Sample records for large aperture fractures

  1. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Survey DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project summary: Drilling into large aperture open fractures (LAFs) typically yield production wells with...

  2. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3-D mapping of Large Aperture Fractures (LAF's) * Budget: 679,000 - Phase 2: Drilling - January-December, 2011. * Task 4: Stepout drilling from existing production wells....

  3. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component...

  4. OVERBURDEN PRESSURE AFFECTS FRACTURE APERTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    OVERBURDEN PRESSURE AFFECTS FRACTURE APERTURE AND FRACTURE PERMEABILITY IN A FRACTURED RESERVOIR are in integrated reservoir study, reservoir charac- terization, naturally fractured reservoirs, waterflooding in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs." His research areas include experimental analysis

  5. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fining Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  6. Large aperture optical switching devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1983-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new approach to constructing large aperture optical switches for next generation inertial confinement fusion lasers. A transparent plasma electrode formed in low pressure ionized gas acts as a conductive coating to allow the uniform charging of the optical faces of an electro-optic material. In this manner large electric fields can be applied longitudinally to large aperture, high aspect ratio Pockels cells. We propose a four-electrode geometry to create the necessary high conductivity plasma sheets, and have demonstrated fast (less than 10 nsec) switching in a 5x5 cm aperture KD*P Pockels cell with such a design. Detaid modelling of Pockels cell performance with plasma electrodes has been carried out for 15 and 30 cm aperture designs.

  7. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyde, Roderick A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  8. Application of a geocentrifuge and sterolithographically fabricated apertures to multiphase flow in complex fracture apertures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn E. McCreery; Robert D. Stedtfeld; Alan T. Stadler; Daphne L. Stoner; Paul Meakin

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geotechnical centrifuge was used to investigate unsaturated multiphase fluid flow in synthetic fracture apertures under a variety of flow conditions. The geocentrifuge subjected the fluids to centrifugal forces allowing the Bond number to be systematically changed without adjusting the fracture aperture of the fluids. The fracture models were based on the concept that surfaces generated by the fracture of brittle geomaterials have a self-affine fractal geometry. The synthetic fracture surfaces were fabricated from a transparent epoxy photopolymer using sterolithography, and fluid flow through the transparent fracture models was monitored by an optical image acquisition system. Aperture widths were chosen to be representative of the wide range of geological fractures in the vesicular basalt that lies beneath the Idaho Nation Laboratory (INL). Transitions between different flow regimes were observed as the acceleration was changed under constant flow conditions. The experiments showed the transition between straight and meandering rivulets in smooth walled apertures (aperture width = 0.508 mm), the dependence of the rivulet width on acceleration in rough walled fracture apertures (average aperture width = 0.25 mm), unstable meandering flow in rough walled apertures at high acceleration (20g) and the narrowing of the wetted region with increasing acceleration during the penetration of water into an aperture filled with wetted particles (0.875 mm diameter glass spheres).

  9. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) is aiming at the detection of the high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) in high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). WCD at high altitude offer a unique possibility of detecting low gamma fluxes in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV range. The status of the Observatory and data collected from 2007 to date will be presented.

  10. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  11. Predicting dissolution patterns in variable aperture fractures: 1. Development and evaluation of an enhanced depth-averaged computational model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detwiler, R L; Rajaram, H

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-rock interactions within variable-aperture fractures can lead to dissolution of fracture surfaces and local alteration of fracture apertures, potentially transforming the transport properties of the fracture over time. Because fractures often provide dominant pathways for subsurface flow and transport, developing models that effectively quantify the role of dissolution on changing transport properties over a range of scales is critical to understanding potential impacts of natural and anthropogenic processes. Dissolution of fracture surfaces is controlled by surface-reaction kinetics and transport of reactants and products to and from the fracture surfaces. We present development and evaluation of a depth-averaged model of fracture flow and reactive transport that explicitly calculates local dissolution-induced alterations in fracture apertures. The model incorporates an effective mass transfer relationship that implicitly represents the transition from reaction-limited dissolution to transport-limited dissolution. We evaluate the model through direct comparison to previously reported physical experiments in transparent analog fractures fabricated by mating an inert, transparent rough surface with a smooth single crystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), which allowed direct measurement of fracture aperture during dissolution experiments using well-established light transmission techniques [Detwiler, et al., 2003]. Comparison of experiments and simulations at different flow rates demonstrate the relative impact of the dimensionless Peclet and Damkohler numbers on fracture dissolution and the ability of the computational model to simulate dissolution. Despite some discrepancies in the small-scale details of dissolution patterns, the simulations predict the evolution of large-scale features quite well for the different experimental conditions. This suggests that our depth-averaged approach to simulating fracture dissolution provides a useful approach for extending laboratory results that are often limited in scale to scales that are more representative of geologic processes of interest.

  12. Multiphase Fluid Flow in Deformable Variable-Aperture Fractures - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detwiler, Russell

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures provide flow paths that can potentially lead to fast migration of fluids or contaminants. A number of energy-­?related applications involve fluid injections that significantly perturb both the pressures and chemical composition of subsurface fluids. These perturbations can cause both mechanical deformation and chemical alteration of host rocks with potential for significant changes in permeability. In fractured rock subjected to coupled chemical and mechanical stresses, it can be difficult to predict the sign of permeability changes, let alone the magnitude. This project integrated experimental and computational studies to improve mechanistic understanding of these coupled processes and develop and test predictive models and monitoring techniques. The project involved three major components: (1) study of two-­?phase flow processes involving mass transfer between phases and dissolution of minerals along fracture surfaces (Detwiler et al., 2009; Detwiler, 2010); (2) study of fracture dissolution in fractures subjected to normal stresses using experimental techniques (Ameli, et al., 2013; Elkhoury et al., 2013; Elkhoury et al., 2014) and newly developed computational models (Ameli, et al., 2014); (3) evaluation of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) as a method to detect and quantify gas leakage through a fractured caprock (Breen et al., 2012; Lochbuhler et al., 2014). The project provided support for one PhD student (Dr. Pasha Ameli; 2009-­?2013) and partially supported a post-­?doctoral scholar (Dr. Jean Elkhoury; 2010-­?2013). In addition, the project provided supplemental funding to support collaboration with Dr. Charles Carrigan at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in connection with (3) and supported one MS student (Stephen Breen; 2011-­?2013). Major results from each component of the project include the following: (1) Mineral dissolution in fractures occupied by two fluid phases (e.g., oil-­?water or water-­?CO{sub 2}) causes changes in local capillary forces and redistribution of fluids. These coupled processes enhance channel formation and the potential for development of fast flow paths through fractures. (2) Dissolution in fractures subjected to normal stress can result in behaviors ranging from development of dissolution channels and rapid permeability increases to fracture healing and significant permeability decreases. The timescales associated with advective transport of dissolved ions in the fracture, mineral dissolution rates, and diffusion within the adjacent porous matrix dictate the sign and magnitude of the resulting permeability changes. Furthermore, a high-­? resolution mechanistic model that couples elastic deformation of contacts and aperture-­?dependent dissolution rates predicts the range of observed behaviors reasonably well. (3) ERT has potential as a tool for monitoring gas leakage in deep formations. Using probabilistic inversion methods further enhances the results by providing uncertainty estimates of inverted parameters.

  13. Development of a large aperture Nb3Sn racetrack quadrupolemagnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, Paolo; Bartlett, Scott E.; Caspi, Shlomo; Dietderich,Daniel R.; Gourlay, Steven A.; Hannaford, Charles R.; Hafalia, AurelioR.; Lietzke, Alan F.; Mattafirri, Sara; McInturff, Alfred D.; Nyman,Mark; Sabbi, Gianluca

    2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP), a collaboration between BNL, FNAL, LBNL, and SLAC, has among its major objectives the development of advanced magnet technology for an LHC luminosity upgrade. The LBNL Superconducting Magnet Group supports this program with a broad effort involving design studies, Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor development, mechanical models, and basic prototypes. This paper describes the development of a large aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn racetrack quadrupole magnet using four racetrack coils from the LBNL Subscale Magnet (SM) Program. The magnet provides a gradient of 95 T/m in a 110 mm bore, with a peak field in the conductor of 11.2 T. The coils are prestressed by a mechanical structure based on a pre-tensioned aluminum shell, and axially supported with aluminum rods. The mechanical behavior has been monitored with strain gauges and the magnetic field has been measured. Results of the test are reported and analyzed.

  14. LAGOVirtual: A Collaborative Environment for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Camacho; R. Chacon; G. Diaz; C. Guada; V. Hamar; H. Hoeger; A. Melfo; L. A. Nunez; Y. Perez; C. Quintero; M. Rosales; R. Torrens; the LAGO Collaboration

    2009-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the LAGOVirtual Project: an ongoing project to develop platform to collaborate in the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO). This continental-wide observatory is devised to detect high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, by using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). This platform will allow LAGO collaboration to share data, and computer resources through its different sites. This environment has the possibility to generate synthetic data by simulating the showers through AIRES application and to store/preserve distributed data files collected by the WCD at the LAGO sites. The present article concerns the implementation of a prototype of LAGO-DR adapting DSpace, with a hierarchical structure (i.e. country, institution, followed by collections that contain the metadata and data files), for the captured/simulated data. This structure was generated by using the community, sub-community, collection, item model; available at the DSpace software. Each member institution-country of the project has the appropriate permissions on the system to publish information (descriptive metadata and associated data files). The platform can also associate multiple files to each item of data (data from the instruments, graphics, postprocessed-data, etc.).

  15. LAGOVirtual: A Collaborative Environment for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camacho, R; Diaz, G; Guada, C; Hamar, V; Hoeger, H; Melfo, A; Nunez, L A; Perez, Y; Quintero, C; Rosales, M; Torrens, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the LAGOVirtual Project: an ongoing project to develop platform to collaborate in the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO). This continental-wide observatory is devised to detect high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, by using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). This platform will allow LAGO collaboration to share data, and computer resources through its different sites. This environment has the possibility to generate synthetic data by simulating the showers through AIRES application and to store/preserve distributed data files collected by the WCD at the LAGO sites. The present article concerns the implementation of a prototype of LAGO-DR adapting DSpace, with a hierarchical structure (i.e. country, institution, followed by collections that contain the metadata and data files), for the captured/simulate...

  16. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in well siting. - Definitive well test with rig on hole. - Real time geologic, PT logging, and flowtest analysis to determine next rig move. No standby or demob cost. -...

  17. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -Significantly reduced number of dry holes, fewer wells drilled and higher per-well productivity for a given wellfield power output -Significantly reduce parasitic loads for...

  18. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440EnergyThree-Component Long-Offset

  19. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440EnergyThree-Component

  20. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County, Minnesota: EnergyFinanzas

  1. advanced technology large-aperture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) is aiming at the detection of the high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, using the single particle technique in...

  2. Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchange efficiency of open fractures: a model based on lowpass filtered apertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuville, Amélie; Schmittbuhl, Jean; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05126.x

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural open joints in rocks commonly present multi-scale self-affine apertures. This geometrical complexity affects fluid transport and heat exchange between the flow- ing fluid and the surrounding rock. In particular, long range correlations of self-affine apertures induce strong channeling of the flow which influences both mass and heat advection. A key question is to find a geometrical model of the complex aperture that describes at best the macroscopic properties (hydraulic conductivity, heat exchange) with the smallest number of parameters. Solving numerically the Stokes and heat equa- tions with a lubrication approximation, we show that a low pass filtering of the aperture geometry provides efficient estimates of the effective hydraulic and thermal properties (apertures). A detailed study of the influence of the bandwidth of the lowpass filtering on these transport properties is also performed. For instance, keeping the information of amplitude only of the largest Fourier length scales allows us to rea...

  3. Orientation Estimation for Multiple Large Fractures by Scattering Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have done the numerical modeling of seismic response to multiple sets of vertical large fractures by using finite-difference method (FD), which can easily handle media with monoclinic anisotropy. We consider three types ...

  4. Cryogenics for a 5 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid with Large Aperture at DESY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadwinkel, E.; Lierl, H.; Notz, D.; Schaffran, J.; Schoeneburg, B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg, 22607 (Germany); Herzog, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg, 22607 (Germany); Linde Kryotechnik A.G., plant operation section at DESY, Pfungen, 8422 (Switzerland)

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A large aperture superconducting solenoid-magnet with fields up to 5.25 Tesla is being set up as high field test facility at DESY. It is used to measure prototype time projection chambers foreseen as detectors for a future high energy physics collider experiment. The new cryogenic supply of this magnet within the existing HERA cryogenic helium system is described. The cryogenic control, operation and results are outlined.

  5. Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holditch, Stephen A

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extending up to three thousand feet from the producing well. Also, a model simulating a nuclear cavity was designed. This model simulated a well containing an eighty foot radius cavity with a fractured zone of one hundred times the reservoir permeability... of each system was prepared. The results of this study showed that all fractures of greater than one thousand foot radius had greater productivity and greater cumu- lative gas produced than did the nuclear cavity. It appears that large hydraulic...

  6. Design of large aperture superferric quadrupole magnets for an in-flight fragment separator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaghloul, Aziz; Kim, Dogyun; Kim, Jangyoul; Kim, Mijung; Kim, Myeongjin; Yun, Chongcheoul; Kim, Jongwon [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Superferric quadrupole magnets to be used for in-flight fragment separator have been designed. A quadrupole magnet triplet for beam focusing is placed in a cryostat together with superconducting correction coils. To maximize acceptance of rare isotope beams produced by projectile fragmentation, it is essential to use large-aperture quadrupole magnets. The pole tip radius is 17 cm in the current design, and we tried to enlarge the aperture with 3D analysis on magnetic fields. In the front end of the separator, where a target and beam dump are located, we plan to use two sets of quadrupole triplets made of high-Tc superconductor (HTS) operating at 20-50 K considering high radiation heat load. The HTS magnet will use warm iron poles. Both low-Tc and high-Tc superconductors are acquired for test winding, and two kinds of dewar and cryostat are under construction to perform the coil and magnet tests. The magnetic design of superferric quadrupole is mainly discussed.

  7. Development of a Large Aperture Nb3Sn Racetrack Quadrupole Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, Paolo; Bartlett, Scott E.; Caspi, Shlomo; Dietderich, Daniel R.; Gourlay, Steve A.; Hannaford, Charles R.; Hafalia, Aurelio R.; Lietzke, Alan F.; Mattafirri, Sara; McInturff, Alfred D.; Nyman, Mark; Sabbi, Gianluca

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP), a collaboration between BNL, FNAL, LBNL, and SLAC, has among its major objectives the development of advanced magnet technology for an LHC luminosity upgrade. The LBNL Superconducting Magnet Group supports this program with a broad effort involving design studies, Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor development, mechanical models, and basic prototypes. This paper describes the development of a large aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn racetrack quadrupole magnet using four racetrack coils from the LBNL Subscale Magnet (SM) Program. The magnet provides a gradient of 95 T/m in a 110 mm bore, with a peak field in the conductor of 11.2 T. The coils are pre-stressed by a mechanical structure based on a pre-tensioned aluminum shell, and axially supported with aluminum rods. The mechanical behavior has been monitored with strain gauges and the magnetic field has been measured. Results of the test are reported and analyzed.

  8. Operating Water Cherenkov Detectors in high altitude sites for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) are efficient detectors for detecting GRBs in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV energy range using the single particle technique, given their sensitivity to low energy secondary photons produced by high energy photons when cascading in the atmosphere. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) operates arrays of WCD in high altitude sites (above 4500 m a.s.l.) in Bolivia, Mexico and Venezuela, with planned extension to Peru. Details on the operation and stability of these WCD in remote sites with high background rates of particles will be detailed, and compared to simulations. Specific issues due to operation at high altitude, atmospheric effects and solar activity, as well as possible hardware enhancements will also be presented.

  9. Measurement of fracture aperture fields using transmitted light: An evaluation of measurement errors and their influence on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detwiler, Russell

    Scott E. Pringle and Robert J. Glass Flow Visualization and Processes Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico Abstract. Understanding of single-phase and multiphase flow and transport light transmission techniques yield quantitative measurements of aperture, solute concentration

  10. LCLS X-ray mirror measurements using a large aperture visible light interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarville, T; Soufli, R; Pivovaroff, M

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron or FEL X-ray mirrors are required to deliver an X-ray beam from its source to an experiment location, without contributing significantly to wave front distortion. Accurate mirror figure measurements are required prior to installation to meet this intent. This paper describes how a 300 mm aperture phasing interferometer was calibrated to <1 nm absolute accuracy and used to mount and measure 450 mm long flats for the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Measuring focus mirrors with an interferometer requires additional calibration, because high fringe density introduces systematic errors from the interferometer's imaging optics. This paper describes how these errors can be measured and corrected. The calibration approaches described here apply equally well to interferometers larger than 300 mm aperture, which are becoming more common in optics laboratories. The objective of this effort was to install LCLS flats with < 10 nm of spherical curvature, and < 2 nm rms a-sphere. The objective was met by measuring the mirrors after fabrication, coating and mounting, using a 300 mm aperture phasing interferometer calibrated to an accuracy < 1 nm. The key to calibrating the interferometer accurately was to sample the error using independent geometries that are available. The results of those measurements helped identify and reduce calibration error sources. The approach used to measure flats applies equally well to focus mirrors, provided an additional calibration is performed to measure the error introduced by fringe density. This calibration has been performed on the 300 mm aperture interferometer, and the measurement correction was evaluated for a typical focus mirror. The 300 mm aperture limitation requires stitching figure measurements together for many X-ray mirrors of interest, introducing another possible error source. Stitching is eliminated by applying the calibrations described above to larger aperture instruments. The authors are presently extending this work to a 600 mm instrument. Instruments with 900 mm aperture are now becoming available, which would accommodate the largest mirrors of interest.

  11. Edit paper Methods for Large Scale Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ely, Gregory

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we propose computationally efficient and robust methods for estimating the moment tensor and location of micro-seismic event(s) for large search volumes. Our contribution is two-fold. First, we propose a novel joint-complexity measure, namely the sum of nuclear norms which while imposing sparsity on the number of fractures (locations) over a large spatial volume, also captures the rank-1 nature of the induced wavefield pattern. This wavefield pattern is modeled as the outer-product of the source signature with the amplitude pattern across the receivers from a seismic source. A rank-1 factorization of the estimated wavefield pattern at each location can therefore be used to estimate the seismic moment tensor using the knowledge of the array geometry. In contrast to existing work this approach allows us to drop any other assumption on the source signature. Second, we exploit the recently proposed first-order incremental projection algorithms for a fast and efficient implementation of the resulting...

  12. In-situ monitoring of surface post-processing in large aperture fused silica optics with Optical Coherence Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, G M; Bass, I l; Hackel, R P; Mailhiot, C; Demos, S G

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical Coherence Tomography is explored as a method to image laser-damage sites located on the surface of large aperture fused silica optics during post-processing via CO{sub 2} laser ablation. The signal analysis for image acquisition was adapted to meet the sensitivity requirements for this application. A long-working distance geometry was employed to allow imaging through the opposite surface of the 5-cm thick optic. The experimental results demonstrate the potential of OCT for remote monitoring of transparent material processing applications.

  13. Abstract--We have recently completed a large-area, coded-aperture, gamma-ray imager for use in searching for radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Berthold K.P.

    sufficient radiation can reach a large gamma-ray detec- tor from a small source to make detection possibleAbstract-- We have recently completed a large-area, coded- aperture, gamma-ray imager for use. Results of first measurements obtained with the system are presented. I. INTRODUCTION emote detection

  14. Three dimensional geologic modeling of a fractured reservoir, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T.; Grover, G.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geological assessment of a large carbonate reservoir in Saudi Arabia shows that it is a Type 2 fractured reservoir in which fractures provide the essential permeability. Intercrystalline microporosity, found within the basinally deposited mudstones and wackestones, is the dominant porosity type. Near-vertical, east-west-oriented extension fractures are preferentially localized in low-to-moderate porosities associated with stylolites. Porosity/fracture density relationships, combined with the results of structural curvature mapping, yielded a 3-dimensional model of fracture density. Fracture permeability and fracture porosity distributions were generated by integrating fracture density modeling results with average fracture aperture information derived from well test data. Dramatic differences exist between matrix- and fracture-related porosity, permeability models that help explain observed production behavior within the field. These models are being used by reservoir and simulation engineers for daily reservoir management, history matching, and long-term development drilling planning.

  15. Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

  16. NESC-VII: Fracture Mechanics Analyses of WPS Experiments on Large-scale Cruciform Specimen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes numerical analyses performed to simulate warm pre-stress (WPS) experiments conducted with large-scale cruciform specimens within the Network for Evaluation of Structural Components (NESC-VII) project. NESC-VII is a European cooperative action in support of WPS application in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity assessment. The project aims in evaluation of the influence of WPS when assessing the structural integrity of RPVs. Advanced fracture mechanics models will be developed and performed to validate experiments concerning the effect of different WPS scenarios on RPV components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA contributes to the Work Package-2 (Analyses of WPS experiments) within the NESCVII network. A series of WPS type experiments on large-scale cruciform specimens have been conducted at CEA Saclay, France, within the framework of NESC VII project. This paper first describes NESC-VII feasibility test analyses conducted at ORNL. Very good agreement was achieved between AREVA NP SAS and ORNL. Further analyses were conducted to evaluate the NESC-VII WPS tests conducted under Load-Cool-Transient- Fracture (LCTF) and Load-Cool-Fracture (LCF) conditions. This objective of this work is to provide a definitive quantification of WPS effects when assessing the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels. This information will be utilized to further validate, refine, and improve the WPS models that are being used in probabilistic fracture mechanics computer codes now in use by the NRC staff in their effort to develop risk-informed updates to Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G.

  17. Solar Central Receiver with an Irising Aperture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galal, T.; Kulaib, A. M.; Abuzaid, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . If the aperture is small, it will be inefficient for periods when the solar isolation is inclined due to spillage. However, if the aperture is large, it will be inefficient for periods when the solar isolation is normal, due to excess heat radiation and convection...

  18. Solar Central Receiver with an Irising Aperture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galal, T.; Kulaib, A. M.; Abuzaid, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . If the aperture is small, it will be inefficient for periods when the solar isolation is inclined due to spillage. However, if the aperture is large, it will be inefficient for periods when the solar isolation is normal, due to excess heat radiation and convection...

  19. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, C.E.; Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains 40 papers that were presented at the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at the Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the week of October 26--29, 1992. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe recent large-scale fracture (brittle and/or ductile) experiments, analyses of these experiments, and comparisons between predictions and experimental results. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to examine the fracture behavior of various materials and structures under conditions relevant to nuclear reactor components and operating environments. The emphasis was on the ability of various fracture models and analysis methods to predict the wide range of experimental data now available. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  20. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions And Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detwiler, Russell

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix diffusion and adsorption within a rock matrix are widely regarded as important mechanisms for retarding the transport of radionuclides and other solutes in fractured rock (e.g., Neretnieks, 1980; Tang et al., 1981; Maloszewski and Zuber, 1985; Novakowski and Lapcevic, 1994; Jardine et al., 1999; Zhou and Xie, 2003; Reimus et al., 2003a,b). When remediation options are being evaluated for old sources of contamination, where a large fraction of contaminants reside within the rock matrix, slow diffusion out of the matrix greatly increases the difficulty and timeframe of remediation. Estimating the rates of solute exchange between fractures and the adjacent rock matrix is a critical factor in quantifying immobilization and/or remobilization of DOE-relevant contaminants within the subsurface. In principle, the most rigorous approach to modeling solute transport with fracture-matrix interaction would be based on local-scale coupled advection-diffusion/dispersion equations for the rock matrix and in discrete fractures that comprise the fracture network (Discrete Fracture Network and Matrix approach, hereinafter referred to as DFNM approach), fully resolving aperture variability in fractures and matrix property heterogeneity. However, such approaches are computationally demanding, and thus, many predictive models rely upon simplified models. These models typically idealize fracture rock masses as a single fracture or system of parallel fractures interacting with slabs of porous matrix or as a mobile-immobile or multi-rate mass transfer system. These idealizations provide tractable approaches for interpreting tracer tests and predicting contaminant mobility, but rely upon a fitted effective matrix diffusivity or mass-transfer coefficients. However, because these fitted parameters are based upon simplified conceptual models, their effectiveness at predicting long-term transport processes remains uncertain. Evidence of scale dependence of effective matrix diffusion coefficients obtained from tracer tests highlights this point and suggests that the underlying mechanisms and relationship between rock and fracture properties are not fully understood in large complex fracture networks. In this project, we developed a high-resolution DFN model of solute transport in fracture networks to explore and quantify the mechanisms that control transport in complex fracture networks and how these may give rise to observed scale-dependent matrix diffusion coefficients. Results demonstrate that small scale heterogeneity in the flow field caused by local aperture variability within individual fractures can lead to long-tailed breakthrough curves indicative of matrix diffusion, even in the absence of interactions with the fracture matrix. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial scale dependence of these processes highlights the inability of short-term tracer tests to estimate transport parameters that will control long-term fate and transport of contaminants in fractured aquifers.

  1. Rotating Aperture System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rusnak, Brian (Livermore, CA); Hall, James M. (Livermore, CA); Shen, Stewart (Danville, CA); Wood, Richard L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  2. Fracture Propagation and Permeability Change under Poro-thermoelastic Loads & Silica Reactivity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Therefore, knowledge of the conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fractures are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result, it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have developed advanced poro-thermo-chemo-mechanical fracture models for rock fracture research in support of EGS design. The fracture propagation models are based on a regular displacement discontinuity formulation. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two-dimensional solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate the impact of pro-thermo-chemical processes on fracture permeability and reservoir pressure. Fracture permeability variation is studied using a coupled thermo-chemical model with quartz reaction kinetics. The model is applied to study quartz precipitation/dissolution, as well as the variation in fracture aperture and pressure. Also, a three-dimensional model of injection/extraction has been developed to consider the impact poro- and thermoelastic stresses on fracture slip and injection pressure. These investigations shed light on the processes involved in the observed phenomenon of injection pressure variation (e.g., in Coso), and allow the assessment of the potential of thermal and chemical stimulation strategies.

  3. Variable-aperture screen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Savage, G.M.

    1991-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is described for separating material into first and second portions according to size including a plurality of shafts, a plurality of spaced disks radiating outwardly from each of the shafts to define apertures and linkage interconnecting the shafts for moving the shafts toward or away from one another to vary the size of the apertures while the apparatus is performing the separating function. 10 figures.

  4. Simulating infiltration tests in fractured basalt at the Box Canyon Site, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unger, Andre J.A.; Faybishenko, Boris; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Simmons, Ardyth M.

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a series of ponded infiltration tests in variably saturated fractured basalt at Box Canyon, Idaho, were used to build confidence in conceptual and numerical modeling approaches used to simulate infiltration in fractured rock. Specifically, we constructed a dual-permeability model using TOUGH2 to represent both the matrix and fracture continua of the upper basalt flow at the Box Canyon site. A consistent set of hydrogeological parameters was obtained by calibrating the model to infiltration front arrival times in the fracture continuum as inferred from bromide samples collected from fracture/borehole intersections observed during the infiltrating tests. These parameters included the permeability of the fracture and matrix continua, the interfacial area between the fracture and matrix continua, and the porosity of the fracture continuum. To calibrate the model, we multiplied the fracture-matrix interfacial area by a factor between 0.1 and 0.01 to reduce imbibition of water from the fracture continuum into the matrix continuum during the infiltration tests. Furthermore, the porosity of the fracture continuum, as calculated using the fracture aperture inferred from pneumatic-test permeabilities, was increased by a factor of 50 yielding porosity values for the upper basalt flow in the range of 0.01 to 0.02. The fracture-continuum porosity was a highly sensitive parameter controlling the arrival times of the simulated infiltration fronts. Porosity values are consistent with those determined during the Large-Scale Aquifer Pumping and Infiltration Test at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

  5. Scales Depencence of Fracture Density and Fabric in the Damage Zone of a Large Displacement Continental Transform Fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayyildiz, Muhammed

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    ). . ......... 48 Figure 6. Representative map of transgranular fractures for one petrographic thin section (P1B13-1-2T). (a) Transgranular fractures are shown on top of the plane polarized image (PPL) of the thin section. (b) Cross polarized...

  6. Multi-scale approach to invasion percolation of rock fracture networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali N. Ebrahimi; Falk K. Wittel; Nuno A. M. Araújo; Hans J. Herrmann

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-scale scheme for the invasion percolation of rock fracture networks with heterogeneous fracture aperture fields is proposed. Inside fractures, fluid transport is calculated on the finest scale and found to be localized in channels as a consequence of the aperture field. The channel network is characterized and reduced to a vectorized artificial channel network (ACN). Different realizations of ACNs are used to systematically calculate efficient apertures for fluid transport inside differently sized fractures as well as fracture intersection and entry properties. Typical situations in fracture networks are parameterized by fracture inclination, flow path length along the fracture and intersection lengths in the entrance and outlet zones of fractures. Using these scaling relations obtained from the finer scales, we simulate the invasion process of immiscible fluids into saturated discrete fracture networks, which were studied in previous works.

  7. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.

  8. Aperture center energy showcase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in a sustainable community. A project under that CRADA, Aperture Center Energy Showcase, offers a means to develop exhibits and demonstrations that present feedback to community members, Sandia customers, and visitors. The technologies included in the showcase focus on renewable energy and its efficiency, and resilience. These technologies are generally scalable, and provide secure, efficient solutions to energy production, delivery, and usage. In addition to establishing an Energy Showcase, support offices and conference capabilities that facilitate research, collaboration, and demonstration were created. The Aperture Center project focuses on establishing a location that provides outreach, awareness, and demonstration of research findings, emerging technologies, and project developments to Sandia customers, visitors, and Mesa del Sol community members.

  9. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  10. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajaram, Harihar [University of Colorado, Boulder; Brutz, Michael [University of Colorado, Boulder; Klein, Dylan R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Mallikamas, Wasin [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix Diffusion and Adsorption within a rock matrix are important mechanisms for retarding transport of radionuclides in fractured rock. Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often modeled using simplified conceptual representations. There is significant uncertainty in “effective” parameters used in these models, such as the “effective matrix diffusivity”. Often, these parameters are estimated by fitting sparse breakthrough data, and estimated values fall outside meaningful ranges, because simplified interpretive models do not consider complex three-dimensional flow. There is limited understanding of the relationship between the effective parameters and rock mass characteristics including network structure and matrix properties. There is also evidence for an apparent scale-dependence in “effective matrix diffusion” coefficients. These observations raise questions on whether fracture-matrix interaction parameters estimated from small-scale tracer tests can be used for predicting radionuclide fate and transport at the scale of DOE field sites. High-resolution three-dimensional Discrete-Fracture-Network-Matrix (DFNM) models based on well-defined local scale transport equations can help to address some of these questions. Due to tremendous advances in computational technology over the last 10 years, DFNM modeling in relatively large domains is now feasible. The overarching objective of our research is to use DFNM modeling to improve fundamental understanding of how effective parameters in conceptual models are related to fracture network structure and matrix properties. An advanced three-dimensional DFNM model is being developed, which combines upscaled particle-tracking algorithms for fracture-matrix interaction and a parallel fracture-network flow simulator. The particle-tracking algorithms allow complexity in flow fields at different scales, and track transport across fracture-matrix interfaces based on rigorous local approximations to the transport equations. This modeling approach can incorporate aperture variability, multi-scale preferential flow and matrix heterogeneity. We developed efficient particle-tracking methods for handling matrix diffusion and adsorption on fracture walls and demonstrated their efficiency for use within the context of large-scale complex fracture network models with variability in apertures across a network of fractures and within individual fractures.

  11. Project Profile: Improved Large Aperture Collector Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    feasibility demonstrations focused in three main areas: an aggressive manufacturing optimization of the collector sub-structures for lower input material costs & mechanized...

  12. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  13. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel ternary segmentation method was devised to handle the degraded zones, allowing for a bounding analysis of the effects on hydraulic properties. We found that the degraded zones account for less than 15% of the fracture volume, but cover 70% to 80% of the fracture surface. When the degraded zones are treated as part of the fracture, the fracture transmissivities are two to four times larger because the fracture surfaces after reaction are not as rough as they would be if one considers the degraded zone as part of the rock. Therefore, while degraded zones created during geochemical reactions may not significantly increase mechanical aperture, this type of feature cannot be ignored and should be treated with prudence when predicting fracture hydrodynamic properties.

  14. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  15. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  16. Analysis of the classical pseudo-3D model for hydraulic fracture with equilibrium height growth across stress barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Analysis of the classical pseudo-3D model for hydraulic fracture with equilibrium height growth t This paper deals with the so-called ``pseudo three-dimensional'' (P3D) model for a hydraulic fracture of the length, height, and aperture of the hydraulic fracture, in contrast to the numerical formulations adopted

  17. "Taking a break" from bisphosphonates: Is it appropriate? http://ryortho.com/largeJoints.php?news=741_Bisphosphonates-and-Unusual-Femur-Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    INFORMATION I. Epidemiology1-2 a. 10 million Americans have osteoporosis b. 33.6 million have low bone density of the hip c. 1 out of 2 Caucasian women and 1 out of 5 Caucasian men will experience an osteoporosis-related fracture d. Majority of fractures occur in low bone mass rather than osteoporosis e. More than 4 million

  18. Hydraulic Fracturing (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont prohibits hydraulic fracturing or the collection, storage, or treatment of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing

  19. WFPC2 aperture photometry and PSF modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. R. Tanvir; D. R. T. Robinson; T. von Hippel

    1995-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the WFPC-2 undersamples the PSF, aperture photometry can produce results which are competetive with profile fitting in many situations. This article reports and investigation of aperture corrections using both real data and PSF models.

  20. Aperture-Tolerant, Chemical-Based Methods to Reduce Channeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Seright

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004, through May 16, 2007, for the project, 'Aperture-Tolerant, Chemical-Based Methods to Reduce Channeling'. We explored the potential of pore-filling gels for reducing excess water production from both fractured and unfractured production wells. Several gel formulations were identified that met the requirements--i.e., providing water residual resistance factors greater than 2,000 and ultimate oil residual resistance factors (F{sub rro}) of 2 or less. Significant oil throughput was required to achieve low F{sub rro} values, suggesting that gelant penetration into porous rock must be small (a few feet or less) for existing pore-filling gels to provide effective disproportionate permeability reduction. Compared with adsorbed polymers and weak gels, strong pore-filling gels can provide greater reliability and behavior that is insensitive to the initial rock permeability. Guidance is provided on where relative-permeability-modification/disproportionate-permeability-reduction treatments can be successfully applied for use in either oil or gas production wells. When properly designed and executed, these treatments can be successfully applied to a limited range of oilfield excessive-water-production problems. We examined whether gel rheology can explain behavior during extrusion through fractures. The rheology behavior of the gels tested showed a strong parallel to the results obtained from previous gel extrusion experiments. However, for a given aperture (fracture width or plate-plate separation), the pressure gradients measured during the gel extrusion experiments were much higher than anticipated from rheology measurements. Extensive experiments established that wall slip and first normal stress difference were not responsible for the pressure gradient discrepancy. To explain the discrepancy, we noted that the aperture for gel flow (for mobile gel wormholing through concentrated immobile gel within the fracture) was much narrower than the width of the fracture. The potential of various approaches were investigated for improving sweep in parts of the Daqing Oil Field that have been EOR targets. Possibilities included (1) gel treatments that are directed at channeling through fractures, (2) colloidal dispersion gels, (3) reduced polymer degradation, (4) more viscous polymer solutions, and (5) foams and other methods. Fractures were present in a number of Daqing wells (both injectors and producers). Because the fractures were narrow far from the wellbore, severe channeling did not occur. On the contrary, fractures near the wellbore aided reservoir sweep. In the February 2006 issue of the Journal of Petroleum Technology, a 'Distinguished-Author-Series' paper claimed that a process using aqueous colloidal dispersion gels (CDG gels) performed superior to polymer flooding. Unfortunately, this claim is misleading and generally incorrect. Colloidal dispersion gels, in their present state of technological development, should not be advocated as an improvement to, or substitute for, polymer flooding.

  1. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  2. Infiltration and Seepage Through Fractured Welded Tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Ghezzehei; P.F. Dobson; J.A. Rodriguez; P.J. Cook

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nopal I mine in Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico, contains a uranium ore deposit within fractured tuff. Previous mining activities exposed a level ground surface 8 m above an excavated mining adit. In this paper, we report results of ongoing research to understand and model percolation through the fractured tuff and seepage into a mined adit both of which are important processes for the performance of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Travel of water plumes was modeled using one-dimensional numerical and analytical approaches. Most of the hydrologic properly estimates were calculated from mean fracture apertures and fracture density. Based on the modeling results, we presented constraints for the arrival time and temporal pattern of seepage at the adit.

  3. Efficient Geomechanical Simulations of Large-Scale Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Using the Fast Multipole-Displacement Discontinuity Method (FM-DDM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verde Salas, Alexander José

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    multipole and local expansions. However, in spite of its immediately apparent application in the geomechanic context, FMM has been limited to only certain fracture problems because those analytical expansions are only available for selected fundamental...

  4. Effect of non-linear loading paths on sheet metal fracture : large strain in-plane compression followed by uniaxial tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcadet, Stephane (Stephane Jean Marie)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced high strength steel sheets are rapidly entering the transport industry, as their high strength to weight ratio helps improving fuel and costs efficiency. The early ductile fracture of these materials limits their ...

  5. Journal of Glaciology, Vol. 58, No. 207, 2012 doi: 10.3189/2012JoG11J191 165 Fracture field for large-scale ice dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levermann, Anders

    at the lateral shelf margins due to the lack of basal traction. Fractures affect this stress balance divergence or convergence of the ice flow (Hughes, 1977, 1983) or due to the buckling and shearing close

  6. Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The trend toward production of hydrocarbons from unconventional reservoirs (tight gas, shale oilgas) has caused a large increase in the use of hydraulic fracture stimulation of...

  7. Development of RWHet to Simulate Contaminant Transport in Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yong; LaBolle, Eric; Reeves, Donald M; Russell, Charles

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate simulation of matrix diffusion in regional-scale dual-porosity and dual-permeability media is a critical issue for the DOE Underground Test Area (UGTA) program, given the prevalence of fractured geologic media on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Contaminant transport through regional-scale fractured media is typically quantified by particle-tracking based Lagrangian solvers through the inclusion of dual-domain mass transfer algorithms that probabilistically determine particle transfer between fractures and unfractured matrix blocks. UGTA applications include a wide variety of fracture aperture and spacing, effective diffusion coefficients ranging four orders of magnitude, and extreme end member retardation values. This report incorporates the current dual-domain mass transfer algorithms into the well-known particle tracking code RWHet [LaBolle, 2006], and then tests and evaluates the updated code. We also develop and test a direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach to replace the classical transfer probability method in characterizing particle dynamics across the fracture/matrix interface. The final goal of this work is to implement the algorithm identified as most efficient and effective into RWHet, so that an accurate and computationally efficient software suite can be built for dual-porosity/dual-permeability applications. RWHet is a mature Lagrangian transport simulator with a substantial user-base that has undergone significant development and model validation. In this report, we also substantially tested the capability of RWHet in simulating passive and reactive tracer transport through regional-scale, heterogeneous media. Four dual-domain mass transfer methodologies were considered in this work. We first developed the empirical transfer probability approach proposed by Liu et al. [2000], and coded it into RWHet. The particle transfer probability from one continuum to the other is proportional to the ratio of the mass entering the other continuum to the mass in the current continuum. Numerical examples show that this method is limited to certain ranges of parameters, due to an intrinsic assumption of an equilibrium concentration profile in the matrix blocks in building the transfer probability. Subsequently, this method fails in describing mass transfer for parameter combinations that violate this assumption, including small diffusion coefficients (i.e., the free-water molecular diffusion coefficient 1×10-11 meter2/second), relatively large fracture spacings (such as meter), and/or relatively large matrix retardation coefficients (i.e., ). These “outliers” in parameter range are common in UGTA applications. To address the above limitations, we then developed a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS)-Reflective method. The novel DNS-Reflective method can directly track the particle dynamics across the fracture/matrix interface using a random walk, without any empirical assumptions. This advantage should make the DNS-Reflective method feasible for a wide range of parameters. Numerical tests of the DNS-Reflective, however, show that the method is computationally very demanding, since the time step must be very small to resolve particle transfer between fractures and matrix blocks. To improve the computational efficiency of the DNS approach, we then adopted Roubinet et al.’s method [2009], which uses first passage time distributions to simulate dual-domain mass transfer. The DNS-Roubinet method was found to be computationally more efficient than the DNS-Reflective method. It matches the analytical solution for the whole range of major parameters (including diffusion coefficient and fracture aperture values that are considered “outliers” for Liu et al.’s transfer probability method [2000]) for a single fracture system. The DNS-Roubinet method, however, has its own disadvantage: for a parallel fracture system, the truncation of the first passage time distribution creates apparent errors when the fracture spacing is small, and thus it tends to erroneously predict breakthrough curves (BTCs) for th

  8. Statistical analysis of liquid seepage in partially saturated heterogeneous fracture systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liou, T.S.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field evidence suggests that water flow in unsaturated fracture systems may occur along fast preferential flow paths. However, conventional macroscale continuum approaches generally predict the downward migration of water as a spatially uniform wetting front subjected to strong inhibition into the partially saturated rock matrix. One possible cause of this discrepancy may be the spatially random geometry of the fracture surfaces, and hence, the irregular fracture aperture. Therefore, a numerical model was developed in this study to investigate the effects of geometric features of natural rock fractures on liquid seepage and solute transport in 2-D planar fractures under isothermal, partially saturated conditions. The fractures were conceptualized as 2-D heterogeneous porous media that are characterized by their spatially correlated permeability fields. A statistical simulator, which uses a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, was employed to generate synthetic permeability fields. Hypothesized geometric features that are expected to be relevant for seepage behavior, such as spatially correlated asperity contacts, were considered in the SA algorithm. Most importantly, a new perturbation mechanism for SA was developed in order to consider specifically the spatial correlation near conditioning asperity contacts. Numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport were then performed in these synthetic fractures by the flow simulator TOUGH2, assuming that the effects of matrix permeability, gas phase pressure, capillary/permeability hysteresis, and molecular diffusion can be neglected. Results of flow simulation showed that liquid seepage in partially saturated fractures is characterized by localized preferential flow, along with bypassing, funneling, and localized ponding. Seepage pattern is dominated by the fraction of asperity contracts, and their shape, size, and spatial correlation. However, the correlation structure of permeability field is less important than the spatial correlation of asperity contacts. A faster breakthrough was observed in fractures subjected to higher normal stress, accompanied with a nonlinearly decreasing trend of the effective permeability. Interestingly, seepage dispersion is generally higher in fractures with intermediate fraction of asperity contacts; but it is lower for small or large fractions of asperity contacts. However, it may become higher if the ponding becomes significant. Transport simulations indicate that tracers bypass dead-end pores and travel along flow paths that have less flow resistance. Accordingly, tracer breakthrough curves generally show more spreading than breakthrough curves for water. Further analyses suggest that the log-normal time model generally fails to fit the breakthrough curves for water, but it is a good approximation for breakthrough curves for the tracer.

  9. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During this reporting period, research was continued on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. This report proposed a model to relate the seismic response to production data to determine crack spacing and aperture, provided details of tests of proposed models to obtain fracture properties from conventional well logs with actual field data, and verification of the naturally fractured reservoir simulator developed in this project.

  10. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  11. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rumpf, Arthur N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Interaction Between Hydraulic Fractures and Natural Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Wenxu

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing of a naturally-fractured reservoir is a challenge for industry, as fractures can have complex growth patterns when propagating in systems of natural fractures in the reservoir. Fracture propagation near a natural fracture (NF...

  13. Borehole deviation surveys are necessary for hydraulic fracture monitoring Leo Eisner, Schlumberger Cambridge Research, Petr Bulant, Charles University in Prague, Jol H. Le Calvez*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Borehole deviation surveys are necessary for hydraulic fracture monitoring Leo Eisner, Schlumberger Not performing accurate borehole deviation surveys for hydraulic fracture monitoring (HFM) and neglecting fracture parameters. Introduction Recently a large number of hydraulic fracture treatments have been

  14. Model for Fracturing Fluid Flowback and Characterization of Flowback Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Bo

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A large volume of fracturing fluid that may include slick water and various sorts of additives is injected into shale formations along with proppant to create hydraulic fractures which define a stimulated shale volume a shale gas well will actually...

  15. Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints near an injection well have potential to divert a large percentage of an injected CO{sub 2} stream away from a target coal seam. However, the strata-bound nature of Pottsville fracture systems is a natural factor that mitigates the risk of long-range leakage and surface seepage. Flow models indicate that cross-formational flow in strata-bound joint networks is low and is dissipated by about an order of magnitude at each successive bedding contact. These models help confirm that strata-bound joint networks are self-compartmentalizing and that the thick successions of interbedded shale and sandstone separating the Pottsville coal zones are confining units that protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. DFN models are powerful tools for the simulation and analysis of fracture networks and can play an important role in the assessment of risks associated with carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Importantly, the stochastic nature DFN models dictates that they cannot be used to precisely reproduce reservoir conditions in a specific field area. Rather, these models are most useful for simulating the fundamental geometric and statistical properties of fracture networks. Because the specifics of fracture architecture in a given area can be uncertain, multiple realizations of DFN models and DFN-based flow models can help define variability that may be encountered during field operations. Using this type of approach, modelers can inform the risk assessment process by characterizing the types and variability of fracture architecture that may exist in geologic carbon sinks containing natural fractures.

  16. Large

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLand and AssetLandscapingLarge

  17. Prediction of effects of hydraulic fracturing using reservoir and well flow simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mineyuki Hanano; Tayuki Kondo

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a method to predict and evaluate effects of hydraulic fracturing jobs by using reservoir and well flow numerical simulation. The concept of the method i5 that steam production rate at the operating well head pressure is predicted with different fracture conditions which would be attained by the hydraulic fracturing jobs. Then, the effects of the hydraulic fracturing is evaluated by comparing the predicted steam production rate and that before the hydraulic fracturing. This course of analysis will suggest how large fracture should be created by the fracturing job to attain large enough increase in steam production at the operating condition and the best scheme of the hydraulic fracturing job.

  18. Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yannan

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

  19. Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yannan

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

  20. Finite Conductivity Fractures in Elliptical Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    TO THE DEPARTMENT OF PETROLEUM ENGINEERING AND THE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE STUDIES OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL well performance. Indeed, a large number of wells, which could not otherwise be operated economically, it is important that means be available to evaluate fracture effectiveness. The most widely used tool in fracture

  1. Fracture Properties From Seismic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Daniel R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures scatter seismic energy and this energy can be analyzed to provide information about fracture

  2. Seismic characterization of fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JM Carcione

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic characterization of fractures. José M. Carcione, OGS, Italy. Fractured geological formations are generally represented with a stress-strain relation.

  3. Spatial statistics for predicting flow through a rock fracture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coakley, K.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid flow through a single rock fracture depends on the shape of the space between the upper and lower pieces of rock which define the fracture. In this thesis, the normalized flow through a fracture, i.e. the equivalent permeability of a fracture, is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids, i.e. open spaces, and contact areas within the fracture. Patterns of voids and contact areas, with complexity typical of experimental data, are simulated by clipping a correlated Gaussian process defined on a N by N pixel square region. The voids have constant aperture; the distance between the upper and lower surfaces which define the fracture is either zero or a constant. Local flow is assumed to be proportional to local aperture cubed times local pressure gradient. The flow through a pattern of voids and contact areas is solved using a finite-difference method. After solving for the flow through simulated 10 by 10 by 30 pixel patterns of voids and contact areas, a model to predict equivalent permeability is developed. The first model is for patterns with 80% voids where all voids have the same aperture. The equivalent permeability of a pattern is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids and contact areas within the pattern. Four spatial statistics are examined. The change point statistic measures how often adjacent pixel alternate from void to contact area (or vice versa ) in the rows of the patterns which are parallel to the overall flow direction. 37 refs., 66 figs., 41 tabs.

  4. New results from the LASS (Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; D'Amore, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Endorf, R.; Fujii, K.; Hayashii, H.; Iwata, S.

    1987-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New results are presented from analyses of several mesonic and baryonic states containing one or more strange quarks. The data are taken from a high statistics (4 events/nb) study of K p interactions at 11 GeV/c carried out in the LASS Spectrometer at SLAC. New information is reported on the underlying K* states and also evidence for selective coupling of K eta to the K*'s; on the strangeonium members of the axial vector nonets in the K anti K channel; and on evidence for an * state.

  5. Operations and Maintenance Manual for Large Aperture Scanner System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Anthony M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance manual includes detailed instructions for system assembly, use, and maintenance.

  6. Fracture-Flow-Enhanced Solute Diffusion into Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Ye, Ming; Sudicky, E.A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Society of Petroleumresources from fractured reservoirs (e.g. , Warren and Root,Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2008 SGP-TR-185 FRACTURE-FLOW-ENHANCED SOLUTE DIFFUSION INTO FRACTURED

  7. Optimal Maneuvers for Distributed Aperture Imaging Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitch, Danielle

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to the wave vectors (locations in the so-called u-v plane) that are proportional to the relative positions of the apertures. Imaging to specified resolution demands measurement of the Fourier components with adequate signal-to-noise ratio over the interior...

  8. Characterizing fractured rock for fluid-flow, geomechanical, and paleostress modeling: Methods and preliminary results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C.C.; Larsen, E.; Page, W.R.; Howard, T.M.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures have been characterized for fluid-flow, geomechanical, and paleostress modeling at three localities in the vicinity of drill hole USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada. A method for fracture characterization is introduced that integrates mapping fracture-trace networks and quantifying eight fracture parameters: trace length, orientation, connectivity, aperture, roughness, shear offset, trace-length density, and mineralization. A complex network of fractures was exposed on three 214- to 260-m 2 pavements cleared of debris in the upper lithophysal unit of the Tiva Canyon Member of the Miocene Paint-brush Tuff. The pavements are two-dimensional sections through the three-dimensional network of strata-bound fractures. All fractures with trace lengths greater than 0.2 m were mapped and studied.

  9. Recent advances in hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidley, J.L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a reference to the application of significant technological advances in hydraulic fracturing. It features illustrative problems to demonstrate specific applications of advanced technologies. Chapters examine pretreatment formation evaluation, rock mechanics and fracture geometry, 2D and 3D fracture-propagation models, propping agents and fracture conductivity, fracturing fluids and additives, fluid leakoff, flow behavior, proppant transport, treatment design, well completions, field implementation, fracturing-pressure analysis, postfracture formation evaluation, fracture azimuth and geometry determination, and economics of fracturing.

  10. Analysis of transverse apertures in a circular waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastham, Gary Bryan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a transverse aperture will be extremely useful in the design of coupled cavity resonators and circular cavity backed resonant aperture antennas. B. l. iterature Review Many authors have investigated the effects of apertures in both the transverse... 1989 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ANALYSIS OF TRANSVERSE APERTURES IN A CIRCULAR WAVEGUIDE A Thesis GARY BRYAN EASTHAM Approved as to style and content by: Kai Chang (Chair of Committee) Brian D. Young (Member) Donal L. Parker...

  11. High velocity impact fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teng, Xiaoqing

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-depth understanding of dynamic ductile fracture is one of the most important steps to improve the survivability of critical structures such as the lost Twin Towers. In the present thesis, the macroscopic fracture ...

  12. Vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection from laser-irradiated target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Robert F. (Los Alamos, NM); Mitchell, Kenneth B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to a vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection of a laser-irradiated target. Within a vacuum chamber are disposed a beam focusing element, a disc having an aperture and a recollimating element. The edge of the focused beam impinges on the edge of the aperture to produce a plasma which refracts any retroreflected light from the laser's target.

  13. Parallel optical nanolithography using nanoscale bowtie aperture array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Parallel optical nanolithography using nanoscale bowtie aperture array Sreemanth M.V. Uppuluri of parallel optical nanolithography using nanoscale bowtie aperture array. These nanoscale bowtie aperture1805 photoresist. An interference-based optical alignment system was employed to position the bowtie

  14. Optical nanolithography with k/15 resolution using bowtie aperture array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Optical nanolithography with k/15 resolution using bowtie aperture array Xiaolei Wen · Luis M nanolithography using bowtie apertures with the help of the interferometric- spatial-phase-imaging (ISPI) technique. The ISPI system can detect and control the distance between the bowtie aperture, and photoresist

  15. Extraordinary infrared transmission through a periodic bowtie aperture array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Extraordinary infrared transmission through a periodic bowtie aperture array Edward C. Kinzel to surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonances and/or Rayleigh­Wood anomalies (RWA). Bowtie apertures to be strongly resonant. We demonstrate here that the total transmission through a bowtie aperture array can

  16. Complementary bowtie aperture for localizing and enhancing optical magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Complementary bowtie aperture for localizing and enhancing optical magnetic field Nan Zhou, Edward, 2011 Nanoscale bowtie antenna and bowtie aperture antenna have been shown to generate strongly enhanced. In this Letter, we discuss the enhancement of magnetic field intensity of nanoscale complementary bowtie aperture

  17. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, W.F.

    1983-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  18. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  19. Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

  20. The Political History of Hydraulic Fracturing’s Expansion Across the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbis, Robert E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Political History of Hydraulic Fracturing’s Expansion AcrossPolitical History of Hydraulic Fracturing’s Expansion Acrosss use of the hydraulic fracturing development process.

  1. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  2. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report was on preparing data and modules for Piceance Basin-wide fracture prediction. A review of the geological data input and automated history reconstruction approach was made. Fluid pressure data analysis and preliminary basin simulations were carried out. These activities are summarized briefly below and reviewed in more detail in Appendices A-E. Appendix D is a review of the fluid pressure data and its implications for compartmentation. Preliminary fracture prediction computations on generic basins are presented in Appendix E; these were carried out as part of our code testing activities. The results of these two Appendices are the beginning of what will be the basis of the model testing; fluid pressures are directly comparable with the model predictions and are a key element of fracture nucleation and presentation. We summarize the tectonic and sedimentary history of the Piceance Basin based on our automated history reconstruction and published interpretations. The narrative and figures provide the basic material we have quantified for our CIRF.B basin simulator input. This data supplements our existing well data interpretation approach. It provides an independent check of the automated sedimentary/subsidence history reconstruction module. Fluid pressure data was gathered and analyzed. This data serves two functions. Fluid pressure distribution across the basin provides a quantitative test as it is a direct prediction of CIRF.B. Furthermore, fluid pressure modifies effective stress. It thereby enters fracture nucleation criteria and fracture extension rate and aperture laws. The pressure data is presented in Appendix Din terms of overpressure maps and isosurfaces.

  3. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are defined from the numerical solution of a complex hypersingular integral equation written for a given fracture configuration and loading. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures with existing discontinuities such as faults and joints. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two- and three-dimensional heat extraction solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate heat extraction and the variations of the reservoir stress with cooling. The numerical models have been developed in a user-friendly environment to create a tool for improving fracture design and investigating single or multiple fracture propagation in rock.

  4. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, G. W.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS DURING CO2 INJECTION IN HYDRAULICALLY AND NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in less efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on modeling the fluid flow in fracture surface, examining the fluid transfer mechanisms and describing the fracture aperture distribution under different overburden pressure using X-ray CT scanner.

  6. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterMonitoring during hydraulic fracturing using the TG-2 well,fracture processes in hydraulic fracturing, Quarterly Report

  7. Simulation of Hydraulic Fractures and their Interactions with Natural Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sesetty, Varahanaresh

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the stimulated reservoir volume during hydraulic fracturing is important to geothermal and petroleum reservoir stimulation. The interaction between a hydraulic fracture and pre-existing natural fractures exerts significant control...

  8. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Integration of borehole imaging data with available open-hole log, core, and well-test data from horizontal and vertical wells allowed for the distribution of fracture parameters, including fracture density, aperture, porosity, and permeability throughout a geocellular model. Analysis of over 5000 fractures showed that changes in lithology, grain size, and/or bed thickness do not correlate with changes in fracture densities. Review of P- and S-wave log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. Fracture permeabilities compare favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix- related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (ER 50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  9. Dual-sided coded-aperture imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter (Clinton, TN)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a vehicle, a single detector plane simultaneously measures radiation coming through two coded-aperture masks, one on either side of the detector. To determine which side of the vehicle a source is, the two shadow masks are inverses of each other, i.e., one is a mask and the other is the anti-mask. All of the data that is collected is processed through two versions of an image reconstruction algorithm. One treats the data as if it were obtained through the mask, the other as though the data is obtained through the anti-mask.

  10. Acoustics of finite-aperture vortex beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitri, F G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld surface integral is provided, which makes it feasible to rigorously model, evaluate and compute the acoustic scattering and other mechanical effects of finite-aperture vortex beams such as the acoustic radiation force and torque on a viscoelastic sphere in various applications in acoustic tweezers and microfluidics, particle entrapment, manipulation and rotation. Partial-wave series expansions are derived for the incident field of acoustic spiraling (vortex) beams, comprising high-order Bessel and Bessel-Gauss beams.

  11. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE...

  12. Functionalized apertures for the detection of chemical and biological materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Letant, Sonia E. (Livermore, CA); van Buuren, Anthony W. (Livermore, CA); Terminello, Louis J. (Danville, CA); Thelen, Michael P. (Danville, CA); Hope-Weeks, Louisa J. (Brentwood, CA); Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are nanometer to micron scale functionalized apertures constructed on a substrate made of glass, carbon, semiconductors or polymeric materials that allow for the real time detection of biological materials or chemical moieties. Many apertures can exist on one substrate allowing for the simultaneous detection of numerous chemical and biological molecules. One embodiment features a macrocyclic ring attached to cross-linkers, wherein the macrocyclic ring has a biological or chemical probe extending through the aperture. Another embodiment achieves functionalization by attaching chemical or biological anchors directly to the walls of the apertures via cross-linkers.

  13. Evaluation of the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, and effective fracture length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolon, Elyezer P.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-permeability gas wells often produce less than predicted after a fracture treatment. One of the reasons for this is that fracture lengths calculated after stimulation are often less than designed lengths. While actual fracture lengths may...

  14. Evaluation of the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, and effective fracture length 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolon, Elyezer P.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-permeability gas wells often produce less than predicted after a fracture treatment. One of the reasons for this is that fracture lengths calculated after stimulation are often less than designed lengths. While actual fracture lengths may...

  15. SU-E-T-10: A Dosimetric Comparison of Copper to Lead-Alloy Apertures for Electron Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusk, B; Hogstrom, K; Gibbons, J; Carver, R [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric differences of copper compared to conventional lead-alloy apertures for electron beam therapy. Methods: Copper apertures were manufactured by .decimal, Inc. and matching lead-alloy, Cerrobend, apertures were constructed for 32 square field sizes (2×2 – 20×20 cm{sup 2}) for five applicator sizes (6×6–25×25 cm{sup 2}). Percent depth-dose and off-axis-dose profiles were measured using an electron diode in water with copper and Cerrobend apertures for a subset of aperture sizes (6×6, 10×10, 25×25 cm{sup 2}) and energies (6, 12, 20 MeV). Dose outputs were measured for all field size-aperture combinations and available energies (6–20 MeV). Measurements were taken at 100 and 110 cm SSDs. Using this data, 2D planar absolute dose distributions were constructed and compared. Passing criteria were ±2% of maximum dose or 1-mm distance-to-agreement for 99% of points. Results: A gamma analysis of the beam dosimetry showed 93 of 96 aperture size, applicator, energy, and SSD combinations passed the 2%/1mm criteria. Failures were found for small field size-large applicator combinations at 20 MeV and 100-cm SSD. Copper apertures showed a decrease in bremsstrahlung production due to copper's lower atomic number compared to Cerrobend (greatest difference was 2.5% at 20 MeV). This effect was most prominent at the highest energies with large amounts of shielding material present (small field size-large applicator). Also, an increase in electrons scattered from the collimator edge of copper compared to Cerrobend resulted in an increased dose at the field edge for copper at shallow depths (greatest increase was 1% at 20 MeV). Conclusion: Apertures for field sizes ?6×6 cm{sup 2} at any energy, or for small fields (?4×4 cm{sup 2}) at energies <20 MeV, showed dosimetric differences less than 2%/1mm for more than 99% of points. All field size-applicator size-energy combinations passed 3%/1mm criteria for 100% of points. Work partially funded by .decimal, Inc. (Sanford, FL)

  16. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielek, Timothy P. (Albuquerque, NM); Thompson, Douglas G. (Albuqerque, NM); Walker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  17. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging with Motion Estimation and Liliana Borcea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papanicolaou, George C.

    Callaghan George Papanicolaou Abstract We introduce from first principles a synthetic aperture radar (SAR calibrated small apertures, (b) preliminary motion estimation from the data using the Wigner transform-band persistent surveillance SAR is a specific application that is covered by our analysis. Detailed numerical

  18. Very high numerical aperture light transmitting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sales, Brian C. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new light-transmitting device using a SCIN glass core and a novel calcium sodium cladding has been developed. The very high index of refraction, radiation hardness, similar solubility for rare earths and similar melt and viscosity characteristics of core and cladding materials makes them attractive for several applications such as high-numerical-aperture optical fibers and specialty lenses. Optical fibers up to 60 m in length have been drawn, and several simple lenses have been designed, ground, and polished. Preliminary results on the ability to directly cast optical components of lead-indium phosphate glass are also discussed as well as the suitability of these glasses as a host medium for rare-earth ion lasers and amplifiers.

  19. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dravins, Dainis; Nuñez, Paul D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances, and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long...

  20. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  1. Nanoscale ridge aperture as near-field transducer for heat-assisted magnetic recording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    in a bowtie or half-bowtie shape are capable of generating small optical spots as well as elon- gated optical produced by three types of ridge aperture antennas: the bowtie aperture, half- bowtie aperture, and C

  2. Simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs using empirical transfer function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tellapaneni, Prasanna Kumar

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research utilizes the imbibition experiments and X-ray tomography results for modeling fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs. Conventional dual porosity simulation requires large number of runs to quantify transfer function parameters...

  3. Water Use for Hydraulic Fracturing: A Texas Sized Problem? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeClere, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of Texas could face a 2.7 trillion gallon shortfall of water by 2060. Hydraulic fracturing (HF) requires large amounts of water for each well. Tax incentives should be offered to companies that substitute brackish ...

  4. Experimental observations of deformation caused by mineral dissolution in variable-aperture fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detwiler, Russell

    -water reactions. For example, subsurface CO2 sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs or deep saline., 2003; Gherardi et al., 2007]. Furthermore, in deep reservoirs, mineral dissolution is coupled

  5. Suspensions in hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.N. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Suspensions or slurries are widely used in well stimulation and hydraulic fracturing processes to enhance the production of oil and gas from the underground hydrocarbon-bearing formation. The success of these processes depends significantly upon having a thorough understanding of the behavior of suspensions used. Therefore, the characterization of suspensions under realistic conditions, for their rheological and hydraulic properties, is very important. This chapter deals with the state-of-the-art hydraulic fracturing suspension technology. Specifically it deals with various types of suspensions used in well stimulation and fracturing processes, their rheological characterization and hydraulic properties, behavior of suspensions in horizontal wells, review of proppant settling velocity and proppant transport in the fracture, and presently available measurement techniques for suspensions and their merits. Future industry needs for better understanding of the complex behavior of suspensions are also addressed. 74 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  6. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  7. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  8. Can a fractured caprock self-heal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkhoury, JE; Elkhoury, JE; Detwiler, RL; Ameli, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characterization of fractured reservoirs. J. Geophys. Eng.fractured carbonates caused by flow of CO 2 -rich brine under reservoirreservoirs. We present results from two experiments in fractured

  9. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  10. Radiation thermometer size-of-source effect testing using aperture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebmann, F.; Kolat, T. [Fluke Corporation, 799 E Utah Valley Dr., American Fork, Utah, USA, 84003 (United States)] [Fluke Corporation, 799 E Utah Valley Dr., American Fork, Utah, USA, 84003 (United States)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Size-of-source effect is an important attribute of any radiation thermometer. The effects of this attribute may be quantified in a number of different ways to include field-of-view, distance ratio, or size-of-source effect. These parameters provide needed information for the user of a radiation thermometer, as they aid in determining whether the measured object is large enough for adequate radiation thermometry measurement. Just as important, these parameters provide needed information for calibration. This information helps to determine calibration geometry, and it is needed for calibration uncertainty determination. For determination of size-of-source effect, there are a limited number of test methods furnished by the standards available today. The test methods available may be cumbersome to perform due to the cost of the required equipment and the time needed to set-up and perform the test. Other methods have been proposed. This paper discusses one such method. This method uses a circular aperture such as that used in radiation thermometer calibration. It describes the method both theoretically and mechanically. It then discusses testing done to verify this method comparing the results to those obtained while performing steps in current standards. Finally, based on this testing, the basis for a new standard test method is presented.

  11. Aperture Arrays for the SKA: Dense or Sparse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Braun; Wim van Cappellen

    2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly consider some design aspects of aperture arrays for use in radio astronomy, particularly contrasting the performance of dense and sparse aperture arrays. Recent insights have emerged in the final design phase of LOFAR which suggest that sparse aperture arrays have the best prospects for cost-effective performance at radio frequencies below about 500 MHz; exceeding those of both dense aperture arrays and parabolic reflectors by an order of magnitude. Very attractive performance, of 10,000 - 20,000 m2/K, can be achieved with a sparse design that covers the 70 - 700 MHz range with two antenna systems that share receiver resources. Cost-effective systems of this type represent only a modest increment in system complexity over that being deployed in LOFAR and are achievable with today's technology.

  12. aperture optical system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 May 15, 2003 Vol. 28, No. 10 OPTICS LETTERS 801 Phase retrieval for high-numerical-aperture optical systems Biotechnology...

  13. Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  14. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography: reconstruction by synthetic aperture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Dazi

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have applied the synthetic-aperture method to linear-scanning microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography in biological tissues. A non-focused ultrasonic transducer was used to receive thermoacoustic signals, to which the delay-and-sum algorithm...

  15. aperture single photon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emitting diode where current may be injected into a single dot. D. J. P. Ellis; A. J. Bennett; A. J. Shields; P. Atkinson; D. A. Ritchie 2007-09-13 4 Oxide-apertured microcavity...

  16. Investigation of Created Fracture Geometry through Hydraulic Fracture Treatment Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ibraheem 1987-

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful development of shale gas reservoirs is highly dependent on hydraulic fracture treatments. Many questions remain in regards to the geometry of the created fractures. Production data analysis from some shale gas wells quantifies a much...

  17. Receiver for solar energy collector having improved aperture aspect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntire, William R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary concentrator for use in receiver systems for linear focusing primary concentrators is provided with reflector wings at each end. The wings increase the capture of light rays reflected from areas adjacent the rim of a primary concentrator, increasing the apparent aperture size of the absorber as viewed from the rim of the primary concentrator. The length, tilt, and curvature of the wing reflectors can be adjusted to provide an absorber having a desired aperture aspect.

  18. Transmission of High-Power Electron Beams Through Small Apertures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschalaer, Christoph [MIT Bates Linear Accelerator; Alarcon, Ricardo O.; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V. [JLAB; Bertozzi, William; Boyce, James R. [College of William and Mary; Cowan, Ray Franklin [MIT; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Fisher, Peter H.; Ihloff, Ernest E. [MIT Bates Linear Accelerator; Kalantarians, Narbe [Unversity of Texas; Kelleher, Aidan Michael [MIT Bates Linear Accelerator; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Milner, Richard; Neil, George R. [JLAB; Ou, Longwu [MIT; Schmookler, Barak Abraham [MIT; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Williams, Gwyn P. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed to pass a 100 MeV, 430 kWatt c.w. electron beam from the energy-recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's FEL facility through a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Beam transmission losses of 3 p.p.m. through a 2 mm diameter aperture were maintained during a 7 hour continuous run.

  19. Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

  20. Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotte, F.P.; Doughty, C.; Birkholzer, J.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to reliably predict flow and transport in fractured porous rock is an essential condition for performance evaluation of geologic (underground) nuclear waste repositories. In this report, a suite of programs (TRIPOLY code) for calculating and analyzing flow and transport in two-dimensional fracture-matrix systems is used to model single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests. The SWIW test, a tracer test using one well, is proposed as a useful means of collecting data for site characterization, as well as estimating parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. After some specific code adaptations, we numerically generated a complex fracture-matrix system for computation of steady-state flow and tracer advection and dispersion in the fracture network, along with solute exchange processes between the fractures and the porous matrix. We then conducted simulations for a hypothetical but workable SWIW test design and completed parameter sensitivity studies on three physical parameters of the rock matrix - namely porosity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation coefficient - in order to investigate their impact on the fracture-matrix solute exchange process. Hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, is also modeled in this study, in two different ways: (1) by increasing the hydraulic aperture for flow in existing fractures and (2) by adding a new set of fractures to the field. The results of all these different tests are analyzed by studying the population of matrix blocks, the tracer spatial distribution, and the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained, while performing mass-balance checks and being careful to avoid some numerical mistakes that could occur. This study clearly demonstrates the importance of matrix effects in the solute transport process, with the sensitivity studies illustrating the increased importance of the matrix in providing a retardation mechanism for radionuclides as matrix porosity, diffusion coefficient, or retardation coefficient increase. Interestingly, model results before and after hydrofracking are insensitive to adding more fractures, while slightly more sensitive to aperture increase, making SWIW tests a possible means of discriminating between these two potential hydrofracking effects. Finally, we investigate the possibility of inferring relevant information regarding the fracture-matrix system physical parameters from the BTCs obtained during SWIW testing.

  1. Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos,,,

    ... seismology and mining. Fractures constitute the sources of earthquakes, and hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs are mainly composed of fractured rocks.

  2. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objective: Make Seismic...

  3. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for...

  4. Fracture prediction in metal sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Young-Woong

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important failure modes of thin-walled structures is fracture. Fracture is predominantly tensile in nature and, in most part, is operated by the physical mechanisms of void nucleation, growth, and linkage. ...

  5. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Few engineering materials are limited by their strength; rather they are limited by their resistance to fracture or fracture toughness. It is not by accident that most critical structures, such as bridges, ships, nuclear pressure vessels and so forth, are manufactured from materials that are comparatively low in strength but high in toughness. Indeed, in many classes of materials, strength and toughness are almost mutually exclusive. In the first instance, such resistance to fracture is a function of bonding and crystal structure (or lack thereof), but can be developed through the design of appropriate nano/microstructures. However, the creation of tough microstructures in structural materials, i.e., metals, polymers, ceramics and their composites, is invariably a compromise between resistance to intrinsic damage mechanisms ahead of the tip of a crack (intrinsic toughening) and the formation of crack-tip shielding mechanisms which principally act behind the tip to reduce the effective 'crack-driving force' (extrinsic toughening). Intrinsic toughening is essentially an inherent property of a specific microstructure; it is the dominant form of toughening in ductile (e.g., metallic) materials. However, for most brittle (e.g., ceramic) solids, and this includes many biological materials, it is largely ineffective and toughening conversely must be developed extrinsically, by such shielding mechanisms as crack bridging. From a fracture mechanics perspective, this results in toughening in the form of rising resistance-curve behavior where the fracture resistance actually increases with crack extension. The implication of this is that in many biological and high-strength advanced materials, toughness is developed primarily during crack growth and not for crack initiation. This is an important realization yet is still rarely reflected in the way that toughness is measured, which is invariably involves the use of single-value (crack-initiation) parameters such as the fracture toughness K{sub Ic}.

  6. Development of an equivalent homogenous fluid model for pseudo-two-phase (air plus water) flow through fractured rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, J.; Indraratna, B. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). School of Civil Engineering

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture flow of two-phase mixtures is particularly applicable to the coal mining and coal bed methane projects in Australia. A one-dimensional steady-state pseudo-two-phase flow model is proposed for fractured rock. The model considers free flow of a compressible mixture of air and water in an inclined planar fracture and is based upon the conservation of momentum and the 'cubic' law. The flow model is coupled to changes in the stress environment through the fracture normal stiffness, which is related to changes in fracture aperture. The model represents the individual air and water phases as a single equivalent homogenous fluid. Laboratory testing was performed using the two-phase high-pressure triaxial apparatus on 54 mm diameter (approximately 2: 1 height: diameter) borehole cores intersected by induced near-axial fractures. The samples were of Triassic arenaceous fine-medium grained sandstone (known as the Eckersley Formation) that is found locally in the Southern Coalfield of New South Wales. The sample fracture roughness was assessed using a technique based upon Fourier series analysis to objectively attribute a joint roughness coefficient. The proposed two-phase flow model was verified using the recorded laboratory data obtained over a range of triaxial confining pressures (i.e., fracture normal stresses).

  7. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, F. Patrick (Livermore, CA)

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  8. Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchanges: aperture lowpass filtering model 1 Natural open joints in rocks commonly present multi-scale self-affine apertures. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchanges: aperture lowpass filtering model 1 SUMMARY Natural aperture that describes at best the macroscopic properties (hydraulic conductivity, heat exchange of the effective hydraulic and thermal properties (apertures). A detailed study of the influence of the bandwidth

  9. A physically based numerical approach for modeling fracture-matrix interaction in fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of naturally fractured reservoirs with uniform fracturefor naturally fractured reservoirs, SPE-11688, Presented atflow simulations in fractured reservoirs, Report LBL- 15227,

  10. Indirect fracture delineation in a carbonate reservoir: The Upper Jurassic Hanifa of Abqaiq field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, D.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abqaiq field is a northeast-trending anticline approximately 60 km long and 12 km wide and contains several reservoirs. The Hanifa Reservoir is approximately 100 m thick and consists of fine-grained, muddy limestone with subordinate dolomite and anhydrite. Since discovery of the Hanifa oil pool in 1947, pressure fluctuations have indicated communication with the overlying Arab-D Reservoir. Welltest permeability measurements are approximately 40 times higher than core permeability measurements of the Hanifa. This divergence of Hanifa permeability measurements combined with the indicated Arab-D communication suggests the presence of a natural fracture network. Direct observations of Hanifa cores reveal common, sub-vertical fractures with average apertures <200 microns. With limited core coverage and no oriented cores, a new technique was needed to delineate the areas affected by fractures. A technique combining indirect fracture indicators was devised for Abqaiq field and can be applied to other, similar fields. The actual flow system of the Abqaiq Hanifa is a complex interaction between matrix porosity/permeability and fracture permeability or enhanced permeability. Future development plans allow for low matrix permeability access to much of the Hanifa storage space and high fracture permeability both within the Hanifa and connecting to the Arab-D Reservoir.

  11. Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa Castro, Juan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A Thesis by JUAN CARLOS CORREA CASTRO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test Copyright 2011 Juan Carlos Correa Castro EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A...

  12. ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul M. Sharma

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those predicted by fracture models. There was no accepted optimal method for conducting hydraulic fracturing in the Bossier. Each operator used a different approach. Anadarko, the most active operator in the play, had tested at least four different kinds of fracture treatments. The ability to arrive at an optimal fracturing program was constrained by the lack of adequate fracture models to simulate the fracturing treatment, and an inability to completely understand the results obtained in previous fracturing programs. This research aimed at a combined theoretical, experimental and field-testing program to improve fracturing practices in the Bossier and other tight gas plays.

  13. Seismic waves in rocks with fluids and fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic wave propagation through the earth is often stronglyaffected by the presence of fractures. When these fractures are filledwith fluids (oil, gas, water, CO2, etc.), the type and state of the fluid(liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the response of theseismic waves. This paper summarizes recent work on methods ofdeconstructing the effects of fractures, and any fluids within thesefractures, on seismic wave propagation as observed in reflection seismicdata. One method explored here is Thomsen's weak anisotropy approximationfor wave moveout (since fractures often induce elastic anisotropy due tononuniform crack-orientation statistics). Another method makes use ofsome very convenient fracture parameters introduced previously thatpermit a relatively simple deconstruction of the elastic and wavepropagation behavior in terms of a small number of fracture parameters(whenever this is appropriate, as is certainly the case for small crackdensities). Then, the quantitative effects of fluids on thesecrack-influence parameters are shown to be directly related to Skempton scoefficient B of undrained poroelasticity (where B typically ranges from0 to 1). In particular, the rigorous result obtained for the low crackdensity limit is that the crack-influence parameters are multiplied by afactor (1 ? B) for undrained systems. It is also shown how fractureanisotropy affects Rayleigh wave speed, and how measured Rayleigh wavespeeds can be used to infer shear wave speed of the fractured medium.Higher crack density results are also presented by incorporating recentsimulation data on such cracked systems.

  14. Synthetic aperture integration (SAI) algorithm for SAR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N. Reginald

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  15. Fracture Modeling and Flow Behavior in Shale Gas Reservoirs Using Discrete Fracture Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogbechie, Joachim Nwabunwanne

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gen and NFflow) for fracture modeling of a shale gas reservoir and also studies the interaction of the different fracture properties on reservoir response. The most important results of the study are that a uniform fracture network distribution and fracture...

  16. Procedure for estimating fracture energy from fracture surface roughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williford, Ralph E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fracture energy of a material is determined by first measuring the length of a profile of a section through a fractured surface of the material taken on a plane perpendicular to the mean plane of that surface, then determining the fractal dimensionality of the surface. From this, the yield strength of the material, and the Young's Modulus of that material, the fracture energy is calculated.

  17. Identification and quantification of fracture behavior through reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, S. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)]|[Hefner Corporation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrated the use of reservoir simulation as a tool for quantifying and describing the relative significance of fracture and matrix flow units to overall reservoir storage capacity and transmissibility in a field development example. A high matrix porosity Pennsylvanian age sandstone oil reservoir, that is currently undergoing the early stages of secondary recovery by waterflood, was studied. Unexpected early water breakthrough indicated the presence of a high directional permeability fracture system superimposed on the high porosity matrix system. To further understand the reservoir behavior, improve field performance and to quantify the relative contributions of fracture and matrix units to permeability and storage capacity, a reservoir simulation and characterization project was initiated. Well test, well log, tracer and geologic data were integrated into the simulation project. The integrated study indicated that the fractures exhibited high directional permeability but low storage capacity relative to the matrix portion of the reservoir. Although fractures heavily influenced overall fluid flow behavior, they did not contain large storage capacity. The system had a low calculated fracture intensity index. Reservoir simulation enabled the quantification of the relative importance of the two flow systems which in turn had a large impact on total reserves estimates and production forecasting. Simulation results indicated a need to realign injector and producer patterns which improved production rates and ultimate recovery.

  18. Fracture characterization and discrimination criteria for karst and tectonic fractures in the Ellenburger Group, West Texas: Implications for reservoir and exploration models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoak, T.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States); [Kestrel Geoscience, Littleton, CO (United States); Sundberg, K.R. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Deyhim, P. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Ortoleva, P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Lab. for Computational Geodynamics

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Ellenburger Group fractured dolomite reservoirs of West Texas, it is extremely difficult to distinguish between multiple phases of karst-related fracturing, modifications to the karst system during burial, and overprinting tectonic fractures. From the analyses of drill core, the authors developed criteria to distinguish between karst and tectonic fractures. In addition, they have applied these criteria within the context of a detailed diagenetic cement history that allows them to further refine the fracture genesis and chronology. In these analyses, the authors evaluated the relationships between fracture intensity, morphologic attributes, host lithology, fracture cement, and oil-staining. From this analysis, they have been able to characterize variations in Ellenburger tectonic fracture intensity by separating these fractures from karst-related features. In general, the majority of fracturing in the Ellenburger is caused by karst-related fracturing although a considerable percentage is caused by tectonism. These findings underscore the importance of considering the complete geologic evolution of a karst reservoir during exploration and field development programs. The authors have been able to more precisely define the spatial significance of the fracture data sets by use of oriented core from Andector Field. They have also demonstrated the importance of these results for exploration and reservoir development programs in West Texas, and the potential to extrapolate these results around the globe. Given the historic interest in the large hydrocarbon reserves in West Texas carbonate reservoirs, results of this study will have tremendous implications for exploration and production strategies targeting vuggy, fractured carbonate systems not only in West Texas, but throughout the globe.

  19. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  20. Numerical simulation of hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Joseph Barnes

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ared that the results of such treatments were not always adequately described by the two-dimensional models. With recent advances in hydraulic fracturing and computing technology, attempts have been made to formulate more realistic fracture models. These three...NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING A Thesis by JOSEPH BARNES WARNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Maj or Subj ect...

  1. aperture optics system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aperture optics system First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 May 15, 2003 Vol. 28, No. 10 ...

  2. aperture icf optics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aperture icf optics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advanced Optics Experiments Using...

  3. aperture shield materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aperture shield materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Light-weight Flexible...

  4. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography: Reconstruction by synthetic aperture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography: Reconstruction by synthetic aperture Dazi Feng, Yuan thermoacoustic signals, to which the delay-and-sum algorithm was applied for image reconstruc- tion. We greatly-induced thermoacoustic tomography based on focused transducers. Two mi- crowave sources, which had frequencies of 9 and 3

  5. Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy with multi-aperture telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fienup, James R.

    Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy with multi-aperture telescopes Samuel T. Thurman and James R Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 Abstract: Fourier spectroscopy can be performed with multi Society of America OCIS codes: (300.6300) Spectroscopy, Fourier transforms; (110.6770) Telescopes; (120

  6. BTEX biodegradation in fractured shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Cleirigh, D.; Coryea, H. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Christopher, M.; Vaughn, C. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A petroleum hydrocarbon groundwater plume was identified at a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) facility in Oklahoma. The affected area had an average BTEX concentration of 3.8 mg/L. Previous aquifer tests indicated preferential groundwater flow paths resulting from natural fractures present in the aquifer formation (primarily shale). A pneumatic fracturing pilot study was performed to evaluate the technology`s effectiveness in creating a more isotropic aquifer. As part of the study, pre-fracture/post-fracture pump tests were performed. Pre-fracture and post-fracture graphs confirmed the study`s hypothesis that pneumatic fracturing would eliminate preferential flow paths and increase groundwater yield. Based on the successful pneumatic fracturing test, an area within the petroleum hydrocarbon plume was fractured and a pilot-scale biodegradation system was operated for four months. The remediation system provided groundwater circulation amended with nutrients and oxygen. Results of the study indicated a significant decrease in BTEX concentrations between the injection well and the observation wells. By Day 113, the benzene concentration (0.044 mg/L) at one of the observation wells was less than the desired state cleanup goal of 0.05 mg/L.

  7. Fracture model for cemented aggregates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Thompson, Darla G.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin; Ionita, Axinte; Shunk, Devin; Lewis, Matthew W.; Lawson, Joe C.; Kale, Sohan; Koric, Seid

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanisms-based fracture model applicable to a broad class of cemented aggregates and, among them, plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) composites, is presented. The model is calibrated for PBX 9502 using the available experimental data under uniaxial compression and tension gathered at various strain rates and temperatures. We show that the model correctly captures inelastic stress-strain responses prior to the load peak and it predicts the post-critical macro-fracture processes, which result from the growth and coalescence of micro-cracks. In our approach, the fracture zone is embedded into elastic matrix and effectively weakens the material's strength along the plane of the dominant fracture.

  8. Development of hydraulic-fracturing models for application to coal-seam methane drainage. Final report, January 17, 1983-June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, M.E.; Mavko, B.B.; Thorson, L.D.

    1985-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop two- and three-dimensional models the industry can use to design and understand hydraulic fracture treatments for stimulating methane production from coal seams. Initially, two-dimensional models were used to study pressure-driven fractures near a stress barrier. The results illustrated that barriers can arrest fracture propagation, cause the wetted length to approach the fracture tip, and change the aperture shape. It became clear that 3-dimensional calculations were necessary for analysis of the coal-seam problem. Work was begun on the circular model, the simplest of the 3-D models. It was determined that the fluid-flow equations using the common uniform-aperture approximation do not properly conserve mass when the flow slot varies with position and time. The problem was corrected by carefully combining the equations for radial flow and the elasticity equations for governing aperture. The model was successfully applied to show the effects of changes in rates, viscosities, and elastic modulus.

  9. Interferometric hydrofracture microseism localization using neighboring fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is the process of injecting high-pressure fluids into a reservoir to induce fractures and thus improve reservoir productivity. Microseismic event localization is used to locate created fractures. ...

  10. Interferometric hydrofracture microseism localization using neighboring fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    Hydraulic fracturing is the process of injecting high-pressure fluids into a reservoir to induce fractures and thus improve reservoir productivity. Microseismic event localization is used to locate created fractures. ...

  11. A new coal-permeability model: Internal swelling stress and fracture-matrix interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new coal-permeability model for uniaxial strain and constant confining stress conditions. The model is unique in that it explicitly considers fracture-matrix interaction during coal deformation processes and is based on a newly proposed internal-swelling stress concept. This concept is used to account for the impact of matrix swelling (or shrinkage) on fracture-aperture changes resulting from partial separation of matrix blocks by fractures that do not completely cut through the whole matrix. The proposed permeability model is evaluated with data from three Valencia Canyon coalbed wells in the San Juan Basin, where increased permeability has been observed during CH{sub 4} gas production, as well as with published data from laboratory tests. Model results are generally in good agreement with observed permeability changes. The importance of fracture-matrix interaction in determining coal permeability, demonstrated in this work using relatively simple stress conditions, underscores the need for a dual-continuum (fracture and matrix) mechanical approach to rigorously capture coal-deformation processes under complex stress conditions, as well as the coupled flow and transport processes in coal seams.

  12. Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Heather M.

    Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones Heather M. Savage1,2 and Emily E. Brodsky1 Received 22 April 2010; revised 10 of fracture distributions as a function of displacement to determine whether damage around small and large

  13. Exploring the physicochemical processes that govern hydraulic fracture through laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belmonte A; Connelly P

    ) containing model boreholes as an analog to hydraulic fracturing with various fracture-driving fluids. The

  14. High transmission nanoscale bowtie-shaped aperture probe for near-field optical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    High transmission nanoscale bowtie-shaped aperture probe for near-field optical imaging Liang Wang probe integrated with nanoscale bowtie aperture for enhanced optical transmission is demonstrated. The bowtie-shape aperture allows a propagating mode in the bowtie gap region, which enables simultaneous

  15. Improving near-field confinement of a bowtie aperture using surface plasmon polaritons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Improving near-field confinement of a bowtie aperture using surface plasmon polaritons Pornsak; published online 1 June 2011 Bowtie aperture is known to produce subdiffraction-limited optical spot with high intensity. In this work, we investigate integrating a bowtie aperture with circular grooves

  16. Enhanced optical near field from a bowtie aperture Eric X. Jin and Xianfan Xua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Enhanced optical near field from a bowtie aperture Eric X. Jin and Xianfan Xua School of Mechanical 2006; published online 11 April 2006 The enhanced optical near field from a bowtie aperture of the same opening area. Light concentration and transmission enhancement of bowtie apertures promise

  17. Seismic signatures of the Lodgepole fractured reservoir in Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, J.; Collier, H.; Angstman, B.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based upon the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. We present the feasibility of using seismic measurement techniques to map the fracture zones between wells spaced 2400 ft at depths of about 1000 ft. For this purpose we constructed computer models (which include azimuthal anisotropy) using Lodgepole reservoir parameters to predict seismic signatures recorded at the borehole scale, crosswell scale, and 3 D seismic scale. We have integrated well logs with existing 2D surfaces seismic to produce petrophysical and geological cross sections to determine the reservoir parameters and geometry for the computer models. In particular, the model responses are used to evaluate if surface seismic and crosswell seismic measurements can capture the anisotropy due to vertical fractures. Preliminary results suggested that seismic waves transmitted between two wells will propagate in carbonate fracture reservoirs, and the signal can be received above the noise level at the distance of 2400 ft. In addition, the large velocities contrast between the main fracture zone and the underlying unfractured Boundary Ridge Member, suggested that borehole reflection imaging may be appropriate to map and fracture zone thickness variation and fracture distributions in the reservoir.

  18. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: John H. Queen Hi-Q Geophysical Inc. Track Name: Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture...

  19. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorie M. Dilley

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Open or recently closed fractures would be more susceptible to enhancing the permeability of the system. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will assist in fracture stimulation site selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures (Moore, Morrow et al. 1987), and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. These fluid inclusions are faithful records of pore fluid chemistry. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. This report presents the results of the project to determine fracture locations by the chemical signatures from gas analysis of fluid inclusions. With this project we hope to test our assumptions that gas chemistry can distinguish if the fractures are open and bearing production fluids or represent prior active fractures and whether there are chemical signs of open fracture systems in the wall rock above the fracture. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method developed for the geothermal industry which applies the mass quantification of fluid inclusion gas data from drill cuttings and applying known gas ratios and compositions to determine depth profiles of fluid barriers in a modern geothermal system (Dilley, 2009; Dilley et al., 2005; Norman et al., 2005). Identifying key gas signatures associated with fractures for isolating geothermal fluid production is the latest advancement in the application of FIS to geothermal systems (Dilley and Norman, 2005; Dilley and Norman, 2007). Our hypothesis is that peaks in FIS data are related to location of fractures. Previous work (DOE Grant DE-FG36-06GO16057) has indicated differences in the chemical signature of fluid inclusions between open and closed fractures as well as differences in the chemical signature of open fractures between geothermal systems. Our hypothesis is that open fracture systems can be identified by their FIS chemical signature; that there are differences based on the mineral assemblages and geology of the system; and that there are chemical precursors in the wall rock above open, large fractures. Specific goals for this project are: (1) To build on the preliminary results which indicate that there are differences in the FIS signatures between open and closed fractures by identifying which chemical species indicate open fractures in both active geothermal systems and in hot, dry rock; (2) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the geology of the fields; (3) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the mineral assemblages in the fracture; and (4) To determine if there are specific chemical signatures in the wall rock above open, large fractures. This method promises to lower the cost of geothermal energy production in several ways. Knowledge of productive fractures in the boreholes will allow engineers to optimize well production. This information can aid in well testing decisions, well completion strategies, and in resource calculations. It will assist in determining the areas for future fracture enhancement. This will develop into one of the techniques in the 'tool bag' for creating and managing Enhanced Geothermal Systems.

  20. Estimation of fracture flow parameters through numerical analysis of hydromechanical pressure pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappa, F.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an Engineered Fractured Geothermal Reservoir. Example of theinteractions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferredwithin a shallow fractured carbonate reservoir. Fracture

  1. Effects of oxygen on fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, M.L.; Shuchart, C.E.; Yaritz, J.G.; Norman, L.R.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of polysaccharide gels at high temperature is limited by such factors as pH, mechanical degradation, and oxidants. Oxygen is unavoidably placed in fracturing fluids through dissolution of air. To prevent premature degradation of the fracturing fluid by this oxidant, oxygen scavengers are commonly used. In this paper, the effects of oxygen and various oxygen scavengers on gel stability will be presented. Mechanical removal of oxygen resulted in surprisingly stable fracturing gels at 275 F. However, chemical removal of oxygen gave mixed results. Test data from sodium thiosulfate, sodium sulfite, and sodium erythorbate used as oxygen scavengers/gel stabilizers showed that the efficiency of oxygen removal from gels did not directly coincide with the viscosity retention of the gel, and large excesses of additives were necessary to provide optimum gel stabilization. The inability of some oxygen scavengers to stabilize the gel was the result of products created from the interaction of oxygen with the oxygen scavenger, which in turn, produced species that degraded the gel. The ideal oxygen scavenger should provide superior gel stabilization without creating detrimental side reaction products. Of the materials tested, sodium thiosulfate appeared to be the most beneficial.

  2. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

  3. Transmission of Megawatt Relativistic Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arizona State University; Arizona State University; JLAB; MIT; College of William and Mary, JLAB; MIT; JLAB; JLAB; MIT; MIT; Hampton University; MIT; JLAB; MIT; JLAB; MIT; MIT; JLAB; MIT; JLAB; JLAB

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High power, relativistic electron beams from energy recovery linacs have great potential to realize new experimental paradigms for pioneering research in fundamental and applied research. A major design consideration for these new generation of experimental capabilities is the understanding of the halo associated with these bright, intense beams. In this Letter, we report on measurements performed using the 100 MeV, 430 kWatt CW electron beam from the energy recovery linac at the Jeff#11;erson Laboratory's Free Electron Laser facility as it traversed a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Thermal measurements of the block together with neutron measurements near the beam-target interaction point yielded a consistent understanding of the beam losses. These were determined to be 3 ppm through a 2 mm diameter aperture and were maintained during a 7 hour continuous run.

  4. Modeling the Fracture of Ice Sheets on Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waisman, Haim [Columbia University] [Columbia University; Tuminaro, Ray [Sandia National Labs] [Sandia National Labs

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to investigate the complex fracture of ice and understand its role within larger ice sheet simulations and global climate change. This objective was achieved by developing novel physics based models for ice, novel numerical tools to enable the modeling of the physics and by collaboration with the ice community experts. At the present time, ice fracture is not explicitly considered within ice sheet models due in part to large computational costs associated with the accurate modeling of this complex phenomena. However, fracture not only plays an extremely important role in regional behavior but also influences ice dynamics over much larger zones in ways that are currently not well understood. To this end, our research findings through this project offers significant advancement to the field and closes a large gap of knowledge in understanding and modeling the fracture of ice sheets in the polar regions. Thus, we believe that our objective has been achieved and our research accomplishments are significant. This is corroborated through a set of published papers, posters and presentations at technical conferences in the field. In particular significant progress has been made in the mechanics of ice, fracture of ice sheets and ice shelves in polar regions and sophisticated numerical methods that enable the solution of the physics in an efficient way.

  5. Slator Ranch fracture optimization study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ventura, J.L.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Las Ovejas (Lobo) field in Zapata County, TX, is being developed actively. The field was discovered on Tenneco Oil EandP's Slator Ranch lease with the successful completion of the Sanchez-O'Brien Vaquillas Ranch Well 1. Tenneco operates all of the 17,712-acre (71 678 X 10/sup 3/-m/sup 2/) lease (with the exception of a 320-acre (1295 X 10/sup 3/-m/sup 2/) tract assigned to the Vaquillas Ranch Well 1) and has successfully completed five wells in the Lobo field subsequent to the discovery well. The Lobo interval in the Slator Ranch area is a tight gas sand, and all these wells require fracture stimulation. Because a successful fracture is essential for a good Lobo completion and because hydraulic fracturing represents a significant portion of the completed well cost, it is important to optimize this phase of the completion. The purpose of this study was to determine the following for Slator Ranch Lobo completions: an optimum fracture length as a function of permeability; whether wells should be tailed-in with bauxite, or fractured with all bauxite or sand (if an optimum tail-in does exist, to determine the optimum tail-in for a fixed fracture length as a function of permeability); the drainage area and abandonment pressure for Slator Ranch Well 2; the effect of compression on reserves; and closure pressure as a function of time and distance along the fracture for Slator Ranch Well 2.

  6. New observations of infiltration through fractured alluvium in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site: A preliminary field investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, C.S. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Smith, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McKinnis, W.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Mercury, NV (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional tectonics coupled with the subsurface detonation of nuclear explosives has caused widespread fracturing of the alluvium of Yucca Flat. Fractures deeper than 30 meters have been observed in boreholes. Some of these fractures are large enough to capture significant amounts of runoff during storm events. Evidence of stream capture by fractures and observations of runoff flowing into open fractures give qualitative evidence of infiltration to depths greater than several meters and possibly to the saturated zone. Our field observations contradict the assumption that little infiltration occurs on Yucca Flat. The larger, hydrologically important fractures are associated with geologic faults or the regional stress field. Additional field studies are needed to investigate the impact of fractures on the transport of contaminants.

  7. Water Use for Hydraulic Fracturing: A Texas Sized Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeClere, David

    The state of Texas could face a 2.7 trillion gallon shortfall of water by 2060. Hydraulic fracturing (HF) requires large amounts of water for each well. Tax incentives should be offered to companies that substitute brackish groundwater for fresh...

  8. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    carbonate reservoir were labeled A through F to protect proprietary information included in this research. A 2% potassium chloride solution was used for the acid system and fracture conductivity measurements to prevent clay swelling. Injection temperature...

  9. Optimization of fracture treatment designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda, Jose Ignacio

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using the type curves published by Holditch et al2O. n f H r lic Fracture Pro a ation imula or In 1955, the first model to simulate the propagation of a vertical hydraulic fracture was developed by Khristianovitch and Zheltov O (K-Z model). This two... . . . . 93 97 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 5. I Reservoir and well data for base case example 54 5. 2 Fracture design data for base case example . 54 5. 3 Economic data for base case example . . 54 5. 4 Comparison of the methods used in STIMOP and LPOP...

  10. Risk assessment of groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracturing fluid spills in Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Sarah Marie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast-paced growth in natural gas production in the Marcellus Shale has fueled intense debate over the risk of groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracturing and the shale gas extraction process at large. While several ...

  11. To appear in the International Journal of Fracture Cavitation in Rubber: An Elastic Instability or a Fracture Phenomenon?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Pamies, Oscar

    To appear in the International Journal of Fracture Cavitation in Rubber: An Elastic Instability that cavitation in rubber -- that is, the sudden growth of inherent defects in rubber into large enclosed cavities far exceed the elastic limit of the rubber, which therefore ought to inelastically deform

  12. Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul Sharma; Kyle Friehauf

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is essential for producing gas and oil at an economic rate from low permeability sands. Most fracturing treatments use water and polymers with a gelling agent as a fracturing fluid. The water is held in the small pore spaces by capillary pressure and is not recovered when drawdown pressures are low. The un-recovered water leaves a water saturated zone around the fracture face that stops the flow of gas into the fracture. This is a particularly acute problem in low permeability formations where capillary pressures are high. Depletion (lower reservoir pressures) causes a limitation on the drawdown pressure that can be applied. A hydraulic fracturing process can be energized by the addition of a compressible, sometimes soluble, gas phase into the treatment fluid. When the well is produced, the energized fluid expands and gas comes out of solution. Energizing the fluid creates high gas saturation in the invaded zone, thereby facilitating gas flowback. A new compositional hydraulic fracturing model has been created (EFRAC). This is the first model to include changes in composition, temperature, and phase behavior of the fluid inside the fracture. An equation of state is used to evaluate the phase behavior of the fluid. These compositional effects are coupled with the fluid rheology, proppant transport, and mechanics of fracture growth to create a general model for fracture creation when energized fluids are used. In addition to the fracture propagation model, we have also introduced another new model for hydraulically fractured well productivity. This is the first and only model that takes into account both finite fracture conductivity and damage in the invaded zone in a simple analytical way. EFRAC was successfully used to simulate several fracture treatments in a gas field in South Texas. Based on production estimates, energized fluids may be required when drawdown pressures are smaller than the capillary forces in the formation. For this field, the minimum CO{sub 2} gas quality (volume % of gas) recommended is 30% for moderate differences between fracture and reservoir pressures (2900 psi reservoir, 5300 psi fracture). The minimum quality is reduced to 20% when the difference between pressures is larger, resulting in additional gas expansion in the invaded zone. Inlet fluid temperature, flow rate, and base viscosity did not have a large impact on fracture production. Finally, every stage of the fracturing treatment should be energized with a gas component to ensure high gas saturation in the invaded zone. A second, more general, sensitivity study was conducted. Simulations show that CO{sub 2} outperforms N{sub 2} as a fluid component because it has higher solubility in water at fracturing temperatures and pressures. In fact, all gas components with higher solubility in water will increase the fluid's ability to reduce damage in the invaded zone. Adding methanol to the fracturing solution can increase the solubility of CO{sub 2}. N{sub 2} should only be used if the gas leaks-off either during the creation of the fracture or during closure, resulting in gas going into the invaded zone. Experimental data is needed to determine if the gas phase leaks-off during the creation of the fracture. Simulations show that the bubbles in a fluid traveling across the face of a porous medium are not likely to attach to the surface of the rock, the filter cake, or penetrate far into the porous medium. In summary, this research has created the first compositional fracturing simulator, a useful tool to aid in energized fracture design. We have made several important and original conclusions about the best practices when using energized fluids in tight gas sands. The models and tools presented here may be used in the future to predict behavior of any multi-phase or multi-component fracturing fluid system.

  13. A study of steam injection in fractured media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dindoruk, M.D.S.; Aziz, K.; Brigham, W.; Castanier, L.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam injection is the most widely used thermal recovery technique for unfractured reservoirs containing heavy oil. There have been numerous studies on theoretical and experimental aspects of steam injection for such systems. Fractured reservoirs contain a large fraction of the world supply of oil, and field tests indicate that steam injection is feasible for such reservoirs. Unfortunately there has been little laboratory work done on steam injection in such systems. The experimental system in this work was designed to understand the mechanisms involved in the transfer of fluids and heat between matrix rocks and fractures under steam injection.

  14. Fracture of aluminum naval structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galanis, Konstantinos, 1970-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural catastrophic failure of naval vessels due to extreme loads such as underwater or air explosion, high velocity impact (torpedoes), or hydrodynamic loads (high speed vessels) is primarily caused by fracture. ...

  15. Sensitivity analysis of fracture scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a 2-D finite difference method to numerically calculate the seismic response of a single finite fracture in a homogeneous media. In our experiments, we use a point explosive source and ignore the free surface effect, ...

  16. FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (Principal Advisor) #12;#12;v Abstract Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are geothermal reservoirs formed

  17. Seismic anisotropy of fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schoenberg, C. M. Sayers

    2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    of seismic anisotropy to determine the orientation of fracture sets is of ... this assumption of noninteraction does not imply that the ... conventional (2-subscript) condensed 6 x 6 matrix notation,. 11. 6, while ... have simple physical interpretations.

  18. Estimation of fracture compliance from tubewaves generated at a fracture intersecting a borehole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding fracture compliance is important for characterizing fracture networks and for inferring fluid flow in the subsurface. In an attempt to estimate fracture compliance in the field, we developed a new model to ...

  19. Critical Chemical-Mechanical Couplings that Define Permeability Modifications in Pressure-Sensitive Rock Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham Grader; Susan Brantley

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examined and quantified processes controlling changes in the transport characteristics of natural fractures, subjected to coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical (TMC) effects. Specifically, it examined the effects of mineral dissolution and precipitation mediated by mechanical effects, using laboratory through-flow experiments concurrently imaged by X-ray CT. These were conducted on natural and artificial fractures in cores using water as the permeant. Fluid and mineral mass balances are recorded and are correlated with in-sample saturation, porosity and fracture aperture maps, acquired in real-time by X-ray CT-imaging at a maximum spatial resolution of 15-50 microns per pixel. Post-test, the samples were resin-impregnated, thin-sectioned, and examined by microscopy to define the characteristics of dissolution and precipitation. The test-concurrent X-ray imaging, mass balances, and measurements of permeability, together with the post-test microscopy, were used to define dissolution/precipitation processes, and to constrain process-based models. These models define and quantify key processes of pressure solution, free-face dissolution, and shear-dilation, and the influence of temperature, stress level, and chemistry on the rate of dissolution, its distribution in space and time, and its influence on the mechanical and transport properties of the fracture.

  20. Stochastic Modeling of a Fracture Network in a Hydraulically Fractured Shale-Gas Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mhiri, Adnene

    2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    : ? Uniform distribution of heterogeneities that cause a variation of geomechanical properties such as: — In-situ stress — Fracture initiation pressure — Elastic moduli (Shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio) ? No interaction with natural fractures: — Natural... that are dynamically created due to the change in the geomechanical properties in the vicinity of the primary fracture these are referred to as secondary fractures and are thought to be orthogonal to primary fractures. ? The fractures that originate due...

  1. INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT, MONTICELLO, SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Letters INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,12091 INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,transient data from a hydraulic fracturing experiment have

  2. Elastic properties of saturated porous rocks with aligned fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This unexpected result is caused by the wave-induced flow of fluids between pores and fractures. ..... For non-fractured rock setting fracture weaknesses. DN and ...

  3. GMINC - A MESH GENERATOR FOR FLOW SIMULATIONS IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Society of Petroleumfor Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, paper SPE-11688,Determining Naturally Fractured Reservoir Properties by Well

  4. Analysis of flow behavior in fractured lithophysal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jianchun; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. , 1980. Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Petroleum, Tulsa,bounded naturally fractured reservoirs. Soc. Pet. Eng. J.test in a naturally fractured reservoir. J. Pet. Tech. 1295–

  5. Tracer Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten; van Heel, Ton; Shan, Chao

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Flow in Fractured Reservoirs, SPE Advanced TechnologyTransfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs Karsten Pruess 1 , Tonbehavior arises in fractured reservoirs. As cold injected

  6. asymmetric hydraulic fracture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the fractured shale 17 RPSEA UNCONVENTIONAL GAS CONFERENCE 2012: Geology, the Environment, Hydraulic Fracturing Engineering Websites Summary: Fracturing Experiment Overview...

  7. advanced hydraulic fracturing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the fractured shale 18 RPSEA UNCONVENTIONAL GAS CONFERENCE 2012: Geology, the Environment, Hydraulic Fracturing Engineering Websites Summary: Fracturing Experiment Overview...

  8. Multiwell experiment: Fracturing experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Branagan, P.T.; Cipolla, C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the complexity of the stimulation, no conventional analyses were useful, so we decided to concentrate on the minifrac to provide important fracture parameters. The minifrac was conducted in an identical manner to the pressure-up and pad stages of the stimulation. Figure 1 shows two initial pressure-history match calculations that were performed to model the minifrac. We found that the pressure behavior could not be matched with any normal behavior. Examining the field pressure data, we see that the interesting feature is the sudden flattening in the pressure at a level 1050 psi above the closure stress during pumping and the rapid drop to this same level at shut-in, after which the pressure decreases much more slowly. We first tried to match this behavior using enhanced height growth. While height growth can flatten the pressure during pumping, it also causes a very slow pressure decline at shut-in. We also tried additional leakoff height as height grew, but this could not flatten the pressure as much as needed. Finally, we tried an accelerated leakoff condition above 1050 psi. We did this by increasing the leakoff coefficient by a constant factor above some threshold value. To keep the results smooth and code convergent, we actually linearly phased in the increased leakoff between 1000 and 1100 psi. The final result of these calculations is shown in Figure 2; a factor of 50 increase in the leakoff coefficient was required to match the data for pressures above 1050 psi.

  9. Uncertainty in the maximum principal stress estimated from hydraulic fracturing Measurements due to the presence of the induced fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-fu; Stephansson, Ove

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reopening during hydraulic fracturing stress determinations.Laboratory study of hydraulic fracturing pressure data?Howevaluation of hydraulic fracturing stress measurement

  10. Aperture calculation of the Pierre Auger Observatory surface detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Armengaud, E.; Aublin, J.; Bertou, Xavier; Chou, A.; Ghia, P.L.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Hamilton, J.C.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Medina, C.; Navarra, G.; Parizot, E.; Tripathi, A.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the instantaneous aperture and integrated exposure of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory, taking into account the trigger efficiency as a function of the energy, arrival direction (with zenith angle lower than 60 degrees) and nature of the primary cosmic-ray. We make use of the so-called Lateral Trigger Probability function (or LTP) associated with an extensive air shower, which summarizes all the relevant information about the physics of the shower, the water tank Cherenkov detector, and the triggers.

  11. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, Edward E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The present invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput. The balance correlation response function for the self-supporting array pattern provides an accurate representation of the source of nonfocusable radiation.

  12. Three-dimensional hydraulic fracture model development for application to and understanding of coal-bed methane-stimulation treatments. Final report, July 1, 1984-December 16, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, B.B.; Nielsen, P.E.; Hanson, M.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary three-dimensional numerical model was developed to simulate hydraulically driven fracturing for application to coal seam methane drainage. The initial focus was development of a circular fracture model which served, in part, as a test bed for concepts and formulations applicable to the more general three-dimensional model. Findings from circular model studies were used to design a multiseam fracture treatment. The three-dimensional model involved development of exact influence coefficients for the elastic calculations, inclusion of the aperture time derivative, implementation of an equilibrium tip condition, incorporation of modulus and stress layering, dynamic grid rezoning, incorporation of a two-dimensional fluid flow solution, implementation of the applicable fluid flow boundary conditions, development of a physically realistic fracture front propagation scheme, and proper coupling and control of the various fracture, flow, and calculational model components. Model simulations illustrate important physical effects of fracturing in coal. Preliminary simulations are discussed which show the effects of different viscosity fluids, and effects of stress and modulus variations on vertical fracture containment.

  13. Apparatus and method for deterministic control of surface figure during full aperture polishing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Feit, Michael Dennis; Steele, William Augustus

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A polishing system configured to polish a lap includes a lap configured to contact a workpiece for polishing the workpiece; and a septum configured to contact the lap. The septum has an aperture formed therein. The radius of the aperture and radius the workpiece are substantially the same. The aperture and the workpiece have centers disposed at substantially the same radial distance from a center of the lap. The aperture is disposed along a first radial direction from the center of the lap, and the workpiece is disposed along a second radial direction from the center of the lap. The first and second radial directions may be opposite directions.

  14. High Resolution Backside Imaging and Thermography using a Numerical Aperture Increasing Lens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Resolution Backside Imaging and Thermography using a Numerical Aperture Increasing Lens M. S, representing the highest resolution subsurface thermography to date. Keywords: thermal imaging, high

  15. Hydromechanical modeling of pulse tests that measure both fluidpressure and fracture-normal displacement of the Coaraze Laboratory site,France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappa, F.; Guglielmi, Y.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.; Thoraval, A.

    2006-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ fracture mechanical deformation and fluid flowinteractions are investigated through a series of hydraulic pulseinjection tests, using specialized borehole equipment that cansimultaneously measure fluid pressure and fracture displacements. Thetests were conducted in two horizontal boreholes spaced one meter apartvertically and intersecting a near-vertical highly permeable faultlocated within a shallow fractured carbonate rock. The field data wereevaluated by conducting a series of coupled hydromechanical numericalanalyses, using both distinct-element and finite-element modelingtechniques and both two- and three-dimensional model representations thatcan incorporate various complexities in fracture network geometry. Oneunique feature of these pulse injection experiments is that the entiretest cycle, both the initial pressure increase and subsequent pressurefall-off, is carefully monitored and used for the evaluation of the insitu hydromechanical behavior. Field test data are evaluated by plottingfracture normal displacement as a function of fluid pressure, measured atthe same borehole. The resulting normal displacement-versus-pressurecurves show a characteristic loop, in which the paths for loading(pressure increase) and unloading (pressure decrease) are different. Bymatching this characteristic loop behavior, the fracture normal stiffnessand an equivalent stiffness (Young's modulus) of the surrounding rockmass can be back-calculated. Evaluation of the field tests by couplednumerical hydromechanical modeling shows that initial fracture hydraulicaperture and normal stiffness vary by a factor of 2 to 3 for the twomonitoring points within the same fracture plane. Moreover, the analysesshow that hydraulic aperture and the normal stiffness of the pulse-testedfracture, the stiffness of surrounding rock matrix, and the propertiesand geometry of the surrounding fracture network significantly affectcoupled hydromechanical responses during the pulse injection test. Morespecifically, the pressure-increase path of the normaldisplacement-versus-pressure curve is highly dependent on thehydromechanical parameters of the tested fracture and the stiffness ofthe matrix near the injection point, whereas the pressure-decrease pathis highly influenced by mechanical processes within a larger portion ofthe surrounding fractured rock.

  16. Patterns and perspectives in applied fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkle, J.G.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This lecture begins with a overview of applied fracture mechanics pertinent to safety of pressure vessels. It then progresses to a chronological panorama of experimental and analytical results. To be useful and dependable in safety analysis of real structures, new analysis developments must be physically realistic, which means that they must accurately describe physical cause and effect. Consequently, before mathematical modeling can begin, cause and effect must be established from experimental data. This can be difficult and time consuming, but worth the effort. Accordingly, the theme of this paper is that the search for patterns is constant and vital. This theme is illustrated by the development of small, single-specimen, fracture toughness testing techniques. It is also illustrated by the development, based on two different published large-strain, elastic-plastic, three-dimensional finite-element analyses, of a hypothesis concerning three-dimensional loss of constraint. When a generalization of Irwin`s thickness-normalized plastic-zone parameter, reaches a value close to 2{pi}, the through-thickness contraction strain at the apex of the near-tip logarithmic-spiral slip-line region becomes the dominant negative strain accommodating crack opening. Because slip lines passing from the midplane to the stress-free side surfaces do not have to curve, once these slip lines are established, stresses near the crack tip are only elevated by strain hardening and constraint becomes significantly relaxed. This hypothesis, based on published three-dimensional elastic-plastic analyses, provides a potentially valuable means for gaining additional insight into constraint effects on fracture toughness by considering the roles played by the plastic strains as well as the stresses that develop near a crack tip.

  17. Aperture-based antihydrogen gravity experiment: Parallel plate geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, J. R.; Hedlof, R. M.; Ordonez, C. A. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical model and a Monte Carlo simulation are presented of an experiment that could be used to determine the direction of the acceleration of antihydrogen due to gravity. The experiment would rely on methods developed by existing antihydrogen research collaborations. The configuration consists of two circular, parallel plates that have an axis of symmetry directed away from the center of the earth. The plates are separated by a small vertical distance, and include one or more pairs of circular barriers that protrude from the upper and lower plates, thereby forming an aperture between the plates. Antihydrogen annihilations that occur just beyond each barrier, within a “shadow” region, are asymmetric on the upper plate relative to the lower plate. The probability for such annihilations is determined for a point, line and spheroidal source of antihydrogen. The production of 100,000 antiatoms is predicted to be necessary for the aperture-based experiment to indicate the direction of free fall acceleration of antimatter, provided that antihydrogen is produced within a sufficiently small antiproton plasma at a temperature of 4 K.

  18. Fracture characterization and estimation of fracture porosity of naturally fractured reservoirs with no matrix porosity using stochastic fractal models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tae Hyung

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining fracture characteristics at the laboratory scale is a major challenge. It is known that fracture characteristics are scale dependent; as such, the minimum sample size should be deduced in order to scale to reservoir dimensions. The main...

  19. Experimental Evidence for Self-Limiting Reactive Flow through a Fractured Cement Core: Implications for Time-Dependent Wellbore Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huerta, Nicolas J.; Hesse, Marc A.; Bryant, Steven L.; Strazisar, Brian R; Lopano, Christina L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a set of reactive transport experiments in cement fractures. The experiments simulate coupling between flow and reaction when acidic, CO{sub 2}-rich fluids flow along a leaky wellbore. An analog dilute acid with a pH between 2.0 and 3.15 was injected at constant rate between 0.3 and 9.4 cm/s into a fractured cement core. Pressure differential across the core and effluent pH were measured to track flow path evolution, which was analyzed with electron microscopy after injection. In many experiments reaction was restricted within relatively narrow, tortuous channels along the fracture surface. The observations are consistent with coupling between flow and dissolution/precipitation. Injected acid reacts along the fracture surface to leach calcium from cement phases. Ahead of the reaction front, high pH pore fluid mixes with calcium-rich water and induces mineral precipitation. Increases in the pressure differential for most experiments indicate that precipitation can be sufficient to restrict flow. Experimental data from this study combined with published field evidence for mineral precipitation along cemented annuli suggests that leakage of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids along a wellbore may seal the leakage pathway if the initial aperture is small and residence time allows mobilization and precipitation of minerals along the fracture.

  20. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Potential within the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paiute Reservation GBCGE Resarch, Education and Outreach Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey...

  1. 2012 Peer Review Overview Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing (LBNL) - 512 FY11 AOP 5 Break Break Break Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal...

  2. Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS Candidate and Conventional...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Nevada through Directed Research and Public Outreach Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey...

  3. Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV...

  4. 1Plastic deformation and fracture processes in metallic and ceramic nanomaterials... 2007 Advanced Study Center Co. Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovid'ko Ilya A.

    1Plastic deformation and fracture processes in metallic and ceramic nanomaterials... © 2007-mail: ovidko@def.ipme.ru PLASTIC DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE PROCESSES IN METALLIC AND CERAMIC NANOMATERIALS at the boundaries between the large grains and nanoscale matrix. In the framework of the model, cracks are generated

  5. Three Models for Water ooding in a Naturally Fractured Petroleum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THREE MODELS FOR WATERFLOODING IN A NATURALLY. FRACTURED ... 1. Introduction. For the purposes of this paper a naturally fractured reservoir.

  6. Method for directional hydraulic fracturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, David E. (West St. Paul, MN); Daly, Daniel W. (Crystal, MN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for directional hydraulic fracturing using borehole seals to confine pressurized fluid in planar permeable regions, comprising: placing a sealant in the hole of a structure selected from geologic or cemented formations to fill the space between a permeable planar component and the geologic or cemented formation in the vicinity of the permeable planar component; making a hydraulic connection between the permeable planar component and a pump; permitting the sealant to cure and thereby provide both mechanical and hydraulic confinement to the permeable planar component; and pumping a fluid from the pump into the permeable planar component to internally pressurize the permeable planar component to initiate a fracture in the formation, the fracture being disposed in the same orientation as the permeable planar component.

  7. A study of strange and strangeonium states produced in LASS (Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; D'Amore, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Endorf, R.; Fujii, K.; Hayashii, H.; Iwata, S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from the analysis of several final states from a high-sensitivity (4 ev/nb) study of inelastic K/sup -/p interactions at 11 GeV/c carried out in the LASS Spectrometer at SLAC. New information is reported on leading and underlying K* states, and the strangeonium states produced by hypercharge exchange exchange are compared and contrasted with those observed in radiative decays of the J/psi. 8 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Large-Pore Apertures in a Series of Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy MaterialsFeatured VideosTechnologies | Blandine

  9. Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paillet, Frederick I.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

  10. A Global Model for Fracture Falloff Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marongiu-Porcu, Matteo

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The reservoir permeability is an essential input for the optimum design of modern hydraulic fracture treatments, which are undeniably the crucial technology involved in the development of tight and/or unconventional gas reservoirs. The fracture...

  11. Fluid Flow Simulation in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to analyze fluid flow in fractured reservoirs. In most petroleum reservoirs, particularly carbonate reservoirs and some tight sands, natural fractures play a critical role in controlling fluid ...

  12. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    during hydraulic fracturing Moore and Glaser, in press JGR,press JGR, B – 2006JB004373 where m is the average hydraulichydraulic fracturing with water. Moore and Glaser, in press

  13. Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks Mingjie Chen Keywords: Hydraulic fracturing Fractal dimension Surrogate model Optimization Global sensitivity a b s t r a c t Hydraulic fracturing has been used widely to stimulate production of oil, natural gas

  14. Wave Propagation in Fractured Poroelastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic wave propagation through fractures and cracks is an important subject in exploration and production geophysics, earthquake seismology and mining.

  15. Discrete fracture modeling for fractured reservoirs using Voronoi grid blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Matthew Edward

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    or pseudofracture groups modeled in their own grid blocks. Discrete Fracture Modeling (DFN) is still a relatively new field, and most research on it up to this point has been done with Delaunay tessellations. This research investigates an alternative approach using...

  16. Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving interfaces Anthony Peirce Department Mitchell (UBC) · Ed Siebrits (SLB, Houston) #12;2 Outline · What is a hydraulic fracture? · Scaling Fluid Proppant #12;6 An actual hydraulic fracture #12;7 HF experiment (Jeffrey et al CSIRO) #12;8 1D

  17. Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving interfaces Anthony Peirce Department Siebrits (SLB, Houston) #12;2 Outline · What is a hydraulic fracture? · Mathematical models of hydraulic fracture · Scaling and special solutions for 1-2D models · Numerical modeling for 2-3D problems

  18. RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT analylsiis for constant pressure production in a naturally fractured reservoir is presented. The solution, the Warren and Root model which assumes fracturing is perfectly unifom, provides an upper bound of reservoir

  19. Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    APRIL 2013 Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California: A WAsteWAteR And WAteR QuAlity Pe | Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California Wheeler Institute for Water Law & Policy Center for Law #12;Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California | 3Berkeley law | wheeler InstItute for water law

  20. Fractured shale reservoirs: Towards a realistic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton-Smith, T. [Applied Earth Science, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractured shale reservoirs are fundamentally unconventional, which is to say that their behavior is qualitatively different from reservoirs characterized by intergranular pore space. Attempts to analyze fractured shale reservoirs are essentially misleading. Reliance on such models can have only negative results for fractured shale oil and gas exploration and development. A realistic model of fractured shale reservoirs begins with the history of the shale as a hydrocarbon source rock. Minimum levels of both kerogen concentration and thermal maturity are required for effective hydrocarbon generation. Hydrocarbon generation results in overpressuring of the shale. At some critical level of repressuring, the shale fractures in the ambient stress field. This primary natural fracture system is fundamental to the future behavior of the fractured shale gas reservoir. The fractures facilitate primary migration of oil and gas out of the shale and into the basin. In this process, all connate water is expelled, leaving the fractured shale oil-wet and saturated with oil and gas. What fluids are eventually produced from the fractured shale depends on the consequent structural and geochemical history. As long as the shale remains hot, oil production may be obtained. (e.g. Bakken Shale, Green River Shale). If the shale is significantly cooled, mainly gas will be produced (e.g. Antrim Shale, Ohio Shale, New Albany Shale). Where secondary natural fracture systems are developed and connect the shale to aquifers or to surface recharge, the fractured shale will also produce water (e.g. Antrim Shale, Indiana New Albany Shale).

  1. 3-D airborne ultrasound synthetic aperture imaging based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    3-D airborne ultrasound synthetic aperture imaging based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic was implemented by mechanical scanning a co-located transmitter and receiver using the classic synthetic aperture, silicone rubber, and foam plastics, in an attempt to overcome bad mechanical impedance matching between

  2. Aperture synthesis of time-limited X waves and analysis of their propagation characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jian-yu

    of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering Cairo University, Giza, Egypt Ioannis M. Besieris. Also, the possibility of using a finite-time excitation of a dynamic aperture to generate a finite-energy-time aperture. This confirms the fact that time windowing the infinite energy X-wave excitation is a viable

  3. Super-resolution in incoherent optical imaging using synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Super-resolution in incoherent optical imaging using synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements Barak the Rayleigh limit of the system is obtained by tiling digitally several Fresnel holographic elements into a complete Fresnel hologram of the observed object. Each element is acquired by the limited-aperture system

  4. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging with Motion Estimation and , T. Callaghan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borcea, Liliana

    principles a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging and target motion estimation method that is combined of the data into properly calibrated small apertures, (b) motion or platform trajectory perturbation estimation process. X-band persistent surveillance SAR is a specific application that is covered by our

  5. Multi-Site Application of the Geomechanical Approach for Natural Fracture Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Billingsley; V. Kuuskraa

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to predict the nature and distribution of natural fracturing, Advanced Resources Inc. (ARI) incorporated concepts of rock mechanics, geologic history, and local geology into a geomechanical approach for natural fracture prediction within mildly deformed, tight (low-permeability) gas reservoirs. Under the auspices of this project, ARI utilized and refined this approach in tight gas reservoir characterization and exploratory activities in three basins: the Piceance, Wind River and the Anadarko. The primary focus of this report is the knowledge gained on natural fractural prediction along with practical applications for enhancing gas recovery and commerciality. Of importance to tight formation gas production are two broad categories of natural fractures: (1) shear related natural fractures and (2) extensional (opening mode) natural fractures. While arising from different origins this natural fracture type differentiation based on morphology is sometimes inter related. Predicting fracture distribution successfully is largely a function of collecting and understanding the available relevant data in conjunction with a methodology appropriate to the fracture origin. Initially ARI envisioned the geomechanical approach to natural fracture prediction as the use of elastic rock mechanics methods to project the nature and distribution of natural fracturing within mildly deformed, tight (low permeability) gas reservoirs. Technical issues and inconsistencies during the project prompted re-evaluation of these initial assumptions. ARI's philosophy for the geomechanical tools was one of heuristic development through field site testing and iterative enhancements to make it a better tool. The technology and underlying concepts were refined considerably during the course of the project. As with any new tool, there was a substantial learning curve. Through a heuristic approach, addressing these discoveries with additional software and concepts resulted in a stronger set of geomechanical tools. Thus, the outcome of this project is a set of predictive tools with broad applicability across low permeability gas basins where natural fractures play an important role in reservoir permeability. Potential uses for these learnings and tools range from rank exploration to field-development portfolio management. Early incorporation of the permeability development concepts presented here can improve basin assessment and direct focus to the high potential areas within basins. Insight into production variability inherent in tight naturally fractured reservoirs leads to improved wellbore evaluation and reduces the incidence of premature exits from high potential plays. A significant conclusion of this project is that natural fractures, while often an important, overlooked aspect of reservoir geology, represent only one aspect of the overall reservoir fabric. A balanced perspective encompassing all aspects of reservoir geology will have the greatest impact on exploration and development in the low permeability gas setting.

  6. Geomechanical Simulation of Fluid-Driven Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhnenko, R.; Nikolskiy, D.; Mogilevskaya, S.; Labuz, J.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project supported graduate students working on experimental and numerical modeling of rock fracture, with the following objectives: (a) perform laboratory testing of fluid-saturated rock; (b) develop predictive models for simulation of fracture; and (c) establish educational frameworks for geologic sequestration issues related to rock fracture. These objectives were achieved through (i) using a novel apparatus to produce faulting in a fluid-saturated rock; (ii) modeling fracture with a boundary element method; and (iii) developing curricula for training geoengineers in experimental mechanics, numerical modeling of fracture, and poroelasticity.

  7. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5\\times5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5\\times2.5\\times2.5 mm3 voxel size were used to evaluate our algorithm on GPU. It takes onl...

  8. Stress-dependent permeability of fractured rock masses: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Ki-Bok; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the stress-dependent permeability issue in fractured rock masses considering the effects of nonlinear normal deformation and shear dilation of fractures using a two-dimensional distinct element method program, UDEC, based on a realistic discrete fracture network realization. A series of ''numerical'' experiments were conducted to calculate changes in the permeability of simulated fractured rock masses under various loading conditions. Numerical experiments were conducted in two ways: (1) increasing the overall stresses with a fixed ratio of horizontal to vertical stresses components; and (2) increasing the differential stresses (i.e., the difference between the horizontal and vertical stresses) while keeping the magnitude of vertical stress constant. These numerical experiments show that the permeability of fractured rocks decreases with increased stress magnitudes when the stress ratio is not large enough to cause shear dilation of fractures, whereas permeability increases with increased stress when the stress ratio is large enough. Permeability changes at low stress levels are more sensitive than at high stress levels due to the nonlinear fracture normal stress-displacement relation. Significant stress-induced channeling is observed as the shear dilation causes the concentration of fluid flow along connected shear fractures. Anisotropy of permeability emerges with the increase of differential stresses, and this anisotropy can become more prominent with the influence of shear dilation and localized flow paths. A set of empirical equations in closed-form, accounting for both normal closure and shear dilation of the fractures, is proposed to model the stress-dependent permeability. These equations prove to be in good agreement with the results obtained from our numerical experiments.

  9. Effective fracture geometry obtained with large water sand ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Amrendra

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -Pressure z Compressibility Factor viii t Time M Molecular Weight R Gas Constant T Temperature Pi Initial Reservoir Pressure q Flow Rate qsc Flow Rate at Standard Condition B Formation Volume Factor Bg Formation Gas Volume Factor Gp Cumulative... be solved with two boundaries and one initial condition. iprp =)0,( (Initial Condition) (2.34) h qB r prk wrr r pi ? 2=? ? = (Constant Rate Inner Boundary...

  10. Engineering approaches to the application of fracture toughness data in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkle, J.G.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The procedures for measuring the plane strain fracture toughness, K{sub Ic}, of metals were originally developed for relatively high yield strength materials, the toughnesses of which were not affected by strain rate. The application of these procedures to lower yield strength and higher toughness structural and pressure vessel steels have since revealed a perplexing combination of problems involving the effects of geometry, stable crack growth and strain rate on the measured values of toughness. Only the geometric problems were encountered in the development of the procedures for measuring K{sub Ic}. For fracture in the linear elastic range of the load-displacement curve, these problems were overcome by specifying specimen dimensions sufficiently large with respect to the plastic zone size at fracture. However, in the case of structural and pressure vessel steels, it is not always possible to test specimens large enough for fracture to occur prior to general yielding. Therefore, in these cases, the effects of large-scale yielding prior to fracture cannot be avoided, but since they presently have no analytical explanation they are being treated empirically. The problems of geometry and strain rate effects on toughness discussed herein are complex and difficult to solve. However, taking advantage of the improvements that have recently been made in the hardware and software available for performing three-dimensional elastic-plastic and viscoplastic stress analysis, it should be possible to significantly improve the analysis of small-specimen, elastic-plastic fracture toughness data.

  11. RESEARCH PROGRAM ON FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2002-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulation of water injection in discrete fractured media with capillary pressure is a challenge. Dual-porosity models in view of their strength and simplicity can be mainly used for sugar-cube representation of fractured media. In such a representation, the transfer function between the fracture and the matrix block can be readily calculated for water-wet media. For a mixed-wet system, the evaluation of the transfer function becomes complicated due to the effect of gravity. In this work, they use a discrete-fracture model in which the fractures are discretized as one dimensional entities to account for fracture thickness by an integral form of the flow equations. This simple step greatly improves the numerical solution. Then the discrete-fracture model is implemented using a Galerkin finite element method. The robustness and the accuracy of the approach are shown through several examples. First they consider a single fracture in a rock matrix and compare the results of the discrete-fracture model with a single-porosity model. Then, they use the discrete-fracture model in more complex configurations. Numerical simulations are carried out in water-wet media as well as in mixed-wet media to study the effect of matrix and fracture capillary pressures.

  12. Tensile Fracture of Welded Polymer Interfaces: Miscibility, Entanglements and Crazing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting Ge; Gary S. Grest; Mark O. Robbins

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale molecular simulations are performed to investigate tensile failure of polymer interfaces as a function of welding time $t$. Changes in the tensile stress, mode of failure and interfacial fracture energy $G_I$ are correlated to changes in the interfacial entanglements as determined from Primitive Path Analysis. Bulk polymers fail through craze formation, followed by craze breakdown through chain scission. At small $t$ welded interfaces are not strong enough to support craze formation and fail at small strains through chain pullout at the interface. Once chains have formed an average of about one entanglement across the interface, a stable craze is formed throughout the sample. The failure stress of the craze rises with welding time and the mode of craze breakdown changes from chain pullout to chain scission as the interface approaches bulk strength. The interfacial fracture energy $G_I$ is calculated by coupling the simulation results to a continuum fracture mechanics model. As in experiment, $G_I$ increases as $t^{1/2}$ before saturating at the average bulk fracture energy $G_b$. As in previous simulations of shear strength, saturation coincides with the recovery of the bulk entanglement density. Before saturation, $G_I$ is proportional to the areal density of interfacial entanglements. Immiscibiltiy limits interdiffusion and thus suppresses entanglements at the interface. Even small degrees of immisciblity reduce interfacial entanglements enough that failure occurs by chain pullout and $G_I \\ll G_b$.

  13. Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hals, Kjetil M D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

  14. Chemically- and mechanically-mediated influences on the transport and mechanical characteristics of rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, K.-B.; Rutqvist, J.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is presented to represent changes in the mechanical and transport characteristics of fractured rock that result from coupled mechanical and chemical effects. The specific influence is the elevation of dissolution rates on contacting asperities, which results in a stress- and temperature-dependent permanent closure. A model representing this pressure-dissolution-like behavior is adapted to define the threshold and resulting response in terms of fundamental thermodynamic properties of a contacting fracture. These relations are incorporated in a stress-stiffening model of fracture closure to define the stress- and temperature-dependency of aperture loss and behavior during stress and temperature cycling. These models compare well with laboratory and field experiments, representing both decoupled isobaric and isothermal responses. The model was applied to explore the impact of these responses on heated structures in rock. The result showed a reduction in ultimate induced stresses over the case where chemical effects were not incorporated, with permanent reduction in final stresses after cooling to ambient conditions. Similarly, permeabilities may be lower than they were in the case where chemical effects were not considered, with a net reduction apparent even after cooling to ambient temperature. These heretofore-neglected effects may have a correspondingly significant impact on the performance of heated structures in rock, such as repositories for the containment of radioactive wastes.

  15. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering--Poroelastic linear-slip interface model for heterogeneous fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Schoenberg's Linear-slip Interface (LSI) model for single, compliant, viscoelastic fractures has been extended to poroelastic fractures for predicting seismic wave scattering. However, this extended model results in no impact of the in-plane fracture permeability on the scattering. Recently, we proposed a variant of the LSI model considering the heterogeneity in the in-plane fracture properties. This modified model considers wave-induced, fracture-parallel fluid flow induced by passing seismic waves. The research discussed in this paper applies this new LSI model to heterogeneous fractures to examine when and how the permeability of a fracture is reflected in the scattering of seismic waves. From numerical simulations, we conclude that the heterogeneity in the fracture properties is essential for the scattering of seismic waves to be sensitive to the permeability of a fracture.

  16. Cubic law with aperture-length correlation: implications for network scale fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is of central importance to the petroleum industry as well as to hydrogeology and geo- logical engineering with implications for contaminant migration through fractured rock masses and petroleum extraction from fractured: 19 February 2010 * Springer-Verlag 2010 C. Klimczak ()) :R. A. Schultz Geomechanics-Rock Fracture

  17. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (Black and Hower 1965). Clays consist of negatively charged aluminosilicate layers kept together by cations. The most characteristic property is their ability to adsorb water between the layers, resulting in strong repulsive forces and clay expansion... chemicals used in water fracturing such as friction reducers, fluid-loss additives, and surfactants (Black and Hower 1965). The samples used in this study had significant clay-like content. To prevent swelling, a 2% KCl solution was used throughout...

  18. Acoustic Emission in a Fluid Saturated Hetergeneous Porous Layer with Application to Hydraulic Fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, J.T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    responses during hydraulic fracturing, and aid developmentFracture Monitoring Hydraulic fracturing is a method forfluids" used for hydraulic fracturing, the above frequencies

  19. Particle-in-Cell Modeling of Magnetized Argon Plasma Flow Through Small Mechanical Apertures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam B. Sefkow and Samuel A. Cohen

    2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by observations of supersonic argon-ion flow generated by linear helicon-heated plasma devices, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to study whether stationary electrostatic layers form near mechanical apertures intersecting the flow of magnetized plasma. By self-consistently evaluating the temporal evolution of the plasma in the vicinity of the aperture, the PIC simulations characterize the roles of the imposed aperture and applied magnetic field on ion acceleration. The PIC model includes ionization of a background neutral-argon population by thermal and superthermal electrons, the latter found upstream of the aperture. Near the aperture, a transition from a collisional to a collisionless regime occurs. Perturbations of density and potential, with mm wavelengths and consistent with ion acoustic waves, propagate axially. An ion acceleration region of length ~ 200?300 ?D,e forms at the location of the aperture and is found to be an electrostatic double layer, with axially-separated regions of net positive and negative charge. Reducing the aperture diameter or increasing its length increases the double layer strength.

  20. Modeling the Ductile Brittle Fracture Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels using a Cohesive Zone Model based approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels show large variations with changes in temperature and irradiation levels. Brittle behavior is observed at lower temperatures and/or higher irradiation levels whereas ductile mode of failure is predominant at higher temperatures and/or lower irradiation levels. In addition to such temperature and radiation dependent fracture behavior, significant scatter in fracture toughness has also been observed. As a consequence of such variability in fracture behavior, accurate estimates of fracture properties of RPV steels are of utmost importance for safe and reliable operation of reactor pressure vessels. A cohesive zone based approach is being pursued in the present study where an attempt is made to obtain a unified law capturing both stable crack growth (ductile fracture) and unstable failure (cleavage fracture). The parameters of the constitutive model are dependent on both temperature and failure probability. The effect of irradiation has not been considered in the present study. The use of such a cohesive zone based approach would allow the modeling of explicit crack growth at both stable and unstable regimes of fracture. Also it would provide the possibility to incorporate more physical lower length scale models to predict DBT. Such a multi-scale approach would significantly improve the predictive capabilities of the model, which is still largely empirical.

  1. Comments on momentum aperture of 100 GeV/n Au runs in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In RHIC 2010 100 GeV/n Au run, the momentum aperture has been an issue in the re-bucketing and the beam intensity lifetime in store. Both Blue and Yellow beams with comparable storage RF voltage and peak current have suffered more beam loss than in Run 2007. In this note, some comments are made for the momentum aperture of the lattices used from the Au runs in 2007, 2008 and 2010. From the wigglings and the beam decays of each lattice, information regarding the machine momentum aperture is presented. Several directions in further improvement are discussed.

  2. Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

  3. Use of an elliptical aperture to control saturation in closely-coupled, cold iron, superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high fields permitted by superconducting windings result in saturation of closely-coupled iron in dipole and quadrupole beam transport magnets. Coupland suggested using a triangular cutout at the poles to reduce the change in the sextupole (b/sub 2/) term due to saturation. The use of an elliptical aperture in a close-coupled dipole for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has been studied using the BNL computer program MDP (a version of GFUN). The ellipse aspect ratio was varied while holding the horizontal (minor) radius constant. The proper aspect ratio gives no shift in b/sub 2/ sue to saturation, and a reduction in the b/sub 4/ shift. A modification of the ellipse also reduces b/sub 4/. The elliptical aperture introduces a large b/sub 2/ term at low field which must be compensated for by the coil design. A practical coil design which does this for the RHIC magnet is presented. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Thermal Fracturing of Geothermal Wells and the Effects of Borehole Orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hals, Kjetil M D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An enhanced geothermal system (EGS) expands the potential of geothermal energy by enabling the exploitation of regions that lack conventional hydrothermal resources. The EGS subsurface system is created by engineering enhanced flow paths between injection and production wells. Hydraulic stimulation of existing fracture networks has been successfully achieved for unconventional geothermal resources. More recently proposed concepts increase the use of drilled wellbores in hard rock to connect the injection and production wells. The present work investigates the long-term thermal effects of deviated geothermal wellbores and studies how the cooling of the borehole wall results in thermally induced tensile fractures. The results show that induced fractures are created by a combination of in situ and thermal stresses, and that the extent to which thermally induced tensile wall fractures are created largely depends on how the wellbores are oriented with respect to the pre-existing stresses of the reservoir. If the s...

  5. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  6. SNM neutron detection using a time-gated synthetic aperture hybrid approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molinar, M.; Yi, C.; Edgar, C. A.; Manalo, K.; Chin, M.; Sjoden, G. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta GA 30332-0745 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work focuses on using forward and adjoint transport in a hybrid application of 3-D deterministic (PENTRAN) and Monte Carlo (MCNP5) codes to model a series of neutron detector blocks. These blocks, or 'channels, ' contain a unique set of moderators with 4 atm He-3 detectors tuned to detect and profile a gross energy spectrum of a passing neutron (SNM) source. Ganging the units together as a large area system enables one to apply time gating the source-detector response to maximize signal to noise responses from a passing source with minimal background; multiple units may be positioned as a collective synthetic aperture detector array to be used as a way of performing real time neutron spectroscopy for detecting special nuclear materials in moving vehicles. The initial design, detector response coupling, confirmation of initial design functionality using adjoint transport calculations, and realistic simulation using PENTRAN and MCNP5 are presented. Future work will include optimization and application to realistic scenarios and additional sources. (authors)

  7. Apparatus and method for monitoring underground fracturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warpinski, Norman R. (Albuquerque, NM); Steinfort, Terry D. (Tijeras, NM); Branagan, Paul T. (Las Vegas, NV); Wilmer, Roy H. (Las Vegas, NV)

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring deformation of a rock mass around the vicinity of a fracture, commonly induced by hydraulic fracturing is provided. To this end, a well is drilled offset from the proposed fracture region, if no existing well is present. Once the well is formed to a depth approximately equal or exceeding the depth of the proposed fracture, a plurality of inclinometers, for example tiltmeters, are inserted downhole in the well. The inclinometers are located both above and below the approximate depth of the proposed fracture. The plurality of inclinometers may be arranged on a wireline that may be retrieved from the downhole portion of the well and used again or, alternatively, the inclinometers may be cemented in place. In either event, the inclinometers are used to measure the deformation of the rock around the induced fracture.

  8. Apparatus and method for monitoring underground fracturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warpinski, N.R.; Steinfort, T.D.; Branagan, P.T.; Wilmer, R.H.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring deformation of a rock mass around the vicinity of a fracture, commonly induced by hydraulic fracturing is provided. To this end, a well is drilled offset from the proposed fracture region, if no existing well is present. Once the well is formed to a depth approximately equal or exceeding the depth of the proposed fracture, a plurality of inclinometers, for example tiltmeters, are inserted downhole in the well. The inclinometers are located both above and below the approximate depth of the proposed fracture. The plurality of inclinometers may be arranged on a wireline that may be retrieved from the downhole portion of the well and used again or, alternatively, the inclinometers may be cemented in place. In either event, the inclinometers are used to measure the deformation of the rock around the induced fracture. 13 figs.

  9. Investigation of the effect of gel residue on hydraulic fracture conductivity using dynamic fracture conductivity test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marpaung, Fivman

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    conductivity is created when proppant slurry is pumped into a hydraulic fracture in low permeability rock. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially, we pump proppant/ fracturing fluid slurries... different or special methods for completion, stimulation, and/or production techniques to retrieve the resource. Natural gas from coal or coal bed methane, tight gas sands, shale gas, and gas hydrates are all examples of unconventional gas reservoirs...

  10. I N F I N I T E CONDUCTIVITY FRACTURE NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    I N F I N I T E CONDUCTIVITY FRACTURE I N A NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIR A REPORT SUBMITTED How& #12;ABSTRACT This r e p o r t describes t h e behavior of a n a t u r a l l y fractured r e s e r v o i r when a well is producing a t constant rate through an i n f i n i t e conductivity fracture

  11. Joint anisotropy characterization and image formation in wide-angle synthetic aperture radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varshney, Kush R. (Kush Raj)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imagery formed from wide-angle synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements has fine cross-range resolution in principle. However, conventional SAR image formation techniques assume isotropic scattering, which is not valid ...

  12. Focused synthetic aperture radar processing of ice-sounder data collected over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legarsky, J.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Akins, T. L.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing algorithm for airborne/spaceborne ice-sounding radar systems and applied it to data collected in Greenland. By using focused SAR (phase-corrected coherent averaging), we improved along...

  13. Synthetic Aperture Sonar Imaging via One-Way Wave Quyen Huynh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    produces a Naval Surface Warfare Center - Panama City FL, research partially supported by the US Office in the phase of the real aperture data. We adopt the Stop and Go model; a point source radiates at time t = 0

  14. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  15. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  16. Wave Propagation in Fractured Poroelastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave Propagation in Fractured. Poroelastic Media. WCCM, Barcelona, Spain, July 2014. Juan E. Santos,. 1. 1. Instituto del Gas y del Petr´oleo (IGPUBA), UBA,

  17. Fracturing technology poised for rapid advancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von Flatern, R.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the advances and current status of hydraulic fracturing and the industry's ability to design and predict the results. Although modeling techniques have improved over the years, there still is no model which can be considered very reliable. The paper considers alternatives to help improve the reliability of these models such as on-site quality control. This quality control aspect entails the site-specific tailoring of a fracturing fluid to be better suited for the target fracturing zone environment and adjusting the fluid properties accordingly. It also entails various methods for fluid injection and placement of propping agents. Some future trends in hydraulic fracturing are also discussed.

  18. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering ŒPoroelastic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiji Nakagawa

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 18, 2010 ... The new model contains fracture permeability in the plan-parallel direction. ... Division of Chemical Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy ...

  19. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fracture Characterization in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log...

  20. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 4.5.2 Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Presentation Number: 022 Investigator: Queen, John (Hi-Q Geophysical Inc.) Objectives: To develop...

  1. FRACTURED RESERVOIR E&P IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN BASINS: A 3-D RTM MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Ortoleva; J. Comer; A. Park; D. Payne; W. Sibo; K. Tuncay

    2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Key natural gas reserves in Rocky Mountain and other U.S. basins are in reservoirs with economic producibility due to natural fractures. In this project, we evaluate a unique technology for predicting fractured reservoir location and characteristics ahead of drilling based on a 3-D basin/field simulator, Basin RTM. Recommendations are made for making Basin RTM a key element of a practical E&P strategy. A myriad of reaction, transport, and mechanical (RTM) processes underlie the creation, cementation and preservation of fractured reservoirs. These processes are often so strongly coupled that they cannot be understood individually. Furthermore, sedimentary nonuniformity, overall tectonics and basement heat flux histories make a basin a fundamentally 3-D object. Basin RTM is the only 3-D, comprehensive, fully coupled RTM basin simulator available for the exploration of fractured reservoirs. Results of Basin RTM simulations are presented, that demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Furthermore, it is shown how Basin RTM is a basis for a revolutionary automated methodology for simultaneously using a range of remote and other basin datasets to locate reservoirs and to assess risk. Characteristics predicted by our model include reserves and composition, matrix and fracture permeability, reservoir rock strength, porosity, in situ stress and the statistics of fracture aperture, length and orientation. Our model integrates its input data (overall sedimentation, tectonic and basement heat flux histories) via the laws of physics and chemistry that describe the RTM processes to predict reservoir location and characteristics. Basin RTM uses 3-D, finite element solutions of the equations of rock mechanics, organic and inorganic diagenesis and multi-phase hydrology to make its predictions. As our model predicts reservoir characteristics, it can be used to optimize production approaches (e.g., assess the stability of horizontal wells or vulnerability of fractures to production-induced formation pressure drawdown). The Piceance Basin (Colorado) was chosen for this study because of the extensive set of data provided to us by federal agencies and industry partners, its remaining reserves, and its similarities with other Rocky Mountain basins. We focused on the Rulison Field to test our ability to capture details in a well-characterized area. In this study, we developed a number of general principles including (1) the importance of even subtle flexure in creating fractures; (2) the tendency to preserve fractures due to the compressibility of gases; (3) the importance of oscillatory fracture/flow cycles in the expulsion of natural gas from source rock; and (4) that predicting fractures requires a basin model that is comprehensive, all processes are coupled, and is fully 3-D. A major difficulty in using Basin RTM or other basin simulator has been overcome in this project; we have set forth an information theory technology for automatically integrating basin modeling with classical database analysis; this technology also provides an assessment of risk. We have created a relational database for the Piceance Basin. We have developed a formulation of devolatilization shrinkage that integrates organic geochemical kinetics into incremental stress theory, allowing for the prediction of coal cleating and associated enhancement of natural gas expulsion from coal. An estimation of the potential economic benefits of the technologies developed or recommended here is set forth. All of the above findings are documented in this report.

  2. Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

  3. The Role of Acidizing in Proppant Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densirimongkol, Jurairat

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    in fracture conductivity and unsuccessful stimulation treatment. In early years, because of the increase in the success of proppant fracturing, proppant partial monolayer has been put forward as a method that helps generate the maximum fracture conductivity...

  4. Seismic characterization of fractured reservoirs using 3D double beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an efficient target-oriented method to characterize seismic properties of fractured reservoirs: the spacing between fractures and the fracture orientation. We use both singly scattered and multiply scattered ...

  5. Efficient Double-Beam Characterization for Fractured Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    We proposed an efficient target-oriented method to characterize seismic properties of fractured reservoirs: the spacing between fractures and the fracture orientation. Based on the diffraction theory, the scattered wave ...

  6. Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitakbunkate, Termpan

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    to find the maximum productivity index for a given proppant amount. Then, the dimensionless fracture conductivity index corresponding to the maximum productivity index can be computed. The penetration ration, the fracture length, and the propped fracture...

  7. Studying Hydraulic Fracturing through Time-variant Seismic Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Qifan

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Studying seismic anisotropy by shear wave splitting can help us better understand the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and fracture systems. Shear wave splitting can be caused by fracturing and also can naturally take place in most sedimentary...

  8. Ductile fracture modeling : theory, experimental investigation and numerical verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Liang, 1973-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fracture initiation in ductile materials is governed by the damaging process along the plastic loading path. A new damage plasticity model for ductile fracture is proposed. Experimental results show that fracture ...

  9. INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    injection into a fractured reservoir system. A reservoirIn the case of fractured reservoirs, Equations (25) and (26)c ww q a >> For fractured reservoirs, the former expression

  10. Laboratory-scale fracture conductivity created by acid etching 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pournik, Maysam

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Success of acid fracturing treatment depends greatly on the created conductivity under closure stress. In order to have sufficient conductivity, the fracture face must be non-uniformly etched while the fracture strength maintained to withstand...

  11. Multipinhole collimator with 20 apertures for a brain SPECT application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Ellin, Justin R.; Shrestha, Uttam; Seo, Youngho, E-mail: youngho.seo@ucsf.edu [Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94107 (United States); Huang, Qiu [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Gullberg, Grant T. [Department of Radiotracer Development and Imaging Technology, Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94702 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Several new technologies for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) instrumentation with parallel-hole collimation have been proposed to improve detector sensitivity and signal collection efficiency. Benefits from improved signal efficiency include shorter acquisition times and lower dose requirements. In this paper, the authors show a possibility of over an order of magnitude enhancement in photon detection efficiency (from 7.6 × 10{sup ?5} to 1.6 × 10{sup ?3}) for dopamine transporter (DaT) imaging of the striatum over the conventional SPECT parallel-hole collimators by use of custom-designed 20 multipinhole (20-MPH) collimators with apertures of 0.75 cm diameter. Methods: Quantifying specific binding ratio (SBR) of {sup 123}I-ioflupane or {sup 123}I-iometopane’s signal at the striatal region is a common brain imaging method to confirm the diagnosis of the Parkinson’s disease. The authors performed imaging of a striatal phantom filled with aqueous solution of I-123 and compared camera recovery ratios of SBR acquired between low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) parallel-hole collimators and 20-MPH collimators. Results: With only two-thirds of total acquisition time (20 min against 30 min), a comparable camera recovery ratio of SBR was achieved using 20-MPH collimators in comparison to that from the LEHR collimator study. Conclusions: Their systematic analyses showed that the 20-MPH collimator could be a promising alternative for the DaT SPECT imaging for brain over the traditional LEHR collimator, which could give both shorter scan time and improved diagnostic accuracy.

  12. Field-Scale Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient for Fractured Rock: Results From Literature Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui Hai; Molz, Fred J.; Zhang, Yingqi; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed fluid flow in fractured reservoirs: An analysis ofa hydraulically fractured granite geothermal reservoir, Soc.

  13. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crackin a naturally fractured gas reservoir, The Leading Edge,

  14. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Permeability Change in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Using a Fully Coupled Displacement Discontinuity Method.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Qingfeng

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    finite difference method to solve the fluid flow in fractures, a fully coupled displacement discontinuity method to build the global relation of fracture deformation, and the Barton-Bandis model of fracture deformation to build the local relation...

  15. active fracture model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    porosity of naturally fractured reservoirs with no matrix porosity using stochastic fractal models Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Determining fracture characteristics...

  16. Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Detecting...

  17. Images of Fracture Sustainability Test on Stripa Granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Kneafsey

    2014-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of the Stripa Granite core before and after the fracture sustainability test. Photos of fracture faces of Stripa Granite core.

  18. Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 4.4.1 Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI) Presentation Number: 015 Investigator: Patterson, Doug...

  19. Images of Fracture Sustainability Test on Stripa Granite

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tim Kneafsey

    Images of the Stripa Granite core before and after the fracture sustainability test. Photos of fracture faces of Stripa Granite core.

  20. acetabular internal fracture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  1. age fracture mechanics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  2. alloys fracture mechanics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  3. applying fracture mechanics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  4. advanced fracture characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  5. Identification of MHF Fracture Planes and Flow Paths- a Correlation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flow paths. We applied this technique to seismic data collected during a massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatment and found that the fracture planes determined by the...

  6. Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a...

  7. Monitoring of Fracture Cri0cal Steel Bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    #12;Monitoring of Fracture Cri0cal Steel Bridges: Acous0c Emission Sensors system on other fracture cri0cal steel bridges #12;Project Impact #12;Thank

  8. Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers...

  9. Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char....

  10. Modeling of Acid Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Jawad, Murtada s

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    equations are used to draw 3D velocity and pressure profiles. Part of the fluid diffuses or leaks off into the fracture walls and dissolves part of the fracture face according to the chemical reaction below. 2H^(+)(aq) + CO((2-)/3) ? H_(2 )CO_(3)(aq) ? CO...

  11. Fracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    of synthetic polycrystalline diamond make it a promising material for many structural applications studies on the fracture toughness of polycrystalline diamond,29 primarily due to the difficultiesFracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty Ctystallume, 3506 Bassett Street, Santa Clara, California

  12. Using microstructure observations to quantify fracture properties and improve reservoir simulations. Final report, September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laubach, S.E.; Marrett, R.; Rossen, W.; Olson, J.; Lake, L.; Ortega, O.; Gu, Y.; Reed, R.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research for this project provides new technology to understand and successfully characterize, predict, and simulate reservoir-scale fractures. Such fractures have worldwide importance because of their influence on successful extraction of resources. The scope of this project includes creation and testing of new methods to measure, interpret, and simulate reservoir fractures that overcome the challenge of inadequate sampling. The key to these methods is the use of microstructures as guides to the attributes of the large fractures that control reservoir behavior. One accomplishment of the project research is a demonstration that these microstructures can be reliably and inexpensively sampled. Specific goals of this project were to: create and test new methods of measuring attributes of reservoir-scale fractures, particularly as fluid conduits, and test the methods on samples from reservoirs; extrapolate structural attributes to the reservoir scale through rigorous mathematical techniques and help build accurate and useful 3-D models of the interwell region; and design new ways to incorporate geological and geophysical information into reservoir simulation and verify the accuracy by comparison with production data. New analytical methods developed in the project are leading to a more realistic characterization of fractured reservoir rocks. Testing diagnostic and predictive approaches was an integral part of the research, and several tests were successfully completed.

  13. Hydraulic fracturing slurry transport in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.N.; Lord, D.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal-well activity has increased throughout the industry in the past few years. To design a successful hydraulic fracturing treatment for horizontal wells, accurate information on the transport properties of slurry in horizontal pipe is required. Limited information exists that can be used to estimate critical deposition and resuspension velocities when proppants are transported in horizontal wells with non-Newtonian fracturing gels. This paper presents a study of transport properties of various hydraulic fracturing slurries in horizontal pipes. Flow data are gathered in three transparent horizontal pipes with different diameters. Linear and crosslinked fracturing gels were studied, and the effects of variables--e.g., pipe size; polymer-gelling-agent concentration; fluid rheological properties; crosslinking effects; proppant size, density, and concentrations; fluid density; and slurry pump rate--on critical deposition and resuspension velocities were investigated. Also, equations to estimate the critical deposition and resuspension velocities of fracturing gels are provided.

  14. Methodologies and new user interfaces to optimize hydraulic fracturing design and evaluate fracturing performance for gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenxin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents and develops efficient and effective methodologies for optimal hydraulic fracture design and fracture performance evaluation. These methods incorporate algorithms that simultaneously optimize all of ...

  15. Direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestrovic, Ante; Milette, Marie-Pierre; Nichol, Alan; Clark, Brenda G.; Otto, Karl [Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) and Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Medical Physics, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the first investigation of using direct aperture optimization (DAO) for online adaptive radiation therapy (ART). A geometrical model representing the anatomy of a typical prostate case was created. To simulate interfractional deformations, four different anatomical deformations were created by systematically deforming the original anatomy by various amounts (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 cm). We describe a series of techniques where the original treatment plan was adapted in order to correct for the deterioration of dose distribution quality caused by the anatomical deformations. We found that the average time needed to adapt the original plan to arrive at a clinically acceptable plan is roughly half of the time needed for a complete plan regeneration, for all four anatomical deformations. Furthermore, through modification of the DAO algorithm the optimization search space was reduced and the plan adaptation was significantly accelerated. For the first anatomical deformation (0.25 cm), the plan adaptation was six times more efficient than the complete plan regeneration. For the 0.50 and 0.75 cm deformations, the optimization efficiency was increased by a factor of roughly 3 compared to the complete plan regeneration. However, for the anatomical deformation of 1.00 cm, the reduction of the optimization search space during plan adaptation did not result in any efficiency improvement over the original (nonmodified) plan adaptation. The anatomical deformation of 1.00 cm demonstrates the limit of this approach. We propose an innovative approach to online ART in which the plan adaptation and radiation delivery are merged together and performed concurrently--adaptive radiation delivery (ARD). A fundamental advantage of ARD is the fact that radiation delivery can start almost immediately after image acquisition and evaluation. Most of the original plan adaptation is done during the radiation delivery, so the time spent adapting the original plan does not increase the overall time the patient has to spend on the treatment couch. As a consequence, the effective time allotted for plan adaptation is drastically reduced. For the 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 cm anatomical deformations, the treatment time was increased by only 2, 4, and 6 s, respectively, as compared to no plan adaptation. For the anatomical deformation of 1.0 cm the time increase was substantially larger. The anatomical deformation of 1.0 cm represents an extreme case, which is rarely observed for the prostate, and again demonstrates the limit of this approach. ARD shows great potential for an online adaptive method with minimal extension of treatment time.

  16. Use of fracture surface features to improve core description and fracture interpretation in Niobrara and Gallup formations, Colorado and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, B.J.; Petrusak, R.L.; Kulander, B.R. (Amoco Production Co. Research, Tulsa, OK (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Niobrara formation in the Denver basin and the Gallup formation in the eastern San Juan Basin are very fine-grained, low-permeability reservoirs. Natural fracturing provides essential reservoir permeability. When natural and induced fractures are correctly identified in core, understanding of key fractured reservoir characteristics such as fracture spacing, fracture intensity, and fracture size improves greatly. For example, the Gallup has a significant amount of non-mineralized natural fractures which are generally difficult to identify in core as natural. If these fractures are misidentified as induced, fracture intensity may be underestimated and fracture spacing may be overestimated. Diagnostic fracture surface features are very well developed in the Gallup and Niobrara. Proper identification of induced fractures and nonmineralized natural fractures is done by examining these fracture surface features under oblique illumination. The Niobrara cores that were examined provide excellent examples of induced fractures. These cores have predominately mineral-filled and slickened natural fractures. Fracture surface features on the non-mineralized fractures positively identify these fractures as induced and demonstrate that nonmineralized natural fractures are a minor component of the reservoir. The Gallup cores provide excellent examples of the diagnostic surface features of natural fractures. Fractured intervals up to 20 ft long have been recovered in Gallup core. Multiple individual fractures which comprise the larger fractured intervals are identified using fracture surface morphology. This type of detailed fracture description improves evaluations of fractured reservoir quality in the Gallup formation.

  17. NEW AND NOVEL FRACTURE STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF EXISTING GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage wells are prone to continued deliverability loss at a reported average rate of 5% per annum (in the U.S.). This is a result of formation damage due to the introduction of foreign materials during gas injection, scale deposition and/or fines mobilization during gas withdrawal, and even the formation and growth of bacteria. As a means to bypass this damage and sustain/enhance well deliverability, several new and novel fracture stimulation technologies were tested in gas storage fields across the U.S. as part of a joint U.S. Department of Energy and Gas Research Institute R&D program. These new technologies include tip-screenout fracturing, hydraulic fracturing with liquid CO{sub 2} and proppant, extreme overbalance fracturing, and high-energy gas fracturing. Each of these technologies in some way address concerns with fracturing on the part of gas storage operators, such as fracture height growth, high permeability formations, and fluid sensitivity. Given the historical operator concerns over hydraulic fracturing in gas storage wells, plus the many other unique characteristics and resulting stimulation requirements of gas storage reservoirs (which are described later), the specific objective of this project was to identify new and novel fracture stimulation technologies that directly address these concerns and requirements, and to demonstrate/test their potential application in gas storage wells in various reservoir settings across the country. To compare these new methods to current industry deliverability enhancement norms in a consistent manner, their application was evaluated on a cost per unit of added deliverability basis, using typical non-fracturing well remediation methods as the benchmark and considering both short-term and long-term deliverability enhancement results. Based on the success (or lack thereof) of the various fracture stimulation technologies investigated, guidelines for their application, design and implementation have been developed. A final research objective was to effectively deploy the knowledge and experience gained from the project to the gas storage industry at-large.

  18. LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

  19. Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of M42: Aperture Polarimetry of Point-like Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuhiko Kusakabe; Motohide Tamura; Ryo Kandori; Jun Hashimoto; Yasushi Nakajima; Tetsuya Nagata; Takahiro Nagayama; Jim Hough; Phil Lucas

    2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted aperture polarimetry of ~500 stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) in M42 based on our wide-field (~8'\\times 8') $JHKs$ band polarimetry. Most of the near-infrared (NIR) polarizations are dichroic, with position angles of polarization agreeing, both globally and locally, with previous far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter observations, having taken into account the 90$^\\circ $ difference in angles between dichroic absorption and emission. This is consistent with the idea that both NIR dichroic polarizations and FIR/submillimeter thermal polarizations trace the magnetic fields in the OMC-1 region. The magnetic fields inferred from these observations show a pinch at scales less than 0.5 pc with a centroid near IRc2. The hourglass-shaped magnetic field pattern is explained by the models in which the magnetic field lines are dragged along with the contracting gas and then wound up by rotation in a disk. The highly polarized region to the northwest of IRc2 and the low-polarized region near the bright bar are also common among NIR and FIR/submillimeter data, although a few regions of discrepancy exist. We have also discerned ~50 possible highly polarized sources whose polarizations are more likely to be intrinsic rather than dichroic. Their polarization efficiencies ($P(H)/A(H)$) are too large to be explained by the interstellar polarization. These include 10 young brown dwarfs that suggest a higher polarization efficiency, which may present geometrical evidence for (unresolved) circumstellar structures around young brown dwarfs.

  20. The performance of a simulated fractured matrix reservoir subject to a bottom-water drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdi, Mojtaba

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' Large-Scale Flooding in the Fractured. Spraberr'y Trend, Area Reservoir", Journal of Petroleum Technolo , (1959), 216, 15. Razap S, H, : "Hater and, Gas Cycling Pulsing retnod for Iaprov*d 0). 1 0 oovery", yontnal of Petrole n Teobnolo, (1967), 1067...

  1. Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM Elizaveta Gordeliy of hydraulic fractures in an elastic medium. With appropriate enrichment, the XFEM resolves the Neumann(h) accuracy. For hydraulic fracture problems with a lag separating the uid front from the fracture front, we

  2. Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media represented by a DFN Model L. D. Donado, X. Sanchez-Vila, E. Ruiz* & F. J. Elorza** * Enviros Spain S.L. ** UPM #12;Fractured Media Water flows through fractures (matrix basically impervious ­ though relevant to transport) Fractures at all

  3. Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa Castro, Juan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    make necessary continuous efforts to reduce costs and improve efficiency in all aspects of drilling, completion and production techniques. Many of the recent improvements have been in well completions and hydraulic fracturing. Thus, the main goal of a...

  4. Influence of topographic stress on rock fracture : a two-dimensional numerical model for arbitrary surface topography and comparisons with borehole observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slim, Mirna I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical calculations indicate that topographic stresses in some landscapes may be large enough to fracture rocks, which in turn could influence slope stability, erosion rates, and bedrock hydrologic properties. These ...

  5. Operating the LCLS Gas Attenuator and Gas Detector System with Apertures of 6mm Diameter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D.D.; Bionta, R.M.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Kishiyama, K.I.; Roeben, M.D.; Shen, S.; /LLNL, Livermore; Stefan, P.M.; /SLAC; ,

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of increasing the apertures of the LCLS gas attenuator/gas detector system is considered. It is shown that increase of the apertures from 3 to 6 mm, together with 4-fold reduction of the operation pressure does not adversely affect the vacuum conditions upstream or downstream. No change of the pump speed and the lengths of the differential pumping cells is required. One minor modification is the use of 1.5 cm long tubular apertures in the end cells of the differential pumping system. Reduction of the pressure does not affect performance of the gas attenuator/gas detector system at the FEL energies below, roughly, 2 keV. Some minor performance degradation occurs at higher energies.

  6. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty for Osteoporotic Compression Fracture: Multivariate Study of Predictors of New Vertebral Body Fracture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: kome64@yo.rim.or.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Shomura, Yuzo [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Komemushi, Sadao [Kinki University, Schoool of Agriculture (Japan); Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To investigate the risk factors and relative risk of new compression fractures following vertebroplasty. Methods. Initially, we enrolled 104 consecutive patients with vertebral compression fractures caused by osteoporosis. A total of 83 of the 104 patients visited our hospital for follow-up examinations for more than 4 weeks after vertebroplasty. Logistic regression analysis of the data obtained from these 83 patients was used to determine relative risks of recurrent compression fractures, using 13 different factors. Results. We identified 59 new fractures in 30 of the 83 patients: 41 new fractures in vertebrae adjacent to treated vertebrae; and 18 new fractures in vertebrae not adjacent to treated vertebrae. New fractures occurred in vertebrae adjacent to treated vertebrae significantly more frequently than in vertebrae not adjacent to treated vertebrae. Only cement leakage into the disk was a significant predictor of new vertebral body fracture after vertebroplasty (odds ratio = 4.633). None of the following covariates were associated with increased risk of new fracture: age, gender, bone mineral density, the number of vertebroplasty procedures, the number of vertebrae treated per procedure, the cumulative number of vertebrae treated, the presence of a single untreated vertebra between treated vertebrae, the presence of multiple untreated vertebrae between treated vertebrae, the amount of bone cement injected per procedure, the cumulative amount of bone cement injected, cement leakage into the soft tissue around the vertebra, and cement leakage into the vein.

  7. Universal asymptotic umbrella for hydraulic fracture modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linkov, Aleksandr M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents universal asymptotic solution needed for efficient modeling of hydraulic fractures. We show that when neglecting the lag, there is universal asymptotic equation for the near-front opening. It appears that apart from the mechanical properties of fluid and rock, the asymptotic opening depends merely on the local speed of fracture propagation. This implies that, on one hand, the global problem is ill-posed, when trying to solve it as a boundary value problem under a fixed position of the front. On the other hand, when properly used, the universal asymptotics drastically facilitates solving hydraulic fracture problems (both analytically and numerically). We derive simple universal asymptotics and comment on their employment for efficient numerical simulation of hydraulic fractures, in particular, by well-established Level Set and Fast Marching Methods.

  8. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Company. The well was producing a gas condensate reservoir and questions were raised about how much drop in flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant...

  9. Geomechanical review of hydraulic fracturing technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arop, Julius Bankong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing as a method for recovering unconventional shale gas has been around for several decades. Significant research and improvement in field methods have been documented in literature on the subject. The ...

  10. Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos,,,

    pp = 28 MPa, Z. ?1. N. = (14.4+3.6i) GPa, Z. ?1. T. = (21 + 2.6i) GPa,. We consider a set of equispaced fractures with L = 1 cm and 80 % binary fractal variations ...

  11. Multiphase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goal of this research project was to improve the understanding of the gas-oil two-phase flow in fractured porous media. In addition, miscible displacement was studied to evaluate its promise for enhanced recovery.

  12. Dynamic Fracture Toughness of Polymer Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmeet Kaur

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    bar with required instrumentation to obtain load-history and initiation of crack propagation parameters followed by finite element analysis to determine desired dynamic properties. Single edge notch bend(SENB) type geometry is used for Mode-I fracture...

  13. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  14. Fracture Conductivity of the Eagle Ford Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzek, James J

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , and rock geomechanical properties. Therefore, optimizing conductivity by tailoring a well’s fracturing treatment to local reservoir characteristics is important to the oil and gas industry for economic reasons. The roots of hydraulic fracturing can... of the formation. Sahoo et al. (2013) identified that mineralogy, hydrocarbon filled porosity, and total organic content are most prominent parameters that control Eagle Ford well productivity. Mineral composition determines several geomechanical properties...

  15. Poroelastic response of orthotropic fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An algorithm is presented for inverting either laboratory or field poroelastic data for all the drained constants of an anisotropic (specifically orthotropic) fractured poroelastic system. While fractures normally weaken the system by increasing the mechanical compliance, any liquids present in these fractures are expected to increase the stiffness somewhat, thus negating to some extent the mechanical weakening influence of the fractures themselves. The analysis presented quantifies these effects and shows that the key physical variable needed to account for the pore-fluid effects is a factor of (1 - B), where B is Skempton's second coe#14;fficient and satisfies 0 {<=} #20; B < 1. This scalar factor uniformly reduces the increase in compliance due to the presence of communicating fractures, thereby stiffening the fractured composite medium by a predictable amount. One further goal of the discussion is to determine how many of the poroelastic constants need to be known by other means in order to determine the rest from remote measurements, such as seismic wave propagation data in the field. Quantitative examples arising in the analysis show that, if the fracture aspect ratio a{sub f} ~ 0.1 and the pore fluid is liquid water, then for several cases considered Skempton's B ~ 0:9, so the stiffening effect of the pore-liquid reduces the change in compliance due to the fractures by a factor 1-B ~ 0.1, in these examples. The results do however depend on the actual moduli of the unfractured elastic material, as well as on the pore-liquid bulk modulus, so these quantitative predictions are just examples, and should not be treated as universal results. Attention is also given to two previously unremarked poroelastic identities, both being useful variants of Gassmann's equations for homogeneous -- but anisotropic -- poroelasticity. Relationships to Skempton's analysis of saturated soils are also noted. The paper concludes with a discussion of alternative methods of analyzing and quantifying fluid-substitution behavior in poroelastic systems, especially for those systems having heterogeneous constitution.

  16. FRACTURE TOUGHNESS VARIABILITY IN F82H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, David S.; Sokolov, M.

    2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The fracture toughness database for F82H displays some anomalous behavior. Metallographic examination reveals banding in the center of 25 mm thick F82H plate, which is more evident in transverse section. The banding is shown to arise because some grains are etched on a very fine scale whereas the remainder is etched more strongly and better delineates the martensite lath structure. However, the banding found does not provide explanation for the anomalous fracture toughness behavior.

  17. TRITIUM EFFECTS ON WELDMENT FRACTURE TOUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, M; Michael Tosten, M; Scott West, S

    2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L stainless steel and its weldments were measured. Fracture toughness data are needed for assessing tritium reservoir structural integrity. This report provides data from J-Integral fracture toughness tests on unexposed and tritium-exposed weldments. The effect of tritium on weldment toughness has not been measured until now. The data include tests on tritium-exposed weldments after aging for up to three years to measure the effect of increasing decay helium concentration on toughness. The results indicate that Type 304L stainless steel weldments have high fracture toughness and are resistant to tritium aging effects on toughness. For unexposed alloys, weldment fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. Tritium-exposed-and-aged base metals and weldments had lower toughness values than unexposed ones but still retained good toughness properties. In both base metals and weldments there was an initial reduction in fracture toughness after tritium exposure but little change in fracture toughness values with increasing helium content in the range tested. Fracture modes occurred by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed and tritium-exposed steels and welds. This corroborates further the resistance of Type 304L steel to tritium embrittlement. This report fulfills the requirements for the FY06 Level 3 milestone, TSR15.3 ''Issue summary report for tritium reservoir material aging studies'' for the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign (ESC). The milestone was in support of ESC L2-1866 Milestone-''Complete an annual Enhanced Surveillance stockpile aging assessment report to support the annual assessment process''.

  18. Failing softly: A fracture theory of highly-deformable materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamar Goldman Boué; Roi Harpaz; Jay Fineberg; Eran Bouchbinder

    2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly-deformable materials, from synthetic hydrogels to biological tissues, are becoming increasingly important from both fundamental and practical perspectives. Their mechanical behaviors, in particular the dynamics of crack propagation during failure, are not yet fully understood. Here we propose a theoretical framework for the dynamic fracture of highly-deformable materials, in which the effects of a dynamic crack are treated with respect to the nonlinearly deformed (pre-stressed/strained), non-cracked, state of the material. Within this framework, we derive analytic and semi-analytic solutions for the near-tip deformation fields and energy release rates of dynamic cracks propagating in incompressible neo-Hookean solids under biaxial and uniaxial loading. We show that moderately large pre-stressing has a marked effect on the stress fields surrounding a crack's tip. We verify these predictions by performing extensive experiments on the fracture of soft brittle elastomers over a range of loading levels and propagation velocities, showing that the newly developed framework offers significantly better approximations to the measurements than standard approaches at moderately large levels of external loadings and high propagation velocities. This framework should be relevant to the failure analysis of soft and tough, yet brittle, materials.

  19. HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND OVERCORING STRESS MEASUREMENTS IN A DEEP BOREHOLE AT THE STRIPA TEST MINE, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doe, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    u l y 2 , 1 9 8 1 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND OVERCORING STRESSI nun LBL-12478 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND OVERCORING STRESSthe calculated stress. n HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EQUIPMENT AND

  20. A triple-continuum pressure-transient model for a naturally fractured vuggy reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs, Water Resour.model for fissured fractured reservoir, Soc. Pet. Eng. J. ,behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs, Soc. Pet. Eng.

  1. THE STATE OF THE ART OF NUMERICAL MODELING OF THERMOHYDROLOGIC FLOW IN FRACTURED ROCK MASSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow in naturally fractured reservoirs: Proceedings, 2ndliquid-dominated, fractured reservoir over a twenty- yeardrawdown. (c) Fractured Reservoir: The double-porosity

  2. An Analytical Solution for Slug-Tracer Tests in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer Tests in Fractured Reservoirs Chao Shan and Karstenof chemicals or heat in fractured reservoirs is stronglyin a water-saturated fractured reservoir. The solution shows

  3. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters for polar media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waves in such fractured reservoirs (Hsu and Schoenberg,i.e. , for cracked/fractured reservoirs), the vertical phasemore closely. FRACTURED RESERVOIRS AND CRACK-INFLUENCE

  4. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs. SPE Journal, R.the Bristol Channel fractured reservoir analogue (a), ?uidfor naturally fractured reservoirs. These simulations are

  5. Brief Guide to the MINC-Method for Modeling Flow and Transport in Fractured Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess editor, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulating Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Using a SubdomainModels of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, In Situ, 15, (2),for Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, papr,r SPE-11688,

  6. Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Gaulke, Scott

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simu- lations in Fractured Reservoirs,” Lawrence Berkeleyfrom a twctphase fractured reservoir. T h e results obtainedRecovery in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs Gudmundur S.

  7. Fracture behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked elbows. Technical report, October 1993--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilinski, T.; Mohan, R.; Rudland, D.; Fleming, M. [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from Task 2 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The focus of the Task 2 work was directed towards furthering the understanding of the fracture behavior of long-radius elbows. This was accomplished through a combined analytical and experimental program. J-estimation schemes were developed for both axial and circumferential surface cracks in elbows. Large-scale, quasi-static and dynamic, pipe-system, elbow fracture experiments under combined pressure and bending loads were performed on elbows containing an internal surface crack at the extrados. In conjunction with the elbow experiments, material property data were developed for the A106-90 carbon steel and WP304L stainless steel elbow materials investigated. A comparison of the experimental data with the maximum stress predictions using existing straight pipe fracture prediction analysis methods, and elbow fracture prediction methods developed in this program was performed. This analysis was directed at addressing the concerns regarding the validity of using analysis predictions developed for straight pipe to predict the fracture stresses of cracked elbows. Finally, a simplified fitting flaw acceptance criteria incorporating ASME B2 stress indices and straight pipe, circumferential-crack analysis was developed.

  8. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  9. Phase retrieval with the transport-of-intensity equation in an arbitrarily-shaped aperture by iterative discrete cosine transforms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Lei; Zuo, Chao; Idir, Mourad; Qu, Weijuan; Asundi, Anand

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) based phase retrieval method is proposed with putting an arbitrarily-shaped aperture into the optical wavefield. In this arbitrarily-shaped aperture, the TIE can be solved under non-uniform illuminations and even non-homogeneous boundary conditions by iterative discrete cosine transforms with a phase compensation mechanism. Simulation with arbitrary phase, arbitrary aperture shape, and non-uniform intensity distribution verifies the effective compensation and high accuracy of the proposed method. Experiment is also carried out to check the feasibility of the proposed method in real measurement. Comparing to the existing methods, the proposed method is applicable for any types of phasemore »distribution under non-uniform illumination and non-homogeneous boundary conditions within an arbitrarily-shaped aperture, which enables the technique of TIE with hard aperture become a more flexible phase retrieval tool in practical measurements.« less

  10. Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Using a High Numerical Aperture Microscope Objective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Using a High Numerical Aperture Microscope Objective Bo Huang-5080 We designed, constructed, and tested a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microscope using a high, combined with various methods to shorten the surface plasmon propaga- tion length, achieves diffraction

  11. Shallow intraplate earthquakes in Western Australia observed by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tregoning, Paul

    Shallow intraplate earthquakes in Western Australia observed by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture earthquakes in a stable continental region of southwest Western Australia. Both small-magnitude events occur with tectonic processes in this area of Western Australia often initiate in the upper 1 km of crust. Citation

  12. Feasibility study for mapping the polar ice bottom topography using interferometric synthetic-aperture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    interferometric synthetic-aperture radar processing for basal surface topography mapping of the thickest GreenlandFeasibility study for mapping the polar ice bottom topography using interferometric synthetic sheets. Ice bottom topography drives ice dynamics, which affects the mass balance. Accurate information

  13. Change Detection Using Synthetic Aperture Sonar: Preliminary Results from the Larvik Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    detection technology for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with synthetic aperture sonars (SAS of route survey with unmanned systems, this means repeatedly surveying ports and important transit routes the processing have been proposed, however the field as applied to the underwater environment remains in its

  14. Aperture Test for Internal Target Operation in the JLAB High-current ERL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high current beam transmission test has been successfully completed at the JLAB FEL Facility, culminating in very low-loss transmission of a high current CW beam through a small aperture. The purpose of this test was to determine if an ERL is capable of meeting the stringent requirements imposed by the use of a 1018/cm3 internal gas target proposed for the DarkLight experiment*. Minimal beamline modifications were made to create a machine configuration that is substantially different from those used in routine UV or IR FEL operation. A sustained (8 hour) high power beam run was performed, with clean transmission through a 2 mm transverse aperture of 127 mm length simulating the target configuration. A beam size of 50 um (rms) was measured near the center of the aperture. Experimental data from a week-long test run consistently exhibited beam loss of only a few ppm on the aperture while running 4.5 mA current at 100 MeV -- or nearly 0.5 MW beam power. This surpassed the users? expectation and demonstrated a unique capability of an ERL for this type of experiments. This report presents a summary of the experiment, a brief overview of our activities, and outlines future plans.

  15. Modified composite Fresnel zone plates with high numerical apertures Qing Cao and Jurgen Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Modified composite Fresnel zone plates with high numerical apertures Qing Cao and J¨urgen Jahns Traditional Fresnel zone plates (TFZPs) can be used for the focusing and imaging of soft x-rays and EUV proposed the modified Fresnel zone plates that can produce sharp Gaussian focal spots (we call them

  16. High Resolution Backside Imaging and Thermography using a Numerical Aperture Increasing Lens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Resolution Backside Imaging and Thermography using a Numerical Aperture Increasing Lens Shawn inspection alone, it is necessary to develop techniques, such as thermography, with the capability ­solid immersion lens microscopy and thermography. Standard non-contact optical resolution is limited

  17. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  18. Compact description of substrate-related aberrations in high numerical-aperture optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stallinga, Sjoerd

    ) and advanced optical disk4 (AOD) make use of GaN lasers with wavelength 0.405 m, with BD using a numericalCompact description of substrate-related aberrations in high numerical-aperture optical disk) through the substrate. Deviations of the thickness from the nominal value result in spherical aberration

  19. Evaluation of acid fracturing based on the "acid fracture number" concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alghamdi, Abdulwahab

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................. 29 4.2.1 Initial Pad Volume ........................................................................... 29 4.2.2 Acid Strength and Volume...............................................................30 V... stages of pad fluids and acids.11 The reaction of HCl with carbonate formations is fast, especially at high temperatures. This means that the acid will not be able to penetrate deeply down the fracture, which may affect the outcome of acid fracturing...

  20. A Physically Based Approach for Modeling Multiphase Fracture-Matrix Interaction in Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Pan, Lehua; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling fracture-matrix interaction within a complex multiple phase flow system is a key issue for fractured reservoir simulation. Commonly used mathematical models for dealing with such interactions employ a dual- or multiple-continuum concept, in which fractures and matrix are represented as overlapping, different, but interconnected continua, described by parallel sets of conservation equations. The conventional single-point upstream weighting scheme, in which the fracture relative permeability is used to represent the counterpart at the fracture-matrix interface, is the most common scheme by which to estimate flow mobility for fracture-matrix flow terms. However, such a scheme has a serious flaw, which may lead to unphysical solutions or significant numerical errors. To overcome the limitation of the conventional upstream weighting scheme, this paper presents a physically based modeling approach for estimating physically correct relative permeability in calculating multiphase flow between fractures and the matrix, using continuity of capillary pressure at the fracture-matrix interface. The proposed approach has been implemented into two multiphase reservoir simulators and verified using analytical solutions and laboratory experimental data. The new method is demonstrated to be accurate, numerically efficient, and easy to implement in dual- or multiple-continuum models.

  1. Fractured: Experts examine the contentious issue of hydraulic fracturing water use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fracture Fluid Performance in Oil Shale with Surfactant Additives by X-Ray Tomography Methods (Crisman Institute: Schechter) Re-Use of Produced Waters as Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids (Crisman Institute: Nasr-El-Din) In a joint House Commi#20;ee...

  2. SchlumbergerPrivate A.Kalantari-Dahaghi, S.D.Mohaghegh,SPE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    · Nano-Darcy Matrix Permeability · Complex Fracture Network Distribution (natural and induced fractures micrometer based on core analysis. Fracture sets Fracture Aperture Distribution Geometry Orientation Fracture

  3. Discrete Element Model for Simulations of Early-Life Thermal Fracturing Behaviors in Ceramic Nuclear Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hai Huang; Ben Spencer; Jason Hales

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete element Model (DEM) representation of coupled solid mechanics/fracturing and heat conduction processes has been developed and applied to explicitly simulate the random initiations and subsequent propagations of interacting thermal cracks in a ceramic nuclear fuel pellet during initial rise to power and during power cycles. The DEM model clearly predicts realistic early-life crack patterns including both radial cracks and circumferential cracks. Simulation results clearly demonstrate the formation of radial cracks during the initial power rise, and formation of circumferential cracks as the power is ramped down. In these simulations, additional early-life power cycles do not lead to the formation of new thermal cracks. They do, however clearly indicate changes in the apertures of thermal cracks during later power cycles due to thermal expansion and shrinkage. The number of radial cracks increases with increasing power, which is consistent with the experimental observations.

  4. A robust method for fracture orientation and density detection from seismic scattered energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

  5. Experimental analysis of the extension to shear fracture transition in Berea Sandstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobich, Jennifer Kay

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and follows Coulomb behavior; however, the angle between the fracture surface and ??1 increases continuously with Pc. Fracture surfaces characteristic of the extension to shear fracture transition appear as linked, stepped extension fractures; the length...

  6. Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and 76 Field, Clinton Co., KY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPE 36651 Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and enhanced recovery, production operations in fracture- dominated oil and gas reservoirs. Borehole geophones to study reservoir fracture systems. Methods currently applied to study fracture systems include tilt

  7. Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wessling, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling of the fracture surfaces results in a significant opening of the fracture, which would influence the rate of geothermal

  8. IPIRG programs - advances in pipe fracture technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkowski, G.; Olson, R.; Scott, P. [Batelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the advances made in fracture control technology as a result of the research performed in the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The findings from numerous experiments and supporting analyses conducted to investigate the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping and pipe systems subjected to high-rate loading typical of seismic events are summarized. Topics to be discussed include; (1) Seismic loading effects on material properties, (2) Piping system behavior under seismic loads, (3) Advances in elbow fracture evaluations, and (4) {open_quotes}Real{close_quotes} piping system response. The presentation for each topic will be illustrated with data and analytical results. In each case, the state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics prior to the first IPIRG program will be contrasted with the state-of-the-art at the completion of the IPIRG-2 program.

  9. Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring: A Jonah Field Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seher, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing involves the injection of a fluid to fracture oil and gas reservoirs, and thus increase their permeability. The process creates numerous microseismic events, which can be used to monitor subsurface ...

  10. Fractional Diffusion Modeling of Electromagnetic Induction in Fractured Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Jianchao

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    -2 km, a zone where pores and fractures over various length scales are highly complicated. Spatial confinement of fluid or electric charge transport by the fractal geometry gives rise to interesting dynamic processes within the pore space and fractures...

  11. Gaseous Detonation-Driven Fracture of Tubes Tong Wa Chao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    never asked for anything back. First is Professor Wolfgang Knauss, who guided me in the solid to be consistent with fracture under mixed-mode loading. High-speed movies of the fracture events and blast wave

  12. Laboratory-scale fracture conductivity created by acid etching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pournik, Maysam

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the closure stress. While there have been several experimental studies conducted on acid fracturing, most of these have not scaled experiments to field conditions and did not account for the effect of rock weakening and etching pattern. Hence, acid fracture...

  13. Development and testing of an advanced acid fracture conductivity apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, ChunLei

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    wells. Acid fracturing is a standard practice to increase the production rate and to improve ultimate recovery in carbonate reservoirs. There have been successful cases in most carbonate reservoirs around the world. However acid fracture performance...

  14. Fracture characterization from seismic measurements in a borehole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture characterization is important for optimal recovery of hydrocarbons. In this thesis, we develop techniques to characterize natural and hydraulic fractures using seismic measurements in a borehole. We first develop ...

  15. Stochastic multiscale models for fracture analysis of functionally graded materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Sharif

    Chakraborty, Sharif Rahman * Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering three multiscale models, including sequential, invasive, and concurrent models, for fracture analysis-intensity factors or accurate probability of fracture initiation. The concurrent multiscale model is sufficiently

  16. FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Approach to the Fracture Hydrology at Stripa, PreliminaryRocks. On Recent Trends in Hydrology, Special PublicationsDE86 013586 W FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES

  17. Finite Difference Modeling of Seismic Responses to Intersecting Fracture Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi, Shihong

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractured reservoir characterization is becoming increasingly important for the petroleum industry. Currentmethods for this task are developed based on effectivemedia theory, which assumes the cracks or fractures in a ...

  18. Effects of subsurface fracture interactions on surface deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerry, Ruel (Ruel Valentine)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the surface deformation resulting from the opening of a single fracture in a layered elastic half-space resembles the observed deformation at the InSalah site, it seems unlikely that only a single fracture is ...

  19. Analysis of Scattered Signal to Estimate Reservoir Fracture Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandi, Samantha K.

    We detect fracture corridors and determine their orientation and average spacing based on an analysis of seismic coda in the frequency-wave number (f-k ) domain. Fracture corridors have dimensions similar to seismic ...

  20. Seismic characterization of fractured reservoirs by focusing Gaussian beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    Naturally fractured reservoirs occur worldwide, and they account for the bulk of global oil production. The most important impact of fractures is their influence on fluid flow. To maximize oil production, the characterization ...

  1. On equivalence of thinning fluids used for hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linkov, Alexander

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper aims to answer the question: if and how non-Newtonian fluids may be compared in their mechanical action when used for hydraulic fracturing? By employing the modified formulation of the PKN problem we obtain its simple analytical solutions in the cases of perfectly plastic and Newtonian fluids. Since the results for shear thinning fluids are intermediate between those for these cases, the obtained equation for the fracture length suggests a criterion of the equivalence of various shear thinning fluids for the problem of hydraulic fractures. We assume fluids equivalent in their hydrofracturing action, when at a reference time they produce fractures of the same length. The equation for the fracture length translates the equivalence in terms of the hydraulic fracture length and treatment time into the equivalence in terms of the properties of a fracturing fluid (behavior and consistency indices). Analysis shows that the influence of the consistency and behavior indices on the fracture length, particle v...

  2. Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project will provide the first ever formal evaluation of fracture and fracture flow evolution in an EGS reservoir following a hydraulic stimulation.

  3. Experimental Study of Acid Fracture Conductivity of Austin Chalk Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nino Penaloza, Andrea

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to those in actual acid fracture treatments. After acid etching, fracture conductivity is measured at different closure stresses. This research work presents a systematic study to investigate the effect of temperature, rock-acid contact time and initial...

  4. Effectiveness of microseismic monitoring for optimizing hydraulic fracturing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alampi, Ann M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing has fundamentally changed the oil and gas industry in the past 10 years. Bakersfield, California provides a unique case study because steam injection, a type of hydraulic fracturing, has been used there ...

  5. Fracture Characterization from Scattered Energy: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandi, Samantha K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use 3D surface seismic data to determine the presence and the preferred orientation of fracture corridors in a field. The Scattering Index method is proving to be a robust tool for detecting and mapping fracture corridors. ...

  6. How can we use one fracture to locate another?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is an important tool that helps extract fluids from the subsurface. It is critical in applications ranging from enhanced oil recovery to geothermal energy pro-duction. As the goal of fracturing is to ...

  7. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  8. Experimental Study of Acid Fracture Conductivity of Austin Chalk Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nino Penaloza, Andrea

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid fracture conductivity and the effect of key variables in the etching process during acid fracturing can be assessed at the laboratory scale. This is accomplished by using an experimental apparatus that simulates acid injection fluxes comparable...

  9. A Bayesian framework for fracture characterization from surface seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamanian, S. Ahmad

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a methodology for quantitatively characterizing the fractured nature of a hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoir from surface seismic data under a Bayesian inference framework. Fractures provide pathways for fluid ...

  10. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W. [Golder Associates, Redmond, VA (United States); Wadleigh, E. [Marathon Oil Co., Midland, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph the theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  11. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  12. Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction. Seismic wave propagation through fractures is an important subject in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization ...

  13. Experimental and Analytical Research on Fracture Processes in ROck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert H.. Einstein; Jay Miller; Bruno Silva

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies on fracture propagation and coalescence were conducted which together with previous tests by this group on gypsum and marble, provide information on fracturing. Specifically, different fracture geometries wsere tested, which together with the different material properties will provide the basis for analytical/numerical modeling. INitial steps on the models were made as were initial investigations on the effect of pressurized water on fracture coalescence.

  14. Predicting hip fracture type with cortical bone mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treece, Graham M.; Gee, Andrew H.; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Black, Dennis M.; Poole, Kenneth E. S.; Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited...

  15. Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions SANUM Conference (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

  16. Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions CSIRO CSS TCP Detournay (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

  17. Role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns Alexander Rozhko Thesis September 2007 #12;ii Role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns Abstract. The mechanical role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns was studied both

  18. Creation and Impairment of Hydraulic Fracture Conductivity in Shale Formations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junjing

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-stage hydraulic fracturing is the key to the success of many shale gas and shale oil reservoirs. The main objectives of hydraulic fracturing in shale are to create artificial fracture networks that are conductive for oil and gas flow...

  19. Poroelastic modeling of fracture-seismic wave interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock containing a compliant, fluid-filled fracture can be viewed as one case of heterogeneous poroelastic media. When this fracture is subjected to seismic waves, a strong contrast in the elastic stiffness between the fracture itself and the background can result in enhanced grain-scale local fluid flow. Because this flow--relaxing the pressure building up within the fracture--can increase the dynamic compliance of the fracture and change energy dissipation (attenuation), the scattering of seismic waves can be enhanced. Previously, for a flat, infinite fracture, we derived poroelastic seismic boundary conditions that describe the relationship between a finite jump in the stress and displacement across a fracture, expressed as a function of the stress and displacement at the boundaries. In this paper, we use these boundary conditions to determine frequency-dependent seismic wave transmission and reflection coefficients. Fluid-filled fractures with a range of mechanical and hydraulic properties are examined. From parametric studies, we found that the hydraulic permeability of a fracture fully saturated with water has little impact on seismic wave scattering. In contrast, the seismic response of a partially water-saturated fracture and a heterogeneous fracture filled with compliant liquid (e.g., supercritical CO{sub 2}) depended on the fracture permeability.

  20. MODELING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY FORMAL HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUES*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    MODELING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY FORMAL HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUES* Todd Arbogast,y Jim in naturally fractured reservoirs. A single component in a single phase and two-component mis- cible. porous medium, double porosity, fractured reservoir, homogenization. yDepartment of Mathematics, Purdue

  1. ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Report Submitted;2 ABSTRACT Interporosity flow in a naturslly fractured reservoir is modelled by a new formulation of the distribution. Thus, observed pressure response from fractured reservoirs can be analysed to obtain the matrix

  2. EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-57 SGP-TR-57 EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: A SUMMARY INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS A SUMMARY OP EXPERImCE WORtDWIDE Roland N. Horne Stanford University ABSTRACT Reinjection of water i n t o fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both f o r

  3. HYDRAULIC STIMULATION OF NATURAL FRACTURES AS REVEALED BY INDUCED MICROEARTHQUAKES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1- HYDRAULIC STIMULATION OF NATURAL FRACTURES AS REVEALED BY INDUCED MICROEARTHQUAKES, CARTHAGE, December, 2001 Manuscript # 01066 LAUR# 01-1204 #12;Hydraulic Stimulation of Natural Fractures -2- ABSTRACT We have produced a high-resolution microseismic image of a hydraulic fracture stimulation

  4. Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface Victor C. Tsai Seismological Laboratory consider a hydraulic fracture problem in which the crack grows parallel to a free surface, subject to fully components. wall Wall shear stress. ^· Non-dimensionalized ·. 1 Introduction Hydraulic fracture has been

  5. Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface Victor C. Tsai Seismological Laboratory consider a hydraulic fracture problem in which the crack grows parallel to a free surface, subject to fully components. ^· Non-dimensionalized ·. 1 Introduction Hydraulic fracture has been studied for many years

  6. Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas Shales Using Production Data Razi Identification of infill drilling locations has been challenging with mixed results in gas shales. Natural fractures are the main source of permeability in gas shales. Natural fracture patterns in shale has a random

  7. Creation and Impairment of Hydraulic Fracture Conductivity in Shale Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junjing

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-stage hydraulic fracturing is the key to the success of many shale gas and shale oil reservoirs. The main objectives of hydraulic fracturing in shale are to create artificial fracture networks that are conductive for oil and gas flow...

  8. Time-resolved measurement of photon emission during fast crack propagation in three-point bending fracture of silica glass and soda lime glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiota, Tadashi, E-mail: tshiota@ceram.titech.ac.jp; Sato, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Kouichi [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S7-13 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)] [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S7-13 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of photon emission (PE) and fast crack propagation upon bending fracture were conducted in silica glass and soda lime glass. Observation of fracture surfaces revealed that macroscopic crack propagation behavior was similar between the silica glass and soda lime glass when fracture loads for these specimens were comparable and cracks propagated without branching. However, a large difference in the PE characteristics was found between the two glasses. In silica glass, PE (645–655?nm) was observed during the entire crack propagation process, whereas intense PE (430–490?nm and 500–600?nm) was observed during the initial stages of propagation. In contrast, only weak PE was detected in soda lime glass. These results show that there is a large difference in the atomic processes involved in fast crack propagation between these glasses, and that PE can be used to study brittle fracture on the atomic scale.

  9. Lower Limits on Aperture Size for an ExoEarth-Detecting Coronagraphic Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Christopher C; Mandell, Avi; Clampin, Mark; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D; McElwain, Michael W; Stapelfeldt, Karl R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The yield of Earth-like planets will likely be a primary science metric for future space-based missions that will drive telescope aperture size. Maximizing the exoEarth candidate yield is therefore critical to minimizing the required aperture. Here we describe a method for exoEarth candidate yield maximization that simultaneously optimizes, for the first time, the targets chosen for observation, the number of visits to each target, the delay time between visits, and the exposure time of every observation. This code calculates both the detection time and multi-wavelength spectral characterization time required for planets. We also refine the astrophysical assumptions used as inputs to these calculations, relying on published estimates of planetary occurrence rates as well as theoretical and observational constraints on terrestrial planet sizes and classical habitable zones. Given these astrophysical assumptions, optimistic telescope and instrument assumptions, and our new completeness code that produces the hi...

  10. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a SNOM fiber tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atie, Elie M; Eter, Ali El; Salut, Roland; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Tannous, Tony; Baida, Fadi I; Grosjean, Thierry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nano-meter scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e. in contact to the nano-structures. In these paper, We demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of 'remote' (non contact) sensing on the nano-meter scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, move-able and background-free optical nano-sensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nano-meter accuracy. This work paves the way towards a new class of nano-po...

  11. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  12. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput.

  13. Method for generating small and ultra small apertures, slits, nozzles and orifices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khounsary, Ali M. (Hinsdale, IL)

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device for one or more small apertures, slits, nozzles and orifices, preferably having a high aspect ratio. In one embodiment, one or more alternating layers of sacrificial layers and blocking layers are deposited onto a substrate. Each sacrificial layer is made of a material which preferably allows a radiation to substantially pass through. Each blocking layer is made of a material which substantially blocks the radiation.

  14. IFP V4.0:a polar-reformatting image formation processor for synthetic aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IFP V4.0 is the fourth generation of an extraordinarily powerful and flexible image formation processor for spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar. It has been successfully utilized in processing phase histories from numerous radars and has been instrumental in the development of many new capabilities for spotlight mode SAR. This document provides a brief history of the development of IFP, a full exposition of the signal processing steps involved, and a short user's manual for the software implementing this latest iteration.

  15. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alarcon, R; Benson, S V; Bertozzi, W; Boyce, J R; Cowan, R; Douglas, D; Evtushenko, P; Fisher, P; Ihloff, E; Kalantarians, N; Kelleher, A; Kossler, W J; Legg, R; Long, E; Milner, R G; Neil, G R; Ou, L; Schmookler, B; Tennant, C; Tschalaer, C; Williams, G P; Zhang, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is ...

  16. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  17. Interference Fracturing: Non-Uniform Distributions of Perforation Clusters that Promote Simultaneous Growth of Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Simultaneous Growth of Multiple Hydraulic Fractures A.P. Peirce, University of British Columbia and A.P. Bunger in horizontal well stimulation is the generation of hydraulic fractures (HFs) from all perforation clusters shadowing" that refers to suppression of some hydraulic fractures by the compressive stresses exerted

  18. Design of a near-field coded aperture cameras for high-resolution medical and industrial gamma-ray imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accorsi, Roberto, 1971-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coded Aperture Imaging is a technique originally developed for X-ray astronomy, where typical imaging problems are characterized by far-field geometry and an object made of point sources distributed over a mainly dark ...

  19. Identifying Best Practices in Hydraulic Fracturing Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    . Treating Rate Medina Treating Pressure Medina Production Remaining Gas Ultimate Gas Gas Months Prod Gas Medina and Whirlpool sands of southwest New York State are considered to be tight gas sands. Most wells, are fractured upon completion to provide economic amounts of gas. #12;SPE 72385 BACKGROUND A dataset

  20. Investigation of the effect of gel residue on hydraulic fracture conductivity using dynamic fracture conductivity test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marpaung, Fivman

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ............................................................................ 51 Figure B.9: Fracture Conductivity Behavior (Polymer Concentration = 50 lb/Mgal and Gas Rate = 0.5 slm) ............................................................................ 52 Figure B.10: Fracture Conductivity Behavior (Polymer... documented in API RP-61 (1989). The recommended conditions and procedure for the test includes loading a known proppant concentration (generally 2 lb/ft2) uniformly between two steel pistons at ambient temperature, maintaining closure stress for 15 minutes...

  1. A Triple-Porosity Model for Fractured Horizontal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alahmadi, Hasan Ali H.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . The model consists of three contiguous porous media: the matrix, less permeable micro-fractures and more permeable macro-fractures. Only the macro-fractures produce to the well while they are fed by the micro-fractures only. Consequently, the matrix feeds... the micro-fractures only. Therefore, the flow is sequential from one medium to the other. Four sub-models are derived based on the interporosity flow assumption between adjacent media, i.e., pseudosteady state or transient flow assumption. These are fully...

  2. Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to collect and analyze existing data on the Michigan Basin for fracture patterns on scales ranging form thin section to basin. The data acquisition phase has been successfully concluded with the compilation of several large digital databases containing nearly all the existing information on formation tops, lithology and hydrocarbon production over the entire Michigan Basin. These databases represent the cumulative result of over 80 years of drilling and exploration.

  3. Analysis of error in using fractured gas well type curves for constant pressure production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schkade, David Wayne

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of normalized time and normalized cumulative production is a large improvement over using a constant evaluation pressure. 0 imens ion less cumulative production type curves are particularly useful in modeling production for economic projections, such as re... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYSIS OF ERROR IN USING FRACTURED GAS WELL TYPE CURVES FOR CONSTANT PRESSURE PRDDUCTION A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE SCHKADE Approved as to style and content by: S. A. Ho lditch...

  4. A CLOSE COMPANION SEARCH AROUND L DWARFS USING APERTURE MASKING INTERFEROMETRY AND PALOMAR LASER GUIDE STAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernat, David [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bouchez, Antonin H.; Cromer, John L.; Dekany, Richard G.; Moore, Anna M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ireland, Michael; Tuthill, Peter [Sydney Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia); Martinache, Frantz [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Subaru Telescope, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Angione, John; Burruss, Rick S.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Henning, John R.; Hickey, Jeff; Kibblewhite, Edward; McKenna, Daniel L.; Petrie, Harold L.; Roberts, Jennifer; Shelton, J. Chris; Thicksten, Robert P.; Trinh, Thang [Palomar Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics Team, Palomar Observatory, California Institute of Technology, Palomar Mountain, CA 92060 (United States)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a close companion search around 16 known early L dwarfs using aperture masking interferometry with Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS AO). The use of aperture masking allows the detection of close binaries, corresponding to projected physical separations of 0.6-10.0 AU for the targets of our survey. This survey achieved median contrast limits of {Delta}K {approx} 2.3 for separations between 1.2 {lambda}/D-4{lambda}/D and {Delta}K {approx} 1.4 at 2/3 {lambda}/D. We present four candidate binaries detected with moderate-to-high confidence (90%-98%). Two have projected physical separations less than 1.5 AU. This may indicate that tight-separation binaries contribute more significantly to the binary fraction than currently assumed, consistent with spectroscopic and photometric overluminosity studies. Ten targets of this survey have previously been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of companion searches. We use the increased resolution of aperture masking to search for close or dim companions that would be obscured by full aperture imaging, finding two candidate binaries. This survey is the first application of aperture masking with LGS AO at Palomar. Several new techniques for the analysis of aperture masking data in the low signal-to-noise regime are explored.

  5. Temperature-dependent void-sheet fracture in Al-Cu-Mg-Ag-Zr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, M.J. [Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States); Gangloff, R.P. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature-dependent initiation fracture toughness and stable crack growth resistance are important attributes of next-generation aluminum alloys for airframe applications such as the high speed civil transport. Previous research showed that tensile fracture strain increases as temperature increases for AA2519 with Mg and Ag additions, because the void-sheet coalescence stage of microvoid fracture is retarded. The present work characterizes intravoid-strain localization (ISL) between primary voids at large constituents and secondary-void nucleation at small dispersoids, two mechanisms that may govern the temperature dependence of void sheeting. Most dispersoids nucleate secondary voids in an ISL band at 25 C, promoting further localization, while dispersoid-void nucleation at 150 C is greatly reduced. Increased strain-rate hardening with increasing temperature does not cause this behavior. Rather, a stress relaxation model predicts that flow stress and strain hardening decrease with increasing temperature or decreasing strain rate due to a transition from dislocation accumulation to diffusional relaxation around dispersoids. This transition to softening causes a sharp increase in the model-predicted applied plastic strain necessary for dispersoid/matrix interface decohesion. This reduced secondary-void nucleation and reduced ISL at elevated temperature explain retarded void sheeting and increased fracture strain.

  6. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

  7. Feasibility of a borehole VHF radar technique for fracture mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to establish the feasibility of a downhole high-frequency electromagnetic technique for location of fractures in the vicinity of boreholes. An existing flame-cut slot in granite was filled with salt water to simulate a brine-filled fracture. A transmitter consisting of a phased dual-dipole array arranged to provide a directional signal toward the fracture was installed in a borehole opposite the fracture. A receiver operated at 30 to 300 MHz was also located in the same borehole. The radar returns from the simulated fracture were detectable in boreholes located at distances of up to 12 meters from the fracture. These results indicate for the first time the feasibility of a downhole VHF radar for use in a single borehole for detection of fractures located away from the borehole.

  8. Mechanical Behavior of Small-Scale Channels in Acid-etched Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Jiayao

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    .) ............................................................................................................. 30 Fig. 2.4 Width profile of a fracture?s cross-section. ..................................................... 34 Fig. 2.5 Fracture?s cross-section approximated by an ellipse. ..................................... 35 Fig. 2.6 Fracture... profile scanned in the lab. .................................................................... 57 Fig. 3.5 Width profiles of fracture surfaces under closure stress 1,000 psi. ................ 58 Fig. 3.6 Width profiles of fracture surfaces...

  9. Flow of groundwater and transport of contaminants through saturated fractured geologic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, T.D.; Kunkel, J.R.; Way, S.C.; Koenig, R.A.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of several field investigations conducted during the early part of 1988 to characterize the Roza Member basalt aquifer of the Wanapum Formation of the Columbia River Basalt Group. A research wellfield was implemented and field tests conducted to lithologically classify subsurface geologic media and hydrologic parameters in an 800- by 1400-foot area located in the northwest quarter of Section 16, T.25N, R.34E, six miles south of the town of Creston in Lincoln County, Washington. This final project report assimilates the data and information generated by the study for possible eventual application to repository site characterization and performance prediction in fractured geologic media. The relatively high-yielding aquifers of the Roza Member basalt are separated by claystone aquitards and are hydrologically interrupted by at least two different subsurface hydrologic structures. Water-level data were collected over an 18-month period and used to assess seasonal variations in regional and local hydraulic gradient. Additional wellbore slug tests and two more passive (nonpumping) tracer tests enabled calculation of equivalent hydraulic apertures and effective porosities for the Roza basalt flow top. Analysis of data from two pumping tests provided a basis for calculation of transmissivities and storage coefficients for the Roza basalt. 31 refs., 97 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Aperture lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discharge lamp includes means for containing a light emitting fill, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill; means for exciting the fill to cause the fill to emit light; and means for reflecting some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length. Another discharge lamp includes an envelope; a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope; a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light; and a reflective ceramic structure disposed around the envelope and defining an light emitting opening, wherein the structure comprises a sintered body built up directly on the envelope and made from a combination of alumina and silica.

  11. Characterization of fracture networks for fluid flow analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.C.S.; Billaux, D.; Hestir, K.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.; Karasaki, K.; Nihei, K.; Gentier, S.; Cox, L.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of fluid flow through fractured rocks is difficult because the only way to assign hydraulic parameters to fractures is to perform hydraulic tests. However, the interpretation of such tests, or ''inversion'' of the data, requires at least that we know the geometric pattern formed by the fractures. Combining a statistical approach with geophysical data may be extremely helpful in defining the fracture geometry. Cross-hole geophysics, either seismic or radar, can provide tomograms which are pixel maps of the velocity or attenuation anomalies in the rock. These anomalies are often due to fracture zones. Therefore, tomograms can be used to identify fracture zones and provide information about the structure within the fracture zones. This structural information can be used as the basis for simulating the degree of fracturing within the zones. Well tests can then be used to further refine the model. Because the fracture network is only partially connected, the resulting geometry of the flow paths may have fractal properties. We are studying the behavior of well tests under such geometry. Through understanding of this behavior, it may be possible to use inverse techniques to refine the a priori assignment of fractures and their conductances such that we obtain the best fit to a series of well test results simultaneously. The methodology described here is under development and currently being applied to several field sites. 4 refs., 14 figs.

  12. Permeability and Dispersion Coefficients in Rocks with Fracture Network - 12140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.K.; Htway, M.Z. [Handong Global University, 3 Namsong-ri, Heunghae-eub, Buk-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 791-708 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.Box 150, Yusong, Daejon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid flow and solute transport are considered for a rock medium with a fracture network with regard to the effective permeability and the dispersion coefficients. To investigate the effects of individual fractures a three-fracture system is chosen in which two are parallel and the third one connects the two at different angles. Specifically the micro-cell boundary-value problems(defined through multiple scale analysis) are solved numerically by using finite elements to calculate the permeability and dispersion coefficients. It is shown that the permeability depends significantly on the pattern of the fracture distribution and the dispersion coefficient is influenced by both the externally imposed pressure gradient (which also reflects the flow field) and the direction of the gradient of solute concentration on the macro-scale. From the calculations of the permeability and dispersion coefficients for solute in a rock medium with a fracture network the following conclusions are drawn. 1. The permeability of fractured medium depends on the primary orientation of the fracture network and is influenced by the connecting fractures in the medium. 2. The cross permeability, e.g., permeability in the direction normal to the direction of the external pressure gradient is rather insensitive to the orientation of the fracture network. 3. Calculation of permeability is most efficiently achieved with optimal discretization across individual fractures and is rather insensitive to the discretization along the fracture.. 4. The longitudinal dispersion coefficient Dxx of a fractured medium depends on both the macro-scale concentration gradient and the direction of the flow (pressure gradient). Hence both features must be considered when investigating solute transport in a fractured medium. (authors)

  13. Impact fracture behavior of HT9 duct

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, F.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferritic alloys are known to undergo a ductile-brittle transition as the test temperature is decreased. This inherent problem has limited their applications to reactor component materials subjected to low neutron exposures. However, the excellent resistance to void swelling exhibited by these alloys has led to choosing the materials as candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. Despite the ductile-brittle transition problem, results show that the materials exhibit superior resistance to fracture under very high neutron fluences at irradiation temperatures above 380{degrees}C. Impact testing on FFTF duct sections of HT9 indicates that HT9 ducts have adequate fracture toughness at much higher temperatures for handling operations at room temperature and refueling operations.

  14. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  15. Remediation of a fractured clay soil contaminated with gasoline containing MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.L.; Grady, D.E. [Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR (United States); Walden, T. [BP Oil Europe, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasoline and other light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) released into fractured clay soils initially move by advection of the LNAPL through the fractures. Once advective movement of the LNAPL ceases, dissolution of the gasoline components into the pore water and diffusion into the intact blocks of clay becomes an important transport process. The aqueous-phase flux of each compound in the mixture depends in large part upon its aqueous solubility. For example, a low-solubility compound like isooctane remains primarily in the fracture in the LNAPL. A high-solubility compound, like methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), dissolves readily and may move almost entirely into the clay matrix. The distribution of compounds between the matrix and the fractures will have an important impact on the rate at which the gasoline contaminated soil can be remediated. In this context, the presence of soluble additives like MTBE can significantly impact the risk and remediation time for the, soil. Beginning in 1993 a field study to examine the applicability of air flushing for remediation of low-permeability soils was sponsored by API. The study focused on a variety of soil vapor extraction (SVE) and in situ air sparging (IAS) approaches for mass removal and risk reduction. The source of gasoline contamination in this study was a release of 50 liters of a mixture containing 14 gasoline hydrocarbons ranging from pentane to naphthalene, and including MTBE. The mixture was released into the shallow subsurface and allowed to redistribute for 10 months prior to air flushing startup. Numerical modeling indicated that essentially all of the MTBE should have dissolved into the matrix. In contrast, essentially all of the isooctane should have remained in the LNAPL in the fractures.

  16. Field-Scale Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient for FracturedRock: Results From Literature Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui Hai; Molz, Fred J.; Zhang, Yingqi; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix diffusion is an important mechanism for solutetransport in fractured rock. We recently conducted a literature survey onthe effective matrix diffusion coefficient, Dem, a key parameter fordescribing matrix diffusion processes at the field scale. Forty fieldtracer tests at 15 fractured geologic sites were surveyed and selectedfor study, based on data availability and quality. Field-scale Dem valueswere calculated, either directly using data reported in the literature orby reanalyzing the corresponding field tracer tests. Surveyed dataindicate that the effective-matrix-diffusion-coefficient factor FD(defined as the ratio of Dem to the lab-scale matrix diffusioncoefficient [Dem]of the same tracer) is generally larger than one,indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient in the fieldis comparatively larger than the matrix diffusion coefficient at therock-core scale. This larger value could be attributed to the manymass-transfer processes at different scales in naturally heterogeneous,fractured rock systems. Furthermore, we observed a moderate trend towardsystematic increase in the emDFmDDF value with observation scale,indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is likely tobe statistically scale dependent. The FD value ranges from 1 to 10,000for observation scales from 5 to 2,000 m. At a given scale, the FD valuevaries by two orders of magnitude, reflecting the influence of differingdegrees of fractured rock heterogeneity at different sites. In addition,the surveyed data indicate that field-scale longitudinal dispersivitygenerally increases with observation scale, which is consistent withprevious studies. The scale-dependent field-scale matrix diffusioncoefficient (and dispersivity) may have significant implications forassessing long-term, large-scale radionuclide and contaminant transportevents in fractured rock, both for nuclear waste disposal and contaminantremediation.

  17. Lisburne Formation fracture characterization and flow modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpov, Alexandre Valerievich

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lead to exponential distrtbutions; multiplicatory processes as they occur in breakage lead 10 to lognormal distributions; and continuity of the process from smallest to largest sizes produces hyperbolic (fractal) distributions. However, a rigorous... of fractures on related outcrops was in the range of 1, 6-1. 8. Brock (1971) stated an important rule of thumb of fractal studies: the linearity on the double logarithmic plot should extend over at least two or three orders of naagnitude ol particle size...

  18. FRACTURE FAILURE CRITERIA OF SOFC PEN STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Qu, Jianmin

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal stresses and warpage of the PEN are unavoidable due to the temperature changes from the stress-free sintering temperature to room temperature and mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of various layers in the PEN structures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) during the PEN manufacturing process. In the meantime, additional mechanical stresses will also be created by mechanical flattening during the stack assembly process. The porous nature of anode and cathode in the PEN structures determines presence of the initial flaws and crack on the interfaces of anode/electrolyte/cathode and in the interior of the materials. The sintering/assembling induced stresses may cause the fracture failure of PEN structure. Therefore, fracture failure criteria for SOFC PEN structures is developed in order to ensure the structural integrity of the cell and stack of SOFC. In this paper, the fracture criteria based on the relationship between the critical energy release rate and critical curvature and maximum displacement of the warped cells caused by the temperature changes as well as mechanical flattening process is established so that possible failure of SOFC PEN structures may be predicted deterministically by the measurement of the curvature and displacement of the warped cells.

  19. Development of an analytical solution for thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tests in horizontally fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs, paper presented attests in horizontally fractured reservoirs Yoojin Jung Earthtests in horizontally fractured reservoirs where fluid flow

  20. Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry on Injectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic Strength Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    swelling in a fractured geothermal reservoir, Proceedings ofon Injectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with Highdry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable

  1. Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanical Behavior of a Fractured Porous Slope in Response to Free Water-Surface Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guglielmi, Y.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these effects in fractured reservoirs, at an intermediateinteractions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferredis a mesoscale fractured carbonate reservoir (30 m × 30 m ×

  2. Numerical simulation of single-phase and multiphase non-Darcy flow in porous and fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow simulations in fractured reservoirs, Report LBL-15227,behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs, Soc. Pet. Eng.Flow in Porous and Fractured Reservoirs Yu-Shu Wu Earth

  3. Development of Nb3Sn 11 T single aperture demonstrator dipole for LHC upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zlobin, A.V.; Apollinari, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Nobrega, f.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab; Auchmann, B.; Karppinen, M.; Rossi, L.; /CERN

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC collimation upgrade foresees additional collimators installed in dispersion suppressor regions. To obtain the necessary space for the collimators, a solution based on the substitution of LHC main dipoles for stronger dipoles is being considered. CERN and FNAL have started a joint program to demonstrate the feasibility of Nb{sub 3}Sn technology for this purpose. The goal of the first phase is the design and construction of a 2-m long single-aperture demonstrator magnet with a nominal field of 11 T at 11.85 kA with 20% margin. This paper describes the magnetic and mechanical design of the demonstrator magnet and summarizes its design parameters.

  4. Correction of motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  5. Ion funnel with extended mass range and reduced conductance limit aperture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion funnel design is disclosed that decreases the axial RF (parasite) fields at the ion funnel exit. This is achieved by addition of one or more compensation electrodes after the conductance limit electrode. Various RF voltage profiles may be applied to the various electrodes minimizing the parasite axial potential wells. The smallest RF aperture that serves as the conductance limiting electrode is further reduced over standard designs. Overall, the ion funnel improves transmission ranges of both low m/z and high m/z ions, reducing RF activation of ions and decreasing the gas load to subsequent differential pumping stages.

  6. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This was the seventh quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued the large task of processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional geological information to aid in the interpretation, (3) tied the well log data to the seismic via generation of synthetic seismograms, (4) began integrating regional structural information and fracture trends with our observations of structure in the study area, (5) began constructing a velocity model for time-to-depth conversion and subsequent AVO and raytrace modeling experiments, and (6) completed formulation of some theoretical tools for relating fracture density to observed elastic anisotropy. The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. A basemap is presented with the seismic lines being analyzed for this project plus locations of 13 wells that we are using to supplement the analysis. The arrows point to two wells for which we have constructed synthetic seismograms.

  7. Characterization and significance of a stylolitic fracture system determined from horizontal core and borehole imaging data, Hanifa Reservoir, Abqaiq Field (SA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T.; Grover, G. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Wiltse, E. [Schlumberger, Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field, eastern Saudi Arabia, consists of microporous (up to 30% porosity) lime mudstones with low matrix permeability (< 10 md). SEM imagery reveals a crystal framework texture of micro-rhombic calcite crystals with 2-5 {mu}m-sized intercrystalline pore spaces. Fluid transmissibility was preliminarily identified as via fractures as indicated by no stratigraphic predictability to fluid flow, high flow over thin stratigraphic intervals, little relationship between high flow and high porosity intervals, large disparity between core Kh and well-test Kh, and observation offractures in cores and borehole imaging logs front horizontal Hanifa wells. Integration of descriptions from over 4000 fractures observed in borehole images together with descriptions of over 500 fractures identified from vertica1 and horizontal cores has resulted in further characterization of the fracture system. The fractures are open to partially-open, with an east-to northeast orientation, and they cluster in low porosity zones which are characterized by intense stylolitization. These sub-parallel, nearly vertical, discontinuous fractures terminate at stylolites, or pinchout locally into tight carbonate matrix, and contain appreciable amounts of dead oil and calcite cement. In zones of particularly intense stylolitization, fracturing may be locally pervasive, giving the rock a brecciated appearance. Together, the stylolites and stylolite-related fractures form the primary permeability system ofthe Hanifa reservoir. This fracture system architecture is critical to understanding the production characteristics of the reservoir, which include anomalously high fluid flow in low porosity zones or transition zones between high and low porosity, radial flow behavior from well tests, smaller than expected differences in well productivity between vertical and horizontal wells, and limited injection water breakthrough.

  8. Fracture testing of Edwards limestone: a statistical treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redding, David Earl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters. . 21 8. Goodness-of-Fit Statistic (Alpha) for Rubber Fracture Testing of Edwards Limestone. . 9. Sum of Square Residuals for Predicted Geometry vs. Base Geometry. . 38 10. Residuals in Sigma Theta Maximum at the Median Probability Value... for Predicted Geometry vs. Base Geometry. . 38 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Rubber Fracture Test Geometry. Page 2. Hollow Brass Cylinder Calibration. 13 3. Sigma Theta Max vs. Volume. . 18 4A. Cumulative Probability vs. Sigma Theta Max. Rubber Fracture...

  9. apophyseal ring fractures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system 4 2 Ring solutions Kolokolnikov, Theodore 90 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  10. ankle joint fractures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for hydrocarbon production, control and manipulation of water supplies events induced by hydraulic fracturing. The effect of a thin weak elastic layer was investigated by Jones...

  11. adjacent compression fractures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;MRCM New Approach Multiple Stankewitz, Rich 140 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  12. arch fracture intraoperatively: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formation determined. Szymczak, P 2009-01-01 149 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  13. acute compression fracture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;MRCM New Approach Multiple Stankewitz, Rich 112 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  14. acetabular fracture fixation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    knowledge about the po... Wilke, C O 2002-01-01 104 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  15. apophyseal ring fracture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system 4 2 Ring solutions Kolokolnikov, Theodore 90 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  16. Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    code (modeling at the reservoir scale) - CFD: NETL's computational fluid dynamics code (modeling at the fracture scale) * Develop fat-ray double-difference tomography...

  17. Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Evaluation of...

  18. SciTech Connect: CRACK TIP PLASTICITY AND FRACTURE INITIATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N50000* --Metals, Ceramics, & Other Materials; CRACKS; FRACTURE PROPERTIES; METALS BUILDING MATERIALSfracture of metal, crack tip plasticity and initiation criteria for;...

  19. Aligned fractures modeled as boundary conditions within saturated ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    e di Geofisica Sperimentale, OGS. SUMMARY. Fractures in a fluid-saturated poroelastic -Biot- medium are very thin, compliant and highly permeable layers.

  20. Fractured reservoirs: An analysis of coupled elastodynamic and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T., Schoenberg, M., Rutqvist, J., and Nihei, K.

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 28, 2006 ... pliance and fluid-permeability tensors of a layer containing closely spaced ...... Coupled thermo-hydromechanical processes of fractured media.

  1. AN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in theAN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARYGeochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in the

  2. Detection and Characterization of Natural and Induced Fractures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objectives: Combine geophysical methods for reservoir and fracture characterization with rock physics measurements made under in-situ...

  3. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothermal Systems (EGS); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010...

  4. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010...

  5. Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced...

  6. Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley,...

  7. Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microearthquake seismorgrams Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the...

  8. Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Characterization Of Fracture...

  9. Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic...

  10. Integrated 3D Acid Fracturing Model for Carbonate Reservoir Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xi

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    workflow is illustrated in Figure 3.3. The approach starts with a fracture simulator, which uses a geomechanical model, to calculate fracture width during the pad injection. A hydraulic fracture is created at the defined injection condition. Next, we... be directly found from the output of Fracpro. Table 3.1 shows an output file example from Fracpro for a fracture geometry at the end of a pad injection. The geometry data is restored in an “.fpx” file, named “PROJECT_NAME.fpx” and can be read using any text...

  11. alternate fracture toughness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    specic stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single...

  12. arrest fracture toughness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    specic stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single...

  13. advanced fracturing technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    specic stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single...

  14. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

  15. Dispersed Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs- an Analysis of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distributions Abstract A methodology for analyzing the internal flow characteristics of a fractured geothermal reservoir using tracer-determined residence time distribution curves...

  16. Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    nearly parallel to the maximum horizontal stress. In this favorable situation, hydraulic injections will tend both to reactivate natural fractures at low pressures, and to...

  17. 1112323-danimer-abstract-hydraulic-fractures | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil Recovery Deepwater Tech Methane Hydrate Field Demo of Eco-Friendly Propped Hydraulic Fractures 11123-23 Primary Performer DaniMer Scientific, LLC (Bainbridge, GA)...

  18. Finite element modeling of hydraulic fracturing in 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 22, 2013 ... Gautier. A.. Touzelet. S.: Tracer testing of the geothermal heat ex- ... R.: A field demonstra- tion of hydraulic fracturing for solid waste diposal—.

  19. Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Michael Batzle, PI Colorado School of Mines Track Name: Fluid...

  20. Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

  1. Review and discussion of the development of synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busse, L J; Collins, H D; Doctor, S R

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and capabilities of synthetic aperture focusing techniques for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT) are presented. The purpose of SAFT-UT is to produce high-resolution images of the interior of opaque objects. The goal of this work is to develop and implement methods which can be used to detect and to quantify the extent of defects and cracks in critical components of nuclear reactors (pressure vessels, primary piping systems, and nozzles). This report places particular emphasis upon the practical experimental results that have been obtained using SAFT-UT as well as the theoretical background that underlies synthetic aperture focusing. A discussion regarding high-speed and real-time implementations of two- and three-dimensional synthetic aperture focusing is also presented.

  2. Modeling Acid Transport and Non-Uniform Etching in a Stochastic Domain in Acid Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Jianye

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    distributions and do not consider the contribution of channels to the conductivity. An acid fracture conductivity correlation needs the average fracture width at zero closure stress. Existing correlations calculate average fracture width using dissolved rock...

  3. Imaging Hydraulic Fractures: Source Location Uncertainty Analysis At The UPRC Carthage Test Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yingping

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is a useful tool for enhancing gas and oil production. High-resolution seismic imaging of the fracture geometry and fracture growth process is the key in determining optimal spacing and location of ...

  4. Analyzing Aqueous Solution Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamin, Sammazo Jean-bertrand

    2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods of hydraulic fracturing most widely utilized on unconventional shale gas and oil reservoirs are “gelled fracturing” and “slick-water fracturing”. Both methods utilize up to several million gallons of water-based fluid per well in a...

  5. Hydraulic Fracture Optimization with a Pseudo-3D Model in Multi-layered Lithology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Mei

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic Fracturing is a technique to accelerate production and enhance ultimate recovery of oil and gas while fracture geometry is an important aspect in hydraulic fracturing design and optimization. Systematic design ...

  6. Degradation of Guar-Based Fracturing Gels: A Study of Oxidative and Enzymatic Breakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarwar, Muhammad Usman

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Unbroken gel and residue from guar-based fracturing gels can be a cause for formation damage. The effectiveness of a fracturing treatment depends on better achieveing desired fracture geometry, proper proppant placement and after that, a good clean...

  7. Seismic scattering attributes to estimate reservoir fracture density : a numerical modeling study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglas), 1978-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a 3-D finite difference numerical model to generate synthetic seismograms from a simple fractured reservoir containing evenly-spaced, discrete, vertical fracture zones. The fracture zones are represented using a ...

  8. Seismic Scattering Attributes to Estimate Reservoir Fracture Density: A Numerical Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Frederick Douglas

    We use a 3-D finite difference numerical model to generate synthetic seismograms from a simple fractured reservoir containing evenly-spaced, discrete, vertical fracture zones. The fracture zones are represented using a ...

  9. Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Abstract Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands fluids escape from hydrocarbon reservoirs through permeable networks of fractures, injected sands. Within fractures and injected sands, oxidation of chained hydrocarbons supplies bicarbonate to the co

  10. Hydromechanical interactions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferred from hydraulic and mechanical measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydromechanical interactions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferred from hydraulic, France Abstract Hydromechanical coupled processes in a shallow fractured carbonate reservoir rock were fracture network made up of vertical faults and bedding planes. Hydromechanical response of the reservoir

  11. A microstructural study of the extension-to-shear fracture transition in Carrara Marble 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Erika

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Triaxial extension experiments on Carrara Marble demonstrate that there is a continuous transition from extension to shear fracture on the basis of mechanical behavior, macroscopic fracture orientation and fracture morphology ...

  12. A triple-continuum pressure-transient model for a naturally fractured vuggy reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    well test data from a fractured-vuggy reservoir in Westernwell test data from a fractured-vuggy reservoir in Westerndata for two wells from a naturally fractured vuggy oil reservoir,

  13. Statistical analysis of surface lineaments and fractures for characterizing naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Genliang; George, S.A.; Lindsey, R.P.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-six sets of surface lineaments and fractures mapped from satellite images and/or aerial photos from parts of the Mid-continent and Colorado Plateau regions were collected, digitized, and statistically analyzed in order to obtain the probability distribution functions of natural fractures for characterizing naturally fractured reservoirs. The orientations and lengths of the surface linear features were calculated using the digitized coordinates of the two end points of each individual linear feature. The spacing data of the surface linear features within an individual set were, obtained using a new analytical sampling technique. Statistical analyses were then performed to find the best-fit probability distribution functions for the orientation, length, and spacing of each data set. Twenty-five hypothesized probability distribution functions were used to fit each data set. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test was used to rank the significance of each fit. A distribution which provides the lowest chi-square goodness-of-fit value was considered the best-fit distribution. The orientations of surface linear features were best-fitted by triangular, normal, or logistic distributions; the lengths were best-fitted by PearsonVI, PearsonV, lognormal2, or extreme-value distributions; and the spacing data were best-fitted by lognormal2, PearsonVI, or lognormal distributions. These probability functions can be used to stochastically characterize naturally fractured reservoirs.

  14. Scalable, efficient ion-photon coupling with phase Fresnel lenses for large-scale quantum computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. W. Streed; B. G. Norton; J. J. Chapman; D. Kielpinski

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient ion-photon coupling is an important component for large-scale ion-trap quantum computing. We propose that arrays of phase Fresnel lenses (PFLs) are a favorable optical coupling technology to match with multi-zone ion traps. Both are scalable technologies based on conventional micro-fabrication techniques. The large numerical apertures (NAs) possible with PFLs can reduce the readout time for ion qubits. PFLs also provide good coherent ion-photon coupling by matching a large fraction of an ion's emission pattern to a single optical propagation mode (TEM00). To this end we have optically characterized a large numerical aperture phase Fresnel lens (NA=0.64) designed for use at 369.5 nm, the principal fluorescence detection transition for Yb+ ions. A diffraction-limited spot w0=350+/-15 nm (1/e^2 waist) with mode quality M^2= 1.08+/-0.05 was measured with this PFL. From this we estimate the minimum expected free space coherent ion-photon coupling to be 0.64%, which is twice the best previous experimental measurement using a conventional multi-element lens. We also evaluate two techniques for improving the entanglement fidelity between the ion state and photon polarization with large numerical aperture lenses.

  15. Turbulent flow of gas in fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Wong In

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sises of 40 - 60, 20 - 40 and 10 - 20 mesh and with varying concentration of proppants . The confining pressure was varied for each core up to $, 000 psi step by step. The proppant concentration in each fracture was varied up to a complete monolayer... an ovex'bux'den pressure of 4, 000 psi, the reduction in flow capaoity would vary from 86 $ to 76 4 with corresponding change of pressure dxop from 2, 000 psi to 7, 000 psi across a 320 ft long fractuxe. ACKHOWLEDGENEN% The author wishes to extend...

  16. Recent developments in dynamic fracture: Some perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fineberg, Jay

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review a number of important recent experimental and theoretical developments in the field of dynamic fracture. Topics include experimental validation of the equations of motion for straight tensile cracks (in both infinite media and strip geometries), validation of a new theoretical description of the near-tip fields of dynamic cracks incorporating weak elastic nonlinearities, a new understanding of dynamic instabilities of tensile cracks in both 2D and 3D, crack front dynamics, and the relation between frictional motion and dynamic shear cracks. Related future research directions are briefly discussed.

  17. Recent developments in dynamic fracture: Some perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Fineberg; Eran Bouchbinder

    2015-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review a number of important recent experimental and theoretical developments in the field of dynamic fracture. Topics include experimental validation of the equations of motion for straight tensile cracks (in both infinite media and strip geometries), validation of a new theoretical description of the near-tip fields of dynamic cracks incorporating weak elastic nonlinearities, a new understanding of dynamic instabilities of tensile cracks in both 2D and 3D, crack front dynamics, and the relation between frictional motion and dynamic shear cracks. Related future research directions are briefly discussed.

  18. Fracture of Thermosetting Polymers: Experiments and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benzerga, Amine; Burgess, Brad

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    , have come under scrutiny. The cases consist of a carbon fiber resin matrix. The resin can be any one of a number of epoxies, most germane of which is E862. This resin has the effect of strengthening the overall casing structure, but the full nature... of a resin known as epoxy E862, which is a polymer resin currently explored by NASA researchers, and then model this behavior using FEM. In the early 1990's, successful computational methodologies for modeling fracture of metal-matrix composites...

  19. Fracture Characterization Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbsSalonga, NewCornersFoxFracture Characterization

  20. Transferability of cleavage fracture parameters between notched and cracked geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and specimen geometry dependence of cleavage fracture micromechanisms of a French pressure vessel steel (A508 that only NT tests with a mean fracture strain lower than 25% have to be considered to make sure ; ¢ 50 £ C ]. Also a unique set of Weibull parameters was found to describe all the NT tests over