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  1. Language Shift and National Identity in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngonyani, Deo

    1995-01-01

    School Students in Tanzania." ms. University of DaresPurposes: The Example of Tanzania." International Review ofEmerging Evidence from Tanzania." International Review of

  2. Women in Tanzania: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Sandra

    1983-01-01

    1983. 256 pages. Women in Tanzania: In the last decade, weing countries, Africa and Tanzania, and then moving on toduction and reproduction in Tanzania" because the oppression

  3. Tanzania Partnership Program An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanzania Partnership Program An Overview PartnershipsforSustainableCommunityDevelopment Michigan The Tanzania Partnership Program (TPP) provides an opportunity to develop, test, and refine the PSCD model. Tanzania was selected as the initial location for PSCD based on demonstrated need, potential for success

  4. Assessing the entrepreneurial ecosystem in Tunisia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dziri, Mohamed Hedi

    2013-01-01

    Following the Arab Spring and the Tunisian uprising, many saw Tunisia as a country leading change. A strong willingness to act came along with this shift. Mostly, all the stakeholders in the Tunisian society worked towards ...

  5. Solar Power for Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Christine; Gerace, Jay; Mehner, Nicole; Mohamed, Sharif; Reiss, Kelly

    1999-12-06

    Condensed list of products and activities: 8 educational posters and 1 informational brochure (all original illustrations and text); a business plan with micro-agreements; corporation created called Tanzanian Power, LLC; business feasibility study developed with the University of Albany; Hampshire College collaborated in project development; research conducted seeking similar projects in underdeveloped countries; Citibank proposal submitted (but rejected); cleaned and sent PV panels to Tanzania; community center built in Tanzania; research and list provided to Robinson for educational TV videos and product catalogs; networked with Chase Manhattan Bank for new solar panels; maintained flow of information among many people (stateside and Tanzania); wrote and sent press releases and other outreach information. Several families purchased panels.

  6. Competing for Capital: The Diffusion of Bilateral Investment Treaties, 1960-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins, Zachary; Guzman, Andrew T; Simmons, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Greece Tunisia Togo Thailand Liberia Morocco Niger Cote d’Madagascar Rwanda Tunisia Liberia Cameroon Sri Lanka Tunisia

  7. Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...

  8. Tanzania's New National Stadium and the Rhetoric of Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sortijas, Steve

    2007-01-01

    topic/national-stadium-tanzania. Accessed on June 10, 2007.Review, June 2007. "Tanzania contractors thriving despiteof the United Republic of Tanzania, His Excellency Jakaya

  9. Local Responses to Marine Conservation in Zanzibar, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Arielle

    2006-01-01

    World  Bank.     2005.     Tanzania:  World  Bank  Supports Management  Project  in  Tanzania.     News Re? lease No: development in Tanzania: studies on ac? cumulation 

  10. Political accountability at the local level in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Barak Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Surplus Labor: The Case of Tanzania. Paris: Organization forand Service Delivery in Tanzania. A Summary of Findings from1995. Land Tenure Reform in Tanzania: Legal Problems and

  11. Agricultural Productivity and Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Munenobu

    2009-01-01

    Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania Munenobu IkegamiEvidence from Kagera, Tanzania. CEGA Working Paper SeriesEvidence from Kagera, Tanzania ? Munenobu Ikegami † August

  12. Local responses to marine conservation in Zanzibar, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Arielle

    2004-01-01

    Liberalized development in Tanzania: studies on accumulationbased Conservation in Tanzania. Occasional paper of the IUCNConservation Assistance in Tanzania. World Development. 30(

  13. UCD COMPUTERS FOR TANZANIA The Computers for Tanzania project is progressing well, but we still need

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCD COMPUTERS FOR TANZANIA The Computers for Tanzania project is progressing well, but we still and the installation of the computers. UCDVO members will be traveling to Tanzania in the summer. All makes and models

  14. Florida Atlantic University Study Tour to Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1 Florida Atlantic University Study Tour to Tanzania WST 4417/6934 Gender, Culture, and Social Change in Africa: A Case Study of Tanzania May 9th -May 25th , 2015 Course Instructor: Dr. Josephine the Universities of Tanzania will present some guest lectures and lead class discussions. Topics to be covered

  15. Malaria control in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yhdego, M.; Majura, P. )

    1988-01-01

    A review of the malaria control programs and the problem encountered in the United Republic of Tanzania since 1945 to the year 1986 is discussed. Buguruni, one of the squatter areas in the city of Dar es Salaam, is chosen as a case study in order to evaluate the economic advantage of engineering methods for the control of malaria infection. Although the initial capital cost of engineering methods may be high, the cost effectiveness requires a much lower financial burden of only about Tshs. 3 million compared with the conventional methods of larviciding and insecticiding which requires more than Tshs. 10 million. Finally, recommendations for the adoption of engineering methods are made concerning the upgrading of existing roads and footpaths in general with particular emphasis on drainage of large pools of water which serve as breeding sites for mosquitoes.

  16. The Tanzania Summer Program Dr. Stoltzfus directs a summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    The Tanzania Summer Program Dr. Stoltzfus directs a summer program for Cornell Cornell University and Kilimanjaro Christian Medical College (KCMC) in Moshi, Tanzania. REBECCA STOLTZFUS knowledge. Students come away from Tanzania learning things that I dont know because theyre experienced

  17. The Position of Women on Rural Development Schemes in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brain, James L.

    1975-01-01

    Status of \\'tm! n in Tanzania" canadian JournaZ of African~ PeopZes of Eastern Tanzania Ethnograpric Survey of Africaof court recxmls in Tanzania will show that a very 1aJ:9e

  18. MICRO-ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES ON TUNISIA'S AGRO-EXPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    study of strawberry adoption in Cap Bon. Results show that Tunisia has been successful in increasing is then evaluated, first in general and then using a specific case study of strawberry adoption in Cap Bon. 2

  19. Innovation for Development: A comparative analysis of improved cookstoves in Sri Lanka and Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haick, Cathrin

    2011-11-24

    This dissertation analyses innovation for development. Based on the case study of improved cookstoves, it aims to understand why some innovations are more successful than others, and what is needed for successful innovations ...

  20. A Case Study of the Integration of Environmental, Development, and Reproductive Health Programs: TACARE-Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strunden, George; Gordon, Deanna; Greig, Fiona; Potts, Malcolm

    2002-01-01

    Grant proposal to the Packard Foundation. Maweni, Tanzania.Bureau of Statistics [Tanzania] and Macro InternationalInc. (1997). Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey 1996.

  1. Tanzania: Crisis and Struggle for Survival by Jannik Boeson, et. Al. (eds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Hilarie

    1988-01-01

    be necessary. Joyce Boss Tanzania: Crisis and Struggle forin a debate on whether Tanzania is a model for Africansuperficial, and heedless of Tanzania's particular needs.

  2. Privatizing Public Health: Social Marketing for HIV Prevention in Tanzania, East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahaffey, Erin Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Village Vigilante Groups in Tanzania. African Affairs 86:Groups among the Kuria of Tanzania. Africa: Journal of theRevivalism a Threat to Tanzania's Stability. In Questioning

  3. Negotiating reforms at home: Natural resources and the politics of energy access in urban Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghanadan, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Eberhard, A. (2003). Tanzania Profile of the Electricityhousehold energy use in Tanzania." Energy Policy May: 454-of Social Unity in Tanzania." Journal of Modern African

  4. The Budget and the People: Reflections on the 1984 Budget in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Horace

    1985-01-01

    Salaam , 1979. Laws of Tanzania Art . 6 of 1983. Development215. See The Structural Adjustment Programne for Tanzania.Republic of Tanzania Ministry of Planning and Economic

  5. U.S. and Tunisia to Cooperate on Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Tunisia to Cooperate on Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation and Peaceful Nuclear Energy Infrastructure | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr...

  6. Addressing gaps in surgical skills training by means of low-cost simulation at Muhimbili University in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taché, Stephanie; Mbembati, Naboth; Marshall, Nell; Tendick, Frank; Mkony, Charles; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Muhimbili University in Tanzania Stephanie Taché †1 , NabothSciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and 3 Department of Healthis essential, particularly in Tanzania, where the mortality

  7. The role of research in evaluating conservation strategies in Tanzania: the case of the Katavi-Rukwa ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Tim, Caro; Msago, Omari Ayubu

    2007-01-01

    ecosystem of western Tanzania. Forest Ecology and ManagementFeylininae) from western Tanzania. Proceedings of theinto Rukwa Region, Tanzania. Cahiers d'Afrique 20:1-22.

  8. Population genetic structure of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae in a malaria endemic region of southern Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng'habi, Kija R; Knols, Bart GJ; Lee, Yoosook; Ferguson, Heather M; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2011-01-01

    from seven locations in Tanzania: six from the Kilomberothe Kilombero valley (Tanzania), showing mosquito collectionKilombero Valley, southern Tanzania. Both species occur in

  9. Incentivising safe sex: A randomised trial of conditional cash transfers for HIV and sexually transmitted infection prevention in rural Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    CCT for HIV/STI prevention in Tanzania related behaviors insurveillance system, Tanzania. In: Sankoh OA, Kahn K,infection prevention in rural Tanzania Damien de Walque, 1

  10. Mapping ntfp collection in Tanzania: A comparison of surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    1 Mapping ntfp collection in Tanzania: A comparison of surveys Marije Schaafsma 05 2012 CSERGE Working Paper 2012-05 #12;2 MAPPING NTFP COLLECTION IN TANZANIA: A COMPARISON OF SURVEYS Marije Schaafsma (NTFP) collection and income in the Eastern Arc Mountains (EAM) in Tanzania, using data of the Tanzanian

  11. Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania Fortunata U and Sustainability, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JN, U.K.; 3 Tanzania National Parks, PO Box 3134, Arusha, Tanzania; 4 Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, PO Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania; 5 Center for Collaborative

  12. Common pool resource management and PES: Lessons and constraints for water PES in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Common pool resource management and PES: Lessons and constraints for water PES in Tanzania Brendan, Tanzania c World Wildlife Fund Tanzania Programme Office, Dar es Salaam PO Box 63117, Tanzania d services Common pool resources Payments for ecosystem services Water payments Tanzania Research into common

  13. Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 15 (2013), 69-83 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY POTENTIAL IN SRI LANKA: A PRELIMINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 15 (2013), 69-83 69 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY POTENTIAL faults or hot dry rock that would help geothermal energy development. Data show three regions, metamorphic terrains INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy development in Sri Lanka has been considered

  14. Mass Adult Education: A Necessary Element in the Development of Socialism in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Budd L.

    1972-01-01

    on aduLt education in Tanzania. He is currentLy head of theof Adul-t Educators in Tanzania. A paper delivered at theAduLt Education in Tanzania-- A Handbook on Approaches,

  15. Problems in the Study of Witchcraft Eradication Movements in Southern Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. Zar~a, N~ge~a .Mahenge Ulanga District, Tanzania," in Sholto cross and T.O.Eastern. 16 August 1946. Tanzania National Archives:

  16. A hydrogeochemical survey of Kilimanjaro (Tanzania): implications for water sources and ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    A hydrogeochemical survey of Kilimanjaro (Tanzania): implications for water sources and ages Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, the highest mountain in Africa, has undergone extensive hydrologic changes over (Tanzania). Sample sources included four glaciers, seven groundwater wells, 12 rivers, 10 springs

  17. What Role Can History Play for the Newly Urbanized Women of Kenya and Tanzania?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landau, Loren B.

    1995-01-01

    for Emplo~nr Riglus in Tanzania (London: The Women's Press,both between Kenya and Tanzania and between urban Eastpeople of South Eastern Tanzania. 6 A comparison with Latin

  18. Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions...

  19. Who Changes How: Strategies and Motivation for Risk Reduction Behaviors in the Context of an Economic-based HIV Prevention Intervention in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packel, Laura

    2010-01-01

    and couples in Kenya, Tanzania, and Trinidad: a randomisedcollected in rural northern Tanzania using five methods.planning, 38(3), 147-162. Tanzania Commission for AIDS. (

  20. Implementing poultry vaccination and biosecurity at the village level in Tanzania: a social strategy to promote health in free-range poultry populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    in village chickens in Tanzania. Unpublished DissertationAgricul- ture, Morogoro, Tanzania. 230 pp. Yongolo, M.G.S. ,village in Morogoro Region, Tanzania. In: Proceedings of the

  1. Education, research, and extension: an evaluation of agricultural institutions in Tunisia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedo, Shannon Hajdik

    2004-09-30

    Texas A&M University of the United States and the Institute National Agronomique de Tunisie (INAT) of Tunisia established a collaborative relationship of mutual exchange of information and ideas for the further advancement ...

  2. Sri Lanka Credit to Connect | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:Spill PreventionJumpPapers Ltd SPLSri Lanka Credit

  3. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mexico, the Philippines and Tanzania J.A. Sathaye 1 , W.R.in the forest sector in Tanzania’, Mitigation and Adaptationin the forest sector of Tanzania’, LBNL-43966. Submitted to:

  4. Imbalances in the Modernization and Promotion of the Swahili Language in East Africa: The Case of Kenya and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryanga, Sheila

    1990-01-01

    wa Kiswahili ra Ushairi Tanzania." It is an au1000mous bodyAFRICA: TIIE CASE OF KENYA AND TANZANIA by Sheila Ryanga bi:organized between Tanzania and Kenya have focussed on the

  5. The trouser under the cloth : Ceylon/Sri Lanka, personal space in the decolonization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieris, Anoma D. (Anoma Darshani)

    1994-01-01

    This thesis examines the processes of decolonization in Ceylon/Sri Lanka, through the expressions of personal space surrounding the event of political independence. Personal space is understood as dress, manners, and ...

  6. Chagga elites and the politics of ethnicity in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Thomas James

    2012-06-29

    The focus of this thesis is on elite members of the Chagga ethnic group. Originating from the fertile yet crowded slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro, this group is amongst the most entrepreneurial and best educated in Tanzania. ...

  7. Isotopic and microbial indicators of sewage pollution from Stone Town, Zanzibar, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvell, Catherine Drew

    Isotopic and microbial indicators of sewage pollution from Stone Town, Zanzibar, Tanzania Molly A, Washington, DC, USA c Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam, Zanzibar, Tanzania a r t i c

  8. Precambrian Research xxx (2006) xxxxxx Anorthosites in the Eastern Granulites of Tanzania--New SIMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Precambrian Research xxx (2006) xxx­xxx Anorthosites in the Eastern Granulites of Tanzania, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Received 12 May 2005; received in revised form 3 March 2006; accepted 7 in Tanzania. These are tectonically incorporated into a suite of enderbitic rocks and migmatitic orthogneisses

  9. Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 429..447

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 global heterogeneity in climate-induced agricultural variability,Tanzania has the potential to substan owing to supply shocks in major exporting regions, Tanzania may be able to export more maize at higher

  10. Upper mantle Q and thermal structure beneath Tanzania, East Africa from teleseismic P wave spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    Upper mantle Q and thermal structure beneath Tanzania, East Africa from teleseismic P wave spectra-focus earthquakes recorded at broadband seismic stations of the Tanzania network to estimate regional variation of sublithospheric mantle attenuation beneath the Tanzania craton and the eastern branch of the East African Rift

  11. Origins of non-equilibrium lithium isotopic fractionation in xenolithic peridotite minerals: Examples from Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    : Examples from Tanzania Sonja Aulbach , Roberta L. Rudnick Geochemistry Laboratory, Department of Geology metasomatised peridotite xenoliths from three lithospheric mantle sectionsbeneath theEast African Rift inTanzania, if the samples were erupted in lavas. In Tanzania, the peridotites experienced rift-related heating prior

  12. Herd size of Common Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) in Relation to Cover Type in Northern Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Tanzania Emily Chudek University of Washington, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, Spring 2014 resources distributed within each park. Methods Study Area: Four areas throughout Northern Tanzania wildebeest in Tanzania. Figure 1: All data across entire study area. The median is the line between

  13. Targeting in a Community-Driven Development Program: Applications & Acceptance in Tanzania's TASAF.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Targeting in a Community-Driven Development Program: Applications & Acceptance in Tanzania's TASAF the targeting of a major community-driven development program, Tanzanias $150m Social Action Fund (TASAF). We, this community may be better organized, more educated, and more patient. We use data from Tanzanias Social Action

  14. Savanna Sounds : : Using Remote Acoustic Sensing to Study Spatiotemporal Patterns in Wild Chimpanzee Loud Vocalizations in the Issa Valley, Ugalla, Western Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piel, Alexander Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    movement in western Tanzania. PLoS One 8(3). Stewart, F.A. ,report from Ugalla, western Tanzania. Primates 55(1):35-40.Habitat: the Issa Valley, Tanzania. International Journal of

  15. Trends in the clinical characteristics of HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania between 2002 and 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    therapy in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania between 2002 and 2009.therapy in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania between 2002 and 20092009 in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania and in the International

  16. The Making of the Entrepreneur in Tanzania: experimenting with neo-liberal power through discourses of partnership, entrepreneurship, and participatory education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boner, Elizabeth Helene

    2011-01-01

    as governmentality in Tanzania. In D. Mosse & D. Lewis (Hip Hop Language in Tanzania. In H. S. Alim, A. Ibrahim & A.on poverty reduction in Tanzania. Paper presented at the The

  17. For more than half a century, the Ministry of Water, the Dodoma Urban Water Supply and Sewerage Authority (DUWASA) and the Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Authority (DUWASA) and the Tanzania Meteorological Agency have been monitoring groundwater abstraction, groundwater levels, and rainfall in central Tanzania at the Makutapora Wellfield (Figure 1

  18. Feasibility of an appliance energy testing and labeling program for Sri Lanka

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biermayer, Peter; Busch, John; Hakim, Sajid; Turiel, Issac; du Pont, Peter; Stone, Chris

    2000-04-01

    A feasibility study evaluated the costs and benefits of establishing a program for testing, labeling and setting minimum efficiency standards for appliances and lighting in Sri Lanka. The feasibility study included: refrigerators, air-conditioners, flourescent lighting (ballasts & CFls), ceiling fans, motors, and televisions.

  19. Impacts of the 2004 tsunami on groundwater resources in Sri Lanka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Impacts of the 2004 tsunami on groundwater resources in Sri Lanka Tissa Illangasekare,1 Scott W 2006; accepted 9 March 2006; published 9 May 2006. [1] The 26 December 2004 tsunami caused widespread of the impacts of the tsunami and to provide recommendations for the future of coastal water resources in south

  20. Greenhouse gases mitigation options and strategies for Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mwandosya, M.J.; Meena, H.E.

    1996-12-31

    Tanzania became a party to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UN FCCC) when she ratified the Convention in March, 1996. Now that Tanzania and other developing countries are Parties to the UN FCCC, compliance with its provisions is mandatory. The legal requirements therefore provide a basis for their participation in climate change studies and policy formulation. All parties to the Convention are required by Article 4.1 of the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) to develop, periodically update, publish, and make available national inventories of anthropogenic emissions and removal of greenhouse gases that are not controlled by the Montreal Protocol. This study on possible options for the mitigation of greenhouse gases in Tanzania is a preliminary effort towards the fulfilment of the obligation. In order to fulfil their obligations under the UN FCCC and have a meaningful mitigation assessment, identification and quantification of anthropogenic sources of atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases in the country was undertaken. In this respect, the study of anthropogenic emissions by source and removals by sink of GHGs in Tanzania was done with the main objective of increasing the quantity and quality of base-line data available in order to further scientific understanding of the relationship of greenhouse gas emissions to climate change. Furthermore, the study facilitated identification of national policy and technological options that could reduce the level of emissions in the country.

  1. artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater NERC EQUIP;protected spring in Kampala (Uganda) · groundwater supplies 50% of world's drinking water Kundzewicz and Döll (2009) #12;maize plantation irrigated by a groundwater-fed pivot, Katwe (Zambia) · and 42

  2. Petroleum potentialities of central Tunisia as deduced from identification and characterization of oil source rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saidi, M.; Acheche, M.H.; Inoubli, H. (ETAP, Tunis (Tunisia)); Belayouni, H. (Faculte des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia))

    1991-08-01

    Many potential oil source rocks occur within the Tunisian stratigraphic column, including Silurian-Devonian shales, Albian and upper Albian-Vraconian carbonates, Cenomanian-Turonian black shales and lower Eocene carbonates. This focuses on the inventory of potential oil source rocks in central Tunisia ranging from middle Jurassic to Turonian. The emphasis is on determining their genetic potential and whether they could have generated oil and gas. Geochemical data obtained from the analysis of at least 2,147 samples show this region to be of significant interest as a petroleum prospective area. The main source rocks identified are Toarcian shales, upper Albian-Vraconian carbonates and Cenomanian-Turonian black shales. They contain predominantly type 2 organic matter (oil and gas prone) and are at the low maturity limit of the oil window. The occurrence of those source rocks close to numerous potential reservoir facies supports the conclusion that central Tunisia is a very interesting area for petroleum exploration.

  3. INDIANA UNIVERSITY GEO-PALEOANTHROPOLOGY FIELD COURSE IN TANZANIA G349/549 2015 APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    INDIANA UNIVERSITY GEO-PALEOANTHROPOLOGY FIELD COURSE IN TANZANIA G349/549 2015 APPLICATION OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES INDIANA UNIVERSITY TANZANIA FIELD COURSE 1001 E. 10 th ST. BLOOMINGTON, IN 47405 USA #12;

  4. The Political economy of the Film Industry in Tanzania: From Socialism to an Open Market economy, 1961-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mwakalinga, Mona Ngusekela

    2010-12-15

    This study examines the film industry in Tanzania from the 1960s to 2010 and assesses how government policies, legislation, and cultural institutions have impacted filmmaking in Tanzania. By employing a critical political economy theoretical...

  5. Using HOMER Software, NREL's Micropower Optimization Model, to Explore the Role of Gen-sets in Small Solar Power Systems; Case Study: Sri Lanka

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Givler, T.; Lilienthal, P.

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses using HOMER Software, NREL's Micropower Optimization Model, to explore the role of gen-sets in small solar power systems in Sri Lanka.

  6. Towards transferable functions for extraction of Non-timber Forest Products: A case study on charcoal production in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    on charcoal production in Tanzania M. Schaafsma a, , S. Morse-Jones a , P. Posen a , R.D. Swetnam b , A, University of Copenhagen, Denmark e Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA), Morogoro, Tanzania f Woodrow Department, RSPB, UK h University of Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania i School of Geography

  7. The identification, diversity and prevalence of trypanosomes in field caught tsetse in Tanzania using ITS-1 primers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, Charles

    The identification, diversity and prevalence of trypanosomes in field caught tsetse in Tanzania Research Institute, P.O. Box 1026, Tanga, Tanzania Received 15 April 2007; received in revised form 26 July-scale field studies of trypanosome-infected tsetse in Tanzania in the National Parks of Tarangire

  8. Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from sequential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from-arid northern Tanzania, the native woodland is being rapidly cleared and replaced by low input agriculture Tanzania, the indigenous tropical woodland is rapidly being replaced by low input agriculture. In addition

  9. International Conference on Advances in Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics ICAMEM2010 18-20 December, 2010, Hammamet, Tunisia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis, Antoniadis

    drilling, in order to be able to describe accurately the complexity as well as to calculate thrust forces-20 December, 2010, Hammamet, Tunisia Kyratsis and Antoniadis 1 ANALYSIS OF PARAMETRIC INFLUENCE ON DRILLING The current paper is dealing with the analysis of the calculated thrust forces during the drilling operation

  10. Tanzania wildcats to evaluate Jurassic Mandawa salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagati, M.

    1996-10-07

    After 5 years of stagnant exploration in East Africa, Canadian independent Tanganyika Oil Co. of Vancouver, B.C., will drill two wildcats in Tanzania to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of the coastal Jurassic Mandawa salt basin. Mita-1, spudded around Oct. 1, will be drilled to about 7,000 ft, East Lika-1 will be drilled in early December 1996 to approximately 6,000 ft. The two wells will test different structures and play concepts. The paper describes the exploration history, source rock potential, hydrocarbon shows, potential reservoir, and the prospects.

  11. Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd JumpJumpInformation Tanzania-Biofuels,

  12. Sri Lanka-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:Spill PreventionJumpPapers Ltd SPLSri Lanka

  13. An analysis of the potential economic impact of natural gas production in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umeike, Ekenedilinna (Ekenedilinna Onyedikachi)

    2014-01-01

    Following substantial discoveries of natural gas in recent years, Tanzania has new options for economic development. The country's policy makers are faced with having to make decisions about how best to utilize the gas in ...

  14. Political Ecology and Coastal Conservation: A Case Study of Menai Bay Conservation Area, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinn, Jamie Elizabeth

    2010-06-04

    , Tanzania. This study combines fieldwork and a literature review to conclude that while the conservation area recognizes the importance of authentic community empowerment, it has yet to achieve that goal, thereby compromising the overall success...

  15. Predicting Potential Risk Areas of Human Plague for the Western Usambara Mountains, Lushoto District, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neerinckx, Simon B.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Gulinck, Hubert; Deckers, Jozef; Kimaro, Didas; Leirs, Herwig

    2010-03-01

    A natural focus of plague exists in the Western Usambara Mountains of Tanzania. Despite intense research, questions remain as to why and how plague emerges repeatedly in the same suite of villages. We used human plague incidence data for 1986...

  16. Essays on Dynamics of Cattle Prices in Three Developing Countries of Mali, Kenya, and Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizimana, Jean-Claude

    2012-07-16

    countries of Mali, Kenya, and Tanzania. One way of assessing the efficiency of market and the impacts of liberalization policies is to test for market integration and price transmission. We also analyzed price leadership among the markets in each...

  17. Economic evaluation of rural woodlots in a developing country: Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kihiyo, V.B.M.S.

    1996-03-01

    Rural areas in developing countries use wood as their main source of energy. Previously, wood has been obtained free from natural forests and woodlands. The pressure of increased demand through population growth, and the fact that natural trees take longer to grow, has made this resource scarce. Thus, raising trees in woodlots has been adopted as the solution to its shortage in the wild. However, growing trees in woodlots will inevitably require resources in terms of capital, land and manpower. Economic evaluation becomes necessary to ascertain that these resources are used economically. This paper dwells on some of the salient features of the economic evaluation of woodlots, such as interest rates, shadow prices of factors of production, social opportunity, cost of capital and sensitivity analysis of such woodlots in a developing country such as Tanzania. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  18. Village agroforestry systems and tree-use practices: A case study in Sri Lanka. Multipurpose tree species network research series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickramasinghe, A.

    1992-01-01

    Village agroforestry systems in Sri Lanka have evolved through farmers' efforts to meet their survival needs. The paper examines farmers' land-use systems and their perceptions of the role of trees in the villages of Bambarabedda and Madugalla in central Sri Lanka. The benefits of village agroforestry are diverse food, fuelwood, fodder, timber, and mulch, but food products are of outstanding importance. The ability of Artocarpus heterophyllus (the jackfruit tree) and Cocos nucifera (coconut) to ensure food security during the dry season and provide traditional foods throughout the year, as well as to grow in limited space, make them popular crops in the two study villages. The study recommends that further research precede the formulation of agricultural interventions and that efforts to promote improved tree varieties recognize farmers' practices and expressed needs.

  19. Office of Communication - Brochures Available

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tadjikistan Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks & Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United...

  20. Sandia Energy - CACTUS Software Download

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay...

  1. Sandia Energy - SNL-ESSC (Sandia National Laboratories - Extreme...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States...

  2. Sandia Energy - MHK Materials Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay...

  3. Sandia Energy - Numerical Manufacturing And Design Tool (NuMAD...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States...

  4. Prevalences of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in Hindu Indian subcommunities in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaiya, K L; Swai, A B; McLarty, D G; Bhopal, Raj; Alberti, K G

    1991-01-01

    survey. SETTING--Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. SUBJECTS--Of 20 Hindu subcommunities categorised by caste in Dar-es-Salaam, seven were randomly selected. 1147 (76.7%) of 1495 subjects aged 15 or over participated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Blood glucose...

  5. Geochemical characteristics of bitumens and seeps from Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mpanju, F. ); Philp, P. )

    1991-03-01

    A number of bitumen extracts from prospective source rocks and oil seeps of potential oil-producing areas in Tanzania have been characterized by a variety of geochemical techniques. The data obtained from this study have provided additional insight into the source rock potential of these areas. However, in this paper it is proposed to discuss in detail the results from two of the more unusual samples in this region, namely Wingayongo and Pemba. The Wingayongo bitumens isolated from an exposed Neocomian-aged sandstone, possibly a paleoreservoir, are almost totally devoid of n-alkanes and steranes and dominated by hopane-type biomarkers with the so-called immature {beta}{beta}-stereochemistry at the C{sub 17} and C{sub 21} positions. There is no typical evidence of biodegradation having occurred leading to the proposal of an unusual source material or maturity history for this sample. The Pemba seep samples were also characterized by relatively high concentrations of hopanes with the immature stereochemistry at the C{sub 17} and C{sub 21} positions and a virtual absence of n-alkanes and steranes. The aromatic fractions contained relatively high concentrations of hopanic acids, with the immature stereochemistry at C{sub 17} and C{sub 21} positions and a virtual absence of n-alkanes and steranes. The aromatic fractions contained relatively high concentrations of hopanic acids, with the immature stereochemistry at C{sub 17} and C{sub 21}. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that the seeps in the Pemba region are not true oil seeps. Rather they are formed as a result of extremely high levels of bacterial activity with the bacteria utilizing natural gas in the region as the substrate. The net result is a material referred to in other areas of the world as paraffin dirt whose occurrence results from extensive microbial activity in the region and not directly from seepage of products having a thermal origin.

  6. Some suggestions for adapting group and pair work techniques in teaching English as a second language in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igwilla, Juma C.

    1989-01-01

    English is regarded as a second language in Tanzania for it is the major language of law, government, education, business and industry. It is important that it is a compulsory subject in the curriculum - from primary to tertiary education level...

  7. Proceedings of the International Conference on Information and Automation, December 15-17, 2006, Colombo, Sri Lanka. 1 Sahana: Overview of a Disaster Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    , Colombo, Sri Lanka. 1 Sahana: Overview of a Disaster Management System Mifan Careem, Chamindra De Silva. it then describes the anatomy of the Sahana system. We follow up with a case study of Sahana deployment and lessons learned. I. INTRODUCTION Recent disasters such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, the 2004 Asian tsunami, the 2005

  8. Ra-Th disequilibria: Timescale of carbonatite magma formation at Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.W.; Gill, J.B.; Bruland, K.W. )

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses geologic models dealing with the formation of carbonatites from recent lavas of the Oldoninyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania. This paper also acts as a rebutal to an earlier writing which discussed potential flaws in the collection and dating of the carbonatites. The paper goes on to provide activity ratios from different carbonatites and discussion the lack of evidence for fractional crystallization in a olivine sovite magma.

  9. An overview of the global threat reduction initiative's physical protection work in Tanzania.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banzi, Firmi Paul; Itamura, Michael Takeshi; Robinson, Phillip W.; Strosinski, Micheal Vernon

    2010-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) mission to reduce and protect nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Internationally, over 80 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance security of facilities with these materials. In 2004, a GTRI delegation began working with the Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, (TAEC). The team conducted site assessments for the physical protection of radiological materials in Tanzania. Today, GTRI and the Government of Tanzania continue cooperative efforts to enhance physical security at several radiological sites, including a central sealed-source storage facility, and sites in the cities of Arusha, Dar Es Salaam, and Tanga. This paper describes the scope of physical protection work, lessons learned, and plans for future cooperation between the GTRI program and the TAEC. Additionally the paper will review the cooperative efforts between TAEC and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with regards to a remote monitoring system at a storage facility and to the repackaging of radioactive sources.

  10. SU-E-E-03: Developing Solutions to Critical Radiation Oncology Challenges in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenton, O; Dachi, J; Metz, J; Avery, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Develop solutions to critical medical physics challenges in Tanzania. Methods: In September of 2013 we began working with Jumaa Bin Dachi, a Therapy Physicist at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We developed a bi-lateral learning partnership over the course of eight qualitative Skype meetings with Jumaa. From these meetings we have ascertained that there is a gap between the installation of new equipment and treating patients. This gap has often been overlooked by international partners attempting to improve radiation therapy access. Relationships with academic institutions abroad can fill these gaps, and lead to sustained care of patients needing radiation. Results: Our efforts are best given in a supporting role to help develop solutions and new technology that can reduce the burden on the Medical Physicist. Solutions may include: training material, support for radiation therapy classes, development of appropriate local protocols, and peer-review on documents being produced. New technology needs to focus around simple and easy field shaping, improved patient imaging systems, and systems for patient set-up. We believe our work can help alleviate some of the burdens faced by this institute. Conclusion: While we are just in the beginning stage of this partnership, we believe there is great potential for success between both parties. We hope that the Ocean Road Cancer Institute will benefit from potential funding and resources by partnering with a High Income Country to develop affordable solutions to clinical problems in Tanzania.

  11. Ruminant methane reduction through livestock development in Tanzania. Final report for US Department of Energy and US Initiative on Joint Implementation--Activities Implemented Jointly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Roderick

    1999-07-01

    This project was designed to help develop the US Initiative on Joint Implementation activities in Eastern Africa. It has been communicated in meetings with representatives from the Ministry of Environment of Tanzania and the consultant group that developed Tanzania's National Climate Change Action Plan, the Centre for Energy, Environment, Science and Technology, that this project fits very well with the developmental and environmental goals of the Government of Tanzania. The goal of the Activities Implemented Jointly ruminant livestock project is to reduce ruminant methane emissions in Eastern Africa. The project plans a sustainable cattle multiplication unit (CMU) at Mabuki Ranch in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania. This CMU will focus on raising genetically improved animals to be purchased by farmers, developmental organizations, and other CMUs in Tanzania. Through the purchase of these animals farmers will raise their income generation potential and reduce ruminant methane emissions.

  12. Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Tom Dunkley; Bown, Paul R.; Pearson, Paul N.; Wade, Bridget S.; Coxall, Helen K.; Lear, Caroline H.

    2008-01-01

    phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production Tom Dunkley Jones, 1 Paul R. Bown, 2 Paul N. Pearson, 3 Bridget S. Wade, 4 Helen K. Coxall, 3 and Caroline H. Lear 3 Received... 28 April 2008; revised 30 June 2008; accepted 18 July 2008; published 22 October 2008. [1] A high-resolution record of exceptionally well preserved calcareous nannofossil assemblages from Tanzania is marked by two key transitions closely related...

  13. Water management for hydroelectric power generation at Matera and Kidatu in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matondo, J.I.; Rutashobya, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The major sources of power in Tanzania are hydropower and thermo power. Most of the hydroelectric power is generated in the Great Ruaha river system (280 MW) and in the Pangani river system (46 MW). However, the generated power (hydro and thermo) does not meet the power demand and as a result, an accute power shortage occurred in August 1992. This paper explores the hydropower generation mechanism at Mtera and Kidatu hydroelectric power plants. It also looks into what measures could have been taken in order to avoid the massive power shedding which officially lasted for about six months, although unofficially, power shedding was continued well beyond that period. Strategies for future water management in the Great Ruaha river system for efficient generation of power are also presented.

  14. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  15. Results from intercropping fast-growing trees and food crops at Morogoro, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redhead, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    In Morogoro, Tanzania, agroforestry trials were set up to investigate intercropping with primarily eucalypt species. The climate in the region is very similar to Kolar, Karnataka State, India. Three crops-sorghum, bean and maize-were grown annually under Eucalyptus tereticornis at 2.5 m x 2.5 m for three years with a range of weeding practices. Plots that were intercropped with beans showed best results. Shading by the eucalypts after three years resulted in negligible crop yields in all treatments. Three tree spacings of E. camaldulensis (3 m x 3 m, 4 m x 4 m, and 5 m x 5 m) were combined with the intercropping of beans and maize. Beans gave satisfactory yields at all spacings, but the maize showed significantly depressed yields at 3 m x 3 m at 4 m x 4 m, but was similar to pure maize crop at 5 m x 5 m spacing. Overall the extra revenue from a food crop in the first and second year of tree growth increases the return from the land. The short rotation of fast growing trees depleted the soil of nutrients and, as with other crops, the fertility would have to be maintained by applying fertilizer.

  16. Gold deposits in the late Archaean Nzega-Igunga greenstone belt, central plateau of tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feiss, P.G.; Siyomana, S.

    1985-01-01

    2.2 m oz of gold have been produced, since 1935, from late Archaean (2480-2740 Ma) greenstone belts of the Central Plateau, Tanzania. North and east of Nzega (4/sup 0/12'S, 3/sup 0/11'E), 18% of the exposed basement, mainly Dodoman schists and granites, consists of metavolcanics and metasediments of the Nyanzian and Kavirondian Series. Four styles of mineralization are observed. 1. Stratabound quartz-gold veins with minor sulfides. Host rocks are quartz porphyry, banded iron formation (BIF), magnetite quartzite, and dense, cherty jasperite at the Sekenke and Canuck mines. The Canuck veins are on strike from BIF's in quartz-eye porphyry of the Igusule Hills. 2. Stratabound, disseminated gold in coarse-grained, crowded feldspar porphyry with lithic fragments and minor pyrite. At Bulangamilwa, the porphyry is conformable with Nyanzian-aged submarine (.) greenstone, volcanic sediment, felsic volcanics, and sericite phyllite. The deposits are on strike with BIF of the Wella Hills, which contains massive sulfide with up to 15% Pb+Zn. 3. Disseminated gold in quartz-albite metasomes in Nyanzian greenstones. At Kirondatal, alteration is associated with alaskites and feldspar porphyry dikes traceable several hundred meters into post-Dodoman diorite porphyry. Gold is with pyrite, arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, minor chalcopyrite, and sphalerite as well as tourmalinite and silica-cemented breccias. 4. Basal Kavirondian placers in metaconglomerates containing cobbles and boulders of Dodoman and Nyanzian rocks several hundred meters up-section from the stratabound, disseminated mineralization at Bulangamilwa.

  17. Social and economic aspects of the introduction of gasification technology in rural areas of developing countries (Tanzania)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groeneveld, M.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    The development of third world rural areas depends largely on the availability of energy and for an improvement in agricultural production; an increase in energy consumption is required. It seems attractive to replace the fossil liquid fuels needed for machinery by locally produced fuels. The thermal gasification of agricultural waste which produces gas that can be used directly to drive engines is suggested. A study to identify the social and economic advantages of this process and its applicability in rural areas of Tanzania has been made.

  18. KYOTO UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS GUIDE for INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    and Environmental Studies 129 127 150 161 - - 86 44 Energy Science - - 135 107 - - 14 15 Asian and African Area of Senegal 1 United Republ;ic of Tanzania 2 Republic of Tunisia 3 Federal Republic of Nigeria 2 Republic

  19. 10 17 14 20 23,000 100 1,700

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    and Environmental Studies 129 127 150 161 - - 86 44 Energy Science - - 135 107 - - 14 15 Asian and African Area of Senegal 1 United Republ;ic of Tanzania 2 Republic of Tunisia 3 Federal Republic of Nigeria 2 Republic

  20. KYOTO UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS GUIDE for INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    Integrated Human Studies/ Human and Environmental Studies 127 112 140 155 - - 70 46 Energy Science - - 128 Georgia 2 Egypt 13 Sudan 3 Libya 2 Tunisia 3 Kenya 6 Tanzania 1 Democratic Republic of the Congo 2 Nigeria

  1. The 2006 Naval S&T Partnership Conference is presented by NDIA with technical support from ONR The Naval Postgraduate School's Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Directed Energy Systems · Software Engineering · Combat System Physics · Electronic Warfare · SIGINT 1 Kenya 1 Nigeria 1 Rwanda 1 Senegal 1 Tanzania 1 Tunisia 4 11 #12;The 2006 Naval S&T Partnership

  2. Social and economic aspects of the introduction of gasification technology in rural areas of developing countries (Tanzania)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groeneveld, M.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    According to the evaluation criteria presented, the gasification of corn cobs is acceptable from the economical and agricultural point of view in the rural areas around Arusha (Tanzania). The gasification system is of relatively simple construction and local maintenance is possible. If the system is connected to the already existing corn mills in the villages, it is appropriate to the existing socio-cultural system. The economic calculations made clear that the use of gasification is attractive for both the owners of the corn mill and the government. The advantages for the government are the savings on imported oil and the extra income created for the users of the corn mill (inhabitants of the rural villages). The government loses income from taxes and from the production and transport of diesel oil. Evaluation methods presented can and should be used for gasification projects in other areas.

  3. Feasibility report for the installation and operation of an electrical power generating plant on the Islands of Zanzibar and Pemba, Tanzania. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, M.C.

    1994-04-04

    The study, conducted by S & Davis International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Tanzania`s Ministry of Water, Construction, Energy, Land, and Environment. The report reviews and evaluates the existing power source and support stations for the current and future reliability of providing power to the islands of Zanzibar and Pemba as well as the feasibility of obtaining an independent power source. The study also covers the cost of power generation and rate structures, including the execution schedule and budgetary costs. The report contains the Introduction and Executive Summary and is divided into the following chapters: (1) General Information; (2) Power Supply Assessment; (3) Estimate of Power Usage; (4) Recommended Power Plant Configuration; (5) Technical Data on Generators; (6) The Economics.

  4. Forestry in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykstra, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    Forest types and plantations, and associated forest industries are described. Forests occupy 47% of the total land area, mostly open miombo woodland dominated by Julbernardia and Brachystegia, with small areas of tropical high forest, mangroves and plantations. About 97% of the total roundwood consumed is used as fuelwood or for charcoal. Early results from village forestry programmes (partially financed by SIDA), the less successful communal village plantations, and agroforestry practices are described briefly. Education, training and the importance of wildlife are discussed.

  5. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  6. Tunisia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrailTrosky,EnergyTullahassee,Tunica

  7. Tunisia-IAEA Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power CoClean TechnologyIAEA

  8. Sundaya Lanka Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model for theSunLan Solar Co LtdSunbury, Ohio:Lake,Sundaya

  9. Sri Lanka: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage Edit withSpionSquaw Valley,Transport

  10. InternationalisationInternationalisation at theat the University ofUniversity of SfaxSfax, Tunisia, Tunisia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and economic environments, local representatives, university faculty, students, teachers, ... o Acceptance

  11. Tunisia-Clean Technology Fund (CTF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power CoClean Technology Fund

  12. Tunisia-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power CoClean Technology FundDLR

  13. Tunisia-GTZ Promotion of EERE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power CoClean Technology

  14. Tunisia-REEEP Energy Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power CoClean

  15. Metal pollution of river Msimbazi, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ak'habuhaya, J.; Lodenius, M. )

    1988-01-01

    The Misimbazi River in Dar es Salaam is polluted with industrial, urban and agricultural waste waters. A preliminary investigation on the extent of metal pollution (Hg, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe, Ni, Cd, Mn, Al) was made from samples of sediments and biological indicators. The metal concentrations were in general low, but some of our results indicated industrial pollution.

  16. Erika Smith, '08 Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that they did have. There was simply nobody to teach them that a doll has more play potential than just

  17. Tanzania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P

  18. Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to: navigation, searchTalty, Texas:

  19. Non-Timber Forest Products in Sri Lanka Rangika Perera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center Louisiana State University Agricultural Center Forest Products Society 61st International and beeswax Medicines Bushmeat Perfumes and cosmetics Other edible animal products Dyeing and tanning Hides, and Bushmeat #12;Rattan Chair Bamboo Handicrafts Rattan and Bamboo Garden House #12;Honey Collection- Modern

  20. Perspectives on the Use of the Internet in Sri Lanka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarasinghe, Saman

    of Government. He is also temporarily associated with a Developing Countries and IT Study Group (a non IT and the developing world study group (an informal network at LCS), including David Clark, Hamish Fraser, Libby graduation, he worked as a Consultant to the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) for six months. He

  1. Sri Lanka-DLR Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin JumpOpenColorado)SpiderSreyas CorporateDLR

  2. Apollo Solar Lanka Limited ASLL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to:Angola onAperion Energy Systems

  3. Integrated rural energy planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Mahgary, Y.; Biswas, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on integrated community energy systems in developing countries. Topics considered include an integrated rural energy system in Sri Lanka, rural energy systems in Indonesia, integrated rural food-energy systems and technology diffusion in India, bringing energy to the rural sector in the Philippines, the development of a new energy village in China, the Niaga Wolof experimental rural energy center, designing a model rural energy system for Nigeria, the Basaisa village integrated field project, a rural energy project in Tanzania, rural energy development in Columbia, and guidelines for the planning, development and operation of integrated rural energy projects.

  4. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  5. Institutions and the Volatility Curse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leong, Weishu; Mohaddes, Kamiar

    2011-07-10

    and 12 can be found in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Our sample also includes 32 out of the 34 OECD countries and 8 out of the 12 of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Thus our sample is very comprehensive... -Bissau Netherlands Tanzania Cameroon Guyana New Zealand Thailand Canada Haiti Nicaragua Togo Central African Rep. Honduras Niger Trinidad and Tobago Chad Hungary Nigeria Tunisia Chile India Norway Turkey China, People?s Rep. of Indonesia Oman Uganda Colombia Iran, I...

  6. How Does Health Promotion Work? Evidence from the Dirty Business of Eliminating Dirty Defecation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gertler, Paul; Shah, Manisha; Alzua, Maria Laura; Cameron, Lisa; Martinez, Sebastian; Patil, Sumeet

    2015-01-01

    Experiment   in   Rural   Tanzania.   Washington,   DC:  and   Martinez   led   the   Tanzania   evaluation.   Ben  Indonesia,   Mali,   and   Tanzania.   Health   promotion  

  7. Epidemiology and control of human schistosomiasis in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazigo, Humphrey D.; Nuwaha, Fred; Kinung’hi, Safari M.; Morona, Domenica; de Moira, Angela Pinot; Wilson, Shona; Heukelbach, Jorg; Dunne, David W.

    2012-11-28

    [28]. It was observed that S. mansoni was of little public health im- portance in the two islands due to absence of its inter- mediate hosts: snails, the Biomphalaria species [3,7,19]. The construction of the hydroelectric dams and devel- opment... as the risk areas for transmission of schistosomiasis for communi- ties that lived and worked in areas surrounding the hydroelectrical dams and irrigation schemes. The areas created favourable environmental conditions for the snail intermediate hosts...

  8. Rural students’ experiences at the Open University of Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahai, Lulu Simon

    2014-07-04

    This ethnographic study has been undertaken to address a literature gap relating to rural students’ experiences of distance education in developing countries. It gives an account of teaching and learning practices at the ...

  9. Agricultural Productivity and Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Munenobu

    2009-01-01

    and seminar participants at “Agriculture for Development in Sub-Saharan Africa” or- ganized by African Economic Research

  10. Tanzania Energy Development and Access Expansion Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd JumpJump

  11. Tanzania-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd JumpJumpInformation

  12. Tanzania-Capital Markets Climate Initiative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValley

  13. Tanzania-National Adaptation Programme of Action | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValleyEnergyProgramme of

  14. Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValleyEnergyProgramme

  15. Tanzania-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to: navigation, searchTalty, Texas:(CTI PFAN) |

  16. Tanzania-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to: navigation, searchTalty, Texas:(CTI PFAN)

  17. Green grabbing and the dynamics of local-level engagement with neoliberalization in Tanzania’s wildlife management areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Kathryn E.; Adams, William M.

    2014-11-03

    Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK Click for updates The Journal of Peasant Studies Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http... to physical enclosure of land and physical removal of people, but also to changes in access, rights, institutions and rules as a result of commodification, as well as the restructuring of authority and human-ecological relationships (Fairhead, Leach...

  18. Tunisia-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrailTrosky,EnergyTullahassee,Tunica County,Tunica,in

  19. EUROMED Sustainable Connections: 4.3 Community Profile Jlioula, Tunisia 1 COMMUNITY PROFILE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    the Christian era (2,000 BC), well before it was introduced to North Africa by the Romans. The medical, and is antiseptic as well as diuretic. As far as other uses for olives and olive wood are concerned, its oil is used. Olive oil is also used to perfume, massage, and keep the scalp and skin healthy, and is especially

  20. New data on the characterization of humic substances extracted from phosphatised faecal "pellets" (Tunisia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    New data on the characterization of humic substances extracted from phosphatised faecal "pellets, Université Tunis El Manar, 1060, Tunis, Tunisie Humic substances (HS) were extracted from faecal "pellets of the organic matter within the pellets, both from a qualitative and quantitative point of view. The elemental

  1. Visitors' attitudes toward the maintenance, preservation and development of Ichkeul National Park, Tunisia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Alanna Lee

    1990-01-01

    the actions of other group members. Second, the outdoor recreation activities of Ichkeul National Park visitors are surveyed. Third, the relationship between recreation activities and attitudes about resource preservation or development at Ichkeul...). Cross and Guyer (1980) propose that social dilemmas should be divided into two categories. They call the first a "social fence" and the second a "social trap. " In a social fence the disagreeable, short-term consequences of helpful actions discourage...

  2. Tunisia-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power Co Jump

  3. Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power Co JumpInformation

  4. Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power Co

  5. Gas in developing countries: Volume 2, Country studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains detailed case-studies of the history and prospects for natural gas utilization in eight developing countries: Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand and Tunisia. All of these countries have been visited by members of the research team, with the exception of Pakistan. Running through all the case-histories is the importance of defining a clear market for the gas. In some cases this can prove remarkably difficult, especially when the oil price is relatively low. In other cases a market does exist, but is very limited in relation to the size of available reserves. The other theme which recurs over and over again is the importance of the relationship between the government and its agencies, and the foreign oil companies which are involved in exploration and development of gas reserves. These two issues are addressed in detail in each case study. But it is also the case that each country highlights specific aspects of the gas story.

  6. Marginal cost of natural gas in developing countries: concepts and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashayekhi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Many developing nations are facing complex questions regarding the best strategy for developing their domestic gas reserves. The World Bank has addressed these questions in studies on the cost and prices of gas and its optimal allocation among different markets. Based on the average incremental method, an estimate of the marginal cost of natural gas in 10 developing countries proved to be $0.61-1.79/1000 CF or $3.59-10.54/bbl of oil equivalent, far below the border prices of competing fuels in these nations. Moreover, the cost of gas is not expected to rise in these countries within the next 20 years while the reserves/production ratios remain high. The sample involves a variety of gas compositions and production conditions among the countries of Bangladesh, Cameroon, Egypt, India, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Tunisia.

  7. Natural gas: Governments and oil companies in the Third World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, A.; Hurst, C.; Mabro, R.

    1988-01-01

    It is asserted that oil companies claim to be generally receptive to gas development proposals; however, the lack of potential markets for gas, problems of foreign exchange convertibility, and lack of a legal framework often hinders their engagement. Governments, on the other hand, need to secure domestic energy supply and, if possible, gain some export earnings or royalties. An extensive discussion on the principles of pricing and fiscal regimes, potential points of disagreement is provided. A course of action is outlined from the managerial point of view to circumvent the most common pitfalls in planning and financing a gas project. Eight very detailed case studies are presented for Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Tunisia and Thailand.

  8. Africa: the emphasis is exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    Individual country reports on drilling, oil and gas production, and petroleum exploration and reserves are given for Africa. Nigeria was the continent's largest oil producer in 1979, averaging 2.3 million bpd, followed closely by Libya with 2.07 million bpd. Algeria cut production of crude oil in 1979 to a level of 1,194,350 bpd, and increased gas production to 2031 mmcfd. In Egypt, the return of Israeli-occupied oil fields and a surge in productive capacity enabled production averaging 524,000 bpd. Brief country reports are included for Gabon, Angola, Republic of the Congo, Cameroun, Tunisia, Morocco, Zaire, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Republic of South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles Islands, Mauritania, Republic of Mali, Benin, Kenya, Madagascar, Botswana, Gambia, Mozambique, and Senegal.

  9. The energy sector in Sri Lanka is currently a hotbed of activity and change. A reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of the electricity sector in this small island country in South Asia. The country's current installed power capacity at an annual rate of 8-9%. 60% of the power comes from large-hydro facilities, however, almost all large hydro that intends to provide for off-grid power needs with renewable energy technologies like solar PV, micro-hydro

  10. Movin' on up : mainstreaming under-serviced urban communities in Colombo, Sri Lanka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickrema, Marinne Dhakshike

    2005-01-01

    This thesis offers an early look at a radical shift in Sri Lankan urban housing policy regarding slums in the capital city of Colombo. During the 1980s, the Sri Lankan government achieved widespread urban improvements by ...

  11. Tall buildings in Asia : a critique on the high-rise building in Colombo, Shri Lanka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieris, Anoma D. (Anoma Darshani)

    1993-01-01

    The recent generation of tall buildings in Asia have been appropriated from the West with little adaptation. With no understanding of the forces that have generated this building form, Asia embraces the high-rise as an ...

  12. File:Sri Lanka Wind Resource Map.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent ChangesPower-in-practice-and-theory-teacher.pdf2.pdf Jump4.pdfSlmetstSolarSri

  13. Microsoft Word - Sri_Lanka_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi CorpKenya

  14. Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities:

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage Edit withSpionSquaw Valley,Transport and

  15. Relationships between characteristics of contact farmers and follower farmers in the training and visit system of agricultural extension: Sri Lanka 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayatilaka, Malwattage Wijaya A. P.

    1982-01-01

    , similar others are considered to prov1de more accurate information than d1ssimilar others (Festinger, 1955; Mettee and Smith, 1977). In addi- tion, d1ssimilar others are sa1d to dislike and reject each other more 20 than similar others (Aronson.... The exchanged rewards could be mater1al resources, advice, esteem, compliance, etc. (Turner, 1978). Foa and Foa (1980) consider- ing all resources transacted in interpersonal situations, grouped re- sources to six classes - labeled love, status, information...

  16. Secondary state formation during the early iron age on the island of Sri Lanka : the evolution of a periphery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karunaratne, Priyantha Padmalal

    2010-01-01

    Chicago, Illinois, in (52) Symposium- Beyond basic formationIllinois. March 1999. xx ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Secondary State Formation

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Impact of Tsunami and Tsunami Interventions on Conflicts in Sri Lanka and Aceh/Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Peter

    The objective of this field-based research was to assess the impact of natural disasters and disaster interventions on protracted intra-state conflicts and to provide insight for designing and implementing disaster ...

  18. A study of the factors affecting the sustainability of community managed rural water supply schemes in Sri Lanka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amerasinghe, Nishanthi Manjula

    2009-01-01

    Disparities in water supply coverage in urban and rural areas are high in developing countries, with rural coverage being much lower. The inability of governments to provide the service because of resource constraints, and ...

  19. A planning paradigm for electrification in Sub-Saharan Africa : a case study of Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimson, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, a lack of clean electricity generation sources, poor electricity access and low levels of electricity consumption are profoundly stifling sustainable development. This thesis presents a specialized ...

  20. In quest of a vernacular writing style for the Rangi of Tanzania: assumptions, processes, challenges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stegen, Oliver

    2011-11-23

    Despite increased efforts by linguists and educationalists to facilitate literacy and literature development in minority languages, there are still many languages worldwide which do not have a written form. One area that ...

  1. Ecology of a vector-borne zoonosis in a complex ecosystem: trypanosomiasis in Serengeti, Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auty, Harriet K.

    2009-01-01

    Unravelling the complexities of a disease with multiple wildlife host and multiple tsetse vector species is no easy task. After over a century of field observations, experimental studies, anecdotal evidence and conjecture, ...

  2. Privatizing Public Health: Social Marketing for HIV Prevention in Tanzania, East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahaffey, Erin Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    1971. "Health Service Marketing: A Suggested Model."Journal of Marketing 35:19-27.A. 1998. Social Marketing Centerpiece: An Interview With

  3. Privatizing Public Health: Social Marketing for HIV Prevention in Tanzania, East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahaffey, Erin Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    J-F. 1993. The State in Africa: The Politics of the Belly.Time, and Aging in West Africa. Chicago: Chicago University2006. Global Shadows: Africa in the Neoliberal World Order.

  4. Embodied Energy of Fired Bricks: The Case of Uganda and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashemi, Arman; Cruickshank, Heather

    2015-07-30

    and wastes the energy while too little air flow will stop the fuel from burning properly. Providing dampers and wind breaks to control/protect the fire could greatly improve the fuel efficiency of kilns (Practical Action). 5. BRICK SUPPLIERS Artisans... , small- and medium-scale manufactures are the three major types of suppliers of bricks in Uganda (Table 2). Bricks produced by artisans take a larger share of the market compared to small- and medium-scale manufactured bricks. The handmade bricks...

  5. Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValleyEnergy

  6. Tanzania-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to: navigation, searchTalty, Texas:(CTI PFAN)Energy

  7. The globalization of addiction research: Capacity-building mechanisms and selected examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rawson, RA; Woody, G; Kresina, TF; Gust, S

    2015-01-01

    injectors in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Afr J Drug Alcoholof Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Drug Alcohol Depend 2006;82injecting drug users in Tanzania. Addiction 2010;105(6):

  8. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  9. A TUTUREFORTHE DUGONG? HeleneMarsh, Helen Penroseand CaroleEros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Helene

    on dugong status and management within lts range East Africa Kenya Tanzania Mozambique Madagascar Comoros

  10. BioMed Central Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Madagascar, Comoros Islands, Tanzania, Kenya, Mozambique, Cameroun, Gabon) were collected during active case

  11. Comment on Ra-Th disequilibria systematics: Timescale of carbonatite magma formation at Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gittins, J. )

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses potential flaws in study by Williams, Gill, and bruland (1986) dealing with the extreme disequilibria between uranium and thorium series nuclides in alkalic carbonatite lava specimens. It discusses the apparent discrepencies between chemical compositions of lava which were reported from the same eruption. Clarification is made on the actual timing of eruptions in this volcanic region and the effects this would have on the petrogenesis interpretation of these rocks.

  12. Wood energy and preservation of woodlands in semi-arid developing countries. The case of Dodoma region, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    At present little land and labour resources are expended on energy production, but the woodlands in Dodoma are disappearing, causing villagers to save time by switching from fuelwood collected on foot to charcoal shipped in by truck. Results of a linear program show that if the costs of growing the wood for charcoal are counted the switch to charcoal saves time only in areas where population is relatively dense and natural woodland remote. Woodland preservation in Dodoma will require more plantations, increased plantation productivity, improved efficiency of charcoal kilns or stoves and ultimately a switch to some other fuel than wood.

  13. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines and Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Makundi, W.; Andrasko, K.; Boer, R.; Ravindranath, N.; Sudha, P.; Rao, S.; Lasco, R.; Pulhin, F.; Masera, O.; Ceron, A.; Ordonez, J.; Deying, X.; Zhang, X.; Zuomin, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of carbon (C) mitigation potential and costs of about 40 forestry options in seven developing countries. Each study uses the same methodological approach - Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (COMAP) - to estimate the above parameters between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios. Coupled with data on a per ha basis on C sequestration or avoidance, and costs and benefits, it allows the estimation of monetary benefit per Mg C, and the total costs and carbon potential. The results show that about half (3.0 Pg C) the cumulative mitigation potential of 6.2 Petagram (Pg) C between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries (about 200 x 106 Mg C yr-1) could be achieved at a negative cost and the remainder at costs ranging up to $100 Mg C-1. About 5 Pg C could be achieved, at a cost less than $20 per Mg C. Negative cost potential indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of these options. The achievable potential is likely to be smaller, however, due to market, institutional, and sociocultural barriers that can delay or prevent the implementation of the analyzed options.

  14. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2008-01-01

    potential for carbon sequestration and emission reductionForestry Options on Carbon Sequestration in India, Workinggas emissions and carbon sequestration in the forest sector

  15. Population genetic structure of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae in a malaria endemic region of southern Tanzania

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    Ng'habi, Kija R; Knols, Bart GJ; Lee, Yoosook; Ferguson, Heather M; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2011-01-01

    situated along the river (Mali- nyi, Ukindu, Lupiro, andAnopheles gambiae complex in Mali, West Africa. ParassitolAnopheles gambiae s.s. in Mali, West Africa. Genetica 1994,

  16. An Ecological Analysis of the Impact of Weather, Land Cover and Politics on Childhood Pneumonia in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mgendi, Mlenge 1971-

    2012-12-03

    .................................................................................................... 91 Table 13: Linking air-pollutants and Land use / Land cover (LULC) in the recent studies (2007 ? 2011) inquiries indexed in MEDLINE database....................... 103 xvi Table 14: Disbursement to the local government authorities (LGA... the link between land cover and disease is of increasing interest to researchers across academic disciplines. Different land cover types have been associated with either being sources or sinks of particulate air pollution, and by extension, the spatial...

  17. The role of research in evaluating conservation strategies in Tanzania: the case of the Katavi-Rukwa ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Tim, Caro; Msago, Omari Ayubu

    2007-01-01

    863-885. Irwin, A. 1995. Citizen science: A study of people,comanagement schemes, and citizen-science initiatives arewith ecotourism and citizen science, has considerable

  18. Walk on the Wild Side: Estimating the Global Magnitude of Visits to Protected Areas

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    Balmford, Andrew; Green, Jonathan M. H.; Anderson, Michael; Beresford, James; Huang, Charles; Naidoo, Robin; Walpole, Matt; Manica, Andrea

    2015-02-24

    Protegées (Madagascar), Protected Area Management Board (Philippines), South African National Parks (South Africa), Servicio Nacional de Areas Protegidas (Bolivia), Tanzania National Parks (Tanzania), Thanh Hoa Provincial Forest Protection Department...

  19. How Does Health Promotion Work? Evidence from the Dirty Business of Eliminating Dirty Defecation

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    Gertler, Paul; Shah, Manisha; Alzua, Maria Laura; Cameron, Lisa; Martinez, Sebastian; Patil, Sumeet

    2015-01-01

    CLTS)   in   rural   Mali",   Working   Paper.   Ashraf,  Alzua   led   the   Mali   evaluation   and   Martinez  India,   Indonesia,   Mali,   and   Tanzania.   Health  

  20. 34 December 1997/Vol. 40, No. 12 COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM Shaman with elephant, Sandawe,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santini, Simone

    , Tanzania National Museum #12;COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM December 1997/Vol. 40, No. 12 35 Amarnath Gupta

  1. How Robust Is Muslim Support for Patriarchal Values? A Cross-National Multi-Level Study

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    Alexander, Amy C.; Welzel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Italy Tanzania Trinidad Ireland Macedonia S. Korea MoldovaDenmark Sweden Iceland Spain Macedonia France Y = 8E-18 + .

  2. California’s Water Footprint: recent trends and framework for a sustainable transition

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    Fulton, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Africa. Barbier, EB. 2004. “Water and Economic Growth. ”Sri Lanka: International Water Management Institute. CDF,California Department of Water Resources. 2015. “California

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Asian Development Bank Technical Assistance Report on Building the Capacity of the Sustainable Energy Authority in Sri Lanka Jump to: navigation, search Name Asian Development Bank...

  4. Center for Research in Wireless Communications Clemson Home > Home > People > Staff > James H. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    -5903 Professional preparation: B.S., Electrical Engineering, with honors, Clemson University President's Class Bureau of Standards. Foreign Governments: Greece, Egypt, Iran, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.usaid.govourwork Country Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bhutan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Maldives Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Southern Asia,...

  6. Cubing the Kyoto Protocol: Post-Copenhagen Regulatory Reforms to Reset the Global Thermostat

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    Ferrey, Steven

    2010-01-01

    India and Thailand are from SPP independent renewable energyRenewable Energy Controlled period Sri Lanka No Hydro Open offer India:

  7. Savanna Sounds : : Using Remote Acoustic Sensing to Study Spatiotemporal Patterns in Wild Chimpanzee Loud Vocalizations in the Issa Valley, Ugalla, Western Tanzania

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    Piel, Alexander Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Third, SPATUs rely on solar power to recharge long-livedThird, SPATUs relied on solar power to recharge long-lived

  8. Who Changes How: Strategies and Motivation for Risk Reduction Behaviors in the Context of an Economic-based HIV Prevention Intervention in Tanzania

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    Packel, Laura

    2010-01-01

    How: Strategies and Motivation for Risk Reduction BehaviorsHow: Strategies and Motivation for Risk Reduction Behaviorspers—explores strategies and motivation for risk reduction

  9. The Making of the Entrepreneur in Tanzania: experimenting with neo-liberal power through discourses of partnership, entrepreneurship, and participatory education

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    Boner, Elizabeth Helene

    2011-01-01

    Garvey. Gaynair, G. (2010). Exxon Mobil Explands Support forpotential entrepreneurs. Exxon Mobil for example, partneringefforts such as those of Exxon- Mobil (which has one of the

  10. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 577586, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/577/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 577­586, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8 Hazards and Earth System Sciences Integrated approach for coastal hazards and risks in Sri Lanka M. Garcin the importance of knowledge and the taking into account of coastal hazards. Sri Lanka was one of the countries

  11. Euphytica 122: 381389, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provan, Jim

    Levels and distribution of genetic diversity of coconut (Cocos nucifera L., var. Typica form typica) fromGenetics and Plant Breeding Division, Coconut Research Institute, Lunuwila, Sri Lanka; 2Department of Cell for correspondence; e-mail: rescri@sri.lanka.net) Received 1 March 2000; accepted 12 February 2001 Key words: coconut

  12. M. Palumbo, L. R. Beuchat, M. D. Danyluk, and L. J. Harris, USDA NIFSI, 2009-01951. Updated 1/26/2015. For updates: http://ucfoodsaafety.ucdavis.edu/files/156342

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Authority, 2012 Coconut, desiccated (shred, flake, flour) Imports from Sri Lanka (Ceylon), sampled in UK 20 Coconut, desiccated Imports from Sri Lanka (Ceylon), sampled in Australia not given 35 9 Paratyphi B (1/9 samples), Butantan, Edinberg, Perth Kovacs, 1959 Coconut, desiccated Port receiving, England not given 8

  13. MSU at Work in Africa: Improving Health

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    ,000 individuals in Liberia and Tanzania, compared to 5 to 7 epilepsy patients per 1,000 individuals in the United

  14. A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This working paper includes new analyses of the six R-PPs recently submitted by Argentina, Costa Rica, Kenya, Nepal, Republic of Congo and Tanzania for formal consideration...

  15. Clean Cities: Detroit Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corporation; the Olkonorei Integrated Pastoralist Survival Program in Tanzania, Africa; and as an instructor at the Japanese Ministry of Education in Imadate, Japan. He has...

  16. No Solution in Sight : the Problem of Protracted Refugee Situations in Africa

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    Crisp, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Changing priorities in refugee protection: the Rwandanfrom Tanzania’, New Issues in Refugee Research, No. 53,The Problem of Protracted Refugee Situations in Africa By

  17. You are invited to the 8th Annual Africa Institute of South Africa's (AISA) Young Graduates and Scholars Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    are from institutions, organisations and universities in Nigeria, Germany, Zimbabwe, Japan, Tanzania focus areas are: Climate change, energy and water supply security, science and technology, international

  18. Edinburgh Research Explorer Citation for published version

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    Millar, Andrew J.

    , Environmental Management and Energy Studies, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract in Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda are presented as three separate case studies. Each case examines

  19. INTERNSHIP/PRACTICUM APPLICATION FORM Please type or print legibly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Infrastructure (General); Information / Communication Technology; Energy Roads & Transportation; Water; Ecology), Mali (Tiby), Nigeria (Pampaida), Rwanda (Mayange), Senegal (Potou), Tanzania (Mbola) and Uganda

  20. On 26 December 2004 the Indonesian sub-duction zone near the northern end of Sumatra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in northern Sumatra and expanded across the Indian Ocean and Andaman Sea, striking Sri Lanka and Thailand,it radiated seismic waves into the surrounding rock.The elastic waves expanded outward through Earth

  1. Defining the source region of the Indian Ocean Tsunami from GPS, altimeters, tide gauges and tsunami models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Socquet, Anne

    propagation time of the rupture led to constructive interference of waves radiating first from the South and minutes later from the North, strengthening the tsunami in Southern India, Sri Lanka and Thailand. We

  2. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Rotterdam to Sri Lanka, the Danish registered container ship, Svendborg Maersk, encountered hurricane force vessel in a hurry. The containers shifted under the wave impact and over 40 were lost overboard. Who

  3. ATR 1 (1) pp. 131137 Intellect Limited 2013 Applied Theatre Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    , Uganda, Argentina, Peru, Sri Lanka, #12;book Reviews 132 Cambodia, Australia, Israel and the United. This is only one of the many stories that strike the heart of the reader and showcase the power of performance

  4. Guardians of childhood: state, class and morality in a Sri Lankan bureaucracy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarasuriya, Harini Nireka

    2011-07-04

    This thesis explores the everyday practices, relationships and interactions in a Probation Unit of the Department of Probation and Child Care Services in the Central Province in Sri Lanka. Using multi-sited ethnography ...

  5. Stories of Home: Generation, Memory, and Displacement among Jaffna Tamils and Jaffna Muslims 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiranagama, Sharika

    2006-01-01

    The Sri Lankan civil war has been ongoing for over twenty years. Fought out in the civilian areas of the North and East of Sri Lanka, between the Sri Lankan Government and the LTTE (Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam) it ...

  6. PUBLICLECTURE Thursday 6 December 2012 5.30 6.30pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    , and the impact of agricultural research on poverty. She has conducted field work in Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka publications, including Collective Action and Property Rights for Poverty Reduction: Insights from Africa

  7. Competing for Capital: The Diffusion of Bilateral Investment Treaties, 1960-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins, Zachary; Guzman, Andrew T; Simmons, Beth

    2006-01-01

    2000), India (2001) and Croatia (2001) initiated mini-and Zimbabwe. Thailand-Zimbabwe, Thailand-Croatia, Thailand-Iran, Zimbabwe-Croatia, Zimbabwe-Sri Lanka, Croatia- Iran,

  8. The Relationship of Student Dispositions and Teacher Characteristics with the Mathematics Achievement of Students in Lebanon and Six Arab Countries in TIMSS 2007. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younes, Rayya

    2013-03-22

    . The second study examines the mathematics performance in TIMSS 2007 of 8th grade students in seven Arab countries: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Tunisia. The effects of positive affect towards mathematics, valuing mathematics, self...

  9. FOREIGN SHRIMP FISHERIES Other Than Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbon and Mrs. Evelyn Kramer prepared and checked the statistical data. The project was financed with funds made Italy 33 North Africa and the Near East: jh Egypt 35 Morocco 36 Tunisia 36 Algeria 37 Turkey 38 Israel

  10. TABLE36.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 789 0 0 Tunisia ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 224 0 0 Turkey ... 0 0 0 258 0 0 0 0 0 0 United Kingdom...

  11. TABLE41.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 4,615 0 0 Tunisia ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 224 0 0 Turkey ... 0 0 0 533 0 0 0 0 0 0 United Kingdom...

  12. TABLE40.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 484 4,615 0 0 Tunisia ... 0 0 352 0 0 0 0 224 0 0 Turkey ... 0 451 0 533 0 0 0 0 0 0 United Kingdom...

  13. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    67 0 0 0 789 0 0 Tunisia ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 224 0 0 Turkey ... 0 66 0 258 0 0 0 0 0 0 United Kingdom...

  14. TABLE43.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    194 0 0 484 0 0 0 Tunisia ... 0 0 352 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Turkey ... 0 451 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 United Kingdom...

  15. TABLE35.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    67 0 0 0 789 0 0 Tunisia ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 224 0 0 Turkey ... 0 66 0 258 0 0 0 0 0 0 United Kingdom...

  16. Challenges and opportunities in the Tunisian private equity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gharbi, Moez, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Most of the studies and research analyzing the private equity ("PE") sector in the Middle East North Africa ("MENA") region tend to focus more on the Middle East and less on North Africa. The case of Tunisia is probably ...

  17. Democratizing in Excess: A Marxist Interpretation of the Jasmine Revolutions in North Africa

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    Agbo, Joseph N.; Chimakonam, Jonathan O.

    2015-01-01

    in power of the leaders of Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya. TheseEgypt that saw the return of protesters to Cairo’s Tahir square following Mubarak’s succes- sor allotting dictatorial powers

  18. Message In A Bottle: Sailing Past Censorship Luca Invernizzi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigna, Giovanni

    the foundations of a number of countries (e.g., Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt), and showed the Internet's immense power to catalyze social awareness through the free exchange of ideas. This power is so threatening

  19. Facebook, Political Narrative, and Political Change: A Case Study of Palestinian Youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenderes, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    which informed political power in Egypt. As Figure 1.0 showsEgypt under the Mubarak regime, PNPs influenced both the powerpower of social networking, especially in light of what happened in Tunisia, Egypt,

  20. U.S. State Department's TechWomen 2012 Visit Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechWomen brought a total of 41 women working in the technology sector from Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, the Palestinian Territories, Tunisia and Yemen to the U.S....

  1. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Kushnir, Hadas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37- 41 Mortimer and Ecological Risk Factors for Unprovoked Lion Attacks on Humans in Southeastern Tanzania Hadas Kushnira ; Helga Wildlife Research Institute, Arusha, Tanzania d Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University

  2. Notes and records Reptiles of Katavi National Park, western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    , PO Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania, 3 PO Box 345, Usa River, Tanzania, 4 Conservation Science Group plains. Annual rainfall totals approximately 900 mm falling between November and April. The first study hinged terrapin X X X Squamata Lizards and Snakes Gekkonidae Geckos Hemidactylus mabouiaeac Tropical

  3. A l u m n i C a m p u si n h a l t i m p r e s s u m Eine Freundin Tanzanias

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    Vollmer, Heribert

    neue Krebsmedikamente Küstenschutz und Windkraft auf See Karriere ­ Köpfe ­ Konzerne Prominente Alumni

  4. Evaluating the potential impact of vaginal microbicides to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV in

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    Blower, Sally

    of at least one more this year in several African countries, including South Africa, Tanzania and Zambia [8 to condoms [2,3]. The hope is that microbicides can be added to lubricants for convenient use or combined

  5. The Development of an Academically-Based Entertainment-Education (ABEE) Model: Co-opting Behavioral Change Efficacy of Entertainment-Education for Academic Learning Targeting the Societal Landscape of U.S. Geographic Illiteracy 

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    Simms, Michelle

    2011-07-22

    and detrimental behaviors by presenting positive role models in entertainment products designed to stimulate changes in viewers' behavior. For example, soap operas promote condoms use as a HIV prevention strategy (Tanzania), model culturally-sensitive actions...

  6. Keyword Publications Company Profiles Thesaurus Cited References Indexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --more clumsily and with less success--are struggling to lift the best hammer they can find. All this activity their studies of wild chimpanzees at two field sites in Tanzania. (Goodall's research station at Gombe

  7. Why is it so difficult to grow fuelwood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noronha, R.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of successful and unsuccessful woodlot programmes are cited from China, Korea, India, Tanzania and Niger and the role of social factors examined. Effective village forestry involves social, cultural, economic and local political factors. (Refs. 15).

  8. $6000 FUNDED INTERNSHIPS GCFSI sponsored internees are expected to work in developing countries on projects

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    , to packaging, to transportation. Students will also be placed on projects related to workforce training, gender organizations (e.g. universities, industries, and NGOs) in Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia, India, Vietnam, Nepal

  9. The evolution of shelter: ecology and ethology of chimpanzee nest building

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    Stewart, Fiona Anne

    2011-11-08

    characteristics of chimpanzee nests, nesting trees, nest shape, and architecture in two savanna-dwelling populations on opposite sides of Africa: Fongoli, Senegal, and Issa, Tanzania. Savanna habitats are the most extreme habitats in which chimpanzees survive...

  10. The Political Economy of Health Care Problems in Nigeria

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    Ityavyar, Dennis A.

    1983-01-01

    the comparison between Nigeria and Tanzania are taken from:and Economic Changes in Nigeria and the Organization ofOF HEALTH CARE PROBLEMS IN NIGERIA by Dennis A. Ityavyar The

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    Rabinowitz, Beth Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Changing Rural-urban Linkages in Mali, Nigeria and Tanzania.the Nation and Democracy in Mali: A View from Modibo Keita'sand the Party System in Mali. The Journal of Modern African

  12. Land use change in Maasailand drivers, dynamics and impacts on largeherbivores and agro-pastoralism 

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    Msoffe, Fortunata Urban

    2010-11-24

    The Maasailand of Kenya and Tanzania supports one of the richest wildlife populations remaining on Earth. However, over the last century, Maasailand has experienced land transformation notably through conversion of former ...

  13. KYOTO UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS GUIDE for INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

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    Takada, Shoji

    Energy Science - - 117 98 - - 16 22 Asian and African Area Studies - - - 21 - - 36 13 Informatics - - 182 of Nigeria 2 Republic of South Africa 2 The Republic of the Sudan 1 United Republic of Tanzania 3 Republic

  14. Alien plant invasions in tropical and sub-tropical savannas: patterns, processes and prospects

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    Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Richardson, David M.; Rejmánek, Marcel; Pyšek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Tanzania Species Family Alien plant invasions in savannasLo pez-Olmedo et al. 2007). Alien plant invasions in Africanspecies of naturalised alien plants for tropical savannas in

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 116 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

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    by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean Drilling in the world, extending some 3000 km from the slope south of the Bengal delta to merge with the Sri Lanka

  16. Distribution and dynamics of mangrove forests of South Asiaq Chandra Giri a,*, Jordan Long b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    57198, USA c World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Pakistan d The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. These forests provide important ecosystem goods and services to the region's dense three case studies in Indus Delta (Pakistan), Goa (India), and Sundarbans (Bangladesh and India

  17. COLING 2014 The 25th International Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Southeast Asia, on the other hand, consists of Brunei, Burma Abdul Rauf, Fatima Jinnah Women University, Pakistan WSSANLP Invited Speaker Vincent Berment, INa, France (Director) Program Committee Sadaf Abdul Rauf, Fatima Jinnah Women University, Pakistan Nave

  18. Displacement currents in semiconductor quantum dots embedded dielectric media: A method for room temperature photon detection

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    Perera, A. G. Unil

    , Kandy, Central 20 000, Sri Lanka Received 14 June 2007; accepted 12 July 2007; published online 7 August semiconductors can be sensitized to the electromagnetic spectrum from ultraviolet to far IR. Photovoltaic­13 In photovoltaic detectors, interpenetrating networks of polymer and Qds communicate with two electrodes

  19. Policy Brief No.11 june 2006

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    Policy Brief No.11 june 2006 Human-elephant conflict and rural poverty in Sri Lanka School outing to Pinnawale elephant orphanage Issues facing policy-makers: · What is the link between conflict and poverty now compete with the rural poor for scarce land and water resources. Rural poverty persists in Sri

  20. This Provisional PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanley, Kathryn A.

    in dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3), a mosquito-borne pathogen of humans. In Sri Lanka in the 1980's strain associated with the most severe disease manifestations, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon. Superior infectivity for mosquito vectors

  1. Euphytica 00: 18, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provan, Jim

    genetic relationships among coconut varieties/populations using microsatellite markers L. Perera1,, J.R. Russell2, J. Provan2 & W. Powell2 1Genetics and Plant Breeding Division, Coconut Research Institute@sri.lanka.net, lalithperera63@hotmail.com) Received 17 July 2002; accepted 2 March 2003 Key words: coconut, Cocos nucifera

  2. fied fragments of cloned alleles were used for size determina-tion at the respective loci.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provan, Jim

    in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) and the analysis of coconut populations in Sri Lanka L. PERERA, J. R. RUSSELL, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA, UK Keywords: coconut, Cocos nucifera, SSR, microsatellite Received 14 September.Russell@scri.sari.ac.uk The coconut palm, Cocos nucifera L. is a major plantation crop and the most important palm of the wet tropics

  3. Communicated by J. W. Snape L. Perera J. R. Russell J. Provan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provan, Jim

    between indigenous coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) accessions from Sri Lanka by means of AFLP profiling Received: 16 June 1997 / Accepted: 14 October 1997 Abstract PCR-based DNA profiling of coconut palms. These observations have im- portant implications for the maintenance and collec- tion of coconut germplasm

  4. Acknowledgments: UNEP/WMO, IIASA, JRC, US EPA, SEI, Scripps, Middlebury, U York,

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    (particle filters+) ­ Replacing coal in residential stoves ­ Replacing residential wood burning in Industrialized countries ­ Clean-burning cookstoves in developing countries ­ Modern brick kilns ­ Modern coke + Sri Lanka South East Asia China Rice paddies Livestock manure Wastewater Municipal waste Coal mines

  5. International workshop: Planning for climate change through integrated coastal management. Volume 2: Country and regional reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This workshop included reports from the following countries: Argentina; Bulgaria; Egypt; Estonia; Fiji; Indonesia; Mozambique; Nigeria; Oman; The Philippines; Senegal; Sri Lanka; Suriname; Thailand; and Tuvalu; Regional reports were included on the following: Small Island Developing States of the Pacific; South Pacific Regional Environment Program; and Sea Level Rise Impacts on Central America.

  6. Epidemiological aspects of Claviceps africana, causal agent of Sorghum ergot 

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    Noe, Montes Garcia; Noe, Montes Garcia

    2005-02-17

    . propinquum (K.) Hitch., which is a native perennial of Sri Lanka and southern India, and from Burma eastward to the islands of south-eastern Asia, and S. bicolor (L.) Moench which includes all the domesticated taxa, a widely-distributed and ecologically...

  7. Inheritance of antioxidant activity and its association with seed coat color in Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (l.) walp.) 

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    Ndambe Nzaramba, Magnifique

    2005-08-29

    .S.A., Burma, Sri Lanka and Australia all have significant production. Production figures in the U.S.A. were estimated at about 800,000 hectares/year. Georgia, California and Texas are the leading producers, accounting for about 60% of the total production...

  8. Anti-inflammatory Properties of Cowpea Phenotypes with different Phenolic Profiles 

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    Ojwang, Leonnard

    2012-07-16

    of protein. Brazil, India, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Haiti, Senegal, Cameron, Burkina Faso, Australia and the U.S. also produce significant quantities (18, 19). In the U.S., the total production of cowpeas is estimated at 60,000 to 80,000 acres, of which...

  9. Where Have Rich Vlosky's Graduate Students Ended Up? September 22, 2014

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    DISTRIBUTION OF NATURAL RESOURCE-BASED INDUSTRIES Francisco X. Aguilar, Ph.D. Associate Professor Department of Forestry, School of Natural Resources 203L Anheuser-Busch Natural Resources Building University of Missouri Gangodawila, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka Ph.D. Rangika Bandara Perera. Dissertation Title: EFFECTS OF ECOTOURIST PRE

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duputel, Zacharie

    Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami Dailin Wang,1 Nathan C. Becker,1 David generated a tsunami that was recorded at sea-level stations as far as 4800 km from the epi- center, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Maldives issued tsunami warnings for their coastlines. The United States

  11. BEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . INTRODUCTION In Tunisia, the amount of sludge produced by wastewater treatment stations is constantly waste water treatment stations, in other words, most of it is wastewater from domestic sourcesBEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT Najla LASSOUED1,2 , Essaid

  12. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 1033110351, 2012 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/10331/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    ± 9 (-6 ± 5) W m-2 for sector A (northern Morocco; northwestern Algeria), sector B (western Sahara, northwestern Mauritania and southwest- ern Algeria), and sector C (eastern Algeria, Tunisia), respec- tively. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test revealed that daily ARF values at TOA for sector A were significantly dif

  13. The State and Outcomes of Higher Education in the Arab World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0% Lebanon 2.8% Saudi Arabia 1.4% #12;According to published statistics: Only 2.4% attending HEIs. of Patents 1 Saudi Arabia 147 2 UAE 39 3 Egypt 33 4 Morocco 17 5 Tunisia 8 6 Syria 5 7 Algeria, Kuwait 4 each

  14. R. Muoz et al. (Eds.): NLDB 2011, LNCS 6716, pp. 238241, 2011. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Paolo

    ], CRFs [7]. Results produced by statistical taggers obtain about 95%-97% of correctly tagged words. There are also, hybrid methods that use both knowledge based and statistical resources. 3 Amazighe Language The Amazighe language is spoken in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Siwa (an Egyptian Oasis); it is also

  15. recently read an important study that left me in awe of the knowledge demo-graphics of our planet. In Educating All Children: A Global Agenda, Joel Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    of societies. Indeed, Egypt is a living testimony to the link between the power of knowledge and the impact obvious. The children of Facebook have ignited an intifada to plant democracy in Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain) who lived ca. 965­1040 in Iraq and Egypt. He developed concepts in optics, later used by Descartes

  16. Message In A Bottle: Sailing Past Censorship Luca Invernizzi, Christopher Kruegel, Giovanni Vigna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigna, Giovanni

    in December 2010 to shake the foundations of a number of countries (e.g., Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt), and showed the Internet's immense power to catalyze social awareness through the free exchange of ideas. This power is so threatening to repressive regimes that censorship has become a central point

  17. Proceedings of the Human Language Technology Conference of the North American Chapter of the ACL pages 56, Rochester, April 2007. c 2007 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and geographically. The term language as opposed to dialect is only an expression of power and dominance of one group the perception of the distinction between the Arabic language and an Arabic dialect. This power relationship valley: Egypt and Sudan. North African Arabic covers the dialects of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia

  18. 8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES 2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 2-5 June 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to salt under intensive use context Nizar Omrani* *Institute of Arid Regions Medenine (IRA), Tunisia management. These oases observed a lightening development. The improvement in drilling techniques reinforced in the oases, drillings had been multiplied and spread across the oases. The development of the water

  19. SPRING 201134 GRAHAM E. FULLER I AHMED ZEWAIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    on President Barack Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and is the US Science Envoy"--a change of the system. The Egyptians brought down the head of the system, but not yet the system itself.That is the challenge now. The Egyptian revolution, like that in Tunisia, represents a unique model for change

  20. Relations between albedos and emissivities from MODIS and ASTER data over North African Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    of incident solar energy reflected by the land surface in all directions. They determine the surface radiation map over the arid areas of Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia in North Africa at 30 second (about 1 km) and 2 in climate model deserts such as the Sahara. However, solar short- wave diffuse albedos vary by a factor

  1. Nepal's Maoists: Purists or Pragmatists?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Crisis Group

    2007-05-18

    , Nepal’s Maoists: Their Aims, Structure and Strategy, ?? ??????? ???? ??????????? ????????? ?????? ????? ????????? ?????? ????? ????????? ??????? ??. ???, Nepal: From People Power to Peace?, ?? ?? ????, ?????? ??? ????? ??????? ??. ???, Nepal’s Peace... ), Communist Party of Afghanistan, Communist Party of Bangladesh (Marxist-Leninist), Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), Communist Party of Peru, Communist Party of Turkey Marxist-Leninist, Marxist-Leninist Communist Organisation of Tunisia, Maoist Communist...

  2. Forest Growth Under Extensive Annual Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir, Dan

    aridity factor (precipitation/potential evaporation) of about 0.18. Annual received solar energy of ~7 forests/ Count' area K ha K ha % Morocco 2491 534 6.8 Algeria 1427 718 0.9 Tunisia 308 202 3.1 Egypt 0 72

  3. Abdel Wahab M., El-Metwally M., Hassan R., Lefvre M., Oumbe A., Wald L., 2008. Assessing surface solar irradiance in Northern Africa desert climate and its long-term variations from Meteosat images. International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Qubba, Cairo, Egypt. Mines ParisTech, Center for Energy and Processes, BP 207, 06904 Sophia Antipolis cedex under concern in this paper: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, is the prospect of energy production from sun. These four nations comprise approximately 130 millions inhabitants altogether and solar energy

  4. Envisioning Transnational American Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishkin, Shelley Fisher

    2015-01-01

    Germany, Georgia, Iran, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands, Poland, South Africa, Taiwan, Tunisia, Turkey,Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Lebanon, Morocco, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Russia, Spain, Taiwan, Turkey,Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Lebanon, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey,

  5. SPRING 2010 International Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    E-mail: hermans@acadbookprom.nl Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Italy Uwe Lüdemann Schleiermacherstrasse 8 D 10961Berlin Germany Tel: 030 69 50 81 89 Fax: 030 69 50 81 90 E-mail: mail Algeria, Cyprus, Jordan, Malta, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, and West Bank Claire de Gruchy Avicenna

  6. Strategies of Asian oil-importing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.

    1997-04-01

    Various strategies are used by oil-importing countries to reduce their economic dependence on imported oil: national oil production, energy conservation, and the change of economic structures from high energy intensity sectors to low ones. In this article, the roles of these different strategies have been identified for 10 selected oil-importing countries in Asia: Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Thailand, Hong Kong, R.O Korea, and Taiwan. The results show that most of the selected countries (although Hong Kong and Taiwan are independent economic entities, for simplicity, the author refers to them as countries) have succeeded in reducing their national economy dependence on imported oil since 1973. Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and India are among the most successful countries, with more than 40% reduction in their economic dependence on imported oil.

  7. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,839,817 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1985, a decrease of 3% from the 1,896,446 km/sup 2/ held at the end of 1984. This decrease mainly is due to significant relinquishments made in Algeria, Egypt, and Tunisia. Morocco, however, had an increase of 18,087 km/sup 2/. Oil discoveries were reported in Algeria (possibly 5), Libya (at least 2), and Egypt (16). Only 1 gas find was made (in Morocco). According to sparse information, development drilling may have decreased markedly during 1985. Oil and condensate production increased by 3.1% to approximately 3,054,000 b/d compared to about 2,963,400 b/d in 1984. No statistics are currently available on gas production in North Africa. 8 figures, 27 tables.

  8. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    Licensed oil acreage in the 6 North Africa countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan and Tunisia) totaled 1,500,000 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1986, down 290,000 km/sup 2/ from 1985. About 50% of the relinquishments were in Libya. Most oil and gas discoveries were made in Egypt (16 oil and 2 gas). Several oil finds were reported in onshore Libya, and 1 was reported in Algeria in the southeastern Sahara. According to available statistics, development drilling decreased from 1985 levels, except in Tunisia. A 6.3% decline in oil production took place in 1986, falling below the 3 million bbl level (2,912,000 b/d). Only sparse data are released on the gas output in North Africa. 6 figures, 27 tables.

  9. Research and Satellite Applications -Cristina Bentz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applications ·New projects Overview #12;PETROBRAS Oil, Gas and Energy Company E&P TRADINGHEAD OFFICE DOWNSTREAM GAS & ENERGY REPRESENTATIVE OFFICE Houston Colombia Argentina Angola United Kingdom USA BRAZIL Bolivia Rio de Janeiro NigeriaVenezuela Ecuador Peru Mexico Tanzania Iran China Japan New York Uruguay Libya

  10. **The total number of academic personnel is 18,122. Appointments excluded from the above data include clinical faculty (5,911), affiliate faculty (2,737), and other faculty and academic personnel (4,898). UNITED KINGDOM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    ICELAND 2 INDONESIA 2 LIBYA 2 NEPAL 2 SINGAPORE 2 TANZANIA 1 ALGERIA 1 ARMENIA 1 AZERBAIJAN 1 BRUNEI 1 179 224 8 63 6 26 0 255 7 38 NEW HIRE STATISTICS BY RANK AND TRACK AS OF 10/31/2014 NEW HIRE STATISTICS BYYEAR ­ PROFESSORIAL FACULTY Year Total Male Female American Indian Asian Black Hispanic Pacific

  11. Service in Cambridge ROLE MODELS FOR TOMORROW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    the launch of their efficient, rechargeable batteries in Tanzania. EGG- energy customers can also swap@MIT.EDU Photos: courtesy of Public Service Fellows and Grantees Ruben has "an abiding reverence for education their depleted batteries for fully-charged ones. Jukka concentrated on improving EGG's day-to-day operations

  12. Increased use of Renewable Energy in Africa through a Program of Energy Enterprise Development and Investment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christine Eibs Singer

    2005-03-11

    To provide training in enterprise development and technical applications, local partner capacity building, individualized enterprise development services and seed capital investment to catalyze the creation of sustainable renewable energy enterprises that deliver clean energy services to households and businesses in South Africa, Ethiopia and Tanzania.

  13. A solar box cooker for mass production in East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, P.A.; Wilcke, W.F.

    1992-12-31

    A solar box cooker produced in Tanzania, East Africa with indigenous materials is described. When compared to a commercially produced glass and cardboard one, it was found to perform as well. Heat transfer through each major component of the cooker is presented. The smallest losses were through the walls of the box. The greatest losses were observed in the cover system.

  14. African mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference addressing the development of the minerals industry in Africa. Topics covered include: A review - past, present and future - of Zimbabwe's mining industry; Geomorphological processes and related mineralization in Tanzania; and Rock mechanics investigations at Mufulira mine, Zambia.

  15. Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 62476270, 2015 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/6247/2015/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    of Sources, transport and deposition of iron in the global atmosphere R. Wang et al. Correspondence to: R Kingdom 77 1.39 1.49 0.95 Nigeria 22 1.28 2.08 0.46 Tanzania 24 1.12 0.90 0.85 Zambia 14 2.07 3.35 0

  16. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Burundi, Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda) and is used-Fired Power Plants in the Chattahoochee-Apalachicola (ACF) & Etowah-Coosa (ACT) Rivers Basic Information Title: Toxic Metalloid (As, Se, Sb) Enrichment from Coal-Fired Power Plants in the Chattahoochee

  17. Are there other programs? Yes! This advising guide is a good place to start, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    -related internship, and elective options such as Environmental Issues in Chi- na, Politics in China, Chinese History, Sustainable Energy, Ethics & Sustainability, Frieburg: Green City, and many more. Wildlife Conservation and Political Ecology (SIT) Arusha, Tanzania Language Req: None Class Standing: Sophomore & Above Minimum GPA: 2

  18. Are there other programs? Yes! This advising guide is a good place to start, but you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    -related intern- ship, and elective options such as Environmental Issues in China, Politics in China, Chinese, Sustainable Energy, Ethics & Sustainability, Frieburg: Green City, and many more. Wildlife Conservation and Political Ecology (SIT) Arusha, Tanzania Language Req: None Class Standing: Sophomore & Above Minimum GPA: 2

  19. AS ENGAGED LEARNERS UAlbany students assist government, non-profits and business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    enrolled in Honors College #12;UALBANY ACTS AS A MAJOR FORCE FOR ECONOMIC VITALITY AND GROWTH A Regional, such as engaging in post-tsunami clean-up in Japan and HIV/AIDS education in Tanzania. UALBANY STUDENTS Distinguished Professors (current faculty) 3 separate library facilities with more than 2 million volumes

  20. CAPREx Programme Information Cambridge in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAPREx Programme Information Cambridge in Africa The Cambridge in Africa (CiA) Programme in East Africa- Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda, that supports the training of African doctoral and post-doctoral researchers. It aims to strengthen Africa's own capacity for a sustainable research

  1. SUSTAINABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT (An Overview of Nigeria Experience)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    SUSTAINABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT (An Overview of Nigeria Experience) By Asapo, E. S. (PhD) 20th Development. The Nigeria Experience. Conclusion. #12;Development that meets the needs of present generations, Malawi, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda projected to increase

  2. Going Global Inspired by passion and driven by research, Western Heads East (WHE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    women's groups, WHE has introduced probiotic yogurt as a means of addressing health issues related in Africa · Overall goal to establish probiotic yogurt programs in Tanzania, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda and school lunch programs, while producing and distributing probiotic yogurt · Provides probiotic yogurt

  3. TheStar.com -Ideas -World looks to science to solve food crisis http://www.thestar.com/printArticle/454746 1 of 5 10/19/08 4:45 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and South Africa to develop genetically modified drought-tolerant corn, usingTheStar.com - Ideas - World looks to science to solve food crisis http world food crisis," former UN secretary general Koffi Annan called for a Green Revolution for Africa

  4. 5 6 Institut de recherche pour le dveloppement < Health/Benin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and nutrition; agriculture and aquaculture; impact of climate change and adaptation of societies; energy, Congo, DR Congo, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Madagascar, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, Chad. 5 8 for proposals now in course of preparation concern agroforestry, energy in the South, protected areas

  5. Complex seismic anisotropy at the border of a very low velocity province at the base of the Earth's mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Lianxing

    Complex seismic anisotropy at the border of a very low velocity province at the base of the Earth at distances between 90° and 150° by the seismic stations in three temporary broadband PASSCAL seismic arrays: the Kaapvaal seismic array (1997­1999), the Tanzania seismic array (1994­1995), and the Ethiopia/Kenya seismic

  6. Africa Becoming a Biofuel Battleground Western companies are pushing to acquire vast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a bit of fishing and the production of charcoal. There isn't much else in Mtamba. That could change," an energy plant with a high oil content, which it hopes to plant on Kisarawe's farmland. The Tanzanian the Netherlands, the United States, Sweden, Japan, Canada and Germany have already sent their scouts to Tanzania

  7. PF SECRETARIAT January 2010 BBRRIIEEFF RREEPPOORRTT OONN TTHHEE 77

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    being one of them has a wealth of natural resources if managed sustainably can support people in OECD led to dramatic increase in demand for nat. Resources Policy Forum on this month's Debate in Tanzania. The presentations debate was done by Dr. Cosmas Sokoni Department of Geography ­University of Dar

  8. Financial constraints and firms' investment: results of a natural experiment measuring firm response to power interruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbuks, J.

    . They accomplish this by providing cash and equipment grants to small ?rms in Sri Lanka and Mexico, and measuring the increase in pro?ts arising from this exogenous (positive) shock to capital stock. After controlling for possible spillover e¤ects, the shock... active regional investment policies are not implemented. Sub-Saharan African countries ?t this criterion, because implementation of such policies is limited by political instability, corruption, ethnical fragmentations and clan struggles (Easterly...

  9. Africa: Prosperous times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Political instability and corruption is the rule, rather than the exception, in Africa`s main producing regions, but exploration and production prospects there are bright and attractive to foreign operators. The paper discusses exploration, drilling, resource development, and production in Nigeria, Libya, Algeria, Egypt, Angola, Congo, Gabon, and Tunisia. The other countries of Africa are briefly mentioned, i.e., Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, South Africa, Sudan, Namibia, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Zaire, Mozambique, Ghana, Niger, and Seychelles.

  10. Reduction of ruminant methane emissions - a win-win-win opportunity for business, development, and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes research efforts of The Global Livestock Producers Program (GLPP) in establishing self-sustaining enterprises for cost-effective technologies (i.e., animal nutrition and genetic improvement) and global methane emissions reductions in developing world nations. The US Environmental Protection Agency has funded several studies to examine the possibilities of reducing ruminant methane emissions in India, Tanzania, Bangladesh, and Brazil. The results of the studies showed that: (1) many developing countries` production systems are inefficient, and (2) great potential exists for decreasing global methane emissions through increasing animal productivity. From this effort, the GLPP established livestock development projects in India, Zimbabwe, and Tanzania, and is developing projects for Bangladesh, Nepal, and Brazil. The GLPP has developed a proven methodology for assessing ruminant methane and incorporating methane emissions monitoring into viable projects.

  11. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  12. East African coast overlooked. [Oil and gas potential of the east African coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This paper reviews the petroleum and gas potential of the Tanzania-Mozambique basinal areas. It discusses the locations of the various sedimentary basins in the onshore and near offshore areas, including the central African rift zone. The paper describes the structure, stratigraphy, and petroleum geology of these basins. Finally the paper reviews the exploration history and the outlook for the future of these basins.

  13. The importance of context in delivering effective EIA: Case studies from East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marara, Madeleine; Okello, Nick; Kuhanwa, Zainab; Douven, Wim; Beevers, Lindsay Leentvaar, Jan

    2011-04-15

    This paper reviews and compares the condition of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) system in three countries in the East Africa region: Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania. The criteria used for the evaluation and the comparison of each system are based on the elements of the legal, administrative and procedural frameworks, as well as the context in which they operate. These criteria are adapted from the evaluation and quality control criteria derived from a number of literature sources. The study reveals that the EIA systems of Kenya and Tanzania are at a similar stage in their development. The two countries, the first to introduce the EIA concept into their jurisdiction in this part of Africa, therefore have more experience than Rwanda in the practice of environmental impact assessment, where the legislation and process requires more time to mature both from the governmental and societal perspective. The analysis of the administrative and procedural frameworks highlights the weakness in the autonomy of the competent authority, in all three countries. Finally a major finding of this study is that the contextual set up i.e. the socio-economic and political situation plays an important role in the performance of an EIA system. The context in developing countries is very different from developed countries where the EIA concept originates. Interpreting EIA conditions in countries like Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania requires that the analysis for determining the effectiveness of their systems should be undertaken within a relevant framework, taking into account the specific requirements of those countries.

  14. ‘A confession of ignorance’: deaths from old age and deciphering cause-of-death statistics in Scotland, 1855 – 1949

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Alice; Garrett, Eilidh; Dibben, Chris; Williamson, Lee

    2015-02-05

    and Wales, Sweden, Japan, Chile and Sri Lanka (then Ceylon), and he later developed his ideas with data from the USA (Omran, 1971, 1977). Thomas McKeown (1976a) also used cause-of-death data for England and Wales as the basis for his controversial theory... the ‘official’ cause-of-death series published in the annual reports of the Registrar General for Scotland from 1855 to 1949 (Davenport, 2012). We mainly present the data in the form of mortality rates, rather than absolute numbers, and the population data which...

  15. The Issue Of National Integration in Nepal: An Ethnoregional Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattachan, Krishna B.; Pyakuryal, Kailash N.

    1996-01-01

    . as acute as in Sri Lanka or Yugoslavia? Can the pr c iss f national imcgration in epal be really equated with the idea of a ' rnclune pot' as i often d nc? Is J 'cpa! a 'garden of all astes and ethni group: ' in the real ense? And. houId the monopoly... of the dominant Hindu hill ca tc group end? Anicles have. no doubt appeared to address th se queri ,2 But rna t of them have somch \\ Ignored the policy impli arion of u h ethnoregiona l problems in the c ntcxt f national integration. Th i article intend I h w...

  16. Temporal Patterns of Diversification across Global Cichlid Biodiversity (Acanthomorpha: Cichlidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMahan, Caleb D.; Chakrabarty, Prosanta; Sparks, John S.; Smith, William Leo; Davis, Matthew P.

    2013-08-19

    of the family Cichlidae, which is consistent with previous Gondwanan vicariance hypotheses that have explained the present distribution of cichlid taxa in Madagascar, India/Sri Lanka, Africa, Iran, and Central and South America (e.g., [23,24,46,47]). Our results... for the adaptive character of the Tanganyikan cichlid fish radiations. Evolution 61: 560–578. 18. Chakrabarty P (2005) Testing conjectures about morphological diversity in cichlids of lakes Malawi and Tanganyika. Copeia 2005: 359–373. 19. Rabosky DL (2006) LASER: a...

  17. Newsfront 17-23 September 2007, Issue 34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghimire, Yubaraj

    have any questions, you ask them.” Koirala’s demands from Menon varied from exploring Man Mohan Singh’s visit before the election to smooth supply of petrol. Menon is believed to have given positive response to the demand for petroleum. Menon described... the region for an in- depth work on post-Tsunami issues affecting the communi- ties. This is the first fellowship of the kind. An AMF release said the four journalists will work in Tsunami affected communities in India, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, and Thailand...

  18. Reflections on Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2014-09-22

    the mafia threaten people, is that violence? If a man comes home drunk and curses his wife, is that violence? Can we, as I’ve heard, even call certain kinds of music, architecture or even speech – for instance what 10 happened at Hitler’s rallies... . It seems nearer to what I’ve heard called ‘feuding’, such as what is happening in Israel and Palestine, Kashmir, Sri Lanka, many parts of Africa. Are these really feuds and, if so, what is a feud? 12 It’s obvious that there are many kinds of war...

  19. An assessment of the usefulness of 5 new synthetic pyrethroids in IPM programs for tobacco budworm control in cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakulendran, Sinnappu Victor

    1981-01-01

    New Synthetic Pyrethroids in IPM Programs for Tobacco Budworm Control in Cotton. (Mlay 1981) Sinnappu Victor Rajakulendran, B. Sc. (Agri. ) University of Sri Lanka Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. F. W. Plapp, Jr. Toxicity measurements were...-methyl ethyl) benzene acetate) and fluvalinate. Toxicity was de- termined to larvae of the tobacco budworm Heliothis (P. ), t d lt 1 *f 't p 't, ~tl t' sonorensis (Carlson), and to larvae of its predator, C~t * ddt pl ). Al*, ll d' f t t d as a...

  20. Africa: Unrest and restrictive terms limit abundant potential. [Oil and gas exploration and development in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes the drilling and exploration activity of the oil and gas industries of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Nigeria, Cameroon, Gabon, the Congo, Angola, and South Africa. Information is provided on current and predicted trends in well drilling activities (both onshore and offshore), numbers of new wells, footage information, production statistics and what fields accounted for this production, and planned new exploration activities. The paper also describes the current status of government policies and political problems affecting the oil and gas industry.

  1. Networks of Networks: Changing Patterns in Country Bandwidth and Centrality in Global Information Infrastructure, 2002-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyunjin

    2012-04-01

    of density, degree, and eigenvector centrality from 2002 to 2010. Graphs and statistics were calculated in R (R Development Core Team, 2011) and networks were visualized using Gephi (Bastian, Heymann, & Jacomy, 2009). Global internet geography data obtained....070), Jordan (0.060), Morocco (0.052), Algeria (0.025), Libya (0.014), Palestine Territory (0.012), and Sudan (0.012). The United Arab Emirates showed the highest degree with 12, and the degree of Israel was 8. Data for Iraq and Tunisia were not available...

  2. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium in chromosome 13-linked Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Othmane, K.B.; Speer, M.C.; Stauffer, J. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy (DLMD) is an autosomal recessive Limb Girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2C) characterized by late age of onset, proximal muscle weakness leading to disability, high creatine kinase values, normal intelligence and normal dystrophin in muscle biopsy. We have shown previously that three DLMD families from Tunisia are linked to chromosome 13q12. To further localize the LGMD2C gene, we have investigated seven additional families (119 individuals). Both genotyping and two-point linkage analysis were performed as described elsewhere. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Reproductive behavior of addax antelope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manski, David Allen

    1979-01-01

    -around (mutual circling of the partners), Laufschlag and Flehmen. Estrous was very brief, lasting for a period of approximately 24 to 48 h. Copulation was almost exclusively done by alpha males. Gestation was estimated at nine months, and calving occurred..., and they have disappeared from Tunisia. Apparently the last addax was shot in Bgypt by a bedouin hunter about 1900 (llarper 1945) . A remnant population of addax exisLed in the southern regions of Libya in 1. 966 (Dolan 1966). In Chad, addax seem...

  4. Experience of Consolidation Of Disused Sources In Developing Countries, An African Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kifanga, L.D.; Mompome, W.K.; Shao, D.

    2008-07-01

    Application of sealed sources in agriculture, medicine and industry was used in many African countries without having any arrangements in place for managing the sources when their useful life was over. In Tanzania a substantial use of such sources was utilized. In the early days source management was not an area that was given the required attention hence a legacy associated with sealed sources became evident in many African countries and Tanzania was one of them. In the 90's Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission (TAEC), realized the scope of the waste problem and began to participate in an International Atomic Energy Agency Regional (IAEA) project on waste management. Tanzania in cooperation with IAEA initiated activities under the IAEA Technical Cooperation and the Regional projects 'Strengthening Waste Management Infrastructure, RAF/4/015'; and 'Sustaining the Waste Management Infrastructure RAF/3/005' which played a significant role. The first outcome of the project was realized in 1999, as the first 'Temporary Radioactive Waste Storage Facility' began to operate. This particular Storage facility gave the first impact as well as the need to develop this particular infrastructure further. As the project carried on, more and more orphan sources were recovered, collected and safely stored at the facility. As the use of nuclear technology was expanding and the identification of the extent of sealed sources in the countries became more defined, the need to develop a 'Central Radioactive Waste Management Facility' (CRWMF) was becoming more desired. The central radioactive waste storage facility was constructed and commissioned in 2005. The facility was more advanced and could be used for much longer periods of time, as one of the most advanced storage facility in the Region. At present a large number of disused sources from various industries as well as from different activities are being stored at the facility. Tanzanian authorities are also planning to initiate a nationwide mission to recover and properly store as well as dispose of abandoned sources. Cooperation among the AFRA Member states has been very rewarding in terms of experience and its importance. Skills that have been gained during the past years of existence of the AFRA project will be a vital contribution for years to come. This paper discusses the experiences of United Republic of Tanzania on management of orphan radioactive sources. The need to develop its own radioactive waste management infrastructure was required due to the fact, that many disused radioactive sources have been found abandoned and needed to be properly disposed of. The paper will also discuss some of these experiences. (authors)

  5. Energy resources in southern Africa: a select bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavan, A.

    1981-01-01

    The aims, progress, and possibilities involved in Southern Africa's energy development are the subject of this 473-item bibliography. The primary items of information described in this document are relatively recent (1975-81), originate from both indigenous and international sources, and are mostly in English, although a few are in French and Portuguese. The presented information focuses on the African continent, the Southern African region, and the nations of Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The energy source topics include alcohol, coal, gas, oil, solar, uranium, water, wind, and wood; as well as a general energy-development category.

  6. Platinum-group element abundance patterns in different mantle environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Barfod, D.; Fitton, J.G.; Dawson, J.B.

    1997-11-28

    Mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania display differences in their platinum-group element (PGE) abundance patterns. The Cameroon Line lherzolites have uniform PGE patterns indicating a homogeneous upper mantle over several hundreds of kilometers, with approximately chondritic PGE ratios. The PGE patterns of the Tanzanian peridotites are similar to the PGE systematics of ultramafic rocks from ophiolites. The differences can be explained if the northern Tanzanian lithosphere developed in a fluid-rich suprasubduction zone environment, whereas the Cameroon Line lithosphere only experienced melt extraction from anhydrous periodotites. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Options for developing countries in mining development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walrond, G.W.; Kumar, R.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a study of the issues that developing countries face in planning and implementing mineral development, taking as case studies Botswana, Sierra Leone, Zambia, Tanzania, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea and the developed states of Quebec and Western Australia. The authors consider the major aspects of the matter including organization and administration; regulation; taxation and surplus distribution; the dynamics of such instruments as royalty, rent resource tax and capital allowances under various cost/price scenarios; and selected mining agreements and their key provisions. They stress throughout the need for foreign investment while maximizing the economic benefits reaped from exhaustible resources.

  8. #WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jordan, Rhonda

    2014-06-04

    Growing up, Dr. Rhonda Jordan always enjoyed math and science. After completing her master's in electrical engineering at Columbia University she co-founded a startup in Tanzania that provides access to power for residents who are not connected to the electrical grid. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

  9. #WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Rhonda

    2014-05-27

    Growing up, Dr. Rhonda Jordan always enjoyed math and science. After completing her master's in electrical engineering at Columbia University she co-founded a startup in Tanzania that provides access to power for residents who are not connected to the electrical grid. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

  10. Effects of steeping and germination time on malt properties of two sorghum cultivars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrema, Greyson Chris

    1993-01-01

    University of Agriculture, Tanzania Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr, Lloyd W. Rooney Effects of steeping and germination on malt properties of two sorghum cultivars; ATx623xSC103-12, a high tannin sorghum with purple plant color and Dorado a food type... matter in ATx623xSC103-12 and Dorado melts respectively. Leaching and seed respiration accounted for more than 60% of the total dry matter loss. Less than 40% of the total dry matter loss were due to root and shoot development. Tannin content of ATx...

  11. Effects of prescribed seasonal burning on a Combretum-Commiphora plant community in South Central Kenya 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinyamario, Jenesio Ikindu

    1982-01-01

    ) I NRRS Headquarters Kiboko z B eb Nairobi referee N. R. R. S TANZANIA 0 000 K Mombasa 0 oq 2'20'5 NATIONAL RANGE RESEARCH STATION 0 oi oi Z 0 Z D 0 Aug Control Nov Reserve BLOCK I Jan Jul Mar X e 0 0 5 37'50'E Jut... Reserve Jul Msr 0 s o N Jan Cofilrol Reserve Aug Aug Nov Jan Nov Z ei Z c 37 50'E Plot~s 2' 20'S Experimental BLOCK III Mar Control BLOCK II Experimental plots 200 180 160 140 A verage Rainfall ~ tace CZ2 t904-t990 Average...

  12. High temperature solar thermal technology: The North Africa Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    High temperature solar thermal (HTST) technology offers an attractive option for both industrialized and non-industrialized countries to generate electricity and industrial process steam. The purpose of this report is to assess the potential market for solar thermal applications in the North African countries of Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. North Africa was selected because of its outstanding solar resource base and the variety of applications to be found there. Diminishing oil and gas resources, coupled with expanding energy needs, opens a large potential market for the US industry. The US high temperature solar trough industry has little competition globally and could build a large market in these areas. The US is already familiar with certain solar markets in North Africa due to the supplying of substantial quantities of US-manufactured flat plate collectors to this region.

  13. Technical Training Workshop on International Safeguards: An Introduction to Safeguards for Emerging Nuclear States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Olson, Jarrod; Mathews, Caroline E.; Solodov, Alexander; Zhernosek, Alena; Raffo-Caiado, Ana; Baldwin, George; Horak, Karl; McClelland-Kerr, John; VanSickle, Matthew; Mininni, Margot; Kovacic, Donald

    2009-10-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) hosted a workshop from May 4-22, 2009, on the fundamental elements of international safeguards. Entitled "A Technical Training Workshop on International Safeguards," the workshop introduced post-graduate students from Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Thailand, Morocco, Egypt, Algeria and Tunisia to the fundamental issues and best practices associated with international safeguards and encouraged them to explore potential career paths in safeguards. Workshops like these strengthen the international safeguards regime by promoting the development of a "safeguards culture" among young nuclear professionals within nascent nuclear countries. While this concept of safeguards culture is sometimes hard to define and even harder to measure, this paper will demonstrate that the promotion of safeguards cultures through workshops like these justifies the investment of U.S. taxpayer dollars.

  14. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, J.B.; Walker, T.L.

    1988-10-01

    Significant rightholding changes took place in central and southern Africa during 1987. Angola, Benin, Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Seychelles, Somali Republic, Tanzania, Zaire, and Zambia announced awards or acreage open for bidding. Decreases in exploratory rightholdings occurred in Cameroon, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, and Tanzania. More wells and greater footage were drilled in 1987 than in 1986. Total wells increased by 18% as 254 wells were completed compared to 217 in 1986. Footage drilled during the year increased by 46% as about 1.9 million ft were drilled compared to about 1.3 million ft in 1986. The success rate for exploration wells in 1987 improved slightly to 36% compared to 34% in 1986. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition in 1987 was the major geophysical activity during the year. Total oil production in 1987 was 773 million bbl (about 2.1 million b/d), a decrease of 7%. The decrease is mostly due to a 14% drop in Nigerian production, which comprises 60% of total regional production. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries of 67% remained unchanged from 1986. 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. McHuchuma/Katewaka coal fired power plant feasibility study. Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-22

    This study, conducted by Black and Veatch International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report assesses the feasibility for the development of a new coal fueled power plant in Tanzania at the Mchuchuma/Katewaka coal concession area. Volume 3, the Main Report, is divided into the following sections: (1.0) Introduction; (2.0) Power System Development Studies; (3.0) Conceptual Design Summary of the Mchuchuma Coal Fired Power Plant; (4.0) Fuel Supply Evaluation; (5.0) Transmission System Evaluation; (6.0) Power Plant Site and Infrastructure Evaluation; (7.0) Environmental Impact Assessment; (8.0) Institutional Aspects; (9.0) Financial Evaluation and Benefit Analysis; (10.0) Sources of Finance; Appendix (A) Preliminary Design of Mchuchuma Coal Plant.

  16. Elemental composition of two cumulate rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naeem, A.; Almohandis, A.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two cumulate rock samples K-185, K-250 from the Kapalagulu intrusion, W. Tanzania, were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), wet chemical and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. Major element oxides were determined by XRF and wet chemical methods, while the concentration of trace elements were measured by NAA, using high resolution Ge(Li) detector, minicomputer-based data acquisition system and off-line computer. The percentage of major oxides and sixteen trace elements have been reported. It has been found that Cr, Ni, and Co are highly concentrated in K-250 while Sc, and most of the major elements are more concentrated in K-185. The variation of major and trace elements in these two samples have been discussed.

  17. Opportunities in African power generation: A business briefing for industry and investment executives. Held in Baltimore, Maryland, June 21-22, 1995. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-21

    The report, prepared by the Institute of International Education, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The information contained in the report was compiled in part for a power generation conference held in Baltimore, Maryland. The focus of the report is the market created by electric power projects financed by multilateral development banks. The study contains country information and project profiles related to the energy sector for eleven countries: Benin, Botswana, Cote D`Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Morocoo, Senegal, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The report also outlines the range of service opportunities in the region such as consulting, engineering, construction and project management, and equipment procurement. It is divided into the following sections: (1) Agenda/Program; (2) African Energy Sector Overview; (3) Project Profiles; (4) Country Information; and (5) Attendees.

  18. Potential and cost of carbon sequestration in the Tanzanian forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $ 7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  19. Forestry mitigation potential and costs in developing countries - Preface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Makundi, Willy; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  20. South Asia Water Resources Workshop: An effort to promote water quality data sharing in South Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAJEN,GAURAV; BIRINGER,KENT L.; BETSILL,J. DAVID

    2000-04-01

    To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group comprised of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the US convened at the Soaltee Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, September 12 to 14, 1999. The workshop was sponsored in part by the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The CMC promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in regions throughout the world as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. In the long term, the workshop organizers and participants are interested in the significance of regional information sharing as a means to build confidence and reduce conflict. The intermediate interests of the group focus on activities that might eventually foster regional management of some aspects of water resources utilization. The immediate purpose of the workshop was to begin the implementation phase of a project to collect and share water quality information at a number of river and coastal estuary locations throughout the region. The workshop participants achieved four objectives: (1) gaining a better understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of existing regional organizations promoting environmental cooperation in South Asia; (3) identifying sites within the region at which data is to be collected; and (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process.

  1. Energy-conservation-investment decision making in developing countries: A review of project implementation in industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    Despite recent efforts in a number of developing countries to promote energy conservation (EC) and efficiency, only a fraction of EC potential has been captured, especially for projects that require significant investments. The document analyzes EC efforts in 11 countries where energy audit and/or feasibility study programs have been carried out (Bangladesh, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Pakistan, Panama, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka), covering some 1,500 EC projects involving 242 industrial companies. Cost and length of payback seem to be the determining factors for companies considering EC measures; no-cost or low-cost projects with paybacks of less than a year (such as power factor improvement projects) had the highest rate of implementation, while expensive, complicated projects (e.g., cogeneration or fuel substitution projects) were most often rejected. The document concludes, however, that the rate of implementation of EC programs has been quite high, and recommends that inexpensive, short-term projects be featured in future EC programs and increased levels of TA and financial assistance be made available to companies implementing long-term EC measures.

  2. CMC Participation in the Regional Centre for Strategic Studies (RCSS) Workshop: Defense, Technology and Cooperative Security in South Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biringer, K.L.; Olsen, J.

    1998-11-01

    As an ongoing part of the collaborative efforts between the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories, the United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), staff from the CMC served as faculty in conducting a workshop in Shanghai, China. Sponsor of the workshop was the Regional Centre for Strategic Studies (RCSS) based in Colombo, Sri Lanka. The workshop included participants from throughout South Asia and China. The CMC presented four sessions related to the role of monitoring technologies in promoting regional security and building confidence among nations. Participation in these workshops supports U.S. efforts to further regional cooperation and promote arms control, nonproliferation and other cooperative securily measures and supplements efforts funded by DOE and ACDA over the past four years. The RCSS Shanghai meeting permitted a continued CMC involvement in regionally conducted training for anew generation of leaders in government, the military, and academia throughout South Asia and China. Nuclear issues are clearly a dominant South Asian concern since the nuclear tests of May 1998. However, there remains a strong interest in identifying opportunities for increased trade and reduced tensions in other areas. The RCSS and other regional organizations are enthusiastic about continued CMC involvement in future regional courses.

  3. The Java-Sumatra Aerial Mega-Tramway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

    2007-01-09

    A mega-tramway based on the Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Java is proposed to span Sunda Strait. The Java-Sumatra Aerial Mega-Tramway (JSAMT) will be self-elevating and will regularly and cheaply launch passengers and cargoes via two conveyor belt-like facilities using standard winged shipping containers like those currently used by international trucking and ocean shipping industries that are volplaned across the Sunda Strait. The JSAMT will be a self-sustaining toll facility free of any requirement for international loans or funding guarantees for its construction. Its existence will remove any immediate need for an expensive to dig/maintain Nusantara Tunnel. We offer the formative basic technical specifications for the JSAMT and indicate some of the physical and cultural geographical facts underpinning our macro-engineering proposal; offshoots of a perfected and tested JSAMT may be installed at Palk Strait between India and Sri Lanka, the Gibraltar Strait and the Bering Strait by mid-21st Century.

  4. Observation manipulator bell proves worth in Transmediterranean pipeline construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, R.E.

    1981-10-26

    In constructing the trans-Mediterranean undersea pipeline between Tunisia and Sicily, Perry Oceanographics used a manned, tethered vehicle called an observation manipulator bell (OMB), which has proven itself in deepwater pipelaying operations. The OMB carries a crew of two inside a pressure hull with an internal diameter of 76 in. Its overall diameter is 102 in. and it weighs 17,500 lb. The vehicle has two 5-hp port- and starboard-mounted electric thrusters. Its vertical position can be controlled by either the bell operator using a clump-weight haul-down winch or the surface operator with the umbilical winch. The OMB is fitted with video cameras and voice communication. The vehicle has reached depths of 3000 ft within 30 min with only a 10-ft overshoot. The OMB's single and/or dual manipulator-arm systems can operate its onboard impact wrenches, cut-off saws, water jets, and cable cutters. In addition, the manipulator claws can operate valve wheels and levers, attach anodes, and connect of disconnect cables and hydraulic systems. The versatility of the OMB was demonstrated recently when the vehicle rescued a PC-1602 submarine that had become entangled at 1740 ft.

  5. Trans-Sahara pipe line would deliver Nigeria gas to Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muenzler, M.H.

    1983-11-01

    Bechtel has made an in-house study of a natural gas transmission line extending from Nigeria to the Mediterranean and then on into Europe. Based upon the analysis, the pipeline project appears sufficiently viable to warrant further study. Perhaps the single most important element in design of pipelines crossing international borders is the political aspects involved in constructing, owning, and operating the line. These considerations not only effect the location of the pipeline, the manner of financing and ownership, but also whether the line will be constructed. The line crosses several international boundaries, depending upon the route selected. Each route crosses Niger. Case A crosses Algeria and into Tunisia where it ultimately would cross the Strait of Sicily into Italy. Case B crosses the Niger- Algerian border and then traverses Algeria to the Mediterranean where it is planned to connect to the Segamo pipeline and to link with the pipeline network in Spain. Case C crosses the countries of Niger, Mali, Mauritania, and into Morocco, and ultimately crosses the Mediterranean Sea close to the Strait of Gibraltar. Nigeria has proven natural gas reserves estimated to range from 2.5 to 4 trillion cu m (38 to 140 tcf).

  6. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  7. A versatile technique to minimize electrical losses in distribution feeders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyaruzi, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    This dissertation presents a method of minimizing electrical losses in radial distribution feeders by the use of shunt capacitors. The engineering benefits of reducing peak electrical power and energy losses are compared to the costs associated with the current engineering practice of buying, installing and servicing capacitor banks in the distribution feeders. The present analysis defines this cost-benefit problem and the formulation of the problem of nonuniform feeders with different wire gauges at various feeder sections. Standard utility capacitor bank sizes are used to give a more realistic model. An original computer solution methodology based on techniques developed for this study determines: (i) Whether it is economical to install compensating capacitor banks on a particular radial distribution feeder or not. (ii) The locations at which capacitor banks should be installed. (iii) The types and sizes of capacitor banks to be installed. (iv) The time setting of switched capacitor banks. The techniques have been applied to a typical radial distribution feeder in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The results and the engineering implications of this work are discussed and recommendations for the engineering community made.

  8. Transfer of carbon and a polychlorinated biphenyl through the pelagic microbial food web in a coastal ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallberg, P.; Andersson, A.

    2000-04-01

    In order to estimate fluxes of carbon within the microbial community, seawater was collected in a coastal area off Zanzibar Island, Tanzania, during a rainy season (November 1994) and a dry season (September 1996). Diel experiments were conducted in a 24-L polycarbonate bottle and samples were retrieved every third hour over a period of 30 to 33 h. Abundance and production rates of bacteria, nonoflagellates, and microplankton were determined. To determine possible connections between the fluxes of carbon and the fate of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) no. 153, a time-course experiment was conducted after the diel experiment. The initial PCB partitioning was similar in the two experiments, but the subsequent distribution among the organism groups was different. In the rainy season experiment, the PCB concentration in the largest size fraction was almost three times higher than during the dry season experiment. This was in line with results from the diel experiments where the carbon flux through the microbial food web was approximately three times higher during the rainy season than during the dry season experiment. These results suggest that the transfer rate of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl through the microbial food web is coupled to the carbon flux.

  9. Pigmented foils for radiative cooling and condensation irrigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, T.M.J.; Vargas, W.E.; Niklasson, G.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reports on the development of pigmented polyethylene foils for radiative cooling. The optical properties of the foils were optimized for applications in day-time radiative cooling and water condensation. The authors first study highly scattering foils used as convection shields. These cover foils combine a high solar reflectance and a high transmittance in the atmospheric window region in the infrared. Different pigment materials were studied and ZnS was the only one that could prevent heating of an underlying blackbody at noon, with the sun in its zenith. A 400 {micro}m thick ZnS pigmented polyethylene foil with a pigment volume fraction of 0.15 was tested in Tanzania. At noon the observed temperature of the covered blackbody was only 1.5 K above the ambient. Secondly, they study the potential for condensation of water in an arid region. Pigmented foils for this purpose should combine a high solar reflectance and a high infrared emittance, in order to promote condensation by the radiative cooling effect. Titanium dioxide is a fairly good infrared emitter, but the emittance can be improved by using a mixture of TiO{sub 2} and BaSO{sub 4} pigments or only employing a composite SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}. Field tests with a 390 {micro}m thick polyethylene foil with TiO{sub 2} and BaSO{sub 4} pigments gave encouraging results.

  10. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/11: Cooperative Environmental Monitoring in the Coastal Regions of India and Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajen, Gauray

    1999-06-01

    The cessation of hostilities between India and Pakistan is an immediate need and of global concern, as these countries have tested nuclear devices, and have the capability to deploy nuclear weapons and long-range ballistic missiles. Cooperative monitoring projects among neighboring countries in South Asia could build regional confidence, and, through gradual improvements in relations, reduce the threat of war and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. This paper discusses monitoring the trans-border movement of flow and sediment in the Indian and Pakistani coastal areas. Through such a project, India and Pakistan could initiate greater cooperation, and engender movement towards the resolution of the Sir Creek territorial dispute in their coastal region. The Joint Working Groups dialogue being conducted by India and Pakistan provides a mechanism for promoting such a project. The proposed project also falls within a regional framework of cooperation agreed to by several South Asian countries. This framework has been codified in the South Asian Seas Action Plan, developed by Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. This framework provides a useful starting point for Indian and Pakistani cooperative monitoring in their trans-border coastal area. The project discussed in this paper involves computer modeling, the placement of in situ sensors for remote data acquisition, and the development of joint reports. Preliminary computer modeling studies are presented in the paper. These results illustrate the cross-flow connections between Indian and Pakistani coastal regions and strengthen the argument for cooperation. Technologies and actions similar to those suggested for the coastal project are likely to be applied in future arms control and treaty verification agreements. The project, therefore, serves as a demonstration of cooperative monitoring technologies. The project will also increase people-to-people contacts among Indian and Pakistani policy makers and scientists. In the perceptions of the general public, the project will crystallize the idea that the two countries share ecosystems and natural resources, and have a vested interest in increased collaboration.

  11. Evaluating climate models: Should we use weather or climate observations?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oglesby, Robert J [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    Calling the numerical models that we use for simulations of climate change 'climate models' is a bit of a misnomer. These 'general circulation models' (GCMs, AKA global climate models) and their cousins the 'regional climate models' (RCMs) are actually physically-based weather simulators. That is, these models simulate, either globally or locally, daily weather patterns in response to some change in forcing or boundary condition. These simulated weather patterns are then aggregated into climate statistics, very much as we aggregate observations into 'real climate statistics'. Traditionally, the output of GCMs has been evaluated using climate statistics, as opposed to their ability to simulate realistic daily weather observations. At the coarse global scale this may be a reasonable approach, however, as RCM's downscale to increasingly higher resolutions, the conjunction between weather and climate becomes more problematic. We present results from a series of present-day climate simulations using the WRF ARW for domains that cover North America, much of Latin America, and South Asia. The basic domains are at a 12 km resolution, but several inner domains at 4 km have also been simulated. These include regions of complex topography in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Sri Lanka, as well as a region of low topography and fairly homogeneous land surface type (the U.S. Great Plains). Model evaluations are performed using standard climate analyses (e.g., reanalyses; NCDC data) but also using time series of daily station observations. Preliminary results suggest little difference in the assessment of long-term mean quantities, but the variability on seasonal and interannual timescales is better described. Furthermore, the value-added by using daily weather observations as an evaluation tool increases with the model resolution.

  12. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.Ch.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984, an increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North Africa ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was up 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries.

  13. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984. An increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North America ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries. 9 figures, 27 tables.

  14. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  15. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Daniels, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  16. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  17. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  18. Uranium and thorium decay series disequilibria in young volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the central questions in igneous geochemistry that study of radioactive disequilibria can help to answer are: what are the rates of magma genesis; and what are the timescales of magma separation and transport. In addition to the temporal information that may be extracted from disequilibria data, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of a young rock may be used as a tracer of the Th/U ratio of its source region. Measurements were made by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry of {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th in 20 subduction related, 3 oceanic intraplate, and 10 continental intraplate volcanics. {sup 210}Pb was measured in all, {sup 226}Ra was measured in about half, and {sup 228}Th was measured in 10 of the most recent samples. Disequilibrium between {sup 228}Th and {sup 232}Th was found only in the Nacarbonatite samples from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania, which is attributable to {sup 228}Ra/{sup 232}Th {approximately} 27 at the time of eruption. These rocks also have {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th > 60. Three Ra-enrichment models are developed which constrain carbonatite magma formation at less than 20 years before eruption. The effects of different partial melting processes on the {sup 238}U decay series are investigated. If mid-ocean ridge basalts are formed by a dynamic melting process, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of the basalts provides a minimum estimate of the Th/U ratio of the source region. The {sup 238}U enrichment in arc volcanics is probably the results of metasomatism of the source by fluids derived from the subducting slab, and the {sup 230}Th enrichment observed for other volcanics is probably due to the partial melting process in the absence of U-bearing fluids.

  19. Carbon flows and economic evaluation of mitigation options in Tanzani's forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.R.; Okinting'Ati, Aku

    1995-02-02

    This paper presents estimates of the rate of forest use, deforestation and forest degradation, as well as the corresponding carbon flows, in the Tanzanian forest sector. It is estimated that the country lost 525,000 ha of forests in 1990, with associated committed emissions of 31.5 Mt. Carbon (MtC), and 7.05 MtC of committed carbon sequestration. The paper then describes the possible response options in the forest sector to mitigate GHG emissions, and evaluates the most stable subset of these-i.e. forest conservation, woodfuel plantations and agroforestry. The conservation options were found to cost an average of U.S. $1.27 per tonne of carbon (tC) conserved. Five options for fuelwood plantations and agroforestry, with two different ownership regimes were evaluated. Each one of the options gives a positive net present value at low rates of discount, ranging from U.S. $1.06 to 3.4/1C of avoided emissions at 0 percent discount rate. At 10 percent discount, the eucalyptus and maize option has a highest PNV of U.S. $1.73 tC, and the government plantation gives a negative PNV (loss) of U.S. $0.13 tC sequestered. The options with a private/community type of ownership scheme fared better than government run options. This conclusion also held true when ranking the options by the BRAC indicator, with the government fuelwood plantation ranked the lowest, and the private agroforestry option of eucalyptus and corn performing best. The mitigation options evaluated here show that the forest sector in Tanzania has one of the most cost-effective GHG mitigation opportunities in the world, and they are within the developmental aspirations of the country.

  20. Profiteering on the Iran-Iraq war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzoska, M.

    1987-06-01

    The military gear delivered from the US in the Iran-contra affair represents only a minor portion of arms sales to the combatants in the Iraq-Iran war. That war has now lasted more than six years and has deeply influenced the international arms market. Occurring during a period when other demand for arms has been relatively low, the war has nourished new suppliers and has revived both the legal and illegal private arms market. The erratic behavior of the USSR and the US, until recently by far the most important arms suppliers to the Third World, has pushed Iran and Iraq toward more commercially oriented sources, including many in the Third World. Both countries have had ample supplies of weapons during the war, and these weapons have served their purpose. Mainly because of its duration, the war already ranks third among post-World War II wars - after the Vietnam war and the Biafra war - in battlefield victims, with 300,000-500,000 casualties. The economic cost has risen to nearly $500 billion in weapons, destruction, and lost income. While it is hard to see anything but losers on the battlefield, the arms traffickers are profiting. Total Iranian arms imports since August 1980 have been higher than $10 billion, while Iraq has imported more than $30 billion worth. It is difficult to know whether making arms more difficult to obtain would have stopped the war, but judging from other recent wars, such as those between India and Pakistan, between Uganda and Tanzania, and in the Middle East, it seems likely that hostilities could have been stopped long ago. 12 references.

  1. Assessing human rights impacts in corporate development projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcito, Kendyl; University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel; NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202; NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 ; Utzinger, Jürg; University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel ; Weiss, Mitchell G.; Münch, Anna K.; Singer, Burton H.; Krieger, Gary R.; Wielga, Mark; NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202

    2013-09-15

    Human rights impact assessment (HRIA) is a process for systematically identifying, predicting and responding to the potential impact on human rights of a business operation, capital project, government policy or trade agreement. Traditionally, it has been conducted as a desktop exercise to predict the effects of trade agreements and government policies on individuals and communities. In line with a growing call for multinational corporations to ensure they do not violate human rights in their activities, HRIA is increasingly incorporated into the standard suite of corporate development project impact assessments. In this context, the policy world's non-structured, desk-based approaches to HRIA are insufficient. Although a number of corporations have commissioned and conducted HRIA, no broadly accepted and validated assessment tool is currently available. The lack of standardisation has complicated efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of HRIA as a risk mitigation tool, and has caused confusion in the corporate world regarding company duties. Hence, clarification is needed. The objectives of this paper are (i) to describe an HRIA methodology, (ii) to provide a rationale for its components and design, and (iii) to illustrate implementation of HRIA using the methodology in two selected corporate development projects—a uranium mine in Malawi and a tree farm in Tanzania. We found that as a prognostic tool, HRIA could examine potential positive and negative human rights impacts and provide effective recommendations for mitigation. However, longer-term monitoring revealed that recommendations were unevenly implemented, dependent on market conditions and personnel movements. This instability in the approach to human rights suggests a need for on-going monitoring and surveillance. -- Highlights: • We developed a novel methodology for corporate human rights impact assessment. • We piloted the methodology on two corporate projects—a mine and a plantation. • Human rights impact assessment exposed impacts not foreseen in ESIA. • Corporations adopted the majority of findings, but not necessarily immediately. • Methodological advancements are expected for monitoring processes.

  2. Incorporation of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po to Poultry through the Addition of Dicalcium Phosphate (DCP) to the Diet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casacuberta, N.; Masque, P.; Garcia-Orellana, J.; Gasa, J.; Anguita, M.

    2008-08-07

    Due to the replacement of calcium by uranium in the phosphorite, sedimentary phosphate rock contains high concentrations of {sup 238}U (i.e. from 1500 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} in Morocco to 4000 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} in Tanzania ores). Dicalcium Phosphate (DCP) is produced by the wet acid digestion of the phosphorite, and is used as a source of calcium and phosphorus for livestock feed supplement. If the phosphorite acid digestion is made with hydrochloric acid, DCP may present specific activities of about 10{sup 3} Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} of {sup 238}U and some of its decay chain daughters. In particular, due to its radiological implications, the presence of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in DCP is of special relevance. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential incorporation of these radionuclides to poultry through its diet. Three different diets were therefore prepared with different contents of both DCP and {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Diet A was used as a blank, and had a 2.5% in weight of monocalcium phosphate (MCP); diet B, with a 5% in weight of DCP; and diet C, with a 2.5% of DCP. Concentrations of {sup 210}Pb were 0.93, 101.4 and 51.2 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1}; whereas concentrations of {sup 210}Po were 0.92, 74 and 36 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} of food for diets A, B and C, respectively. Accumulation of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po was analysed at several times during poultry growth in samples of bone, liver, kidney, muscle, excrements as well as entire animals, with a total of 30 broilers fed with the 3 different diets. Results showed clear enhancements in the accumulation of both {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in chicken for diets B and C, and in particular in liver and bone. However, total accumulation of radionuclides in chicken, and especially in edible parts, is low compared to its expulsion through excrements. These results are interpreted in terms of the potential dose through consumption of chicken.

  3. Scapolite as a potential sensor of fluid composition in calc-silicates and granulites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moecher, D.P.; Essene, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Scapolite has been proposed as reservoir for CO/sub 2/ in the lower crust (Goldsmith 1976) and as a sensor of fluid composition in scapolite-bearing calc-silicates and granulites. The scapolite decarbonation reaction 2Meionite(Me)+Quartz(Qz)=5Anorthite(An)+Grossular(Gr)+2CO/sub 2/, obtained by addition of the reaction 3An+Cc=Me and An+2Cc+Qz=Gr+2CO/sub 2/, is a potential equilibrium applicable to a variety of lithologies and grades by which CO/sub 2/ activities could theoretically be calculated. Assuming partial ordering in natural scapolite, and S/sub 298//sup 0/ (Me)=728.6J/mol x K, the scapolite decarbonation reaction has a virtually flat slope in the range 700-1000/sup 0/C and 2.2+/-0.1kb with 2Me+Qz on the high P side of the reaction. Values of logK for the reaction were determined at elevated P, and aCO/sub 2/ calculated for scapolite-bearing calc-silicate assemblages (Sc+Pg+Gt+Q+Di+/-Cc) from Perry Sound (PS), Ontario and the Furua Complex (FC), Tanzania (Coolen 1980), for which X(Gr)approx. =0.8, X(An)approx. =0.6-0.8, and X(Me)greater than or equal to0.7. The a-X relations used were Perkins (1979) for garnet, Newton and Perkins (1982) for plagioclase, and Oterdoom and Gunter (1983) for scapolite. However application of the scapolite decarbonation reaction to garnet-bearing granulites with X(Gr)less than or equal to0.20 yields erroneous estimates of aCO/sub 2/(greater than or equal to1.0) suggesting incorrect assumptions used to determine S/sub 298//sup 0/ for stably ordered meionite or the a-X relations of Oterdoom and Gunter. Further refinement of the thermodynamic data base and evaluation of the degree and effect of order-disorder in natural scapolites must be performed in order to use scapolite to calculate fluid composition in high grade metamorphites.

  4. War, peace, and international politics. Fourth edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziegler, D.W. )

    1987-01-01

    We must conclude that war remains a major problem in the last quarter of the twentieth century. My intention in this book is to introduce you to international relations by focusing on this problem. War is not the only problem of international relations, and so this book does not exhaust the field. But war is a central problem, and the possibility of resort to war affects other aspects of international relations. Whatever else we may look at, we cannot avoid looking at war. In fact, in looking at war, we will touch on most of the other subjects important in international relations. War is conflict among states carried on by their armed forces. To distinguish war from border skirmishes and other minor incidents we usually say it must reach a certain magnitude (for example, at least 1,000 soldiers killed in battle over a year). It would be ideal if we could systematically study all the wars in the last hundred years, but such an exhaustive study would be out of place here. At the same time we cannot discuss such subjects as the cause of war or proposals for preventing it without some knowledge about actual wars. We must test theories against historical facts. What follows in Part I is a somewhat detailed history of seven wars (or groups of wars) fought in the last hundred years. These include the most destructive of the wars World War I (1914-1918), World War II (1939-1945), and the Korean War (1950-1953). By way of background to World War I, we will look at the wars of German unification (1864-1871), which preceded and in some ways prepared the way for it. To balance our account, we will also look at several recent wars India and Pakistan (1971), Uganda and Tanzania (1978-1979), and Cambodia, Vietnam, and China (1978-1980). After looking at some of the major wars of the last hundred years, we will look at what people have the about the causes of war in general.

  5. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program : implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security plans, etc. This standardized approach is applied to specific country and regional needs. Recent examples (FY 2003-2004) include foreign missions to Lithuania, Russian Federation Navy, Russia - PNPI, Greece (joint mission with IAEA), Tanzania, Iraq, Chile, Ecuador, and Egypt. Some of the ambitions and results of the RTR program may be characterized by the successes in Lithuania, Greece, and Russia.

  6. Product Quality Assurance for Off-Grid Lighting in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    World Bank; Mills, Evan; Mills, Evan

    2008-07-13

    Although the emergence of markets for high efficiency off-grid lighting technologies holds promise, realizing the potential of this opportunity on a long-term, sustainable basis requires careful attention to issues of product quality, consumer protection, and the potential for significant 'market spoiling', in anticipation of increases of sales of low cost, low performance off-grid lighting products. The goal of the Lighting Africa quality assurance workshop was to articulate strategies to mitigate the dangers of market spoiling and to explore ways to protect consumers from misleading advertising for sales of inferior, off-grid lighting products in the context of Lighting Africa's overarching objective to support the industry in developing a robust off-grid lighting market in Africa. The workshop resulted in the identification of two strategic approaches for meeting Lighting Africa quality assurance programmatic needs. The first strategy is intended to meet a short-term programmatic need for quality associated with requests for lighting products by bulk procurement agents, such as in a World Bank-financed project. The development of procurement specifications and test procedures that could be used in a quality/usability screening method in order to provide guidance for forthcoming large volume purchases emerged as the best solution to meet this need. Such approaches are used in World Bank-financed solar home systems (SHSs) projects in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and China, among others. However, unlike the SHSs which have multiple balance-of-system (BOS) components warranting the need for an array of specifications for individual components, stand alone lighting systems require specifications that are amenable to individual light points. To test this approach, Lighting Africa elected to use the technical specifications issued by the Photovoltaic Global Approval Program for solar lanterns that use CFL bulbs (PVRS11A) as the basis of qualifying such products. A contract has been competitively awarded to the Global Approval Program for Photovoltaics (PV GAP) under the Lighting Africa Program to select and test ten solar lantern product models. Lantern selection will be determined based on a number of criteria, among them, the ability to provide a daily duty cycle of at least 3 hours of light, the number of days of autonomy of battery, the volume of sales (especially in Africa), and whether or not the manufacturing facility is ISO 9000 certified. Those that are confirmed as meeting the specifications may be eligible to receive a PVGAP quality seal. The work is being carried out in partnership with the Photovoltaic and Wind Quality Test Center in Beijing, China and TUV Rhineland in Koeln, Germany. As off-grid LED-based stand-alone lighting products is in a nascent stage of development compared to CFL-based lanterns, Lighting Africa will support the development of a 'Quality Screening' approach to selecting LED lighting, in order not to delay consumers benefiting from such advances. The screening methodology could be used by procurement agencies to qualify LED lighting products for bulk or programmatic procurements. The main elements of this work comprises of developing a procurement specification and test procedure for undertaking a 'quick' quality/usability screening to be used for procuring LED lights and to test up to 30 LED-based lights to screen products that meet the requirement. The second strategy is intended to meet a longer-term need associated with creating a self-sustaining product quality assurance program that will effectively protect the African consumer, prevent significant market spoiling, adapt with expected technological advancements over the long-term--in other words, give consumers the ability to detect quality products and the information needed to find products that meet their specific needs from among the myriad of lighting products that become available commercially. Workshop discussions and the discussions evolving from the workshop led the Lighting Africa team to opt for an approach similar to that of th

  7. Towards SEA for the developing nations of Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briffett, Clive; Obbard, Jeffrey Philip; Mackee, Jamie

    2003-03-01

    In the developing and transitional countries of Asia, environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been widely practiced as a planning tool that identifies the potential impacts associated with developments and determines their level of significance and the need for mitigating measures. Not withstanding its extensive use in many Asian countries, certain limitations are now being increasingly recognised with regard to achieving sustainable development within the planning process. It is also noted that the natural environment in Asia has continued to be severely degraded despite the adoption of EIA. This research project was undertaken at the National University of Singapore to review the status on the implementation of EIA procedures and to investigate the status and potential of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in Asia. The research project generally investigated the existing physical attributes of six countries including Hong Kong and Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Vietnam and discussed their prevailing environmental conditions. It more specifically reviewed policymaking and environmental planning, environmental legislation and the practice and procedures of environmental impact assessment. It also evaluated environmental assessment education and training activities. In some cases such as Hong Kong, an opportunity to analyse actual SEA practice was included. In other cases, the potential for possible take up of formal SEA was assessed. A comparative review assesses the degree to which EIA and SEA procedures have been utilized, considers how the use of SEA could overcome the deficiencies of the EIA project-based system and includes aspects of meeting sustainability criteria. Results show that the use and application of EIA is relatively strong across all countries with the possible exception of Singapore which relies more heavily on its planning and control system to address potential environmental impacts arising from development projects. Despite this, EIAs have been undertaken in every country due to aid and bank lending agencies requiring them and multinational companies and many local NGOs completing voluntary EIAs. Even though the mandatory introduction of EIA into some countries is fairly recent such as Hong Kong (1999) and Vietnam (1994), efforts to conduct such investigations may have started many years before. The country reviews highlight many common problems and adverse influences that give rise to inadequate EIA practice, and in some cases, recommendations for improvement are proposed. The potential for SEA is assessed on the basis of its present usage which is generally small except for Hong Kong and the environmental strategic decision-making that is being conducted in policy, plan and programme formulations. While the more comprehensive and well-refined westernized model of SEA is generally weakly implemented at present, there is evidence to suggest that Agenda 21, along with other international treaties such as the Biodiversity Charter and the Ramsar Convention, has motivated certain sustainability initiatives that are resulting in increased environmental considerations at a strategic level. In some cases, these may be reflected in National Plan policymaking or in the sector and area-based activities of various ministries and departments. It is concluded that SEA potential is generally strong in those countries with smaller centralized bureaucracies but that its successful implementation will be highly dependent on changing the mind-sets and motivations of top personnel at ministerial level.

  8. WE-A-16A-01: International Medical Physics Symposium: Increasing Access to Medical Physics Education/Training and Research Excellence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortfeld, T; Ngoma, T; Odedina, F; Morgan, S; Wu, R; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2014-06-15

    In response to a world in which cancer is a growing global health challenge, there is now a greater need for US Medical Physicists and other Radiation Oncology professionals across institutions to work together and be more globally engaged in the fight against cancer. There are currently many opportunities for Medical Physicists to contribute to alleviating this pressing need, especially in helping enhance access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence across international boundaries, particularly for low and middle-income countries (LMIC), which suffer from a drastic shortage of accessible knowledge and quality training programs in radiotherapy. Many Medical Physicists are not aware of the range of opportunities that even with small effort could have a high impact. Faculty at the two CAMPEP-accredited Medical Physics Programs in New England: the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Harvard Medical School have developed a growing alliance to increase Access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence (AMPERE), and facilitate greater active involvement of U.S. Medical Physicists in helping the global fight against cancer and cancer disparities. In this symposium, AMPERE Alliance members and partners from Europe and Africa will present and discuss the growing global cancer challenge, the dearth of knowledge, research, and other barriers to providing life-saving radiotherapy in LMIC, mechanisms for meeting these challenges, the different opportunities for participation by Medical Physicists, including students and residents, and how participation can be facilitated to increase AMPERE for global health. Learning Objectives: To learn about the growing global cancer challenge, areas of greatest need and limitations to accessing knowledge and quality radiotherapy training programs, especially in LMIC; To learn about the range of opportunities for Medical Physicists, including students and residents, to work together in global health to help increase AMPERE and alleviate the growing global burden of cancer; To present and discuss a new model for harmonizing Medical Physics Training across countries and how this model (UMass and Heidelberg) could be extended to LMIC in collaboration with the IAEA; To highlight a new platform and program for facilitating contributions by Medical Physicists to increase AMPERE towards the elimination of global cancer disparities. Challenges in Cancer Control in Africa Twalib A. Ngoma, MD, Professor, Executive Director, Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania Cancer care in Africa is beset by lack of attention, political will, cancer registries, cancer plans, human resources, financial resources and treatment facilities.. As a result of this, cancer patients in Africa are far more likely to die of their disease than those in developed countries. According to data from the WHO 750,000 new cancer cases occur in Africa every year and this number is predicted to rise by 70% by 2020. To make matters worse, an estimated 75% of cancer patients in Africa have advanced or incurable cancers at diagnosis making palliative care the most realistic approach to their management. Furthermore, Cancer prevention is nearly nonexistent, cancer detection is rare and treatment usually comes too late and is inefficient. The overall mortality-to-incidence ratio for men with cancer in the Africa is 0.75 compared with 0.54 in the developed world while the ratios for women in Africa, is 0.65 compared with 0.45 for women in the developed world. There is also limited access to radiotherapy. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), whilst developed countries usually have one radiotherapy machine per 250,000 people, most African nations have only one machine per ten million people. The above numbers are alarming and speak for themselves. The only solution to improve this alarming situation is to address the major challenges which African countries face in provision of cancer services which include but not limited to lack of cancer registries, lack of funding