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Sample records for laos liberia madagascar

  1. Liberia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Liberia Population 3,476,608 GDP 1,735,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LR 3-letter ISO code LBR Numeric ISO...

  2. Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  3. Laos: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Laos Population 4,574,848 GDP 11 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LA 3-letter ISO code LAO Numeric ISO...

  4. China Lao Gaixian Wind L P | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lao Gaixian Wind L P Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Lao Gaixian Wind L.P. Place: China Sector: Wind energy Product: China-based wind farm developer. References: China Lao...

  5. Assessment of Biomass Resources in Liberia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.

    2009-04-01

    Biomass resources meet about 99.5% of the Liberian population?s energy needs so they are vital to basic welfare and economic activity. Already, traditional biomass products like firewood and charcoal are the primary energy source used for domestic cooking and heating. However, other more efficient biomass technologies are available that could open opportunities for agriculture and rural development, and provide other socio-economic and environmental benefits.The main objective of this study is to estimate the biomass resources currently and potentially available in the country and evaluate their contribution for power generation and the production of transportation fuels. It intends to inform policy makers and industry developers of the biomass resource availability in Liberia, identify areas with high potential, and serve as a base for further, more detailed site-specific assessments.

  6. laos

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) sponsored the Fundamentals of Nuclear Safeguards and the Additional Protocol workshop in Vientiane,...

  7. Lao Institute for Renewable Energy LIRE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Village Place: Vientiane, Laos Product: Shared-Pico hydropower system, DEWATS and DEWASS plus studies Year Founded: 2006 Phone Number: +856 21 353430 Website: www.lao-ire.org...

  8. Madagascar-USAID Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Madagascar-USAID Climate Activities Jump to: navigation, search Name Madagascar-USAID Climate Activities AgencyCompany Organization U.S. Agency for International Development...

  9. Madagascar: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Madagascar Population 12,238,914 GDP 10,025,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.05 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MG 3-letter ISO code MDG Numeric ISO...

  10. The microstructure and rheology of a model, thixotropic nanoparticle gel under steady shear and large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min Kim, Jung; Kate Gurnon, A.; Wagner, Norman J., E-mail: wagnernj@udel.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Center for Neutron Science, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Eberle, Aaron P. R. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Porcar, Lionel [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 and Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-09-01

    The microstructure-rheology relationship for a model, thermoreversible nanoparticle gel is investigated using a new technique of time-resolved neutron scattering under steady and time-resolved large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) flows. A 21 vol. % gel is tested with varying strength of interparticle attraction. Shear-induced structural anisotropy is observed as butterfly scattering patterns and quantified through an alignment factor. Measurements in the plane of flow show significant, local anisotropy develops with alignment along the compressional axis of flow, providing new insights into how gels flow. The microstructure-rheology relationship is analyzed through a new type of structure-Lissajous plot that shows how the anisotropic microstructure is responsible for the observed LAOS response, which is beyond a response expected for a purely viscous gel with constant structure. The LAOS shear viscosities are observed to follow the Delaware-Rutgers rule. Rheological and microstructural data are successfully compared across a broad range of conditions by scaling the shear rate by the strength of attraction, providing a method to compare behavior between steady shear and LAOS experiments. However, important differences remain between the microstructures measured at comparatively high frequency in LAOS experiments and comparable steady shear experiments that illustrate the importance of measuring the microstructure to properly interpret the nonlinear, dynamic rheological response.

  11. Liberia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volume of work justifies the need for dedicated staff. The counterpart Off-Grid Power and Renewable Energy Unit is expected to be established concurrently. The Grid and Off-Grid...

  12. laos | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    stakeholder organizations attended the event. WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) sponsored the Fundamentals of Nuclear

  13. Liberia-NREL Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are more than enough to cover the country's annual electricity consumption of 297 GWh and oil consumption of 206 dam3. While the contribution of food crop residues, animal manure,...

  14. Liberia-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  15. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  16. Laos-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  17. Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the growth of greenhouse gas emissions. The LEAD program supports and enhances country-led development programs, plans, and policies, and complements efforts of other...

  18. Laos-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and poverty reduction opportunities. FIP investments also mainstream climate resilience considerations and contribute to multiple co-benefits such as biodiversity...

  19. Laos-Low Carbon Asia Research Network (LoCARNet) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Hydrogen, Industry, Land Use, People and...

  20. Materials Data on LaOs2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  2. fnsap | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the IAEA Additional Protocol in Lao PDR Twenty-five participants from the Lao Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Science and Technology and other key stakeholder...

  3. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, National Security Technologies, LLC/Los Alamos Operations- June 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recertification of NSTec/LAO as a Star Participant in the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program.

  4. Asian Development Outlook 2010 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, China, South Korea, Mongolia, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Laos, Vietnam,...

  5. Category:Economic Community of West African States | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    15 pages are in this category, out of 15 total. B Benin Burkina Faso C Cape Verde G Gambia Ghana G cont. Guinea Guinea-Bissau I Ivory Coast L Liberia M Mali N Niger Nigeria...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab Accomplishments:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioscience Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS News Bioscience Fighting Ebola Contour map showing drive times and Ebola lab coverage in Liberia. Sandia has been providing technical assistance to West Africa as part of the effort to control the Ebola epidemic. In Liberia and Sierra Leone we analyzed infrastructure and laboratory networks to improve sample transport and optimize laboratory placement. In Guinea and Sierra Leone, numerous Sandians served as laboratory coordinators for

  7. DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the IAEA

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Additional Protocol in Lao PDR | National Nuclear Security Administration DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the IAEA Additional Protocol in Lao PDR October 07, 2015 Twenty-five participants from the Lao Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Science and Technology and other key stakeholder organizations attended the event. WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) sponsored the Fundamentals of Nuclear

  8. File:NREL-asia-tilt.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Countries Bhutan, China, Nepal, Mongolia, India, North Korea, South Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, Philippines, Bangladesh UN Region Southern Asia, Eastern Asia,...

  9. File:NREL-asia-dir.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Countries Bhutan, China, Nepal, Mongolia, India, North Korea, South Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, Philippines, Bangladesh UN Region Southern Asia, Eastern Asia,...

  10. File:NREL-asia-glo.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Countries Bhutan, China, Nepal, Mongolia, India, North Korea, South Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, Philippines, Bangladesh UN Region Southern Asia, Eastern Asia,...

  11. santa_fe-hc2.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiband superconductivity in interface superconductors Jonathan Edge edge@kth.se * Multiband superconductivity * STO and LAO/STO * Probes for multiband SC * Multiband signature in H c2 * Results for Hc2 in STO and LAO/STO JME & A.Balatsky arXiv:1401.5318 Multiband superconductivity in interface superconductors Jonathan Edge edge@kth.se * Multiband superconductivity * STO and LAO/STO * Probes for multiband SC * Multiband signature in H c2 * Results for Hc2 in STO and LAO/STO Ordinary single

  12. Producing Linear Alpha Olefins From Biomass - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Producing Linear Alpha Olefins From Biomass Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Linear alpha olefins (LAOs) are...

  13. Ristma AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Ristma AG Place: GlisVS, Switzerland Zip: 3902 Product: Swiss battery pack manufacturer primarily for the handheld cordless power tool market. It is laos...

  14. Tunable bilayer two-dimensional electron gas in LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, H. J. Harsan E-mail: phyarian@nus.edu.sg; Annadi, A.; Zeng, S. W.; Ariando E-mail: phyarian@nus.edu.sg; Huang, Z.; L, W. M.; Wong, L. M.; Wang, S. J.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-07-07

    We report magnetotransport properties of double heterointerfaces in LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}(001) (LAO/STO/LAO/STO). A strong nonlinearity in the Hall resistivity is found when the temperature is below 80?K. This effect is attributed to multichannel conduction of interfacial charges generated in double heterostructures of LAO/STO where two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is produced. The multichannel conduction is confirmed by back gating modulation of Hall effect. Our result suggests the possibility to achieve coupled bilayer 2DEG layers in LAO/STO superlattices.

  15. REDD+ Country Readiness Preparation Proposals | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    getting-ready Country: Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guyana, Indonesia, Madagascar, Mexico, Suriname, Panama Middle Africa, Western Africa, South America,...

  16. Microsoft Word - Final Rainfall in Washington newsletter_2010...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    England and Southern Scotland The eastern coasts of large islands like Australia and Madagascar Areas in the northwestern United States near the Great Lakes Seattle, Washington,...

  17. Forest Carbon Partnership Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Madagascar, Mexico, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of the Congo, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vanuatu, Vietnam...

  18. A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    submitted by Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guyana, Indonesia, Madagascar, Mexico, Panama and Suriname can be accessed online at: http:www.wri.orggfi ." To access...

  19. Revealing the Nature of Emergent Ferromagnetism at an Oxide Heterointe...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LaAlO3 (lanthanum aluminium oxide, LAO) and SrTiO3 (strontium titanium oxide, STO) ... The researchers used the x-rays to look specifically at the titanium in the STO slice of ...

  20. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  1. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe???Se??? thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe???Se??? thin films grown on LaAlO? (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10? A/cm at 5 K was obtained. Magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals, FeTe???Se??? thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.

  2. BiFeO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} heterostructures deposited on spark plasma sintered LaAlO{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pravarthana, D.; Lacotte, M.; David, A.; Prellier, W.; Trassin, M.; Haw Chu, Jiun; Ramesh, R.; Salvador, P. A.

    2014-02-24

    Multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO)/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} heterostructured thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on polished spark plasma sintered LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) polycrystalline substrates. Both polycrystalline LAO substrates and BFO films were locally characterized using electron backscattering diffraction, which confirmed the high-quality local epitaxial growth on each substrate grain. Piezoforce microscopy was used to image and switch the piezo-domains, and the results are consistent with the relative orientation of the ferroelectric variants with the surface normal. This high-throughput synthesis process opens the routes towards wide survey of electronic properties as a function of crystalline orientation in complex oxide thin film synthesis.

  3. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm²

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2014-12-03

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films grown on LaAlO₃ (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10⁶ A/cm² at 5 K was obtained. In this study, magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals,more » FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.« less

  4. NSTec Los Alamos Earns DOE-VPP STAR For Safety National Security Technologies (NSTec) Los

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSTec Los Alamos Earns DOE-VPP STAR For Safety National Security Technologies (NSTec) Los Alamos Operations office has been recognized as one of the safest contractors in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) complex with the announcement that the U.S. Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) has recognized them at the STAR level, its highest rating. Los Alamos Operations (LAO) is a New Mexico operation of NSTec, the managing and operational contractor for the

  5. Tuning the Electron Gas at an Oxide Heterointerface via Free Surface Charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Christopher

    2011-08-11

    Oxide heterointerfaces are emerging as one of the most exciting materials systems in condensed matter science. One remarkable example is the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} (LAO/STO) interface, a model system in which a highly mobile electron gas forms between two band insulators, exhibiting two dimensional superconductivity and unusual magnetotransport properties. An ideal tool to tune such an electron gas is the electrostatic field effect. In principle, the electrostatic field can be generated by bound charges due to polarization (as in the normal and ferroelectric field effects) or by adding excess free charge. In previous studies, a large modulation of the carrier density and mobility of the LAO/STO interface has been achieved using the normal field effect. However, little attention has been paid to the field effect generated by free charges. This issue is scarcely addressed, even in conventional semiconductor devices, since the free charges are typically not stable. Here, we demonstrate an unambiguous tuning of the LAO/STO interface conductivity via free surface charges written using conducting atomic force microscopy (AFM). The modulation of the carrier density was found to be reversible, nonvolatile and surprisingly large, {approx}3 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, comparable to the maximum modulation by the normal field effect. Our finding reveal the efficiency of free charges in controlling the conductivity of this oxide interface, and suggest that this technique may be extended more generally to other oxide systems.

  6. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    critical current density over 1 MA/cm² (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm² Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm² We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films grown on LaAlO₃ (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)

  7. ATR/TOR-201X(XXXX)-XXXX

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR-2015-01848 Plutonium Disposition Study Options Independent Assessment Phase 1 Report Option 1: MOX Fuel Option 4: Downblend April 13, 2015 Matthew J. Hart 1 , Nichols F. Brown 2 , Mark J. Rokey 1 , Harold J. Huslage 3 , Denise J. Castro-Bran 4 , Norman Y. Lao 5 , Roland J. Duphily 5 , Vincent M. Canales 2 , Joshua P. Davis 6 , Whitney L. Plumb-Starnes 7 , Jya-Syin W. Chien 5 1 Civil Applications Directorate, Civil and Commercial Programs Division 2 Schedule and Cost

  8. Merging hydraulics with biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorncraft, Garry; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Research staff are now working with developers in Lao PDR and Australia to ensure design criteria is optimised at time of construction. Research is presently underway on a suite of Mekong and Murray-Darling species to identify critical tolerances of shear and pressure. Work in the USA is also being expanded to lamprey and white sturgeon in an effort to increase the understanding beyond salmon species. Researchers and developers are hopeful of constructing the first fish-friendly hydro plants within the next two years. Pending favourable outcomes, the expansion of this technology to other sites and river systems is the ultimate development outcome.

  9. Plutonium_Disposition_Phase_2_TOR_082015_FINAL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR-2015-02671 Plutonium Disposition Study Options Independent Assessment Phase 2 Report August 20, 2015 Matthew J. Hart 1 , Nichols F. Brown 2 , Mark J. Rokey 1 , Harold J. Huslage 3 , J. Denise Castro-Bran 4 , Norman Y. Lao 5 , Roland J. Duphily 5 , Vincent M. Canales 2 , Joshua P. Davis 6 , Whitney L. Plumb-Starnes 7 , Jya-Syin W. Chien 5 1 Civil Applications Directorate, Civil and Commercial Programs Division 2 Schedule and Cost Analysis Department, Acquisition Analysis

  10. World frontiers beckon oil finders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This paper discusses the international aspects of the petroleum industry. Most who work in the industry agree that the possibilities for huge are found largely in international regions. Something that is helping fuel that possibility is the way countries are increasingly opening their doors to US oil industry involvement. Listed in this paper is a partial list of the reported projects now underway around the world involving US companies. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather an indication of how work continues despite a general lull atmosphere for the oil industry. These include Albania, Bulgaria, Congo, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ireland, Malta, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Panama, Paraquay, and Senegal.

  11. Layering, melting, and recrystallization of a close-packed micellar crystal under steady and large-amplitude oscillatory shear flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez-Barrn, Carlos R.; Wagner, Norman J.; Porcar, Lionel

    2015-05-15

    The rheology and three-dimensional microstructure of a concentrated viscoelastic solution of the triblock copolymer poly(ethylene oxide){sub 106}-poly(propylene oxide){sub 68}-poly(ethylene oxide){sub 106} (Pluronic F127) in the protic ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate are measured by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) under flow in three orthogonal planes. This solution's shear-thinning viscosity is due to the formation of two-dimensional hexagonal close-packed (HCP) sliding layer structure. Shear-melting of the crystalline structure is observed without disruption of the self-assembled micelles, resulting in a change in flow properties. Spatially resolved measurements in the 12 plane reveal that both shear-melting and sliding are not uniform across the Couette gap. Melting and recrystallization of the HCP layers occur cyclically during a single large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) cycle, in agreement with the stick-slip flow mechanism proposed by Hamley et al. [Phys. Rev. E 58, 76207628 (1998)]. Analysis of 3D structural Lissajous curves show that the cyclic melting and sliding are direct functions of the strain rate amplitude and show perfect correlation with the cyclic stress response during LAOS. Both viscosity and structural order obey the DelawareRutgers rule. Combining rheology with in situ spatiotemporally resolved SANS is demonstrated to elucidate the structural origins of the nonlinear rheology of complex fluids.

  12. Misfit strain driven cation inter-diffusion across an epitaxial multiferroic thin film interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankara Rama Krishnan, P. S.; Munroe, Paul; Nagarajan, V.; Morozovska, Anna N.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Liang, Wen-I.; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2014-02-07

    Cation intermixing at functional oxide interfaces remains a highly controversial area directly relevant to interface-driven nanoelectronic device properties. Here, we systematically explore the cation intermixing in epitaxial (001) oriented multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) grown on a (001) lanthanum aluminate (LAO) substrate. Aberration corrected dedicated scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy reveal that the interface is not chemically sharp, but with an intermixing of ?2?nm. The driving force for this process is identified as misfit-driven elastic strain. Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire-based phenomenological theory was combined with the Sheldon and Shenoy formula in order to understand the influence of boundary conditions and depolarizing fields arising from misfit strain between the LAO substrate and BFO film. The theory predicts the presence of a strong potential gradient at the interface, which decays on moving into the bulk of the film. This potential gradient is significant enough to drive the cation migration across the interface, thereby mitigating the misfit strain. Our results offer new insights on how chemical roughening at oxide interfaces can be effective in stabilizing the structural integrity of the interface without the need for misfit dislocations. These findings offer a general formalism for understanding cation intermixing at highly strained oxide interfaces that are used in nanoelectronic devices.

  13. Structural Comparison of n-type and p-type LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Christopher

    2011-08-19

    Using a surface x-ray diffraction technique, we investigated the atomic structure of two types of interfaces between LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}, that is, p-type (SrO/AlO{sub 2}) and n-type (TiO{sub 2}/LaO) interfaces. Our results demonstrate that the SrTiO{sub 3} in the sample with the n-type interface has a large polarized region, while that with the p-type interface has a limited polarized region. In addition, the atomic intermixing was observed to extend deeper into STO substrate at the n-type interface than at the p-type. These differences result in different degrees of band bending, which likely contributes to the striking difference in electrical conductivity between the two types of interfaces.

  14. United Nations geothermal activities in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beredjick, N.

    1987-07-01

    The United Nations implements technical cooperation projects in developing countries through its Department of Technical Cooperation for Development (DTCD). The DTCD is mandated to explore for and develop natural resources (water, minerals, and relevant infrastructure) and energy - both conventional and new and renewable energy sources. To date, the United Nations has been involved in over 30 geothermal exploration projects (completed or underway) in 20 developing countries: 8 in Africa (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar); 8 in Asia (China, India, Jordan, Philippines, Thailand); 9 in Latin America (Bolivia, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama) and 6 in Europe (Greece, Romania, Turkey, Yugoslavia). Today, the DTCD has seven UNDP geothermal projects in 6 developing countries. Four of these (Bolivia, China, Honduras, and Kenya) are major exploration projects whose formulation and execution has been possible thanks to the generous contributions under cost-sharing arrangements from the government of Italy. These four projects are summarized.

  15. Enhancing the effectiveness of governmental and non-governmental partnership in natural resources management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, K.L.; Gow, D.; Brown, C.; Christophersen, K.; Gaylord, E.

    1990-08-01

    The African sub-continent (Sub-Saharan Africa) is a vast continent of mangroves and deserts, rainforests, mountains and, miles upon thousands of miles of flat wooded plains. It is a continent whose people rely directly on its basic natural resources--land, water, soils, animals and vegetation--for their day-to-day subsistence and development. The effects of environmental degradation have taught bilateral and multilateral agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and national governments harsh lessons about the critical importance of natural resources management to food security and development. The report examines the role of NGO's as resource stewards and explores the relationship between NGO's and donors in the environmental field, with particular reference to experiences from the Natural Resources Management Support Project for Africa and from the literature. Practical guidelines for enhancing the effectiveness of donor- collaboration are suggested. Annexes present case studies of Cameroon, Madagascar, and Mali.

  16. Africa: the emphasis is exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    Individual country reports on drilling, oil and gas production, and petroleum exploration and reserves are given for Africa. Nigeria was the continent's largest oil producer in 1979, averaging 2.3 million bpd, followed closely by Libya with 2.07 million bpd. Algeria cut production of crude oil in 1979 to a level of 1,194,350 bpd, and increased gas production to 2031 mmcfd. In Egypt, the return of Israeli-occupied oil fields and a surge in productive capacity enabled production averaging 524,000 bpd. Brief country reports are included for Gabon, Angola, Republic of the Congo, Cameroun, Tunisia, Morocco, Zaire, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Republic of South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles Islands, Mauritania, Republic of Mali, Benin, Kenya, Madagascar, Botswana, Gambia, Mozambique, and Senegal.

  17. Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

    1993-03-15

    To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

  18. Clean energy for development investment framework: the World Bank Group action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-03-06

    In September 2005 the Development Committee requested the World Bank to develop an Investment Framework for Clean Energy and Development - in the context of the Gleneagles Communique on Climate Change, Clean Energy and Sustainable Development which was issued in July 2005. This Action Plan provides an update of work undertaken to date as well as actions planned by the World Bank Group (WBG) in support of the Clean Energy for Development Investment Framework (CEIF). The Action Plan relies on partnerships, including with the International Financial Institutions (IFIs) and the private sector. While it concentrates on maximizing and extending existing instruments, it provides for continued dialogue with governments and the private sector on new approaches to accelerate the transition to a low carbon economy. In addition to increased investments, the private sector has an important role to play in closing the investment gap in many countries. Projects such as Bujagali (Uganda), Nam Theun II (Laos) and China and India Thermal Power Plant Rehabilitation projects are examples of how partnerships with the private sector can work, both on financing but also on enhancing the overall regulatory framework for enhanced partnerships. The report was prepared for the 15 April 2007 Development Committee meeting, a joint committee of the Board of Governors of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund on the transfer of real resources to developing countries. 3 figs., 3 tabs., 5 annexes.

  19. Effect of Surface Termination on the Electonic Properties of LaNiO? Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumah, Divine P.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Arena, Dario A.; Walker, Fred J.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-06

    The electronic and structural properties of thin LaNiO? films grown by using molecular beam epitaxy are studied as a function of the net ionic charge of the surface terminating layer. We demonstrate that electronic transport in nickelate heterostructures can be manipulated through changes in the surface termination due to a strong coupling of the surface electrostatic properties to the structural properties of the NiO bonds that govern electronic conduction. We observe experimentally and from first-principles theory an asymmetric response of the structural properties of the films to the sign of the surface charge, which results from a strong interplay between electrostatic and mechanical boundary conditions governing the system. The structural response results in ionic buckling in the near-surface NiO? planes for films terminated with negatively charged NiO? and bulklike NiO? planes for films terminated with positively charged LaO planes. The ability to modify transport properties by the deposition of a single atomic layer can be used as a guiding principle for nanoscale device fabrication.

  20. Integrating spatial support tools into strategic planning-SEA of the GMS North-South Economic Corridor Strategy and Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramachandran, Pavit; Linde, Lothar

    2011-11-15

    The GMS countries, supported by the Asian Development Bank, have adopted a holistic, multidimensional approach to strengthen infrastructural linkages and facilitate cross border trade through (i) the establishment of a trans-boundary road connecting two economic nodes across marginalised areas, followed by 2) facilitation of environmentally and socially sound investments in these newly connected areas as a means to develop livelihoods. The North-South Economic Corridor is currently in its second phase of development, with investment opportunities to be laid out in the NSEC Strategy and Action Plan (SAP). It targets the ecologically and culturally sensitive border area between PR China's Yunnan Province, Northern Lao PDR, and Thailand. A trans-boundary, cross-sectoral Strategic Environmental Assessment was conducted to support the respective governments in assessing potential environmental and social impacts, developing alternatives and mitigation options, and feeding the findings back into the SAP writing process. Given the spatial dimension of corridor development-both with regard to opportunities and risks-particular emphasis was put in the application of spatial modelling tools to help geographically locate and quantify impacts as a means to guide interventions and set priorities.

  1. Effect of Surface Termination on the Electonic Properties of LaNiO₃ Films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumah, Divine P.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Arena, Dario A.; Walker, Fred J.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-06

    The electronic and structural properties of thin LaNiO₃ films grown by using molecular beam epitaxy are studied as a function of the net ionic charge of the surface terminating layer. We demonstrate that electronic transport in nickelate heterostructures can be manipulated through changes in the surface termination due to a strong coupling of the surface electrostatic properties to the structural properties of the Ni—O bonds that govern electronic conduction. We observe experimentally and from first-principles theory an asymmetric response of the structural properties of the films to the sign of the surface charge, which results from a strong interplay betweenmore » electrostatic and mechanical boundary conditions governing the system. The structural response results in ionic buckling in the near-surface NiO₂ planes for films terminated with negatively charged NiO₂ and bulklike NiO₂ planes for films terminated with positively charged LaO planes. The ability to modify transport properties by the deposition of a single atomic layer can be used as a guiding principle for nanoscale device fabrication.« less

  2. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  3. Growth mechanisms, polytypism, and real structure of kaolinite microcrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samotoin, N. D.

    2008-09-15

    The mechanisms of growth of kaolinite microcrystals (0.1-5.0 {mu}m in size) at deposits related to the cluvial weathering crust, as well as to the low-temperature and medium-temperature hydrothermal processes of transformations of minerals in different rocks in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Czechia, Vietnam, India, Cuba, and Madagascar, are investigated using transmission electron microscopy and vacuum decoration with gold. It is established that kaolinite microcrystals grow according to two mechanisms: the mechanism of periodic formation of two-dimensional nuclei and the mechanism of spiral growth. The spiral growth of kaolinite microcrystals is dominant and occurs on steps of screw dislocations that differ in sign and magnitude of the Burgers vector along the c axis. The layered growth of kaolinite originates from a widespread source in the form of a step between polar (+ and -) dislocations, i.e., a growth analogue of the Frank-Read dislocation source. The density of growth screw dislocations varies over a wide range and can be as high as {approx}10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}. Layered stepped kaolinite growth pyramids for all mechanisms of growth on the (001) face of kaolinite exhibit the main features of the triclinic 1Tc and real structures of this mineral.

  4. Building on and spinning off: Sandia National Labs` creation of sensors for Vietnam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses Sandia National Laboratories` development of new technologies for use in the Vietnam War - specifically the seismic sensors deployed to detect troop and vehicle movement - first along the Ho Chi Minh Trail and later in perimeter defense for American military encampments in South Vietnam. Although the sensor story is a small one, it is interesting because it dovetails nicely with our understanding of the war in Vietnam and its frustrations; of the creation of new technologies for war and American enthusiasm for that technology; and of a technological military and the organizational research and a m am development structure created to support it. Within the defense establishment, the sensors were proposed within the context of a larger concept - that of a barrier to prevent the infiltration of troops and supplies from North Vietnam to the South. All of the discussion of the best way to fight in Vietnam is couched in the perception that this was a different kind of war than America was used to fighting. The emphasis was on countering the problems posed by guerrilla/revolutionary warfare and eventually by the apparent constraints of being involved in a military action, not an outright war. The American response was to find the right technology to do the job - to control the war by applying a technological tincture to its wounds and to make the war familiar and fightable on American terms. And, when doubts were raised about the effectiveness of applying existing technologies (namely, the bombing of North Vietnam and Laos), the doubters turned to new technologies. The sensors that were developed for use in Vietnam were a direct product of this sort of thinking - on the part of the engineers at Sandia who created the sensors, the civilian scientific advisors who recommended them, and, ultimately, the soldiers in the field who had to use them.

  5. Low temperature thermoelastic and structural properties of LaGaO{sub 3} perovskite in the Pbnm phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Kevin S.

    2012-10-15

    The thermoelastic and structural properties of LaGaO{sub 3} perovskite have been studied using high resolution neutron diffractometry at 158 temperatures between 11 K and 548 K. Data collected in 2 K intervals between 410 K and 430 K show no evidence for an intermediate phase between the low temperature phase in space group Pbnm and the high temperature phase in space group F3{sup Macron }2/n. From a simultaneous fit of the unit cell volume and the isochoric heat capacity, the phonon density of states in the Pbnm phase is shown to be approximated by a two-term Debye model, with characteristic temperatures 294(1) K and 831(1) K. Vibrational Debye temperatures, determined from fitting the temperature variation of the atomic displacement parameters, show the cations to be more associated with the lower characteristic temperature, whilst that for the anions, is closer to the higher characteristic temperature. Structural parameters are presented as the amplitudes of the seven symmetry-adapted basis-vectors of the aristotype phase, and a structural basis for the temperature-dependence of the bond lengths is outlined. The phase transition in both temperature and pressure arises when a non-bonded La-O distance approaches the La coordination sphere. - Graphical abstract: The weight fraction of the rhombohedral phase of LaGaO{sub 3} from the onset of the phase transition at 408 K to its completion at 430 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermoelastic properties of LaGaO{sub 3} analyzed as a two-term Debye model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure and bonding analyzed in terms of symmetry-adapted basis-vectors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Consistency between calorimetric and crystallographic measurements.

  6. [La(UO{sub 2})V{sub 2}O{sub 7}][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})] the first lanthanum uranyl-vanadate with structure built from two types of sheets based upon the uranophane anion-topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mer, A.; Obbade, S.; Rivenet, M.; Renard, C.; Abraham, F.

    2012-01-15

    The new lanthanum uranyl vanadate divanadate, [La(UO{sub 2})V{sub 2}O{sub 7}][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})] was obtained by reaction at 800 Degree-Sign C between lanthanum chloride, uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and the structure was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. This compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a=6.9470(2) A, b=7.0934(2) A, c=25.7464(6) A, V=1268.73(5) A{sup 3}, Z=4. A full matrix least-squares refinement yielded R{sub 1}=0.0219 for 5493 independent reflections. The crystal structure is characterized by the stacking of uranophane-type sheets {sup 2}{sub {infinity}}[(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})]{sup -} and double layers {sup 2}{sub {infinity}}[La(UO{sub 2})(V{sub 2}O{sub 7})]{sup +} connected through La-O bonds involving the uranyl oxygen of the uranyl-vanadate sheets. The double layers result from the connection of two {sup 2}{sub {infinity}}[La(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup -} sheets derived from the uranophane anion-topology by replacing half of the uranyl ions by lanthanum atoms and connected through the formation of divanadate entities. - Graphical abstract: A view of the three-dimensional structure of [La(UO{sub 2})V{sub 2}O{sub 7}][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})]. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New lanthanum uranyl vanadate divanadate has been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure is characterized by uranophane-type sheets and double layers {sup 2}{sub {infinity}}[La(UO{sub 2})(V{sub 2}O{sub 7})]{sup +}.

  7. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S

    2001-05-22

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFOTM exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer-coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the center-point of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  8. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-02-07

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFO{trademark} exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer- coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the centerpoint of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SASTM access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).