cosmological observables, especially the parameter degeneracies expected to arise between the model parameters and other cosmological parameters, and then test the model against observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and other cosmological probes. We find that the chameleon parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$, which determine respectively the slope of the scalar field potential and the dark matter-dark energy coupling strength, can be constrained to $\\alpha radiation component, despite a passing similarity between the two scenarios in that they both delay the epoch of matter-radiation equality. Based on the derived parameter constraints, we discuss possible signatures of the model for ongoing and future large-scale structure surveys.

  19. Behavioral Initiatives for Energy Efficiency: Large-Scale Energy Reductions through Sensors, Feedback & Information Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-12

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: A team of researchers from more than 10 departments at Stanford University is collaborating to transform the way Americans interact with our energy-use data. The team built a web-based platform that collects historical electricity data which it uses to perform a variety of experiments to learn what triggers people to respond. Experiments include new financial incentives, a calculator to understand the potential savings of efficient appliances, new Facebook interface designs, communication studies using Twitter, and educational programs with the Girl Scouts. Economic modeling is underway to better understand how results from the San Francisco Bay Area can be broadened to other parts of the country.

  20. Nonlinear heat-release/acoustic model for thermoacoustic instability in lean premixed combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peracchio, A.A.; Proscia, W.M.

    1999-07-01

    Lean premixed combustors, such as those used in industrial gas turbines to achieve low emissions, are often susceptible to thermoacoustic combustion instabilities, which manifest themselves as pressure and heat release oscillations in the combustor. These oscillations can result in increased noise and decreased durability due to vibration and flame motion. A physically based nonlinear parametric model has been developed that captures this instability. It describes the coupling of combustor acoustics with the rate of heat release. The model represents this coupling by accounting for the effect of acoustic pressure fluctuations on the varying fuel/air ratio being delivered to the flame, causing a fluctuating heat release due to both fuel air ratio variations and flame front oscillations. If the phasing of the fluctuating heat release and pressure are proper, an instability results that grows into a limit cycle. The nonlinear nature of the model predicts the onset of the instability and additionally captures the resulting limit cycle. Tests of a lean premixed nozzle at engine scale and engine operating conditions in the UTRC single nozzle rig, conducted under DARPA contract, exhibited instabilities. Parameters from the model were adjusted so that analytical results were consistent with relevant experimental data from this test. The parametric model captures the limit cycle behavior over a range of mean fuel air ratios, showing the instability amplitude (pressure and heat release) to increase and limit cycle frequency to decrease as mean fuel air ratio is reduced.

  1. Development of a coal fired pulse combustor for residential space heating. Phase I, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of a program for the development of a coal-fired residential combustion system. This phase consisted of the design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of an advanced pulse combustor sized for residential space heating requirements. The objective was to develop an advanced pulse coal combustor at the {approximately} 100,000 Btu/hr scale that can be integrated into a packaged space heating system for small residential applications. The strategy for the development effort included the scale down of the feasibility unit from 1-2 MMBtu/hr to 100,000 Btu/hr to establish a baseline for isolating the effect of scale-down and new chamber configurations separately. Initial focus at the residential scale was concentrated on methods of fuel injection and atomization in a bare metal unit. This was followed by incorporating changes to the advanced chamber designs and testing of refractory-lined units. Multi-fuel capability for firing oil or gas as a secondary fuel was also established. Upon completion of the configuration and component testing, an optimum configuration would be selected for integrated testing of the pulse combustor unit. The strategy also defined the use of Dry Ultrafine Coal (DUC) for Phases 1 and 2 of the development program with CWM firing to be a product improvement activity for a later phase of the program.

  2. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Allafort, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bouvier, A.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /CSIC, Catalunya /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Unlisted, US /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /ASDC, Frascati /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ecole Polytechnique /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2012-09-20

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron-plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between {approx}6 and {approx}13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of {approx}2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  3. Project Profile: CSP Tower Air Brayton Combustor | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This project addresses key technical hurdles for an optimized CSP central tower hybrid gas turbine system to increase energy conversion efficiency to greater than 50%, greatly...

  4. Impulsive phase flare energy transport by large-scale Alfven waves and the electron acceleration problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Fletcher; H. S. Hudson

    2007-12-20

    The impulsive phase of a solar flare marks the epoch of rapid conversion of energy stored in the pre-flare coronal magnetic field. Hard X-ray observations imply that a substantial fraction of flare energy released during the impulsive phase is converted to the kinetic energy of mildly relativistic electrons (10-100 keV). The liberation of the magnetic free energy can occur as the coronal magnetic field reconfigures and relaxes following reconnection. We investigate a scenario in which products of the reconfiguration - large-scale Alfven wave pulses - transport the energy and magnetic-field changes rapidly through the corona to the lower atmosphere. This offers two possibilities for electron acceleration. Firstly, in a coronal plasma with beta waves propagate as inertial Alfven waves. In the presence of strong spatial gradients, these generate field-aligned electric fields that can accelerate electrons to energies on the order of 10 keV and above, including by repeated interactions between electrons and wavefronts. Secondly, when they reflect and mode-convert in the chromosphere, a cascade to high wavenumbers may develop. This will also accelerate electrons by turbulence, in a medium with a locally high electron number density. This concept, which bridges MHD-based and particle-based views of a flare, provides an interpretation of the recently-observed rapid variations of the line-of-sight component of the photospheric magnetic field across the flare impulsive phase, and offers solutions to some perplexing flare problems, such as the flare "number problem" of finding and resupplying sufficient electrons to explain the impulsive-phase hard X-ray emission.

  5. Electromagnetic Weibel Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-10-20

    In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions, collective instabilities may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Our previous numerical and theoretical studies of intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, PRSTAB, 6, 084401 (2003); Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002)] demonstrated that a fast, electrostatic, Harris-like instability develops, and saturates nonlinearly, for sufficiently large temperature anisotropy (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b} >> 1). The total distribution function after saturation, however, is still far from equipartitioned. In this paper the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate detailed properties of the transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r{sub w}. The kinetic stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure and instability thresholds are determined. The stability analysis shows that, although there is free energy available to drive the electromagnetic Weibel instability, the finite transverse geometry of the charged particle beam introduces a large threshold value for the temperature anisotropy ((T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Weibel} >> (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Harris}) below which the instability is absent. Hence, unlike the case of an electrically neutral plasma, the Weibel instability is not expected to play as significant a role in the process of energy isotropization of intense unneutralized charged particle beams as the electrostatic Harris-type instability.

  6. Development of a retrofit coal combustor for industrial applications, (Phase 1-A). Technical progress report, July--September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    During this past quarter, two tandem-fired pulse combustors were designed to fire at a nominal rate of 3.5 to 5.5 MMBtu/hr under continuation of Phase I work on DOE project DE-AC22-87PC79654. In prior work, MTCI demonstrated the operation of a 1--2 MMBtu/h coal-fired tandem pulse combustor that is intended for small industrial applications. These component tests emphasized verification of key design issues such as combustor coupling, slag rejection, and staged air addition. The current work, which represents an extension of the Phase I effort, focuses on integrated testing of the tandem pulse combustor with a fire-tube boiler, and the addition of a slag quench vessel. A tandem-fired pulse combustion unit designed to fire at a nominal rate of 3.5-5 MMBtu/hr was designed and fabricated. The configuration includes two combustion chambers cast in a single monolith, tailpipes cast separately with annular air preheating capability, and a cyclonic decoupler. Design analysis and evaluations were performed to optimize the system with respect to minimizing heat losses, size, and cost. Heat losses from the combustor and decoupler walls are predicted to be approximately 3 percent. The final designs for the ancillary items (slag quench, tertiary air addition, scrubber and sampling system) were completed and fabrication and installation initiated. A Cleaver-Brooks 150 hp-4 pass boiler was delivered and installed and modifications for interfacing with the retrofit pulse combustor unit completed. A below-ground slag collection pit was excavated to permit direct in-line coupling of the combustor to the boiler and to reduce head-room requirements. The pit is 30 inches deep and lined with waterproof and fireproof siding.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by XALT Energy LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of large format...

  8. The Association of Large-Scale Climate Variability and Teleconnections on Wind Energy Resource over Europe and its Intermittency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriesche, Pascal

    In times of increasing importance of wind power in the world’s energy mix, this study focuses on a better understanding of the influences of large-scale climate variability on wind power resource over Europe. The impact ...

  9. 2 Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent 3 storage in energy end-uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    2 Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent 3 storage in energy end-uses 4] We develop methods for assessing offshore wind 9 resources, using a model of the vertical structure. Dhanju, R. W. 26 Garvine, and M. Z. Jacobson (2007), Large CO2 reductions via 27 offshore wind power

  10. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of ato improvements in energy efficiency. Energy Policy, 19(10),Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of

  11. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    American Council for an Energy-Efficienct Economy (ACEEE),.Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of ato improvements in energy efficiency. Energy Policy, 19(10),

  12. the ? infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. II. Framework, strategy, and first result

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. T.; Griffith, R. L.; Sigurdsson, S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Povich, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, 3801 West Temple Avenue, Pomona, CA 91768 (United States); Mullan, B. [Blue Marble Space Institution of Science, P.O. Box 85561, Seattle, WA 98145-1561 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the ? infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although GAIA will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a zeroth order null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can extend our methodology to smaller waste heat luminosities, and potentially entirely rule out (or detect) both Kardashev Type III civilizations and new physics that allows for unlimited 'free' energy generation.

  13. Investigation of the mechanism in RIJKE pulse combustors with tangential air and fuel injection. Progress report, August 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinn, B.T.; Jagoda, J.I.; Daniel, B.R.; Bai, T.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of DOE Contract No. DE-AS04-85AL31881. This three year investigation started in August 1989 and its objective was to elucidate the mechanisms that control the driving of pulsations in the liquid fuel burning, Rijke type, pulse combustor developed under a preceding DOE contracts. It was demonstrated in that contract that the developed Rijke type pulse combustor can burn a variety of light and heavy liquid fuel oils with high combustion efficiencies while using low excess air, which produces high thermal efficiencies. Since the elucidation of the driving mechanism in the Rijke pulse combustor required the use of optical diagnostics (e.g., radiation measurements), it was decided to perform these investigations in a Rijke pulse combustor that burned propane instead of a liquid fuel in order to avoid difficulties that are often encountered due to the presence of liquid droplets in the combustion region. Consequently, an effort was made to develop a Rijke pulse combustor that is similar to the one developed in the preceding program and demonstrated similar performance characteristics. Such a pulse combustor was developed in the early phases of this program. The developed experimental setup was provided with capabilities for measuring steady combustor temperature distributions, the characteristics of the excited pressure oscillations, the exhaust flow composition, the characteristics of the flow field and the reaction rates. This pulse combustor consists of a cylindrical tube that is attached to a decoupling chamber at each end. Fuel and air are supplied via a tangential air/fuel injection system that is located at a distance of L/4 from the combustor entrance, where L is the combustor length. Part of the combustor tube, where combustion occurs, is water cooled. This section is also equipped with flat quartz windows to permit optical diagnostics.

  14. Large Eddy Simulation based Studies of Reacting and Non-reacting Transverse Jets in Supersonic Crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Venkat

    Large Eddy Simulation based Studies of Reacting and Non-reacting Transverse Jets in Supersonic.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, WrightPatterson Air Force Base, Ohio, 45433, USA Jet in supersonic and oxidizer .2­5 Here, the fuel jet issues from an injector typically mounted on the combustor walls either

  15. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

  16. Risk Management and Combinatorial Optimization for Large-Scale Demand Response and Renewable Energy Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Insoon

    2015-01-01

    flexible future grid in which renewable energy sources andflexible future grid in which distributed renewable energy

  17. Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent storage in energy end-uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent storage in energy end-uses Willett develop methods for assessing offshore wind resources, using a model of the vertical structure offshore wind power matched to inherent storage in energy end- uses, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L02817, doi

  18. 2 Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent 3 storage in energy end-uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    2 Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent 3 storage in energy end-uses 4 by matching the winds of the 14 Middle-Atlantic Bight (MAB) to energy demand in the 15 adjacent states] We develop methods for assessing offshore wind 9 resources, using a model of the vertical structure

  19. Search for large extra dimensions in the exclusive photon + missing energy channel in p anti-p collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazoflores, Jose A.; /Florida State U.

    2006-04-01

    A search was conducted for evidence of large extra dimensions (LED) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's Tevatron using the D0 detector. The Tevatron is a p{bar p} collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Events with particles escaping into extra dimensions will have large missing energy. The search was carried out using data from a total luminosity of 197 {+-} 13 pb{sup -1} with an observable high transverse momentum photon and a large transverse missing energy. The 70 observed events are consistent with photons produced by standard known reactions plus other background processes produced by cosmic muons. The mass limits on the fundamental mass scale at 95% confidence level for large extra dimensions of 2, 4, 6 and 8 are 500 GeV, 581 GeV, 630 GeV, and 668 GeV respectively.

  20. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, 382 428 Gujarat (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, 382 428 Gujarat (India)

    2013-12-15

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  1. NV Energy Large-Scale Photovoltaic Integration Study: Intra-Hour Dispatch and AGC Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Meng, Da; Guo, Xinxin; Jin, Chunlian; Samaan, Nader A.

    2013-01-02

    The uncertainty and variability with photovoltaic (PV) generation make it very challenging to balance power system generation and load, especially under high penetration cases. Higher reserve requirements and more cycling of conventional generators are generally anticipated for large-scale PV integration. However, whether the existing generation fleet is flexible enough to handle the variations and how well the system can maintain its control performance are difficult to predict. The goal of this project is to develop a software program that can perform intra-hour dispatch and automatic generation control (AGC) simulation, by which the balancing operations of a system can be simulated to answer the questions posed above. The simulator, named Electric System Intra-Hour Operation Simulator (ESIOS), uses the NV Energy southern system as a study case, and models the system’s generator configurations, AGC functions, and operator actions to balance system generation and load. Actual dispatch of AGC generators and control performance under various PV penetration levels can be predicted by running ESIOS. With data about the load, generation, and generator characteristics, ESIOS can perform similar simulations and assess variable generation integration impacts for other systems as well. This report describes the design of the simulator and presents the study results showing the PV impacts on NV Energy real-time operations.

  2. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

    2011-03-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

  3. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    experiments in solar energy conversion. To reiterate, higherscience of solar energy conversion. He joined the Caltechdevelopment of solar photo-energy conversion. The Division

  4. Risk Management and Combinatorial Optimization for Large-Scale Demand Response and Renewable Energy Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Insoon

    2015-01-01

    Demand Response and Renewable Energy Integration by InsoonDemand Response and Renewable Energy Integration CopyrightDemand Response and Renewable Energy Integration by Insoon

  5. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    simulations of fusion and energy systems with unprecedentedRequirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   14 General  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  

  6. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences:  Target  2017  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences:  Target  and  Context   DOE’s  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  program  

  7. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    The Case of India: Environmental Energy Technologiesand Energy Savings Potential in Selected Industrial Sectors in India.Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of

  8. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   14 General  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   i  

  9. Green queue : a framework for selecting energy optimal DVFS congurations in large scale MPI applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraza, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    settings . . . . . Green Queue Energy Savings with VariousApplication Figure 4.3: Green Queue Energy Savings withBlind Scaling Relative Energy Green Queue Relative Delay

  10. In-bed tube bank for a fluidized-bed combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemenway, Jr., Lloyd F. (Morgantown, WV)

    1990-01-01

    An in-bed tube bank (10) for a fluidized bed combustor. The tube bank (10) of the present invention comprises one or more fluid communicating boiler tubes (30) which define a plurality of selectively spaced boiler tube sections (32). The tube sections (32) are substantially parallel to one another and aligned in a common plane. The tube bank (10) further comprises support members (34) for joining adjacent tube sections (32), the support members (34) engaging and extending along a selected length of the tube sections (32) and spanning the preselected space therebetween.

  11. Measurement of flowfield in a simulated solid-propellant ducted rocket combustor using laser Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, W.H.; Yang, V.; Chuang, C.L.; Yang, A.S.; Cherng, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    A two-component LDV system was used to obtain detailed flow velocity and turbulence measurements in order to study the flow characteristics in a simulated solid-propellant ducted rocket combustor. The vortical structures near the dome region, the size of the recirculation zone, and the location of the reattachment point are all shown to be strongly affected by the jet momentum of both ram air and fuel streams. It is found that the turbulence intensity is anisotropic throughout the front portion of the simulated conbustor, and that the measured Reynolds stress conmponent distribution is well correlated with the local mean velocity vector distribution. 25 refs.

  12. Turbine combustor configured for high-frequency dynamics mitigation and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang; York, William David; Srinivasan, Shivakumar

    2014-11-04

    A turbomachine combustor includes a combustion chamber; a plurality of micro-mixer nozzles mounted to an end cover of the combustion chamber, each including a fuel supply pipe affixed to a nozzle body located within the combustion chamber, wherein fuel from the supply pipe mixes with air in the nozzle body prior to discharge into the combustion chamber; and wherein at least some of the nozzle bodies of the plurality of micro-mixer nozzles have axial length dimensions that differ from axial length dimensions of other of the nozzle bodies.

  13. Development of Energy Consumption Database Management System of Existing Large Public Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01

    The statistic data of energy consumption are the base of analyzing energy consumption. The scientific management method of energy consumption data and the development of database management system plays an important role in building energy...

  14. A Parallel Statistical Learning Approach to the Prediction of Building Energy Consumption Based on Large Datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Parallel Statistical Learning Approach to the Prediction of Building Energy Consumption Based consumption of buildings based on historical performances is an important approach to achieve energy (SVMs), Prediction, Model, Energy Efficiency, Parallel Computing. 1. INTRODUCTION Building energy

  15. Phenomenology of dark energy: general features of large-scale perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis Perenon; Federico Piazza; Christian Marinoni; Lam Hui

    2015-07-10

    We present a systematic exploration of dark energy and modified gravity models containing a single scalar field non-minimally coupled to the metric. Even though the parameter space is large, by exploiting an effective field theory (EFT) formulation and by imposing simple physical constraints such as stability conditions and (sub-)luminal propagation of perturbations, we arrive at a number of generic predictions. (1) The linear growth rate of matter density fluctuations is generally suppressed compared to $\\Lambda$CDM at intermediate redshifts ($0.5 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 1$), despite the introduction of an attractive long-range scalar force. This is due to the fact that, in self-accelerating models, the background gravitational coupling weakens at intermediate redshifts, over-compensating the effect of the attractive scalar force. (2) At higher redshifts, the opposite happens; we identify a period of super-growth when the linear growth rate is larger than that predicted by $\\Lambda$CDM. (3) The gravitational slip parameter $\\eta$ - the ratio of the space part of the metric perturbation to the time part - is bounded from above. For Brans-Dicke-type theories $\\eta$ is at most unity. For more general theories, $\\eta$ can exceed unity at intermediate redshifts, but not more than about $1.5$ if, at the same time, the linear growth rate is to be compatible with current observational constraints. We caution against phenomenological parametrization of data that do not correspond to predictions from viable physical theories. We advocate the EFT approach as a way to constrain new physics from future large-scale-structure data.

  16. Phenomenology of dark energy: general features of large-scale perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perenon, Louis; Marinoni, Christian; Hui, Lam

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic exploration of dark energy and modified gravity models containing a single scalar field non-minimally coupled to the metric. Even though the parameter space is large, by exploiting an effective field theory (EFT) formulation and by imposing simple physical constraints such as stability conditions and (sub-)luminal propagation of perturbations, we arrive at a number of generic predictions. (1) The linear growth rate of matter density fluctuations is generally suppressed compared to $\\Lambda$CDM at intermediate redshifts ($0.5 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 1$), despite the introduction of an attractive long-range scalar force. This is due to the fact that, in self-accelerating models, the background gravitational coupling weakens at intermediate redshifts, over-compensating the effect of the attractive scalar force. (2) At higher redshifts, the opposite happens; we identify a period of super-growth when the linear growth rate is larger than that predicted by $\\Lambda$CDM. (3) The gravitational sli...

  17. A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale energy storage represents a key challenge for renewable energy and new systems with low cost, high energy density and long cycle life are desired. In this article, we develop a new lithium/polysulfide (Li/PS) semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage, with lithium polysulfide (Li{sub 2}S{sub 8}) in ether solvent as a catholyte and metallic lithium as an anode. Unlike previous work on Li/S batteries with discharge products such as solid state Li{sub 2}S{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}S, the catholyte is designed to cycle only in the range between sulfur and Li{sub 2}S{sub 4}. Consequently all detrimental effects due to the formation and volume expansion of solid Li{sub 2}S{sub 2}/Li{sub 2}S are avoided. This novel strategy results in excellent cycle life and compatibility with flow battery design. The proof-of-concept Li/PS battery could reach a high energy density of 170 W h kg{sup -1} and 190 W h L{sup -1} for large scale storage at the solubility limit, while keeping the advantages of hybrid flow batteries. We demonstrated that, with a 5 M Li{sub 2}S{sub 8} catholyte, energy densities of 97 W h kg{sup -1} and 108 W h L{sup -1} can be achieved. As the lithium surface is well passivated by LiNO{sub 3} additive in ether solvent, internal shuttle effect is largely eliminated and thus excellent performance over 2000 cycles is achieved with a constant capacity of 200 mA h g{sup -1}. This new system can operate without the expensive ion-selective membrane, and it is attractive for large-scale energy storage.

  18. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  19. Method for control of NOx emission from combustors using fuel dilution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schefer, Robert W. (Alamo, CA); Keller, Jay O (Oakland, CA)

    2007-01-16

    A method of controlling NOx emission from combustors. The method involves the controlled addition of a diluent such as nitrogen or water vapor, to a base fuel to reduce the flame temperature, thereby reducing NOx production. At the same time, a gas capable of enhancing flame stability and improving low temperature combustion characteristics, such as hydrogen, is added to the fuel mixture. The base fuel can be natural gas for use in industrial and power generation gas turbines and other burners. However, the method described herein is equally applicable to other common fuels such as coal gas, biomass-derived fuels and other common hydrocarbon fuels. The unique combustion characteristics associated with the use of hydrogen, particularly faster flame speed, higher reaction rates, and increased resistance to fluid-mechanical strain, alter the burner combustion characteristics sufficiently to allow operation at the desired lower temperature conditions resulting from diluent addition, without the onset of unstable combustion that can arise at lower combustor operating temperatures.

  20. Trends in Data Center Design - ASHRAE Leads the Way to Large Energy Savings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Geet, O.

    2013-06-01

    Energy savings strategies for data centers are described, including best practices, ASHRAE standards, and examples of successful strategies for incorporating energy savings.

  1. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhyankar, Nikit; Phadke, Amol

    2011-01-20

    Large-scale EE programs would modestly increase tariffs but reduce consumers' electricity bills significantly. However, the primary benefit of EE programs is a significant reduction in power shortages, which might make these programs politically acceptable even if tariffs increase. To increase political support, utilities could pursue programs that would result in minimal tariff increases. This can be achieved in four ways: (a) focus only on low-cost programs (such as replacing electric water heaters with gas water heaters); (b) sell power conserved through the EE program to the market at a price higher than the cost of peak power purchase; (c) focus on programs where a partial utility subsidy of incremental capital cost might work and (d) increase the number of participant consumers by offering a basket of EE programs to fit all consumer subcategories and tariff tiers. Large scale EE programs can result in consistently negative cash flows and significantly erode the utility's overall profitability. In case the utility is facing shortages, the cash flow is very sensitive to the marginal tariff of the unmet demand. This will have an important bearing on the choice of EE programs in Indian states where low-paying rural and agricultural consumers form the majority of the unmet demand. These findings clearly call for a flexible, sustainable solution to the cash-flow management issue. One option is to include a mechanism like FAC in the utility incentive mechanism. Another sustainable solution might be to have the net program cost and revenue loss built into utility's revenue requirement and thus into consumer tariffs up front. However, the latter approach requires institutionalization of EE as a resource. The utility incentive mechanisms would be able to address the utility disincentive of forgone long-run return but have a minor impact on consumer benefits. Fundamentally, providing incentives for EE programs to make them comparable to supply-side investments is a way of moving the electricity sector toward a model focused on providing energy services rather than providing electricity.

  2. Paper BL3.199 EWEC 2007 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition BL3.199 Wake Modelling for intermediate and large wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paper BL3.199 EWEC 2007 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 1 BL3.199 Wake Modelling for intermediate and large wind farms Ole Rathmann1, 3 , Sten Frandsen1 , and Rebecca Barthelmie2, 1 1 Wind Energy.rathmann@risoe.dk Summary Modern, very large wind farms require large-scale effects to be taken into account when evaluating

  3. Lower bound on the critical energy for the onset of chaos and the chaotic dynamical aperture of large accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guersey, Y. (Department of Natural Sciences, Baruch College of The City University of New York, 17 Lexington Avenue, New York 10010 (United States)); Alhassid, Y. (Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Conneticut 06511 (United States) Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States))

    1992-02-15

    A generic nonintegrable Hamiltonian system is characterized by a critical energy above which chaotic motion sets in. A general method of finding a lower bound to this critical energy that does not require a solution of the equations of motion is discussed. Below the critical energy, the motion is regular everywhere on the energy surface and no instabilities can develop. The method is applied to a practical situation encountered in modern large accelerators, where the transverse motion of the particles in an arrangement of quadrupole, sextupole, and octupole magnetic elements may become chaotic. The chaotic dynamical aperture of the beam is calculated as a function of a dimensionless strength parameter. The estimated critical energy is compared with that obtained from detailed studies of the Poincare sections of the above system at various energies.

  4. Multidimensional Numerical Simulation of a Pulse Combustor \\Lambda Daniel L. Marcus, Richard B. Pember, John B. Bell, Vincent E. Beckner,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    Multidimensional Numerical Simulation of a Pulse Combustor \\Lambda Daniel L. Marcus, Richard B Abstract We have developed a new three­dimensional modeling capability to study the behavior of pulse­dimensional, reacting fluid dynamics in the combustion chamber and in­ corporates lower­dimensional approximations

  5. Numerical Modeling of Non-adiabatic Heat-Recirculating Combustors C. H. Kuo and P. D. Ronney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @usc.edu Colloquium topic area: 12. New Technology Concepts Keywords: Micro-combustion, Heat-recirculating combustors) for propane-air mixtures. These limits showed reasonable quantitative agreement with experiments. Comparison based on existing macro-scale designs such as internal combustion engines may be impractical

  6. Reducing Plug and Process Loads for a Large Scale, Low Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobato, C.; Pless, S.; Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.

    2011-02-01

    This paper documents the design and operational plug and process load energy efficiency measures needed to allow a large scale office building to reach ultra high efficiency building goals. The appendices of this document contain a wealth of documentation pertaining to plug and process load design in the RSF, including a list of equipment was selected for use.

  7. Nuclear structure effects of the nuclei {sup 152,154,156}Dy at high excitation energy and large angular momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, V.; Egido, J.L.

    1995-06-01

    Using the finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov formalism we analyze the properties of the nuclei {sup 152,154,156}Dy at the quasicontinuum region from {ital I}=0{h_bar} to 70{h_bar} and excitation energy up to approximately 16 MeV. We discuss energy gaps, shapes, moments of inertia, and entropy among others. The role of shape fluctuations is studied in the frame of classical statistics and we find large effects on several observables. A very rich structure is found in terms of excitation energy and angular momentum.

  8. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Coherent Light Source (LCLS). d) Architectures with largeCoherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Acceleratorto chart new directions. At LCLS, the short duration of hard

  9. Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Rossa W. (E. Rutherford, NJ); Zoll, August H. (Cedar Grove, NJ)

    1982-01-01

    In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

  10. The Design of a Large Booster Ring for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Nissen, Todd Satogata, Yuhong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the current design of the large booster ring for the Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab. The booster ring takes 3 GeV protons or ions of equivalent rigidity from a pre-booster ring, and accelerates them to 20 GeV for protons or equivalent energy for light to heavy ions before sending them to the ion collider ring. The present design calls for a figure-8 shape of the ring for superior preservation of ion polarization. The ring is made of warm magnets and shares a tunnel with the two collider rings. Acceleration is achieved by warm RF systems. The linear optics has been designed with the transition energy above the highest beam energy in the ring so crossing of transition energy will be avoided. Preliminary beam dynamics studies including chromaticity compensation are presented in this paper.

  11. Impacts of large quantities of wind energy on the electric power system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Yuan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Wind energy has been surging on a global scale. Significant penetration of wind energy is expected to take place in the power system, bringing new challenges because of the variability and uncertainty of this renewable ...

  12. Enterprise Audit Modeling of Large-Scale Agencies' Energy and Carbon Dioxide Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Brigitta Alexandra Anne

    2011-12-31

    Calculating and accounting of embodied and operational energy and carbon emissions within buildings is still not standardized. No regulations exist for standard equations, databases, or best practice methods to evaluate energy and carbon...

  13. Factors Influencing Water Heating Energy Use and Peak Demand in a Large Scale Residential Monitoring Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchelle, M. P.; Parker, D. S.; Anello, M. T.

    2000-01-01

    , as well as obtain improved appliance energy consumption indexes and load profiles. A portion of the monitoring measures water heater energy use and demand in each home on a 15-minute basis....

  14. Risk Management and Combinatorial Optimization for Large-Scale Demand Response and Renewable Energy Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Insoon

    2015-01-01

    results: demand response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Institute. “Automated Demand Response Today”. In: (2012). [Energy. “Benefits of demand response in electricity markets

  15. Analysis Methodology for Large Organizations' Investments in Energy Retrofit of Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heo, Y.; Augenbroe, G.

    2011-01-01

    recommended to follow International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol to verify the effectiveness of energy retrofits (Hansen, 2004; IPMVP, 2010). The IPMVP provides three methods for evaluating the success of energy conservation measures... guidelines for how to subscribe to the IPMVP calibrated simulation approach. The guidelines require the use of transient energy simulation models to calculate the ?pre-retrofit? energy consumption of each building based on hourly weather data...

  16. Benefits of Multi-day Industrial Center Assessments for Large Energy-Intensive Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffington, W.M.; Eggebrecht, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    of information resources and tools, technical assistance, and by demonstrating new technologies (U.S. Department of Energy 2003A). The IAC program and showcase demonstrations are part of a suite of Best Practices available to plants. The DOE-sponsored IAC... of energy efficiency, renewable energy, environmental benefits and productivity (U.S. Department of Energy 2003A). DOE sponsors showcases in partnership with industry and state IOF efforts, and the IAC at Texas A&M University (TAMU) has participated...

  17. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Basic research in a broad range of energy technologies leadsbasic research that underpins a broad range of energy technologies.Basic  Energy  Sciences   10.2.5 Reaction  Dynamics  in  Complex  Molecular  Systems   Principal Investigator: Thomas Miller, California Institute of Technology

  18. IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS 2004 1 Minimizing Energy Consumption In Large-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Veciana, Gustavo

    -temporal field. We begin by formulating a distributed compression problem subject to aggregation (energy) costs energy-aware routing[10], [11] and/or distributed medium access control[12]. In this paper we address of such expenditures may be critical. Indeed if nodes do not have renewable sources of energy, their batteries ma

  19. Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaufrere, A.H.

    1982-04-30

    A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas fired furnances or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

  20. Process for generating electricity in a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kasper, Stanley (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for generating electricity using a gas turbine as part of a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor system wherein coal is fed as a fuel in a slurry in which other constituents, including a sulfur sorbent such as limestone, are added. The coal is combusted with air in a pressurized combustion chamber wherein most of the residual sulfur in the coal is captured by the sulfur sorbent. After particulates are removed from the flue gas, the gas expands in a turbine, thereby generating electric power. The spent flue gas is cooled by heat exchange with system combustion air and/or system liquid streams, and the condensate is returned to the feed slurry.

  1. Compressed air energy storage technology program. Annual report for 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loscutoff, W.V.

    1980-06-01

    The objectives of the Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) program are to establish stability criteria for large underground reservoirs in salt domes, hard rock, and porous rock used for air storage in utility applications, and to develop second-generation CAES technologies that have minimal or no dependence on petroleum fuels. During the year reported reports have been issued on field studies on CAES on aquifers and in salt, stability, and design criteria for CAES and for pumped hydro-storage caverns, laboratory studies of CAES in porous rock reservoris have continued. Research has continued on combined CAES/Thermal Energy Storage, CAES/Solar systems, coal-fired fluidized bed combustors for CAES, and two-reservoir advanced CAES concepts. (LCL)

  2. Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauderer, B.

    1996-09-01

    The primary project objective is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor. This non-equilibrium process is a key step in the capture and retention of sulfur released during coal combustion by the interaction with calcium based sorbent particles. By encapsulating the sulfur bearing calcium particles in slag, the need for landfilling of this waste is eliminated. This objective will be implemented through a series of up to 20 one day tests carried out in a 20 MMBtu/hr air cooled, slagging combustor-boiler installation located in Philadelphia, PA. The project will consist of two tasks. Task 1 consists of the experiments conducted in the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor, and task 2 will consist of analysis of this data. All the operating procedures for this effort have been developed in the 7 years of operation of this combustor.

  3. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    India. Prayas. (2005). Demand-Side Management (DSM) in theEnergy Efficiency and Demand Side Management (DSM). PlanningDemand Growth Demand Side Management Delhi Transco Limited

  4. Event Generation of Large-Angle Bhabha Scattering at LEP2 Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Arbuzov

    1999-10-08

    LABSMC Monte Carlo event generator is used to simulate Bhabha scattering at high energies. Different sources of radiative corrections are considered. The resulting precision is discussed.

  5. Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    recent awards through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, DOE today awarded 66.7 million to the Midwest Geological Sequestration...

  6. Plasma molding over surface topography: Energy and angular distribution of ions extracted out of large holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Plasma molding over surface topography: Energy and angular distribution of ions extracted out November 2001 Plasma molding over surface topography was investigated by measuring the energy and angular of plasma to mold around surfaces of com- plex shape finds application in coating of curved objects, etching

  7. Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,DepartmentFederalJulyDepartment of Energy awardedProject

  8. Energy Department Loan Guarantee Would Support Large-Scale Rooftop Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor Innovative Solar Power Plant |Projects |of EnergyEnergyPower

  9. Clean Energy Solutions Large Scale CHP and Fuel Cells Program | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energyof the Clean Energy Finance<|A fact

  10. Wind Energy-Related Atmospheric Boundary Layer Large-Eddy Simulation Using OpenFOAM: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M.J.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J.G.; Moriarty, P.J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper develops and evaluates the performance of a large-eddy simulation (LES) solver in computing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain under a variety of stability conditions, ranging from shear driven (neutral stratification) to moderately convective (unstable stratification).

  11. Large interannual CO 2 and energy exchange variability in a freshwater marsh under consistent environmental conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Adrian V.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) variability was the largestthe annual sums of GEE, TER and NEP were large (Figure 5).NEP ranged from – 251 gC m À2 a À1 in 2000 to 515 gC m À2 a

  12. Development of Graphical Indices for Displaying Large Scale Building Energy Data Sets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbas, M.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    several years of hourly data (20,000 to 30,000 data points) collected from LoanSTAR sites. These indices are meant to be efficient displays that present data in specific graphic forms developed to highlight certain features. In a large program like Loan...

  13. Energy-Efficient Antenna Selection and Power Allocation for Large-Scale Multiple Antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) sector has been estimated to represent about 2 percent of the global CO2 emissions [1], and 1.8 percent reduce CO2 emissions [5]. On the other hand, large-scale multiple antenna systems which employ hundreds of the total world electricity consumption [2]. The mobile network operational expenditure (OPEX

  14. A large-scale study on predicting and contextualizing building energy usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolter, Jeremy Z.

    In this paper we present a data-driven approach to modeling end user energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings. Our model is based upon a data set of monthly electricity and gas bills, collected by a utility ...

  15. Rule Based Energy Management and Reporting System (EMRS) Applied to a Large Utility Power Station Complex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bamber, D.; Childress, R.; Robinson, J.

    2004-01-01

    Deregulation of electricity and rising fuel costs are causing renewed interest in Energy Management Systems (EMS) to service both the utility and private sectors. This paper details a case study of the successful integration of a new class of rule...

  16. A Practical Approach to Energy Management in a Large Petrochemical Manufacturing Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackley, A.

    2005-01-01

    The largest of Chevron Phillips Chemical Company's 34 chemical manufacturing facilities, the Cedar Bayou Plant located in Baytown, TX, undertook the task of creating a facility-wide energy management and improvement program in 2004. The Cedar Bayou...

  17. Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catalina, T.

    2011-01-01

    that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A...

  18. A Waterfall Model to Achieve Energy Efficient Tasks Mapping for Large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bader, David A.

    reduce the energy consumption and achieve a better load balance for GPU clusters. A task generator based to significantly reduce space, power, and cooling demands. Nvidia's commercial "Tesla" GPU with four high

  19. Impact of signal processing energy and large bandwidth on infrastructureless wireless network routing and scalability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Lillian L.

    Throughput scaling and optimal hop distance of interference-limited wireless networks have been well characterized in literature. For some emerging wireless networks, throughput may be more limited by battery energy rather ...

  20. Feasibility of passive electromagnetic dampers as energy harvesters in large structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrix, Christopher (Christopher M.)

    2013-01-01

    There has been a trend in structural design toward energy efficient design and motion based design. The strategy of motion based design is controlling the movement of structures to meet certain dynamic response requirements ...

  1. Implementation of an Integrated Energy Information System in a Large University Campus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, J. R.; Schuster, L.; Rickey, D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the design, installation and implementation of an integrated energy information system at the central plant, auxiliary utility plants, and selected buildings at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. The Comprehensive...

  2. Master Plan and Energy Audits at a Large Texas Medical Campus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, K.; Stinson, M.; Haag, S.; Hart, M.

    2009-01-01

    , an analysis of the current performance versus targeted performance was made to define the gap between current usage and targeted efficiency level. Baseline energy consumption models were developed for most of the buildings based upon the HVAC system type...

  3. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino flux as a probe of large extra-dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykken, Joseph; /Fermilab; Mena, Olga; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Razzaque, Soebur; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Penn State U.

    2007-05-01

    A suppression in the spectrum of ultrahigh-energy (UHE, {ge} 10{sup 18} eV) neutrinos will be present in extra-dimensional scenarios, due to enhanced neutrino-antineutrino annihilation processes with the supernova relic neutrinos. In this scenario, neutrinos can not be responsible for the highest energy events observed in the UHE cosmic ray spectrum. A direct implication of these extra-dimensional interactions would be the absence of UHE neutrinos in ongoing and future neutrino telescopes.

  4. Large Lagrangian Actions on Elliptical Solutions of 2-Body and 3-Body Problems with Fixed Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying Lv; Shiqing Zhang

    2011-12-04

    Based on the works of Gordon ([4]) and Zhang-Zhou([8])) on the variational minimizing properties for Keplerian orbits and Lagrangian solutions of Newtonian 2-body and 3-body problems, we use the constrained variational principle of Ambrosetti-Coti Zelati ([1]) to compute the Lagrangian actions on Keplerian and Lagrangian elliptical solutions with fixed energies, we also find an interesting relationship between period and energy for Lagrangian elliptical solutions with Newtonian potentials.

  5. Development of a Methodology for Baselining the Energy Use of Large Multi-Building Central Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.S.; Beasley, R.; Turner, W.D.; Claridge, D.E

    2002-01-01

    vidual buildings (DOE 1996). In 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) updated the NEMVP and .renamed the document the International Performance Measurement (/lid Verification Protocol (IPMVP) (DOE '1997) to reflect the. part,icipation of other... countries in the development of consensus energy savings measurement. The' IPMVP, which was expanded and revised in 200 I, provides a flexible quasi-consensus document that leaves the choice of : savirigs measurement methodology to the contracting agency...

  6. Panel 1, Towards Sustainable Energy Systems: The Role of Large-Scale Hydrogen Storage in Germany

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - .EnergyHYDROGEN ENERGY STORAGEHanno

  7. Large Scale Renewable Energy Property Tax Abatement (Nevada State Office of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S.Leadership on Clean Energy | Department ofTheEnergy) |

  8. A methdology for baselining the energy use at large campus utility plants for the purpose of measuring energy savings from energy conservation retrofits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beasley, Rodney Craig

    1999-01-01

    The development of the energy services industry and the implementation of energy savings retrofits by energy services companies has increased the focus on the performance of energy saving retrofits. Energy savings measurement, though not an exact...

  9. On the Use of Integrated Daylighting and Energy Simulations to Drive the Design of a Large Net-Zero Energy Office Building: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guglielmetti, R.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2010-08-01

    This paper illustrates the challenges of integrating rigorous daylight and electric lighting simulation data with whole-building energy models, and defends the need for such integration to achieve aggressive energy savings. Through a case study example, we examine the ways daylighting -- and daylighting simulation -- drove the design of a large net-zero energy project. We give a detailed review of the daylighting and electric lighting design process for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Research Support Facility (RSF), a 220,000 ft2 net-zero energy project the author worked on as a daylighting consultant. A review of the issues involved in simulating and validating the daylighting performance of the RSF will be detailed, including daylighting simulation, electric lighting control response, and integration of Radiance simulation data into the building energy model. Daylighting was a key strategy in reaching the contractual energy use goals for the RSF project; the building's program, layout, orientation and interior/furniture design were all influenced by the daylighting design, and simulation was critical in ensuring these many design components worked together in an integrated fashion, and would perform as required to meet a very aggressive energy performance goal, as expressed in a target energy use intensity.

  10. NO{sub x} and CO emissions from a pulse combustor operating in a lean premixed mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.O.; Bramlette, T.T.; Barr, P.K.; Alvarez, J.

    1993-04-01

    Emission levels below 5.0 ppM NO{sub x}, with corresponding levels of 75 ppM CO (corrected to 3% O{sub 2}), were achieved in a pulse combustor operating in a lean premixed mode. Both NO{sub x} and CO concentrations were invariant with the total mass flow rate, but NO{sub x} and CO concentrations did vary with the rate of microscopic mixing.

  11. Development of a retrofit coal combustor for industrial applications, (Phase 2). Technical progress report, October--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The objective of Phase I of the program for the development of a retrofit pulse coal combustor for industrial applications was to design, fabricate, test and evaluate advanced chamber designs at the laboratory-scale utilizing several fuels (Task 1). The activities were structured to provide design criteria for scaling up to the pilot-scale level for the demonstration of a pulse combustor fired with coal-water mixtures for industrial boiler and process heater retrofit applications. The design data and information acquired during Task I of the initial phase was to develop scale-up design criteria for scaling the laboratory-scale design to pilot-scale including interface requirements for the field demonstration. The scale-up pilot unit design was to be sufficiently developed to allow fabrication of the unit for testing in the existing test facility upon DOE exercising its option for the follow-on activities of this program. These follow-on activities (Phase II) included the fabrication, test, and engineering evaluation of the pilot-scale combustor as well as technical and laboratory test support activities for reducing the technical risks and costs of development at the pilot-scale. Based on the information, test, data and technical support activities, a retrofit combustor system was to be designed for field demonstration. An additional effort - Phase IA - was added to the contract by modification A005. This modification added a Phase IA in place of the original Task 2 of Phase I activity. This interim phase consisted of three technical tasks described in previous quarterly reports. Phase II was initiated in April 1989.

  12. Development of a retrofit coal combustor for industrial applications, (Phase 2). Technical progress report, April--June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    The objective of Phase I of the program for the development of a retrofit pulse coal combustor for industrial applications was to design, fabricate, test and evaluate advanced chamber designs at the laboratory-scale utilizing several fuels (Task 1). The activities were structured to provide design criteria for scaling up to the pilot-scale level for the demonstration of a pulse combustor fired with coal-water mixtures for industrial boiler and process heater retrofit applications. The design data and information acquired during Task 1 of the initial phase was to develop scale-up design criteria for scaling the laboratory-scale design to pilot-scale including interface requirements for the field demonstration. The scale-up pilot unit design was to be sufficiently developed to allow fabrication of the unit for testing in the existing test facility upon DOE exercising its option for the follow-on activities of this program. These follow-on activities (Phase II) included the fabrication, test, and engineering evaluation of the pilot-scale combustor as well as technical and laboratory test support activities for reducing the technical risks and costs of development at the pilot-scale. Based on the information, test, data and technical support activities, a retrofit combustor system was to be designed for field demonstration. An additional effort was added to the contract by modification A005. This modification added a Phase IA in place of the original Task 2 of Phase I activity. This interim phase consisted of three technical tasks described in previous quarterly reports. Phase II was initiated in April 1989.

  13. Large scale structure and the generalised Chaplygin gas as dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Multamaki; M. Manera; E. Gaztanaga

    2003-10-31

    The growth of large scale structure is studied in a universe containing both cold dark matter (CDM) and generalized Chaplygin gas (GCg). GCg is assumed to contribute only to the background evolution of the universe while the CDM component collapses and forms structures. We present some new analytical as well as numerical results for linear and non-linear growth in such model. The model passes the standard cosmological distance test without the need of a cosmological constant (LCDM). But we find that the scenario is severely constrained by current observations of large scale structure. Any small deviations of the GCg parameters away from the standard Lambda dominated cosmology (LCDM) produces substantial suppression for the growth of structures.

  14. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a “hydrogen economy.” The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  15. The Free Energy of the Quantum Heisenberg Ferromagnet at Large Spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Correggi; A. Giuliani

    2012-07-17

    We consider the spin-S ferromagnetic Heisenberg model in three dimensions, in the absence of an external field. Spin wave theory suggests that in a suitable temperature regime the system behaves effectively as a system of non-interacting bosons (magnons). We prove this fact at the level of the specific free energy: if $ S \\to \\infty $ and the inverse temperature $ \\beta \\to 0 $ in such a way that $ \\beta S $ stays constant, we rigorously show that the free energy per unit volume converges to the one suggested by spin wave theory. The proof is based on the localization of the system in small boxes and on upper and lower bounds on the local free energy, and it also provides explicit error bounds on the remainder.

  16. NO[sub x] and CO emissions from a pulse combustor operating in a lean premixed mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.O.; Bramlette, T.T.; Barr, P.K.; Alvarez, J.R. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility)

    1994-12-01

    Control over the combustion fluid dynamics was used to minimize the emission of NO[sub x] and CO. The combustion kinetics were controlled by operating the combustor premixed and were varied by modifying the equivalence ratio over the lean stability envelope. A wide dynamic range in fluid dynamic mixing characteristics was also investigated by modifying the degree of macroscopic mixing and microscopic mixing. The residence time at high temperature was controlled by modifying the frequency of the periodic reacting flow in a pulse combustor. It was found that controlling the flame temperature, chemical kinetics, and residence time at high temperature was best accomplished by controlling the equivalence ratio and the degree of macroscopic mixing rather than controlling the microscopic mixing over the dynamic range obtainable by the techniques used in this study. Emission levels below 5.0 ppm NO[sub x], with corresponding levels of 5.0 ppm CO (corrected to 3% O[sub 2]), were achieved in a pulse combustor operating in a lean premixed mode, without the use of any post combustion cleanup technologies. Both NO[sub 2] and CO emissions were invariant to changes in the power input.

  17. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard

    2014-05-02

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,500 users working on some 650 projects that involve nearly 600 codes in a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In March 2013, NERSC, DOE?s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE?s Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) held a review to characterize High Performance Computing (HPC) and storage requirements for FES research through 2017. This report is the result.

  18. Scenario Development and Analysis of Hydrogen as a Large-Scale Energy Storage Medium (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D. M.

    2009-06-10

    The conclusions from this report are: (1) hydrogen has several important advantages over competing technologies, including - very high storage energy density (170 kWh/m{sup 3} vs. 2.4 for CAES and 0.7 for pumped hydro) which allows for potential economic viability of above-ground storage and relatively low environmental impact in comparison with other technologies; and (2) the major disadvantage of hydrogen energy storage is cost but research and deployment of electrolyzers and fuel cells may reduce cost significantly.

  19. Large-Scale Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Based on CFLs | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectricColorado:EnergyLaor BatteriesEnergy

  20. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Large Business Energy Solutions | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment ofProgramImportsEnergyForecasting Tools Enhanceof

  1. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy 1Energy 1ofExceeding 500Wh/L |

  2. First U.S. Large-Scale CO2 Storage Project Advances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,EnergyFinancingWIPP |Department of EnergyFirst

  3. Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA PublicLED1,400 Jobs | Department ofEnergy LocalProjects |

  4. Results of combustion and emissions testing when co-firing blends of binder-enhanced densified refuse-derived fuel (b-dRDF) pellets and coal in a 440 MW{sub e} cyclone fired combustor. Volume 3: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlsson, O.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains the data resulting from the co-firing of b-dRDF pellets and coal in a 440-MW{sub e} cyclone-fired combustor. These tests were conducted under a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The CRADA partners included the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Otter Tail Power Company, Green Isle Environmental, Inc., XL Recycling Corporation, and Marblehead Lime Company. The report is made up of three volumes. This volume contains other supporting information, along with quality assurance documentation and safety and test plans. With this multi-volume approach, readers can find information at the desired level of detail, depending on individual interest or need.

  5. A Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Large-scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Vijayakumar, M.; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang; Hu, Jian Z.; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-05-01

    Low cost, high performance redox flow batteries are highly demanded for up to multi-megawatt levels of renewable and grid energy storage. Here, we report a new vanadium redox flow battery with a significant improvement over the current technologies. This new battery utilizes a sulfate-chloride mixed solution, which is capable of dissolving more than 2.5 M vanadium or about a 70% increase in the energy storage capacity over the current vanadium sulfate system. More importantly, the new electrolyte remains stable over a wide temperature range of -5 to 60oC, potentially eliminating the need of active heat management. Its high energy density, broad operational temperature window, and excellent electrochemical performance would lead to a significant reduction in the cost of energy storage, thus accelerating its market penetration.

  6. Energy Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guglielmetti , R.; Scheib, J.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini , P.; Petro, R.

    2011-03-01

    Net-zero energy buildings generate as much energy as they consume and are significant in the sustainable future of building design and construction. The role of daylighting (and its simulation) in the design process becomes critical. In this paper we present the process the National Renewable Energy Laboratory embarked on in the procurement, design, and construction of its newest building, the Research Support Facility (RSF) - particularly the roles of daylighting, electric lighting, and simulation. With a rapid construction schedule, the procurement, design, and construction had to be tightly integrated; with low energy use. We outline the process and measures required to manage a building design that could expect to operate at an efficiency previously unheard of for a building of this type, size, and density. Rigorous simulation of the daylighting and the electric lighting control response was a given, but the oft-ignored disconnect between lighting simulation and whole-building energy use simulation had to be addressed. The RSF project will be thoroughly evaluated for its performance for one year; preliminary data from the postoccupancy monitoring efforts will also be presented with an eye toward the current efficacy of building energy and lighting simulation.

  7. Energy Storage and Reactive Power Compensator in a Large Wind Farm: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Yinger, R.; Romanowitz, H.

    2003-10-01

    The size of wind farm power systems is increasing, and so is the number of wind farms contributing to the power systems network. The size of wind turbines is also increasing--from less than 1 MW a few years ago to the 2- to 3-MW machines being installed today and the 5-MW machines under development. The interaction of the wind farm, energy storage, reactive power compensation, and the power system network is being investigated. Because the loads and the wind farms' output fluctuate during the day, the use of energy storage and reactive power compensation is ideal for the power system network. Energy storage and reactive power compensation can minimize real/reactive power imbalances that can affect the surrounding power system. In this paper, we will show how the contribution of wind farms affects the power distribution network and how the power distribution network, energy storage, and reactive power compensation interact when the wind changes. We will also investigate the size of the components in relation to each other and to the power system.

  8. Transport, energy balance, and stability of a large field-reversed configuration*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    . L. Hoffman, R. D. Milroy, R. Maqueda, and L. C Steinhauer University of Washington, Redmond Plasma-reversedthetapinch, whereplasmasconfinedin a field-reversedconfiguration(FRC) have exhibited record energy,particle, and configuration,quiescentFRCswith s values(thenumberof ion gyroradii from thefield null to theseparatrixof theFRC) aslargeas5. LSX

  9. Toward Large-Scale Energy Harvesting by a Nanoparticle-Enhanced Triboelectric Nanogenerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    by commonly available ambient mechanical energy such as human footfalls, a NG with size smaller than a human palm can generate maximum short-circuit current of 2 mA, delivering instantaneous power output of 1.2 W to external load. The power output corresponds to an area power density of 313 W/m2 and a volume power density

  10. Nesting large-eddy simulations within mesoscale simulations for wind energy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D; Chow, F K; Kosovic, B; Lundquist, K A

    2008-09-08

    With increasing demand for more accurate atmospheric simulations for wind turbine micrositing, for operational wind power forecasting, and for more reliable turbine design, simulations of atmospheric flow with resolution of tens of meters or higher are required. These time-dependent large-eddy simulations (LES), which resolve individual atmospheric eddies on length scales smaller than turbine blades and account for complex terrain, are possible with a range of commercial and open-source software, including the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In addition to 'local' sources of turbulence within an LES domain, changing weather conditions outside the domain can also affect flow, suggesting that a mesoscale model provide boundary conditions to the large-eddy simulations. Nesting a large-eddy simulation within a mesoscale model requires nuanced representations of turbulence. Our group has improved the Weather and Research Forecasting model's (WRF) LES capability by implementing the Nonlinear Backscatter and Anisotropy (NBA) subfilter stress model following Kosovic (1997) and an explicit filtering and reconstruction technique to compute the Resolvable Subfilter-Scale (RSFS) stresses (following Chow et al, 2005). We have also implemented an immersed boundary method (IBM) in WRF to accommodate complex terrain. These new models improve WRF's LES capabilities over complex terrain and in stable atmospheric conditions. We demonstrate approaches to nesting LES within a mesoscale simulation for farms of wind turbines in hilly regions. Results are sensitive to the nesting method, indicating that care must be taken to provide appropriate boundary conditions, and to allow adequate spin-up of turbulence in the LES domain.

  11. High Energy Large Area Surveys: optically obscured AGN and the history of accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Fiore; the HELLAS2XMM collaboration

    2004-06-01

    Hard X-ray, large area surveys are a fundamental complement of ultra-deep, pencil beam surveys in obtaining a more complete coverage of the L-z plane, allowing to find luminous QSO in wide z ranges. Furthermore, results from these surveys can be used to make reliable predictions about the luminosity (and hence the redshift) of the sources in the deep surveys which have optical counterparts too faint to be observed with the present generation of optical telescopes. This allows us to obtain accurate luminosity functions on wide luminosity and redshift intervals.

  12. The optical depth of the Universe to ultrahigh energy cosmic ray scattering in the magnetized large scale structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumiko Kotera; Martin Lemoine

    2008-04-30

    This paper provides an analytical description of the transport of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in an inhomogeneously magnetized intergalactic medium. This latter is modeled as a collection of magnetized scattering centers such as radio cocoons, magnetized galactic winds, clusters or magnetized filaments of large scale structure, with negligible magnetic fields in between. Magnetic deflection is no longer a continuous process, it is rather dominated by scattering events. We study the interaction between high energy cosmic rays and the scattering agents. We then compute the optical depth of the Universe to cosmic ray scattering and discuss the phenomological consequences for various source scenarios. For typical parameters of the scattering centers, the optical depth is greater than unity at 5x10^{19}eV, but the total angular deflection is smaller than unity. One important consequence of this scenario is the possibility that the last scattering center encountered by a cosmic ray be mistaken with the source of this cosmic ray. In particular, we suggest that part of the correlation recently reported by the Pierre Auger Observatory may be affected by such delusion: this experiment may be observing in part the last scattering surface of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays rather than their source population. Since the optical depth falls rapidly with increasing energy, one should probe the arrival directions of the highest energy events beyond 10^{20}eV on an event by event basis to circumvent this effect.

  13. Simulating the High Energy Gamma-ray sky seen by the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Longo; P. Azzi; D. Bastieri; G. Busetto; Y. Lei; R. Rando; O. Tibolla; L. Baldini; M. Kuss; L. Latronico; N. Omodei; M. Razzano; G. Spandre; P. Boinee; A. De Angelis; M. Frailis; M. Brigida; F. Gargano; N. Giglietto; F. Loparco; M. N. Mazziotta; C. Cecchi; P. Lubrano; F. Marcucci; M. Pepe; G. Tosti; A. Lionetto; A. Morselli; C. Pittori

    2005-03-24

    This paper presents the simulation of the GLAST high energy gamma-ray telescope. The simulation package, written in C++, is based on the Geant4 toolkit, and it is integrated into a general framework used to process events. A detailed simulation of the electronic signals inside Silicon detectors has been provided and it is used for the particle tracking, which is handled by a dedicated software. A unique repository for the geometrical description of the detector has been realized using the XML language and a C++ library to access this information has been designed and implemented. A new event display based on the HepRep protocol was implemented. The full simulation was used to simulate a full week of GLAST high energy gamma-ray observations. This paper outlines the contribution developed by the Italian GLAST software group.

  14. Development of SiC Large Tapered Crystal Growth | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

  15. FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services » Program ManagementAct FAQs Related to| Department of

  16. 978-1-4799-4394-4/14/$31.00 c 2014 IEEE Towards Energy Proportionality for Large-Scale Latency-Critical Workloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozyrakis, Christos

    978-1-4799-4394-4/14/$31.00 c 2014 IEEE Towards Energy Proportionality for Large-Scale Latency University Google, Inc. Abstract Reducing the energy footprint of warehouse-scale computer (WSC) systems is key to their affordability, yet difficult to achieve in practice. The lack of energy proportionality

  17. The \\^G Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations with Large Energy Supplies. II. Framework, Strategy, and First Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, J T; Sigurðsson, S; Povich, M S; Mullan, B

    2014-01-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the \\^G infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although Gaia will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a "zeroth order" null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can...

  18. Spatially distributed flame transfer functions for predicting combustion dynamics in lean premixed gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper describes a methodology to improve the accuracy of prediction of the eigenfrequencies and growth rates of self-induced instabilities and demonstrates its application to a laboratory-scale, swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed, gas turbine combustor. The influence of the spatial heat release distribution is accounted for using local flame transfer function (FTF) measurements. The two-microphone technique and CH{sup *} chemiluminescence intensity measurements are used to determine the input (inlet velocity perturbation) and the output functions (heat release oscillation), respectively, for the local flame transfer functions. The experimentally determined local flame transfer functions are superposed using the flame transfer function superposition principle, and the result is incorporated into an analytic thermoacoustic model, in order to predict the linear stability characteristics of a given system. Results show that when the flame length is not acoustically compact the model prediction calculated using the local flame transfer functions is better than the prediction made using the global flame transfer function. In the case of a flame in the compact flame regime, accurate predictions of eigenfrequencies and growth rates can be obtained using the global flame transfer function. It was also found that the general response characteristics of the local FTF (gain and phase) are qualitatively the same as those of the global FTF. (author)

  19. The impact of equivalence ratio oscillations on combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat Altay, H.; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2009-11-15

    The combustion dynamics of propane-air flames are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, atmospheric inlet temperature, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We modify the location of the fuel injector to examine the impact of equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame on the combustion dynamics. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat-release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When the fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame is steady and the combustion dynamics are controlled only by flame-vortex interactions. In this case, different dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. When the fuel is injected close to the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame exhibits oscillations. In the presence of equivalence ratio oscillations, the measured sound pressure level is significant across the entire range of lean mean equivalence ratios even if the equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame are out-of-phase with the pressure oscillations. The combustion dynamics are governed primarily by the flame-vortex interactions, while the equivalence ratio oscillations have secondary effects. The equivalence ratio oscillations could generate variations in the combustion dynamics in each cycle under some operating conditions, destabilize the flame at the entire range of the lean equivalence ratios, and increase the value of the mean equivalence ratio at the lean blowout limit. (author)

  20. Apparatus and filtering systems relating to combustors in combustion turbine engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Thomas Edward (Greer, SC); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC); Stevenson, Christian Xavier (Inman, SC)

    2012-03-27

    A combustor for a combustion turbine engine that includes: a chamber defined by an outer wall and forming a channel between windows defined through the outer wall toward a forward end of the chamber and at least one fuel injector positioned toward an aft end of the chamber; and a multilayer screen filter comprising at least two layers of screen over at least a portion of the windows and at least one layer of screen over the remaining portion of the windows. The windows include a forward end and a forward portion, and an aft end and an aft portion. The multilayer screen filter is positioned over the windows such that, in operation, a supply of compressed air entering the chamber through the windows passes through at least one layer of screen. The multilayer screen filter is configured such that the aft portion of the windows include at least two layers of screen, and the forward portion of the windows includes one less layer of screen than the aft portion of the windows.

  1. Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaufrere, Albert H. (Huntington, NY)

    1983-10-04

    A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas for further combustion in modified oil or gas fired furnaces or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion volume within the inner shell and a plenum between them through which combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

  2. Strategies to Finance Large-Scale Deployment of Renewable Energy Projects:

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarket StudiesStrategic Energy LLC Place:ResourcesAn

  3. Best Practices and Tools for Large-scale Deployment of Renewable Energy and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher Homes JumpCreekEastBuy Jump

  4. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeKitchens | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergyInformationOpen

  5. Development of SiC Large Tapered Crystal Growth | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

  6. Development of SiC Large Tapered Crystal Growth | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells0 DOE

  7. U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement; Large-Scale, Clean Fusion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE: AprilCubicProduction CapacityU.S.KeroseneEnergy

  8. Sandia Energy - Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNew CREW DatabaseNuclearScience

  9. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. Semiannual report, 1 January-30 June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walch, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  10. 2014-11-25 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment; Extension of Public Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register extension of the public comment period regarding energy conservation standards for small, large and very large air-cool commercial package air conditioning and heating equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on November 25, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  11. Public attitudes regarding large-scale solar energy development in the U.S.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlisle, Juliet E.; Kane, Stephanie L.; Solan, David; Bowman, Madelaine; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2015-08-01

    Using data collected from both a National sample as well as an oversample in U.S. Southwest, we examine public attitudes toward the construction of utility-scale solar facilities in the U.S. as well as development in one’s own county. Our multivariate analyses assess demographic and sociopsychological factors as well as context in terms of proximity of proposed project by considering the effect of predictors for respondents living in the Southwest versus those from a National sample.We find that the predictors, and impact of the predictors, related to support and opposition to solar development vary in terms of psychological and physical distance.more »Overall, for respondents living in the U.S. Southwest we find that environmentalism, belief that developers receive too many incentives, and trust in project developers to be significantly related to support and opposition to solar development, in general. When Southwest respondents consider large-scale solar development in their county, the influence of these variables changes so that property value, race, and age only yield influence. Differential effects occur for respondents of our National sample.We believe our findings to be relevant for those outside the U.S. due to the considerable growth PV solar has experienced in the last decade, especially in China, Japan, Germany, and the U.S.« less

  12. Public attitudes regarding large-scale solar energy development in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Juliet E.; Kane, Stephanie L.; Solan, David; Bowman, Madelaine; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2015-08-01

    Using data collected from both a National sample as well as an oversample in U.S. Southwest, we examine public attitudes toward the construction of utility-scale solar facilities in the U.S. as well as development in one’s own county. Our multivariate analyses assess demographic and sociopsychological factors as well as context in terms of proximity of proposed project by considering the effect of predictors for respondents living in the Southwest versus those from a National sample.We find that the predictors, and impact of the predictors, related to support and opposition to solar development vary in terms of psychological and physical distance. Overall, for respondents living in the U.S. Southwest we find that environmentalism, belief that developers receive too many incentives, and trust in project developers to be significantly related to support and opposition to solar development, in general. When Southwest respondents consider large-scale solar development in their county, the influence of these variables changes so that property value, race, and age only yield influence. Differential effects occur for respondents of our National sample.We believe our findings to be relevant for those outside the U.S. due to the considerable growth PV solar has experienced in the last decade, especially in China, Japan, Germany, and the U.S.

  13. Energy Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S. DOEEnergy StorageTricks Lead to Cost-Saving

  14. Charm production in Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Taesoo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2015-01-01

    We study charm production in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=$2.76 TeV in the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics transport approach and the charm dynamics in the partonic and hadronic medium. The charm quarks are produced through initial binary nucleon-nucleon collisions by using the PYTHIA event generator taking into account the (anti-)shadowing incorporated in the EPS09 package. The produced charm quarks interact with off-shell massive partons in the quark-gluon plasma and are hadronized into $D$ mesons through coalescence or fragmentation close to the critical energy density, and then interact with hadrons in the final hadronic stage with scattering cross sections calculated in an effective Lagrangian approach with heavy-quark spin symmetry. The PHSD results show a reasonable $R_{\\rm AA}$ and elliptic flow of $D$ mesons in comparison to the experimental data for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV from the ALICE Collaboration. We also study the effect of temperature-dependent off-shell charm q...

  15. Search for Diphoton Events with Large Missing Transverse Energy in 7 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy is presented. The data were collected with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at ?s=7??[square root of s=7] TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider ...

  16. Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) Project: Tractive Energy Analysis Methodology and Results from Long-Haul Truck Drive Cycle Evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaClair, Tim J

    2011-05-01

    This report addresses the approach that will be used in the Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) project to evaluate the fuel savings potential of various truck efficiency technologies. The methods and equations used for performing the tractive energy evaluations are presented and the calculation approach is described. Several representative results for individual duty cycle segments are presented to demonstrate the approach and the significance of this analysis for the project. The report is divided into four sections, including an initial brief overview of the LSDC project and its current status. In the second section of the report, the concepts that form the basis of the analysis are presented through a discussion of basic principles pertaining to tractive energy and the role of tractive energy in relation to other losses on the vehicle. In the third section, the approach used for the analysis is formalized and the equations used in the analysis are presented. In the fourth section, results from the analysis for a set of individual duty cycle measurements are presented and different types of drive cycles are discussed relative to the fuel savings potential that specific technologies could bring if these drive cycles were representative of the use of a given vehicle or trucking application. Additionally, the calculation of vehicle mass from measured torque and speed data is presented and the accuracy of the approach is demonstrated.

  17. Combustion characteristics of pulverized coal and air/gas premixed flame in a double swirl combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamal, M.M.

    2009-07-01

    An experimental work was performed to investigate the co-firing of pulverized coal and premixed gas/air streams in a double swirl combustor. The results showed that the NOx emissions are affected by the relative rates of thermal NOx formation and destruction via the pyrolysis of the fuel-N species in high temperature fuel-rich zones. Various burner designs were tested in order to vary the temperature history and the residence time across both coal and gas flames inside the furnace. It was found that by injecting the coal with a gas/air mixture as a combined central jet surrounded by a swirled air stream, a double flame envelope develops with high temperature fuel-rich conditions in between the two reaction zones such that the pyrolysis reactions to N{sub 2} are accelerated. A further reduction in the minimum NOx emissions, as well as in the minimum CO concentrations, was reported for the case where the coal particles are fed with the gas/air mixture in the region between the two swirled air streams. On the other hand, allocating the gas/air mixture around the swirled air-coal combustion zone provides an earlier contact with air and retards the NOx reduction mechanism in such a way that the elevated temperatures around the coal particles allow higher overall NOx emissions. The downstream impingement of opposing air jets was found more efficient than the impinging of particle non-laden premixed flames for effective NOx reduction. In both cases, there is an upstream flow from the stagnation region to the coal primary combustion region, but with the case of air impingement, the hot fuel-rich zone develops earlier. The optimum configuration was found by impinging all jets of air and coal-gas/air mixtures that pronounced minimum NOx and CO concentrations of 310 and 480ppm, respectively.

  18. Search for Z? events with large missing transverse energy in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-10-02

    We present the first search for new phenomena in Z? final states with large missing transverse energy using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.2 fb?¹ collected with the D0 experiment in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. This signature is predicted in gauge-mediated supersymmetry-breaking models, where the lightest neutralino ?˜?? is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle and is produced in pairs, possibly through decay from heavier supersymmetric particles. The ?˜?? can decay either to a Z boson or a photon and an associated gravitino that escapes detection. We exclude this model at the 95% C.L. for supersymmetry-breaking scales of ?more »TeV.« less

  19. Search for Z? events with large missing transverse energy in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-10-01

    We present the first search for new phenomena in Z? final states with large missing transverse energy using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.2 fb?¹ collected with the D0 experiment in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. This signature is predicted in gauge-mediated supersymmetry-breaking models, where the lightest neutralino ?˜?? is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle and is produced in pairs, possibly through decay from heavier supersymmetric particles. The ?˜?? can decay either to a Z boson or a photon and an associated gravitino that escapes detection. We exclude this model at the 95% C.L. for supersymmetry-breaking scales of ?<87 TeV.

  20. Addressing Energy Costs of Current Separation Processes with Advanced Materials and Large scale purification and separation processes transform low value resources into more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Addressing Energy Costs of Current Separation Processes with Advanced Materials and Processes Large scale purification and separation processes transform low value resources into more useful fuels, basic chemicals, food and clean water; however, they also consume considerable energy. With growing global