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1

Powering Microturbines With Landfill Gas, October 2002 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7.4 Landfill Methane Utilization CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants:...

2

Gas-driven microturbine  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an invention which relates to microtechnology and the fabrication process for developing microelectrical systems. It describes a means for fabricating a gas-driven microturbine capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power devices by direct linkage or turbo-electric generators components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers.

Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.; McWhorter, P.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Miller, W.M.

1996-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Microturbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Microturbines are small combustion turbines, approximately the size of a refrigerator, with outputs of 25-500 kilowatt (kW). They evolved from automotive and truck turbochargers, auxiliary power units for airplanes, and small jet engines and are composed of a compressor, a combustor, a turbine, an alternator, a recuperator, and a generator. Microturbines offer a number of potential advantages over other technologies for small-scale power generation. These include their small number of moving parts, compact size, light weight, greater efficiency, lower emissions, lower electricity costs, and ability to use waste fuels. They can be located on sites with space limitations for the production of power, and waste heat recovery can be used to achieve efficiencies of more than 80%. Turbines are classified by the physical arrangement of their component parts: single-shaft or two-shaft, simple-cycle or recuperated, inter-cooled, and reheat. The machines generally rotate more than 40,000 rotations per minute (rpm). Bearing selection, whether the manufacturer uses oil or air, is dependent on use. Single-shaft is the more common design because it is simpler and less expensive to build. Conversely, the split shaft is necessary for machine drive applications because it does not require an inverter to change the frequency of the AC power.

4

List of Microturbines Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microturbines Incentives Microturbines Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 66 Microturbines Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 66) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Personal Property Tax Exemption (Michigan) Property Tax Incentive Michigan Commercial Industrial Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Microturbines Photovoltaics Renewable Fuels Solar Pool Heating

5

Landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas recovery ... However, by referring to landfills as dumps, the article creates a misimpression. ... The answers revolve around the relative emissions from composting facilities and landfills and the degree to which either finished compost or landfill gas is used beneficially. ...

Morton A. Barlaz

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

6

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector.

7

Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

8

Enhancing landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfilling of municipal solid waste (MSW) may cause potential environmental impacts like global warming (GW), soil contaminations, and groundwater pollution. The degradation of MSW in anaerobic circumstances generates methane emissions, and can hence contribute the GW. As the GW is nowadays considered as one of the most serious environmental threats, the mitigation of methane emissions should obviously be aimed at on every landfill site where methane generation occurs. In this study, the treatment and utilization options for the generated LFG at case landfills which are located next to each other are examined. The yearly GHG emission balances are estimated for three different gas management scenarios. The first scenario is the combined heat and power (CHP) production with a gas engine. The second scenario is the combination of heat generation for the asphalt production process in the summer and district heat production by a water boiler in the winter. The third scenario is the LFG upgrading to biomethane. The estimation results illustrate that the LFG collection efficiency affects strongly on the magnitudes of GHG emissions. According to the results, the CHP production gives the highest GHG emission savings and is hence recommended as a gas utilization option for case landfills. Furthermore, aspects related to the case landfills' extraction are discussed.

Antti Niskanen; Hanna Värri; Jouni Havukainen; Ville Uusitalo; Mika Horttanainen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATIONengine that runs on landfill gas. The project team led bynatural gas and simulated landfill gas as a fuel source.

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATIONengine that runs on landfill gas. The project team led bygas and simulated landfill gas as a fuel source. This

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Landfill Gas Generation and Transport In Bioreactor Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activation gas and water flow each other in Bioreactor Landfill. Based on the porous media seepage and ... of water and waste components decomposition for describing landfill gas flow have been developed, and...

Qi-Lin Feng; Lei Liu; Qiang Xue; Ying Zhao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Monitoring of Gin Drinkers' Bay landfill, Hong Kong: I. Landfill gas on top of the landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study centered on the composition of landfill gas and its effects on soil and ... at the Gin Drinkers' Bay (GDB) landfill in Hong Kong This first part of ... the study was a whole-year monitoring of landfill

M. H. Wong; C. T. Yu

13

LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRELIMINARY MODELING RESULTS O.BOUR*, E,UniversitéLaval, Sainte-Foy, Canada SUMMARY: Lateral landfill gas migration occurs in the surroundings of a MSW landfill complementary physical measures were used to build a conceptual model of lateral landfill gas migration

Boyer, Edmond

14

Gas-driven microturbine [Continuation-in-part of application Serial No. 08/773,148  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a means of fabricating a gas-driven microturbine that is capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power mechanical, electrical, or electromechanical devices by direct mechanical linkage of turbo-electric generator components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers. By optimally selecting monopropellants or bipropellants to be the fuel set, a more efficient gas-driven microturbine can be realized from the increased mass flow rate of the gas stream due to the higher combustion reaction energies of these fuel sets. Additionally, compressed gas can be utilized to provide a high-flow gas stream for the gas-driven microturbine. The present invention is adaptable to many defense and non-defense applications, including the provision of mechanical power for miniature devices such as fans, geared mechanisms, mechanical linkages, actuators, bio-medical procedures, manufacturing, industrial, aviation, computers, safety systems, and electrical generators.

Sniegowski, Jeffrey J.; Rodgers, Murray S.; McWhorter, Paul J.; Aeschliman, Daniel P.; Miller, William M.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

15

Landfill Gas Sequestration in Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26505-0880 304-285-4132 Heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov David newell Principal Investigator Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Avenue Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-2183 dnewall@kgs.uk.edu LandfiLL Gas sequestration in Kansas Background Municipal solid waste landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, accounting for about 34 percent of these emissions in 2004. Most methane (CH 4 ) generated in landfills and open dumps by anaerobic decomposition of the organic material in solid-waste-disposal landfills is either vented to the atmosphere or converted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by flaring. The gas consists of about 50 percent methane (CH 4 ), the primary component of natural gas, about 50 percent carbon dioxide (CO

16

RCWMD Badlands Landfill Gas Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RCWMD Badlands Landfill Gas Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name RCWMD Badlands Landfill Gas Project Biomass Facility Facility RCWMD Badlands Landfill Gas...

17

Penrose Landfill Gas Conversion LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penrose Landfill Gas Conversion LLC Place: Los Angeles, California Product: Owner of landfill gas plant. References: Penrose Landfill Gas Conversion LLC1 This article is a stub....

18

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Facility Winnebago County Landfill Gas Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Winnebago County, Wisconsin Coordinates...

19

Landfill Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) publishes annual renewable energy generation and capacity by region (9 regions in England, plus Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). Data available 2003 to 2009. Data is included in the DECC Energy Trends: September 2010 Report (available: http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/trends/558-tr...) Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released September 30th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Energy Generation Hydro Landfill Gas Other Biofuels Renewable Energy Consumption Sewage Gas wind Data application/zip icon 2 Excel files, 1 for generation, 1 for capacity (zip, 24.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

20

Occupational Safety at Landfill Sites - Hazards and Pollution Due to Landfill Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas is formed on a large scale ... of methane gas which escapes every year from landfill sites in the Federal Republic of Germany ... about 2.5 million standard cubic metres. Landfill gas (LFG) with its ...

Volkmar Wilhelm

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Lessons from Loscoe: the uncontrolled migration of landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the uncontrolled migration of landfill gas G. M. Williams 1 N. Aitkenhead...Environment, 1989. The Control of Landfill Gas. HMSO, London. Doelle, H...1988. Trace constituents in landfill gas. Gas Research Institute. Frost...

G. M. Williams; N. Aitkenhead

22

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Nitric Oxide/Nitrogen Dioxide Neal Road LandfillThe methane, nitrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations ofmethane, 30% nitrogen and 30% carbon dioxide. The recorded

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Influence assessment of landfill gas pumping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Changes in CH4 gas concentrations arising in a landfill as a consequence of a number of gas extraction pumping rates, are characterized. The field-monitored results indicate a fairly free flow of gas through the ...

Edward A. McBean; Anthony J. Crutcher; Frank A. Rovers

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 121:569-operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATION

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

26

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Below is the text...

27

Development of Biochar-Amended Landfill Cover for Landfill Gas Mitigation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Development of Biochar-Amended Landfill Cover for Landfill Gas Mitigation Poupak Yaghoubi Department of Civil Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago Chicago, Illinois (2011) Dissertation Chairperson:… (more)

Yaghoubi, Poupak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Forecast and Control Methods of Landfill Emission Gas to Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main component of landfill gas is CH4, its release is a potential hazard to the environment. To understand the gas law and landfill gas production are the prerequisite for effective control of landfill gas. This paper selects three kinds of typical ... Keywords: Landfill gas, German model, IPCC model, Marticorena dynamic model

Wang Qi; Yang Meihua; Wang Jie

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Two Large Landfill Projects BroadRock Renewables, LLC built two high efficiency electricity generating facilities that utilize landfill gas in California and Rhode Island. The...

30

Landfill Gas: From Rubbish to Resource  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The prospects of using landfill gas (LFG) as a high-grade fuel...Kyoto Protocols, and energy prices, are discussed. Adsorption cycles suggested in the late 1980s by Sircar and co-workers for treating LFG are revi...

Kent S. Knaebel; Herbert E. Reinhold

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Landfill Gas Formation, Recovery and Emission in The Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfills are one of the main sources of methane in The Netherlands. Methane emissions from landfills are estimated to be about 180–580 ... at a total of 760–1730 ktonnes. Landfill gas recovery and utilization is...

Hans Oonk

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel TRANSPORTATION ENERGY alternative fuel, and purified landfill gas could provide a renewable domestic source of it. Landfills from landfills and use it in natural gas applications such as fueling motor vehicles. Project

33

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill ... The most common disposal method in the United States for municipal solid waste (MSW) is burial in landfills. ... Under the New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for MSW landfills, MSW operators are required to determine the nonmethane organic gas generation rate of their landfill through modeling and/or measurements. ...

Bart Eklund; Eric P. Anderson; Barry L. Walker; Don B. Burrows

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

34

ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Powering Microturbines With...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

be operated using LFG or other waste fuels, such as oilfield flare gas and wastewater treatment plant Several LFG microturbine projects have come on line recently, demonstrating...

35

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MICROTURBINE PROJECT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICROTURBINE PROJECT MICROTURBINE PROJECT Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC March 31, 1998 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MICROTURBINE PROJECT Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 31, 1998 JO 850200 : FC 980009 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a demonstration of gas-fired, integrated microturbine systems at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), in partnership with Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC (Stacy & Stacy). The project encompassed the testing of two gas microturbine systems at two oil-production wellsites. The microturbine-generators were fueled directly by casinghead gas to power their beam-pumping-unit motors. The system at well 47-A-34 utilized the casinghead sweet gas (0-ppm

36

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:27am Addthis Photo of a bulldozer on top of a large trash mound in a landfill with a cloudy sky in the backdrop. Methane and other gases produced from landfill decomposition can be leveraged for energy. This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector. Overview Landfill gases are a viable energy resource created during waste decomposition. Landfills are present in most communities. These resources can be tapped to generate heat and electricity. As organic waste decomposes, bio-gas is produced made up of roughly half methane, half carbon dioxide, and small amounts of non-methane organic

37

Microturbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Add description List of Microturbines Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMicroturbines&oldid267177" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

38

Using landfill gas for energy: Projects that pay  

SciTech Connect

Pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations will require 500 to 700 landfills to control gas emissions resulting from decomposing garbage. Conversion of landfill gas to energy not only meets regulations, but also creates energy and revenue for local governments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Modeling and simulation of landfill gas production from pretreated MSW landfill simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cumulative landfill gas (LFG) production and its rate ... simulated for pretreated municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill using four models namely first order exponential ... . Considering the behavior of the p...

Rasool Bux Mahar; Abdul Razaque Sahito…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DETERMINATION OF GUIDANCE VALUES FOR CLOSED LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF GUIDANCE VALUES FOR CLOSED LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS O. BOUR*, S. BERGER**, C Gambetta, 74 000 Annecy SUMMARY: In order to promote active landfill gas collection and treatment or natural attenuation, it is necessary to identify trigger values concerning landfill gas emissions

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect

A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C{sub 1}C{sub 4} hydrocarbons; the C{sub 5}-C{sub 10} normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect

A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C[sub 1]C[sub 4] hydrocarbons; the C[sub 5]-C[sub 10] normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

landfill, landfill(ed) site, refuse dump, garbage dump ... depository, trash disposal site (US); sanitary landfill [Landfills may often release a toxic soup of...] ? Abfalldeponie f [Zur Endlagerung ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Franklin County Sanitary Landfill - Landfill Gas (LFG) to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) - Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY LANDFILL - LANDFILL GAS (LFG) TO LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS (LNG) - PROJECT January/February 2005 Prepared for: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Table of Contents Page BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................1 SUMMARY OF EFFORT PERFORMED ......................................................................................2 Task 2B.1 - Literature Search and Contacts Made...................................................................2 Task 2B.2 - LFG Resource/Resource Collection System - Project Phase One.......................3 Conclusion.................................................................................................................................5

45

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Natural Gas Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on AddThis.com... April 13, 2013

46

Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)  

SciTech Connect

Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

Pantelis K. Panteli

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

Is converting landfill gas to energy the best option?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Is converting landfill gas to energy the best option? ... But when it comes to new discards, critics say that the hype over landfill-gas-to-energy(LFGTE) projects may have perverse outcomes, such as discouraging the diversion of organic waste from landfills and actually increasing the amount of methane being released. ... In the notice, EDF suggests that EPA tighten current controls, which require the capture and flaring of landfill gas at sites with more than 2.5 million metric tons of waste, by bringing regulation to smaller landfills and defining LFGTE projects as the best demonstrated technology (BDT). ...

Janet Pelley

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

48

Characteristics of vegetation and its relationship with landfill gas in closed landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An investigation was carried out to elucidate landfill gas (LFG) and the vegetation characteristics in closed landfill. The results indicate that the stabilization process of the landfill is an important factor influencing the components of landfill gases. The coverage, height and species of vegetation increase with the closed time of landfill. Fourteen species were observed in the investigated cells, dominated by Phragmites australis, an invasive perennial plant. The concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide from vegetated cover soil were lower than those from non-vegetated cover soil.

Chai Xiaoli; Zhao Xin; Lou Ziyang; Takayuki Shimaoka; Hirofumi Nakayama; Cao Xianyan; Zhao Youcai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Landfill gas emission prediction using Voronoi diagrams and importance sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are among the nation's largest emitters of methane, a key greenhouse gas, and there is considerable interest in quantifying the surficial methane emissions from landfills. There are limitations in obtaining accurate ... Keywords: Air dispersion modeling, Delaunay tessellation, Kriging, Least squares, MSW landfill, Voronoi diagram

K. R. Mackie; C. D. Cooper

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual landfill gas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas emissions and potential aqueous... Transfer Stations (MTS); Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Landfill Gas (LFG): Geographic Wormation Systems (GIS... . Landfills generate gas...

51

Slippage solution of gas pressure distribution in process of landfill gas seepage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model of landfill gas migration was established under presumption of the ... a large impact on gas pressure distribution. Landfill gas pressure and pressure gradient considering slippage effect...

Qiang Xue; Xia-ting Feng; Bing Liang

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Migration of landfill gas and its control by grouting—a case history  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Article Migration of landfill gas and its control by grouting-a...London. Parker, A. 1981. Landfill gas problems-case histories. Proceedings of Landfill Gas Symposium, UK AERE Harwell. Rees...

J. G. Raybould; D. J. Anderson

53

Analysis of Changes in Landfill Gas Output and the Economic Potential for Development of a Landfill Gas Control Prototype.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The relationship between changes in local atmospheric conditions and the performance of the landfill gas collection system installed at the Rockingham County (NC) municipal solid… (more)

Harrill, David Justin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Capture and Utilisation of Landfill Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about 955 landfills that recovered biogas. The largest number of such landfills were in the USA landfills in Denmark that in total captured 5,800Nm3 of biogas per hour, equivalent to 276.4MW of contained #12;Biomass US DATA ON GENERATION OF BIOGAS AT LANDFILLS Eileen Berenyi, a Research Associate of EEC

Columbia University

55

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, - Landfill Gas Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: cdm.unfccc.int/public_inputs/meth/acm0001/index.html Cost: Free Language: English References: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References

57

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Bergen County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.9262762°, -74.07701° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9262762,"lon":-74.07701,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Facility Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.7924343°, -72.8042797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7924343,"lon":-72.8042797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

Bioenergy recovery from landfill gas: A case study in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) utilization which means a synergy...3/h and the methane concentration was above 90%. The process and optimization of the pilot-scale test were also reported in the paper. The product gas was of...

Wei Wang; Yuxiang Luo; Zhou Deng

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The influence of air inflow on CH4 composition ratio in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When landfill gas is collected, air inflow into the landfill...4 productivity. The decline of CH4 content in landfill gas (LFG) negatively affects energy projects. We...2 was an effective indicator of air inflow ...

Seung-Kyu Chun

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Emissions of Major Aromatic Voc as Landfill Gas from Urban Landfill Sites in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, concentrations of major aromatic VOCs were determined from landfill gas (LFG) at a total of five...?1 (WJ in wintertime). The LFG flux values of aromatic VOC, when compared to the contribution of n...

Ki-Hyun Kim; Sung Ok Baek; Ye-Jin Choi…

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Microturbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microturbines Microturbines Microturbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Illustration showing the operation of a recuperated microturbine. Microturbines are small combustion turbines, approximately the size of a refrigerator, with outputs of 25-500 kilowatt (kW). They evolved from automotive and truck turbochargers, auxiliary power units for airplanes, and small jet engines and are composed of a compressor, a combustor, a turbine, an alternator, a recuperator, and a generator. Microturbines offer a number of potential advantages over other technologies for small-scale power generation. These include their small number of moving parts, compact size, light weight, greater efficiency, lower emissions, lower electricity costs, and ability to use waste fuels. They can be located on sites with space limitations for the production of

66

Microturbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microturbines Microturbines Microturbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Illustration showing the operation of a recuperated microturbine. Microturbines are small combustion turbines, approximately the size of a refrigerator, with outputs of 25-500 kilowatt (kW). They evolved from automotive and truck turbochargers, auxiliary power units for airplanes, and small jet engines and are composed of a compressor, a combustor, a turbine, an alternator, a recuperator, and a generator. Microturbines offer a number of potential advantages over other technologies for small-scale power generation. These include their small number of moving parts, compact size, light weight, greater efficiency, lower emissions, lower electricity costs, and ability to use waste fuels. They can be located on sites with space limitations for the production of

67

Landfill gas with hydrogen addition – A fuel for SI engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent quest to replace fossil fuels with renewable and sustainable energy sources has increased interest on utilization of landfill and bio gases. It is further augmented due to environment concerns and global warming caused by burning of conventional fossil fuels, energy security concerns and high cost of crude oil, and renewable nature of these gases. The main portion of landfill gas or biogas is comprised of methane and carbon dioxide with some other gases in small proportions. Methane if released directly to the atmosphere causes about 21 times global warming effects than carbon dioxide. Thus landfill gas is generally flared, where the energy recovery is not in place in practice. Using landfill gas to generate energy not only encourages more efficient collection reducing emissions into the atmosphere but also generates revenues for operators and local governments. However, use of landfill gases for energy production is not always perceived as an attractive option because of some disadvantages. Thus it becomes necessary to address these disadvantages involved by studying landfill gases in a technological perspective and motivate utilization of landfill gas for future energy needs. This paper discussed landfill gas as a fuel for a spark ignition engine to produce power in an effective way. It has been shown that though the performance and combustion characteristics of the landfill gas fueled engine deteriorated in comparison with methane operation, increasing compression ratio and advancing spark timing improved the performance of the landfill gas operation in par with methane operation. The effects due to composition changes in the landfill gas were found more pronounced at lean and rich mixture operation than at stoichiometry. In addition, the effects of additions of hydrogen up to 30% in the landfill gas were studied. Addition of even small quantities of hydrogen such as 3–5% delivered better performance improvement particularly at the lean and rich limit operations and extended the operational limits. Additions of hydrogen also improved the combustion characteristics and reduced cyclic variations of landfill gas operations especially at the lean and rich mixtures.

S.O. Bade Shrestha; G. Narayanan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

LANDFILL-GAS-TO-ENERGY PROJECTS: AN ANALYSIS OF NET PRIVATE AND SOCIAL BENEFITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Table A1: Model Results for West Lake Landfill WEST LAKE IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Landfill WEST COUNTY IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Average Landfill Gas Generation (mmcf/yr) 1,075 1,735 $1,250 Table A3: Model Results for Modern Landfill MODERN IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Average

Jaramillo, Paulina

69

Estimation of Landfill Gas Generation Rate and Gas Permeability Field of Refuse Using Inverse Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill methane must be captured to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases; moreover it can be used as an alternative energy source. However, despite the widespread use of landfill gas (LFG) collection systems for...

Yoojin Jung; Paul Imhoff; Stefan Finsterle

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: behaviour and performance in a temperate climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Microbial oxidation of methane has attracted interest as an alternative process for treating landfill gas emissions. Approaches have included enhanced landfill cover layers and biocovers,… (more)

Dever, Stuart Anthony

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Removal of Hydrogen Sulfide from Landfill Gas Using a Solar Regenerable Adsorbent.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Landfill gas is a complex mix of gases, containing methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and hydrogen sulfide, created by the action of microorganisms within the landfill.… (more)

Kalapala, Sreevani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Effects of landfill gas on subtropical woody plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An account is given of the influence of landfill gas on tree growth in the field at...Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, Aporusa chinensis, Bombax malabaricum, Castanopsis fissa, Liquidambar formosana, Litsea gluti...

G. Y. S. Chan; M. H. Wong; B. A. Whitton

73

July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This webinar, held July 17, 2012, provided information on the challenges and benefits of developing successful community landfill gas-to-energy projects in Will County, Illinois, and Escambia...

74

Feasibility study: utilization of landfill gas for a vehicle fuel system, Rossman's landfill, Clackamas County, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, a landfill operator in Oregon became interested in the technical and economic feasibility of recovering the methane generated in the landfill for the refueling of vehicles. DOE awarded a grant for a site-specific feasibility study of this concept. This study investigated the expected methane yield and the development of a conceptual gas-gathering system; gas processing, compressing, and storage systems; and methane-fueled vehicle systems. Cost estimates were made for each area of study. The results of the study are presented. Reasoning that gasoline prices will continue to rise and that approximately 18,000 vehicles in the US have been converted to operate on methane, a project is proposed to use this landfill as a demonstration site to produce and process methane and to fuel a fleet (50 to 400) vehicles with the gas produced in order to obtain performance and economic data on the systems used from gas collection through vehicle operation. (LCL)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Numerical Simulation of the Radius of Influence for Landfill Gas Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the Radius of Influence for Landfill Gas Wells Harold Vigneault a * * Corresponding...used to quantify the efficiency of landfill gas recovery wells for unlined landfills...Results will help with the design of landfill gas recovery systems. In North America...

Harold Vigneault; René Lefebvre; Miroslav Nastev

76

Evaluating fugacity models for trace components in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fugacity approach was evaluated to reconcile loadings of vinyl chloride (chloroethene), benzene, 1,3-butadiene and trichloroethylene in waste with concentrations observed in landfill gas monitoring studies. An evaluative environment derived from fictitious but realistic properties such as volume, composition, and temperature, constructed with data from the Brogborough landfill (UK) test cells was used to test a fugacity approach to generating the source term for use in landfill gas risk assessment models (e.g. GasSim). SOILVE, a dynamic Level II model adapted here for landfills, showed greatest utility for benzene and 1,3-butadiene, modelled under anaerobic conditions over a 10 year simulation. Modelled concentrations of these components (95?300 ?g m?3; 43 ?g m?3) fell within measured ranges observed in gas from landfills (24?300–180?000 ?g m?3; 20–70 ?g m?3). This study highlights the need (i) for representative and time-referenced biotransformation data; (ii) to evaluate the partitioning characteristics of organic matter within waste systems and (iii) for a better understanding of the role that gas extraction rate (flux) plays in producing trace component concentrations in landfill gas.

Sophie Shafi; Andrew Sweetman; Rupert L. Hough; Richard Smith; Alan Rosevear; Simon J.T. Pollard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils with and without landfill gas recovery systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Aerobic CH4 oxidation plays an important role in mitigating CH4 release from landfills to the atmosphere. Therefore, in this study, oxidation activity and community of methanotrophs were investigated in a subtropical landfill. Among the three sites investigated, the highest CH4 concentration was detected in the landfill cover soil of the site (A) without a landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, although the refuse in the site had been deposited for a longer time (?14–15 years) compared to the other two sites (?6–11 years) where a LFG recovery system was applied. In April and September, the higher CH4 flux was detected in site A with 72.4 and 51.7 g m?2 d?1, respectively, compared to the other sites. The abundance of methanotrophs assessed by quantification of pmoA varied with location and season. A linear relationship was observed between the abundance of methanotrophs and CH4 concentrations in the landfill cover soils (R = 0.827, P < 0.001). The key factors influencing the methanotrophic diversity in the landfill cover soils were pH, the water content and the CH4 concentration in the soil, of which pH was the most important factor. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylococcus, Methylosarcina, Methylomicrobium and Methylobacter, and type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis) were all detected in the landfill cover soils, with Methylocystis and Methylosarcina being the dominant genera. Methylocystis was abundant in the slightly acidic landfill cover soil, especially in September, and represented more than 89% of the total terminal-restriction fragment abundance. These findings indicated that the LFG recovery system, as well as physical and chemical parameters, affected the diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils.

Yao Su; Xuan Zhang; Fang-Fang Xia; Qi-Qi Zhang; Jiao-Yan Kong; Jing Wang; Ruo He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Meteorological parameters as an important factor on the energy recovery of landfill gas in landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of meteorological factors on the composition and the energy recovery of the landfill gas (LFG) were evaluated in this study. Landfill gas data consisting of methane carbon dioxide and oxygen content as well as LFG temperature were collected from April 2009 to March 2010 along with meteorological data. The data set were first used to visualize the similarity by using self-organizing maps and to calculate correlation factors. Then the data was used with ANN to further analyze the impacts of meteorological factors. In both analysis it is seen that the most important meteorological parameter effective on LFG energy content is soil temperatures. Furthermore ANN was found to be successful in explaining variations of methane content and temperature of LFG with correlation coefficients of 0.706 and 0.984 respectively. ANN was proved itself to be a useful tool for estimating energy recovery of the landfill gas.

?brahim Uyanik; Bestamin Özkaya; Selami Demir; Mehmet Çakmakci

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Toxic oxide deposits from the combustion of landfill gas and biogas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxide deposits found in combustion systems of landfill gas fired power stations contain relatively high concentrations ... They are selectively transported as part of the landfill gas into the gas-burning devices...

Dietmar Glindemann; Peter Morgenstern…

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Removal and determination of trimethylsilanol from the landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The removal and determination of trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) in landfill gas has been studied before and after the special E3000-ITC System. The system works according to principle of temperature swing. The performance of TMSOH and humidity removal was 20% and more than 90%, respectively. The six of active carbons and impinger method were tested on the full-scale landfill in Poland for TMSOH and siloxanes determination. The extraction method and absorption in acetone were used. The concentration of TMSOH and siloxanes were found in range from 23.6 to 29.2 mg/m3 and from 18.0 to 38.9 mg/m3, respectively. The content of TMSOH in biogas originating from landfill was 41% out of all siloxanes. Moreover, the used system is alternative to other existing technique of landfill gas purification.

Grzegorz Piechota; Manfred Hagmann; Roman Buczkowski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The landfill gas activity of the IEA bioenergy agreement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable source of useful energy. Its world wide annual energy potential is in the range of a few hundred TWh. Today it is only marginally exploited. LFG is also an important contributor to the atmospheres CH4-content, it can be estimated to contribute about 25% of the methane coming from anthropogenic sources. In comparison to many other sources of methane emissions such as peat bogs, rice paddies, termites and sheep, landfills can be considered to be point sources, i.e. they are stationary and of limited extension. For this reason landfill gas (LFG) utilisation is one of the most cost effective ways to combat the greenhouse effect. The aim of the IEA activity on LFG is to promote information exchange and co-operation between national programmes in order to promote the proliferation of landfill gas utilisation. During the period 1992–1994 the LFG activity has had six participating countries: Canada, Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Sweden, UK and USA. In the past three-year period, the activity has been mainly directed towards establishing networks and obtaining an over-view of data related to LFG in the member countries. Numerous contacts have been established and perhaps of most importance for the future of the activity are the links towards organisations involved in the development of landfill technology, such as ISWA and SWANA. The gathering and evaluation of data within the LFG area from the member countries has resulted in a number of documents that are to be published within the near future. These documents cover information on LFG utilisation, landfill research, landfill gas potentials, landfill emission assessment and also non-technical barriers to LFG utilisation.

A Lagerkvist

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine  

SciTech Connect

This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of the catalytic bed.

Tom Barton

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

An Empirical Analysis of Gas Well Design and Pumping Tests for Retrofitting Landfill Gas Collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Retrofitting a landfill with a gas collection system is an expensive and time consuming endeavor. Such an undertaking usually consists of longer-term extraction testing programs… (more)

Stevens, Derek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Project Biomass Facility Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Albany County, New York Coordinates 42.5756797°, -73.9359821° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5756797,"lon":-73.9359821,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

85

List of Landfill Gas Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 377 Landfill Gas Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 377) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric

86

Landfill-Gas-to-Energy Projects:? Analysis of Net Private and Social Benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under these standards, large landfills (that is, those with the potential to emit more than 50 Mg/year of nonmethane volatile organic compounds) have to collect and combust the landfill gas. ... Since the 1996 enact ment of the New Source Performance Standard and Emission Guidelines for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills, the Landfill Methane Outreach Program has become a tool to help landfills meet the new regulations. ... The costs of a collection system depend on different site factors, such as landfill depth, number of wells required, etc. Table 1 provides average collection system costs for landfills of three different sizes. ...

Paulina Jaramillo; H. Scott Matthews

2005-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Generation: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the United States and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill, also known as a dump (US) or a tip (UK), is a site for the disposal of waste materials by burial and is the oldest form of waste treatment . Historically, landfills have been one of the most common...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Upgrading of Landfill Gas by Membranes — Experiences with Operating a Pilot Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last years the interest in using landfill gas as an energy source has risen ... has been constructed on the premises of a landfill dump in Neuss. In a two-stage-process, landfill gas is upgraded in order t...

R. Rautenbach; K. Welsch

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Advanced Microturbine Systems  

SciTech Connect

Dept. of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-00-CH11061 was originally awarded to Honeywell International, Inc. â?? Honeywell Power Systems Inc. (HPSI) division located in Albuquerque, NM in October 2000 to conduct a program titled Advanced Microturbine Systems (AMS). The DOE Advanced Microturbines Systems Program was originally proposed as a five-year program to design and develop a high efficiency, low emissions, durable microturbine system. The period of performance was to be October 2000 through September 2005. Program efforts were underway, when one year into the program Honeywell sold the intellectual property of Honeywell Power Systems Inc. and HPSI ceased business operations. Honeywell made an internal decision to restructure the existing program due to the HPSI shutdown and submitted a formal request to DOE on September 24, 2001 to transfer the Cooperative Agreement to Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services (HES&S) in Phoenix, AZ in order to continue to offer support for DOE's Advanced Microturbine Program. Work continued on the descoped program under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00-CH11061 and has been completed.

None

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modeling the final phase of landfill gas generation from long-term observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For waste management, methane emissions from landfills and their effect on climate change are of serious concern. Current models for biogas generation that focus on the economic use of the landfill gas are usuall...

Johannes Tintner; Manfred Kühleitner; Erwin Binner; Norbert Brunner…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

California: Microturbine Protects Environment, Creates Jobs ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

wide range of fuels using existing infrastructure including natural gas, landfill gas, biogas generated from anaerobic digesters, and syngas. While many commercial, industrial, and...

93

Fuel-Flexible Microturbine and Gasifier System for Combined Heat and Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet summarizing project that will develop and demonstrate a prototype microturbine CHP fueled by synthesis gas & integrated with a biomass gasifier

94

Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The solid wastes and refuse disposed of by burial in pits constructed for the purpose, natural depressions, or abandoned quarries or other artificial excavations. Localities used in this way are called landfill s...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Impact of using high-density polyethylene geomembrane layer as landfill intermediate cover on landfill gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Clay is widely used as a traditional cover material for landfills. As clay becomes increasingly costly and scarce, and it also reduces the storage capacity of landfills, alternative materials with low hydraulic conductivity are employed. In developing countries such as China, landfill gas (LFG) is usually extracted for utilization during filling stage, therefore, the intermediate covering system is an important part in a landfill. In this study, a field test of LFG extraction was implemented under the condition of using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane layer as the only intermediate cover on the landfill. Results showed that after welding the HDPE geomembranes together to form a whole airtight layer upon a larger area of landfill, the gas flow in the general pipe increased 25% comparing with the design that the HDPE geomembranes were not welded together, which means that the gas extraction ability improved. However as the heat isolation capacity of the HDPE geomembrane layer is low, the gas generation ability of a shallow landfill is likely to be weakened in cold weather. Although using HDPE geomembrane layer as intermediate cover is acceptable in practice, the management and maintenance of it needs to be investigated in order to guarantee its effective operation for a long term.

Zezhi Chen; Huijuan Gong; Mengqun Zhang; Weili Wu; Yu Liu; Jin Feng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Results of Australian field trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A field scale trial was undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia (2004–2008), to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions from low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The objective of the trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a passive landfill gas drainage and biofiltration system at treating landfill gas under field conditions, and to identify and evaluate the factors that affect the behaviour and performance of the system. The trial results showed that passively aerated biofilters operating in a temperate climate can effectively oxidise methane in landfill gas, and demonstrated that maximum methane oxidation efficiencies greater than 90% and average oxidation efficiencies greater than 50% were achieved over the 4 years of operation. The trial results also showed that landfill gas loading was the primary factor that determined the behaviour and performance of the passively aerated biofilters. The landfill gas loading rate was found to control the diffusion of atmospheric oxygen into the biofilter media, limiting the microbial methane oxidation process. The temperature and moisture conditions within the biofilter were found to be affected by local climatic conditions and were also found to affect the behaviour and performance of the biofilter, but to a lesser degree than the landfill gas loading.

Stuart A. Dever; Gareth E. Swarbrick; Richard M. Stuetz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Numerical Early Warning Model Research of Landfill Gas Permeation and Diffusion Considering Flow-Temperature Coupling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on seepage mechanics in porous medium gas and heat transfer theory, numerical early warning model is established, which is on quantitative description of migration and release of landfill gas and penetration and diffusion of energy, and dynamic ... Keywords: component, landfill gas, flow-temperature coupling, gas pressure and temperature distribution, numerical early warning model

Xue Qiang; Feng Xia-ting; Ma Shi-jin; Zhou Xiao-jun

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effect of Hydrogen Sulfide in Landfill Gas on Anode Poisoning of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The world is facing an energy crisis and there is an immediate need to find a sustainable source of energy. Landfill gas has the potential… (more)

Khan, Feroze

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects," originally presented on July 17, 2012.

100

Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

truck operations. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a methodology that can be used to evaluate the use of LFG generated at landfills as a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel source for refuse trucks in Texas. The methodology simulates the gas...

Gokhale, Bhushan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Vapor phase transport at a hillside landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ambient density gradients. Post-landfill gas input reverses the direction of...landfill may explain observations of landfill gas found at depth. Post-landfill...of gas generation. Transport of landfill gas is shown to be dominated by diffusion...

P. H. Stauffer; N. D. Rosenberg

102

The modelling of biochemical-thermal coupling effect on gas generation and transport in MSW landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfill gas generation was investigated based on the theories of the thermodynamics, microbial dynamics and chemical dynamics. The coupling model was developed for describing the gas transport and heat release. And the relationship between the gas generation rate and the temperature was proposed. The parameters in the gas generation model were obtained by bioreactor test in order to evaluate the volume of gas production of the Erfeishan landfill in China. The simulation results shown that the operating life of the landfill will be overestimated if the model does not consider the thermal effect during degradation of the solid substrate.

Liu Lei; Liang Bing; Xue Qiang; Zhao Ying; Yang Chun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Study on optimization model of energy collection efficiency and its power generation benefit evaluation of landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An optimization model for joint biogas energy collection efficiency that targets the prediction model for landfill gas output dynamics and the optimization model for gas well output has been established. The model was used to comprehensively analyze and evaluate the collection efficiency of a landfill gas well together with the long-term monitoring the gas output of the gas well within Chenjiachong Landfill. The collection efficiency increased by more than 50% than the original collection of landfill biogas and the power generation efficiency increased more than two times after the reservoir area of the landfill was optimized and regulated.

Xue Qiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects This webinar, held July 17, 2012, provided information on the challenges and benefits of developing successful community landfill gas-to-energy projects in Will County, Illinois, and Escambia County, Florida. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 112 MB) or view the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Prairie View RDF Gas to Energy Facility: A Public/Private Partnership Will County partnered with Waste Management, using a portion of the county's DOE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding, to develop the Prairie View Recycling and Disposal Facility. A gas purchase agreement was executed in 2010 and the facility became operational

106

Tracer method to measure landfill gas emissions from leachate collection systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a method developed for quantification of gas emissions from the leachate collection system at landfills and present emission data measured at two Danish landfills with no landfill gas collection systems in place: Fakse landfill and AV Miljř. Landfill top covers are often designed to prevent infiltration of water and thus are made from low permeable materials. At such sites a large part of the gas will often emit through other pathways such as the leachate collection system. These point releases of gaseous constituents from these locations cannot be measured using traditional flux chambers, which are often used to measure gas emissions from landfills. Comparing tracer measurements of methane (CH4) emissions from leachate systems at Fakse landfill and AV Miljř to measurements of total CH4 emissions, it was found that approximately 47% (351 kg CH4 d?1) and 27% (211 kg CH4 d?1), respectively, of the CH4 emitting from the sites occurred from the leachate collection systems. Emission rates observed from individual leachate collection wells at the two landfills ranged from 0.1 to 76 kg CH4 d?1. A strong influence on emission rates caused by rise and fall in atmospheric pressure was observed when continuously measuring emission from a leachate well over a week. Emission of CH4 was one to two orders of magnitude higher during periods of decreasing pressure compared to periods of increasing pressure.

Anders M. Fredenslund; Charlotte Scheutz; Peter Kjeldsen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effects of a temporary HDPE cover on landfill gas emissions: Multiyear evaluation with the static chamber approach at an Italian landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to the European Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC and the related Italian Legislation (“D. Lgs. No. 36/2003”), monitoring and control procedures of landfill gas emissions, migration and external dispersions are clearly requested. These procedures could be particularly interesting in the operational circumstance of implementing a temporary cover, as for instance permitted by the Italian legislation over worked-out landfill sections, awaiting the evaluation of expected waste settlements. A possible quantitative approach for field measurement and consequential evaluation of landfill CO2, CH4 emission rates in pairs consists of the static, non-stationary accumulation chamber technique. At the Italian level, a significant and recent situation of periodical landfill gas emission monitoring is represented by the sanitary landfill for non-hazardous waste of the “Fano” town district, where monitoring campaigns with the static chamber have been annually conducted during the last 5 years (2005–2009). For the entire multiyear monitoring period, the resulting CO2, CH4 emission rates varied on the whole up to about 13,100 g CO2 m?2 d?1 and 3800 g CH4 m?2 d?1, respectively. The elaboration of these landfill gas emission data collected at the “Fano” case-study site during the monitoring campaigns, presented and discussed in the paper, gives rise to a certain scientific evidence of the possible negative effects derivable from the implementation of a temporary HDPE cover over a worked-out landfill section, notably: the lateral migration and concentration of landfill gas emissions through adjacent, active landfill sections when hydraulically connected; and consequently, the increase of landfill gas flux velocities throughout the reduced overall soil cover surface, giving rise to a flowing through of CH4 emissions without a significant oxidation. Thus, these circumstances are expected to cause a certain increase of the overall GHG emissions from the given landfill site.

Bruno Capaccioni; Cristina Caramiello; Fabio Tatŕno; Alessandro Viscione

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

PERFORMANCE OF THE CAPSTONE C30 MICROTURBINE ON BIODIESEL BENDS.  

SciTech Connect

This report will describe the tests of biodiesel blends as a fuel in a Capstone oil fired microturbine (C30) with a nominal rating of 30 kW. The blends, in ASTM No. 2 heating oil, ranged from 0% to 100% biodiesel. No changes were made to the microturbine system for operation on the blends. Apart from the data that the control computer acquires on various turbine parameters, measurements were made in the hot gas exhaust from the turbine. The results from this performance testing and from the atomization tests reported previously provide some insight into the use of biodiesel blends in microturbines of this type. The routine use of such blends would need more tests to establish that the life of the critical components of the microturbine are not diminished from what they are on the baseline diesel or heating fuel. Of course, the extension to 'widespread' use of such blends in generating systems based on the microturbine is also determined by economic and other considerations.

KRISHNA,C.R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hollow fiber membrane process for the pretreatment of methane hydrate from landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Landfill gas is major source of green house effect because it is mainly composed of CH4 and CO2. Especially, the separation of CH4 from landfill gas was studied actively due to its high heating value which can be used for energy resource. In this study, polymeric hollow fiber membrane was produced by dry–wet phase inversion method to separate CH4 from the landfill gas. The morphology of the membranes was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand and correlate the morphology with the performance of the membrane. Firstly, single gas permeation and mixed gas separation were performed in lab-scale. After then, a pilot scale membrane process was designed using a simulation program. The manufactured process settled in Gyeong-ju landfill site and operated at various conditions. As a result, CH4 was concentrated to 88 vol.% and also CO2 removal efficiency increases up to 86.7%.

KeeHong Kim; WonKil Choi; HangDae Jo; JongHak Kim; Hyung Keun Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Case Study, 2013 BroadRock Renewables LLC, in collaboration with DCO Energy, operates combined cycle electric generating plants at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode...

111

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Using methane in these applications helps keep it out of the atmosphere, reducing air pollution. Federal Application Before conducting an assessment or deploying landfill...

112

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects," originally presented on July 17, 2012. Recorded Voice: The broadcast is now starting. All attendees are in listen-only mode. Sarah Busche: Hello, everyone. Good afternoon and welcome to today's webinar. This is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. My name is Sarah Busche, and I'm here with Devin Egan, and we're broadcasting live from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. We're going to give folks

113

Modified landfill gas generation rate model of first-order kinetics and two-stage reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This investigation was carried out to establish a new domestic landfill gas (LFG) generation rate model that takes...L 0), the reaction rate constant in the first stage (K 1), and ...

Jiajun Chen; Hao Wang…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Renewable LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landfill Gas to LNG Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Success story about LNG from landfill gas. Presented by Mike McGowan, Linde NA, Inc., at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

115

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH4 flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 ± 0.014, 0.224 ± 0.012 and 0.237 ± 0.008 l CH4/m2 hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m2 hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06–0.89 l/m2 hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42–2.46 l/m2 hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L0) values in the range of 19.8–102.6 m3/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

Mutasem El-Fadel; Layale Abi-Esber; Samer Salhab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Int. J. Environment and Pollution, V0/. IS, No.4, 2001 Economic evaluation of a landfill system with gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Int. J. Environment and Pollution, V0/. IS, No.4, 2001 Economic evaluation of a landfill system. Landfill technology, as it is the most widely employed and is regarded as the most suitable and simple and externalities are examined. A cost-benefit analysis of a landfill system with gas recovery (LFSGR) has been

Columbia University

118

A Multimedia Study of Hazardous Waste Landfill Gas Migration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hazardous waste landfills pose uniquely challenging environmental problems which arise as a result of the chemical complexity of waste sites, their involvement of many environmental media, and their very size ...

Robert D. Stephens; Nancy B. Ball; Danny M. Mar

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

120

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

To utilize landfill gas for power generation using carbonate fuel cells, the LFG must be cleaned up to remove sulfur and chlorine compounds. This not only benefits the operation of the fuel cell, but also benefits the environment by preventing the emission of these contaminants to the atmosphere. Commercial technologies for gas processing are generally economical in relatively large sizes (3 MMSCFD or larger), and may not achieve the low levels of contaminants required. To address the issue of LFG clean-up for fuel cell application, a process was developed utilizing commercially available technology. A pilot-scale test facility utilizing this process was built at a landfill site in Anoka, Minnesota using the EPRI fuel cell test facility used for coal gas testing. The pilot plant was tested for 1000 hours, processing 970,000 SCF (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of landfill gas. Testing indicated that the process could achieve the following concentrations of contaminants in the clean gas: Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppm (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv if any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm (average) Sulfur Dioxide. The paper describes the LFG composition for bulk and trace compounds; evaluation of various methods to clean landfill gas; design of a LFG cleanup system; field test of pilot-scale gas cleanup process; fuel cell testing on simulated landfill gas; single cell testing on landfill gas contaminants and post test analysis; and design and economic analyses of a full scale gas cleanup system.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Delivery and viability of landfill gas CDM projects in Africa—A South African experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The eThekwini Municipality (Durban, South Africa) landfill gas Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project was the first to be registered and verified in Africa. The idea for the project was developed in 2002, yet it was not until the end of 2006 that the smaller Component One (1 MW) was registered, while the larger Component Two (9 MW) followed only in March 2009. Valuable lessons were learnt from Component One, and these were applied to Component Two. The paper describes the Durban CDM process, the lessons learnt, and assesses the viability of landfill gas to electricity CDM projects in Africa. It concludes that small to medium sized landfill gas to electricity CDM projects are not viable in Africa unless there is a renewable energy feed-in-tariff, or unless the gas is simply flared rather than being utilised for power generation.

R. Couth; C. Trois; J. Parkin; L.J. Strachan; A. Gilder; M. Wright

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Development of correction factors for landfill gas emission model suiting Indian condition to predict methane emission from landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methane emission from landfill gas emission (LandGEM) model was validated through the results of laboratory scale biochemical methane potential assay. Results showed that LandGEM model over estimates methane (CH4) emissions; and the true CH4 potential of waste depends on the level of segregation. Based on these findings, correction factors were developed to estimate CH4 emission using LandGEM model especially where the level of segregation is negligible or does not exist. The correction factors obtained from the study were 0.94, 0.13 and 0.74 for food waste, mixed un-segregated municipal solid waste (MSW) and vegetable wastes, respectively.

Avick Sil; Sunil Kumar; Jonathan W.C. Wong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Carbon dioxide removal and capture for landfill gas up-grading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within the frame of an EC financially supported project - LIFE05 ENV/IT/000874 GHERL (Greenhouse Effect Reduction from Landfill)–a pilot plant was set up in order to demonstrate the feasibility of applying chemical absorption to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas. After proper upgrading - basically removal of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and other trace gas compound–the gas might be fed into the distribution grid for natural gas or used as vehicle fuel, replacing a fossil fuel thus saving natural resources and carbon dioxide emissions. Several experiences in Europe have been carried out concerning the landfill gas - and biogas from anaerobic digestion - quality up-grading through CO2 removal, but in all of them carbon dioxide was vented to the atmosphere after separation, without any direct benefit in terms of greenhouse gases reduction. With respect to those previous experiences, in this work the attention was focused on CO2 removal from landfill gas with an effective capture process, capable of removing carbon dioxide from atmosphere, through a globally carbon negative process. In particular, processes capable of producing final solid products were investigated, with the aim of obtaining as output solid compounds which can be either used in the chemical industry or disposed off. The adopted absorption process is based on using aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide, with the final aim of producing potassium carbonate. Potassium carbonate is a product which has several applications in the chemical industry if obtained with adequate quality. It can be sold as a pulverised solid, or in aqueous solution. Several tests were carried out at the pilot plant, which was located at a landfill site, in order to feed it with a fraction of the on-site collected landfill gas. The results of the experimental campaign are reported, explained and commented in the paper. Also a discussion on economic issues is presented.

Lidia Lombardia; Andrea Corti; Ennio Carnevale; Renato Baciocchi; Daniela Zingaretti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Microturbine Power Conversion Technology Review, April 2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A technology review to assess the market for power electronic converters to connect microturbines to the electric grid or local loads.

126

Fuel-Flexible Microturbine and Gasifier System for Combined Heat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flexible Microturbine and Gasifier System for Combined Heat and Power Fuel-Flexible Microturbine and Gasifier System for Combined Heat and Power Capstone Turbine Corporation, in...

127

Suitability of Tedlar® gas sampling bags for siloxane quantification in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill or digester gas can contain man-made volatile methylsiloxanes (VMS), usually in the range of a few milligrams per normal cubic metre (Nm3). Until now, no standard method for siloxane quantification exists and there is controversy with respect to which sampling procedure is most suitable. This paper presents an analytical and a sampling procedure for the quantification of common VMS in biogas via GC–MS and polyvinyl fluoride (Tedlar®) bags. Two commercially available Tedlar bag models are studied. One is equipped with a polypropylene valve with integrated septum, the other with a dual port fitting made from stainless steel. Siloxane recovery in landfill gas samples is investigated as a function of storage time, temperature, surface-to-volume ratio and background gas. Recovery was found to depend on the type of fitting employed. The siloxanes sampled in the bag with the polypropylene valve show high and stable recovery, even after more than 30 days. Sufficiently low detection limits below 10 ?g Nm?3 and good reproducibility can be achieved. The method is therefore well applicable to biogas, greatly facilitating sampling in comparison with other common techniques involving siloxane enrichment using sorption media.

M. Ajhar; B. Wens; K.H. Stollenwerk; G. Spalding; S. Yüce; T. Melin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Des Plaines Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

129

Lessons from Loscoe: the uncontrolled migration of landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was considered of fundamental importance in determining...making the situation safe, even though in...with coal mining operations. In 1983 smells...central heating boiler had been ignited...different landfill operation and completion scenarios...how to improve the operation and engineering...

G. M. Williams; N. Aitkenhead

130

Effects of Landfill Gas on Growth and Nitrogen Fixation of Two Leguminous Trees (Acacia Confusa, Leucaena Leucocephala)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was made on the effects of landfill gas on ARA (acetylene reducing activity) of ... The effects of the three main components of landfill gas, O2, CO2 and CH4, were first measured separately over a 1-hr pe...

Y. S. G. Chan; M. H. Wong; B. A. Whitton

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Performance of an Internal Combustion Engine Operating on Landfill Gas and the Effect of Syngas Addition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance of an Internal Combustion Engine Operating on Landfill Gas and the Effect of Syngas Addition ... The performance of a four-stroke Honda GC160E spark ignition (SI) internal combustion (IC) engine operating on landfill gas (LFG) was investigated, as well as the impact of H2 and CO (syngas) addition on emissions and engine efficiency. ... In addition, variation across both the syngas content (up to 15%) and the ratio of H2 to CO in the syngas (H2/CO = 0.5, 1, and 2) were tested. ...

McKenzie P. Kohn; Jechan Lee; Matthew L. Basinger; Marco J. Castaldi

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and Greenhouse Gas Reductions- Case Study, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study overviewing two large landfill projects in California and Rhode Island funded by the Recovery Act

133

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

134

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DigesterLandfillGas DigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 +

135

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

136

IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFP-06 IEA- Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, fælles analyser. biogas fra anaerob udrådning (AD) som en integreret gylle og affalds behandlings teknologi. Arbejdet

137

Landfill gas upgrading with pilot-scale water scrubber: Performance assessment with absorption water recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pilot-scale counter current absorption process for upgrading municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill gas to produce vehicle fuel was studied using absorption, desorption and drying units and water as an absorbent. Continuous water recycling was used without adding new water to the system. The process parameters were defined by a previous study made with this pilot system. The effect of pressure (20–25 bar), temperature (10–25 °C) and water flow speed (5.5–11 l/min) on the upgrading performance, trace compounds (siloxanes, halogenated compounds) and water quality were investigated. Raw landfill gas flow was kept constant at 7.41 Nm3/h. Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) contents in the product gas were 86–90% and 4.5–8.0% with all studied pressures and temperatures. The remaining fraction in product gas was nitrogen (N2) (from 1% to 7%). Organic silicon compounds (siloxanes) were reduced by 16.6% and halogenated compounds similarly by 90.1% by water absorption. From studied process parameters, only water flow speed affected the removal of siloxanes and halogen compounds. The absorbent water pH was between 4.4–4.9, sulphide concentration between 0.1–1.0 mg/l and carbonate concentration between 500–1000 mg/l. The product gas drying system reduced the siloxane concentration by 99.1% and halogenated compounds by 99.9% compared to the raw landfill gas. In conclusion, the pilot-scale gas upgrading process studied appears to be able to produce gas with high energy content (approx 86–90% methane) using a closed water circulation system. When using a standard gas drying system, all trace compounds can be removed by over 99% compared to raw landfill gas.

J. Läntelä; S. Rasi; J. Lehtinen; J. Rintala

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Integrated Field Testing of Fuel Cells and Micro-Turbines  

SciTech Connect

A technical and economic evaluation of the prospects for the deployment of distributed generation on Long Beach Island, New Jersey concluded that properly sited DG would defer upgrading of the electric power grid for 10 years. This included the deployment of fuel cells or microturbines as well as reciprocating engines. The implementation phase of this project focused on the installation of a 120 kW CHP microturbine system at the Harvey Cedars Bible Conference in Harvey Cedars, NJ. A 1.1 MW generator powered by a gas-fired reciprocating engine for additional grid support was also installed at a local substation. This report contains installation and operation issues as well as the utility perspective on DG deployment.

Jerome R. Temchin; Stephen J. Steffel

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Catalytically upgraded landfill gas as a cost-effective alternative for fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential use of landfill gas as feeding fuel for the so-called molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) imposes the need for new upgrading technologies in order to meet the much tougher feed gas specifications of this type of fuel cells in comparison to gas engines. Nevertheless, MCFC has slightly lower purity demands than low temperature fuel cells. This paper outlines the idea of a new catalytic purification process for landfill gas conditioning, which may be supposed to be more competitive than state-of-the-art technologies and summarises some lab-scale results. This catalytic process transforms harmful landfill gas minor compounds into products that can be easily removed from the gas stream by a subsequent adsorption step. The optimal process temperature was found to be in the range 250–400 °C. After a catalyst screening, two materials were identified, which have the ability to remove all harmful minor compounds from landfill gas. The first material was a commercial alumina that showed a high activity towards the removal of organic silicon compounds. The alumina protects both a subsequent catalyst for the removal of other organic minor compounds and the fuel cell. Due to gradual deactivation caused by silica deposition, the activated alumina needs to be periodically replaced. The second material was a commercial V2O5/TiO2-based catalyst that exhibited a high activity for the total oxidation of a broad spectrum of other harmful organic minor compounds into a simpler compound class “acid gases (HCl, HF and SO2)”, which can be easily removed by absorption with, e.g. alkalised alumina. The encouraging results obtained allow the scale-up of this LFG conditioning process to test it under real LFG conditions.

W. Urban; H. Lohmann; J.I. Salazar Gómez

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Microbial Community of Landfill Soils and the Influence of Landfill Gas on Soil Recovery and Revegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An extensive database for soil microbiological and physicochemical conditions has been established from samples taken from restored landfill sites in South East England. The sites...

Sharon D. Wigfull; Paul Birch

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Instrumentation for the Measurement of Landfill Gas Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Where problems of gas emission are suspected, the reliable detection and measurement of the gas is essential if solutions to the problem are to be designed, constructed and monitored for their effectiveness. T...

D. Crowhurst

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Mechanics of biocell landfill settlements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Prediction of landfill gas generation and settlements are of concerns in design and maintenance of biocell landfills. Accurate settlement prediction is essential for design of… (more)

Hettiarachchi, Chamil Hiroshan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Integrated Combined Heat and Power/Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Landfill Gas to Power Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Landfill gas (LFG), composed largely of methane and carbon dioxide, is used in over 450 operational projects in 43 states. These projects convert a large source of greenhouse gases into a fuel that...

144

The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions using various thermal systems in a landfill site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from an uncontrolled landfill site filled with Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) are compared with those from controlled sites in which collected Landfill Gases (LFG) are utilised by various technologies. These technologies include flaring, conventional electricity generation technologies such as Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) and Gas Turbine (GT) and an emerging technology, Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC). The results show that SOFC is the best option for reducing the GHG emissions among the studied technologies. In the case when SOFC is used, GHG emissions from the controlled site are reduced by 63% compared to the uncontrolled site. This case has a specific lifetime GHG emission of 2.38 tonnes CO2 .eq/MWh when only electricity is produced and 1.12 tonnes CO2.eq/MWh for a cogeneration application.

C. Ozgur Colpan; Ibrahim Dincer; Feridun Hamdullahpur

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Municipal solid waste degradation and landfill gas resources characteristics in self-recirculating sequencing batch bioreactor landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the degradation characteristics of municipal solid waste (MSW) in China, the traditional anaerobic sequencing batch bioreactor landfill (ASBRL) was optimized, and an improved anaerobic sequencing batch b...

Xiao-zhi Zhou ???; Shu-xun Sang ???; Li-wen Cao ???

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Global methane emissions from landfills: New methodology and annual estimates 19801996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Change: Instruments and techniques; KEYWORDS: landfill, landfill gas, methane emissions, methanotrophy

147

Combustion of syngas in a pressurized microturbine-like combustor: Experimental results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The different routes for power production from biomass often lead to an intermediary product such as a synthesis gas or syngas, which is typically rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The simple design, fuel flexibility and size, which often matches the amount of waste energy available in industrial sites, makes microturbines an attractive solution for on-site, decentralized power generation using a limited range of alternative fuels such as synthetic gas. The properties of the synthetic fuel differ from properties of natural gas and a detailed experimental study with a separated microturbine-like pressurized combustor is therefore necessary. The present article reviews the experimental results obtained by gradually switching the fuel feed from natural gas to wet syngas in a pressurized, slightly modified lean premix microturbine combustor. Temperature profiles, pressure, emissions and flame imaging were closely monitored to detect possible problems in operability of the combustor caused by the strong difference in fuel characteristics. No problems regarding auto-ignition, dynamic or static instability were observed throughout the test-run. Temperature profiles stayed well within allowable limits and did not reveal any significant shift in flame anchoring position. The combustion of syngas during full or part load of the combustor produced remarkably low \\{NOx\\} and CO emissions. The microturbine combustor achieved stable full load combustion of syngas at the end of the test-run.

Frank Delattin; Giovanni Di Lorenzo; Sergio Rizzo; Svend Bram; Jacques De Ruyck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Emerging technologies for the management and utilization of landfill gas. Final report, August 1994-August 1997  

SciTech Connect

The report gives information on emerging technologies that are considered to be commercially available (Tier 1), currently undergoing research and development (Tier 2), or considered as potentially applicable (Tier 3), for the management of landfill gas (LFG) emissions or for the utilization of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from LFG. The emerging technologies that are considered to be Tier 1 are: (1) phosphoric acid fuel cells, (2) processes for converting CH4 from LFG to compressed LFG for vehicle fuel or other fuel uses, and (3) use of LFG as a fuel source for leachate evaporation systems. The Tier 2 technologies covered in the report are: (1) operation of landfills as anaerobic bioreactors, (2) operation of landfills are aerobic bioreactors, (3) production of ethanol from LFG, (4) production of commercial CO2 from LFG, and (5) use of LFG to provide fuel for heat and CO2 enhancement in greenhouses. Tier 3 technologies, considered as potentially applicable for LFG. include Stirling and Organic Rankine Cycle engines.

Roe, S.; Reisman, J.; Strait, R.; Doorn, M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Hwayang-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Namhoon, E-mail: nhlee@anyang.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Passive landfill gas emission – Influence of atmospheric pressure and implications for the operation of methane-oxidising biofilters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A passively vented landfill site in Northern Germany was monitored for gas emission dynamics through high resolution measurements of landfill gas pressure, flow rate and composition as well as atmospheric pressure and temperature. Landfill gas emission could be directly related to atmospheric pressure changes on all scales as induced by the autooscillation of air, diurnal variations and the passage of pressure highs and lows. Gas flux reversed every 20 h on average, with 50% of emission phases lasting only 10 h or less. During gas emission phases, methane loads fed to a connected methane oxidising biofiltration unit varied between near zero and 247 g CH4 h?1 m?3 filter material. Emission dynamics not only influenced the amount of methane fed to the biofilter but also the establishment of gas composition profiles within the biofilter, thus being of high relevance for biofilter operation. The duration of the gas emission phase emerged as most significant variable for the distribution of landfill gas components within the biofilter.

Julia Gebert; Alexander Groengroeft

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Renewable LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landfill Gas to LNG Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LNG LNG Update on the world's largest landfill gas to LNG plant Mike McGowan Head of Government Affairs Linde NA, Inc. June 12, 2012 $18.3 billion global sales A leading gases and engineering company Linde North America Profile $2.3 billion in gases sales revenue in North America in 2011 5,000 employees throughout the U.S., Canada and the Caribbean Supplier of compressed and cryogenic gases and technology Atmospheric gases - oxygen, nitrogen, argon Helium LNG and LPG Hydrogen Rare gases Plant engineering and supply LNG Petrochemicals Natural gas processing Atmospheric gases 3 Linde's alternative fuels portfolio Green hydrogen production - Magog, Quebec Renewable liquefied natural gas production - Altamont, CA Biogas fueling, LNG import terminal - Sweden

152

Pilot scale evaluation of the BABIU process – Upgrading of landfill gas or biogas with the use of MSWI bottom ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biogas or landfill gas can be converted to a high-grade gas rich in methane with the use of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash as a reactant for fixation of CO2 and H2S. In order to verify results previously obtained at a laboratory scale with 65–90 kg of bottom ash (BA), several test runs were performed at a pilot scale, using 500–1000 kg of bottom ash and up to 9.2 N m3/h real landfill gas from a landfill in the Tuscany region (Italy). The input flow rate was altered. The best process performance was observed at a input flow rate of 3.7 N m3/(h tBA). At this flow rate, the removal efficiencies for H2S were approximately 99.5–99%.

P. Mostbauer; L. Lombardi; T. Olivieri; S. Lenz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

California: Microturbine Protects Environment, Creates Jobs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The U.S. market potential for distributed generation using microturbines is significant; however, it remains mostly untapped for commercial and small industrial buildings. Developing new, cost-effective designs for this market can greatly reduce energy consumption and create jobs.

154

domestic refuse landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

domestic refuse landfill, domestic waste landfill, house waste landfill, house refuse landfill ? Hausmüllaufschüttung f

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Influence of Landfill Gas on the Microdistribution of Grass Establishment Through Natural Colonization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many revegetated landfills have poor cover including bare areas where plants do not grow. This study, on the Bisasar Road Landfill site in South Africa, assessed grass species preferences to microhabitat condi...

Douglas H. Trotter; John A. Cooke

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

at higher temperatures and pressures with reduced pollutants Testing the limits of air bearings for microturbine's increased output Developing control algorithms for...

158

High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Fact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capstone Turbine Corporation, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and NASA Glenn Research Center, is developing a clean, cost-effective 370 kW microturbine with...

159

High Efficiency Microturbine Leads to Increased Market Share  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EERE-supported microturbine research and development for a device that increased electrical efficiency of the unit from about 17%-22% to 33%.

160

High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Presentatio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Fact Sheet, 2014 2011 CHPIndustrial Distributed Energy R&D Portfolio Review - Summary Report AMO Peer Review,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Distributed Energy Technology Simulator: Microturbine Demonstration, October 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

results of a demonstration of a microturbine simulator used to mimic the behavior of a distributed energy resource on an electrical system

162

High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery- Fact Sheet, 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet: this project will develop a clean, cost-effective 370 kW microturbine with 42% net electrical efficiency and 85% total CHP efficiency

163

INTEGRATED CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR CO 2 SEPARATION AND LNG PRODUCTION FROM LANDFILL GAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An integrated cryogenic system to separate carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) and produce LNG from landfill gas is investigated and designed. The main objective of this design is to eliminate the requirement of a standard CO 2 removal process in the liquefaction system such distillation or (temperature or pressure) swing adsorption and to directly separate carbon dioxide as frost at the liquefying channel of methane. Two identical sets of heat exchangers are installed in parallel and switched alternatively with a time period so that one is in separation?liquefaction mode while the other is in CO 2 clean?up mode. A thermal regeneration scheme is presented for the purpose of saving energy and avoiding the stoppage of LNG production followed by the flow switching. The switching period is determined from results of a combined heat and mass transfer analysis on the CO 2 freeze?out process.

H. M. Chang; M. J. Chung; S. B. Park

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

(sanitary) landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(sanitary) landfill, landfill(ed) site, refuse dump, garbage dump...Landfills may often release a toxic soup of...] ? Abfalldeponie f [Zur Endlagerung von Abfallstoffen oder von Industrieprodukten al...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Calcite precipitation in landfills: an essential product of waste stabilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and carbon dioxide observed for landfill gas do not reflect the amount of bicarbonate...reactions within the waste) and landfill gas. Both of these are potentially...Brief summaries of leachate and landfill gas compositions and their evolution...

D. A. C. Manning

166

Chlorofluorocarbons as tracers of landfill leachate in surface and groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...considerably lower concentrations in landfill gas. CFCs and CCl4 in leachate may...all groundwater, leachate and landfill gas samples were taken on 6 April 2004...at the central site facility. Landfill gas was sampled by attaching a thick...

A. E. Foley; T. C. Atkinson; Y. Zhao

167

Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Phase II Final Report for January 25, 1999 - April 30, 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery.

Brown, W. R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L. A.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electric power generation using a phosphoric acid cell on a municipal solid waste landfill gas stream. Technology verification report, November 1997--July 1998  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phosphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Performance data were collected at two sites determined to be representative of the U.S. landfill market. The Penrose facility, in Los Angeles, CA, was the first test site. The landfill gas at this site represented waste gas recovery from four nearby landfills, consisting primarily of industrial waste material. It produced approximately 3000 scf of gas/minute, and had a higher heating value of 446 Btu/scf at about 44% methane concentration. The second test site, in Groton, CT, was a relatively small landfill, but with greater heat content gas (methane levels were about 57% and the average heating value was 585 Btu/scf). The verification test addressed contaminant removal efficiency, flare destruction efficiency, and the operational capability of the cleanup system, and the power production capability of the fuel cell system.

Masemore, S.; Piccot, S.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Phase equilibrium conditions for simulated landfill gas hydrate formation in aqueous solutions of tetrabutylammonium nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrate phase equilibrium conditions for the simulated landfill gas (LFG) of methane and carbon dioxide (50 mol% methane, 50 mol% carbon dioxide) were investigated with the pressure range of (1.90 to 13.83) MPa and temperature range of (280.0 to 288.3) K at (0.050, 0.170, 0.340, and 0.394) mass fraction (w) of tetrabutylammonium nitrate (TBANO3). The phase boundary between liquid–vapor–hydrate (L–V–H) phases and liquid–vapor (L–V) phases was determined by employing an isochoric pressure-search method. The phase equilibrium data measured showed that TBANO3 appeared a remarkable promotion effect at w TBANO 3  = 0.394, corresponding to TBANO3 · 26H2O, but inhibition effect at w TBANO 3  = (0.050, or 0.170) on the semiclathrate hydrate formation. In addition, the application of TBANO3 at 0.340 mass fraction, corresponding to TBANO3 · 32H2O, displayed promotion effect at lower pressures (below 6.38 MPa) and inhibition effect at higher pressures (above 6.38 MPa).

Ling-Li Shi; De-Qing Liang; Dong-Liang Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

slag landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

slag landfill [Context: the impacts of Cu 2+ emissions from the slag landfill to the groundwater were assessed to be...] ? Schlackendeponie f ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Metal-modified and vertically aligned carbon nanotube sensors array for landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) layers were synthesized on Fe-coated low-cost alumina substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology. A miniaturized CNT-based gas sensor array was developed for monitoring landfill gas (LFG) at a temperature of 150??C. The sensor array was composed of 4 sensing elements with unmodified CNT, and CNT loaded with 5?nm nominally thick sputtered nanoclusters of platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and silver (Ag). Chemical analysis of multicomponent gas mixtures constituted of CO2, CH4, H2, NH3, CO and NO2 has been performed by the array sensor responses and pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results demonstrate that the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor array is able to discriminate the NO2 presence in the multicomponent mixture LFG. The NO2 gas detection in the mixture LFG was proved to be very sensitive, e.g.: the CNT:Ru sensor shows a relative change in the resistance of 1.50% and 0.55% for NO2 concentrations of 3.3?ppm and 330?ppb dispersed in the LFG, respectively, with a wide NO2 gas concentration range measured from 0.33 to 3.3?ppm, at the sensor temperature of 150??C. The morphology and structure of the CNT networks have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. A forest-like nanostructure of vertically aligned CNT bundles in the multi-walled form appeared with a height of about 10 ?m and a single-tube diameter varying in the range of 5?35?nm. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectroscopy D-peak and G-peak indicates the presence of disorder and defects in the CNT networks. The size of the metal (Pt, Ru, Ag) nanoclusters decorating the CNT top surface varies in the range of 5?50?nm. Functional characterization based on electrical charge transfer sensing mechanisms in the metal-modified CNT-chemoresistor array demonstrates high sensitivity by providing minimal sub-ppm level detection, e.g., download up to 100?ppb NO2, at the sensor temperature of 150??C. The gas sensitivity of the CNT sensor array depends on operating temperature, showing a lower optimal temperature of maximum sensitivity for the metal-decorated CNT sensors compared to unmodified CNT sensors. Results indicate that the recovery mechanisms in the CNT chemiresistors can be altered by a rapid heating pulse from room temperature to about 110??C. A comparison of the NO2 gas sensitivity for the chemiresistors based on disorderly networked CNTs and vertically aligned CNTs is also reported. Cross-sensitivity towards relative humidity of the CNT sensors array is investigated. Finally, the sensing properties of the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor arrays are promising to monitor gas events in the LFG for practical applications with low power consumption and moderate sensor temperature.

M Penza; R Rossi; M Alvisi; E Serra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

MHK Technologies/Microturbine River In Stream | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microturbine River In Stream Microturbine River In Stream < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Microturbine River In Stream.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Whitestone Power Communications Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Microturbine River In Stream Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description HDPE blades are the only moving parts in the water.This gives the turbine high resistance to silty or salty water. Blades designed to survive impact of 1500 lb object. HDPE provides flexibility and strength. Blades penetrate water 24 inches allowing for deep and shallow operation. Mounting design allows for variable depth operation for varying river conditions.All submerged prime-mover parts constructed from HDPE. No underwater gearboxes, generators or electrical cables. Velocity of blades 50% of velocity of river current.

173

Behavior of Capstone and Honeywell microturbine generators during load changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior of Capstone and Honeywell Microturbine Generatorsthe Capstone 30-kW and Honeywell Parallon 75- kW MTGs. Allthe Capstone 30-kW and Honeywell Parallon 75-kW MTGs. For

Yinger, Robert J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Improving the Operating Efficiency of Microturbine-Based Distributed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

370 kilowatt (kW) microturbine with 42% net electrical efficiency and 85% total combined heat and power (CHP) efficiency. Introduction The U.S. economic market potential for...

175

Evaluation of landfill gas production and emissions in a MSW large-scale Experimental Cell in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are an important environmental concern in Brazil due to the existence of several uncontrolled disposal sites. A program of laboratory and field tests was conducted to investigate gas generation in and emission from an Experimental Cell with a 36,659-ton capacity in Recife/PE – Brazil. This investigation involved waste characterisation, gas production and emission monitoring, and geotechnical and biological evaluations and was performed using three types of final cover layers. The results obtained in this study showed that waste decomposes 4–5 times faster in a tropical wet climate than predicted by traditional first-order models using default parameters. This fact must be included when considering the techniques and economics of projects developed in tropical climate countries. The design of the final cover layer and its geotechnical and biological behaviour proved to have an important role in minimising gas emissions to the atmosphere. Capillary and methanotrophic final cover layers presented lower CH4 flux rates than the conventional layer.

Felipe Jucá Maciel; José Fernando Thomé Jucá

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect

Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Byxbee Park Sanitary Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Facility Byxbee Park Sanitary Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Santa Clara County, California Coordinates 37.2938907, -121.7195459...

178

Cooperative Research and Development for Advanced Microturbines Program on Advanced Integrated Microturbine System  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Integrated Microturbine Systems (AIMS) project was kicked off in October of 2000 to develop the next generation microturbine system. The overall objective of the project was to develop a design for a 40% electrical efficiency microturbine system and demonstrate many of the enabling technologies. The project was initiated as a collaborative effort between several units of GE, Elliott Energy Systems, Turbo Genset, Oak Ridge National Lab and Kyocera. Since the inception of the project the partners have changed but the overall direction of the project has stayed consistent. The project began as a systems study to identify design options to achieve the ultimate goal of 40% electrical efficiency. Once the optimized analytical design was identified for the 40% system, it was determined that a 35% efficient machine would be capable of demonstrating many of the advanced technologies within the given budget and timeframe. The items that would not be experimentally demonstrated were fully produced ceramic parts. However, to understand the requirements of these ceramics, an effort was included in the project to experimentally evaluate candidate materials in representative conditions. The results from this effort would clearly identify the challenges and improvement required of these materials for the full design. Following the analytical effort, the project was dedicated to component development and testing. Each component and subsystem was designed with the overall system requirements in mind and each tested to the fullest extent possible prior to being integrated together. This method of component development and evaluation helps to minimize the technical risk of the project. Once all of the components were completed, they were assembled into the full system and experimentally evaluated.

Michael J. Bowman

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Some of the modern regulated landfills attempt to capture and utilize landfill biogas, a renewable collecting landfill biogas worldwide. The landfills that capture biogas in the US collect about 2.6 million. All rights reserved. Keywords: Landfill gas; Renewable energy; Municipal solid waste; Biogas; Methane

Columbia University

180

Dynamic friction and wear in a planar-contact encapsulated microball bearing using an integrated microturbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demonstration and characterization of a novel planar-contact encapsulated microball bearing using a radial in-flow microturbine are presented. Stable operation of the air-driven silicon microturbine is shown for over ...

McCarthy, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

U.S. Installation, Operation, and Performance Standards for Microturbine Generator Sets, August 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report detailing the various codes and standards that are applicable for the installation, operation, and performance of microturbines.

182

A new microturbine-based dispersed generation scheme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Almost all of the commercial microturbine-based dispersed generation systems today are composed of a high-speed permanent-magnet alternator and a diode rectifier-PWM inverter pair. A dispersed generation scheme â?? made up of a microturbine, an induction generator, and a diode rectifier-PWM inverter pair â?? is introduced in this paper. A complete model for the self-excited squirrel-cage induction generator is developed and used to study the steady-state and transient behaviours of the overall system. The power delivered to the grid is controlled by an injected current control loop. The input/output power balance is maintained by regulating the DC-bus voltage using a new method based on the torque control of microturbine. Analysis shows that the Simulink simulation results of induction generator is a viable substitute for permanent magnet alternator in microturbine-based dispersed generation systems due to its low cost, low maintenance, rugged structure, and slack between rotor speed and terminal frequency, which isolates the transients of the grid from the generator system when the DC-bus capacitor size is reduced. Both schemes have been simulated and the simulation results are presented to compare the proposed scheme based on induction generator with the present microturbine-based dispersed generation scheme based on synchronous machine.

Afshin Majd; Mehrdad Kazerani

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Gasification, Microturbines and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification, Microturbines and Fuel Cells for Farming Operations Biomass Gasification, Microturbines and Fuel Cells for Farming Operations Project Summary Full Title: Opportunities for Hydrogen: An Analysis of the Application of Biomass Gasification to Farming Operations Using Microturbines and Fuel Cells Project ID: 133 Principal Investigator: Darren Schmidt Purpose To determine the feasibility of a hydrogen based biomass fueled power installation for farming operations. Performer Principal Investigator: Darren Schmidt Organization: University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center Address: 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Telephone: 701-777-5120 Email: dschmidt@undeerc.org Additional Performers: J.R Gunderson, University of North Dakota Period of Performance Start: June 1999

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual international landfill Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-end of lifetime average collection efficiencies for international greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories for landfills... t h e U . S i THE IMPORTANCE OF LANDFILL GAS CAPTURE AND...

185

A renewable energy plan for the Oak Grove Sanitary Landfill In Winder, Georgia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oak Grove Sanitary Landfill in Winder, Georgia is already refining its landfill gas (LFG) and sending it through the natural gas pipeline. This is more… (more)

Hambrick, Tracy L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Landfills Convert Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on AddThis.com... May 25, 2013 Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas

187

(sanitary) landfill reclamation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(sanitary) landfill reclamation, reclamation of (sanitary) landfills [For industrial and commercial development] ? Deponielandgewinnung f, Kippenlandgewinnung

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ni catalysts derived from Mg–Al layered double hydroxides for hydrogen production from landfill gas conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor with a hydrotalcite-like structure containing Ni/Mg/Al cations was prepared. A series of Ni catalysts containing mixed-oxides and spinel phases were then obtained through thermal treatment of the LDH precursor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) revealed that the LDH derived Ni catalysts have well-dispersed nickel phases upon reduction. The thermal treatment temperatures have noticeable effects on the specific surface area, pore volume, phase transformation, particle size, and reducibility of the catalysts. Thermal treatment temperatures up to 700 °C promote the generation of mesopores which facilitate an increase in specific area and pore volume. Beyond 700 °C sintering occurs, mesopores collapse, and specific area and pore volume decrease. High thermal treatment temperatures favor the phase transformation to spinel solid solutions and the particle size growth. Metal-support interaction is enhanced but reducibility is hindered due to the formation of spinel solid solution phases. The LDH derived Ni catalysts were tested for landfill gas conversion at 750 °C and have shown excellent activity and stability in terms of methane conversion. At gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 240,000 h?1 and pressure of 1 atm, 81% methane conversion was achieved during a 48 h test period without apparent catalyst deactivation.

Qingsong Wang; Wei Ren; Xueliang Yuan; Ruimin Mu; Zhanlong Song; Xiaolin Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

New Technology Demonstration of Microturbine with Heat Recovery at Fort Drum, New York  

SciTech Connect

This report replaces PNNL-14417 and documents a project to demonstrate and evaluate a combined heat and power-configured microturbine system.

Friedrich, Michele; Armstrong, Peter R.; Smith, David L.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

COMBUSTIVE APPROACH FOR MEASURING TOTAL VOLATILE PHOSPHORUS CONTENT IN LANDFILL GAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A technique was developed to measure the total gaseous phosphorus content in biogas. The amount of air needed for a neutral to oxidising flame was mixed with the biogas. The gas mixture was burnt in a closed quar...

JORIS ROELS; FRANK VANHAECKE; WILLY VERSTRAETE

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Landfill Bioreactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modern waste disposal has evolved from open dumping to the current practice of sanitary landfilling. Although this approach has proved to be a good alternative for preventing a variety of negative human healt...

Dr. J. Patrick A. Hettiaratchi PhD; PEng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

R&D Research/Demonstration Greenhouse Using Methane Gas from a Landfill for Co-Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A research/demonstration greenhouse for the production of greenhouse tomatoes using the single truss tomato production ... from landfills or other sources for heating and lighting to maximize crop production whil...

William J. Roberts

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

(sanitary) landfill operator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(sanitary) landfill operator, Müllkippenbetreiber m, Mülldeponiebetreiber, Kippenbetreiber, Deponiebetreiber

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

Don Augenstein

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of air injection and extraction tests in a landfill site in Korea: implications for landfill management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air extraction and injection were evaluated for extracting hazardous landfill gas and enhancing degradation of organic materials in a landfill in Korea. From the pilot and full ... pressure radius of influence wa...

J. Lee; C. Lee; K. Lee

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decision support tool for landfill gas-to energy projects,”industrial emissions e. Landfills f. Solid waste treatmentreductions Forests, dairy, landfills 75% overall savings HFC

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

198

The world's largest landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The world's largest landfill ... GeoChip-Based Analysis of Microbial Functional Gene Diversity in a Landfill Leachate-Contaminated Aquifer ... GeoChip-Based Analysis of Microbial Functional Gene Diversity in a Landfill Leachate-Contaminated Aquifer ...

Joseph M. Suflita; Charles P. Gerba; Robert K. Ham; Anna C. Palmisano; William L. Rathje; Joseph A. Robinson

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Thermodynamic Modeling and Numerical Simulation of Single-Shaft Microturbine Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined production system based on microturbine holds the promise of increasing energy utilization efficiency and improving environmental quality due to its many attractive merits as a distributed energy source technology. To analyze and evaluate...

Hao, X.; Zhang, G.; Zhou, J.; Chen, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery- Presentation by Capstone Turbine Corporation, June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation on High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery, given by John Nourse of Capstone Turbine Corporation, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2, 2011.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Landfill Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Get Feedback Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/lmop/publications-tools/handbook.html Cost: Free References: Project Development Handbook[1] The handbook describes the process of implementing a waste-to-energy landfill gas project. Overview "Approximately 250 million tons of solid waste was generated in the United States in 2008 with 54 percent deposited in municipal solid waste (MSW)

202

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on...

203

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Colton Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

204

Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Girvin Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Duval County, Florida Coordinates 30.3500511°, -81.6035062° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3500511,"lon":-81.6035062,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

205

Acme Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Acme Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Acme Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Contra Costa County, California Coordinates 37.8534093°, -121.9017954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8534093,"lon":-121.9017954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

206

BKK Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BKK Landfill Biomass Facility BKK Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BKK Landfill Biomass Facility Facility BKK Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

207

Dane County Landfill | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dane County Landfill Dane County Landfill Jump to: navigation, search Name Dane County Landfill Facility Dane County Landfill #2 Rodefeld Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dane County, Wisconsin Coordinates 43.0186073°, -89.5497632° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0186073,"lon":-89.5497632,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Westchester Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

209

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Kiefer Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Sacramento County, California Coordinates 38.47467°, -121.3541631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.47467,"lon":-121.3541631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Milliken Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Behavior of Capstone and Honeywell microturbine generators during load changes  

SciTech Connect

This report describes test measurements of the behavior of two microturbine generators (MTGs) under transient conditions. The tests were conducted under three different operating conditions: grid-connect; stand-alone single MTG with load banks; and two MTGs running in parallel with load banks. Tests were conducted with both the Capstone 30-kW and Honeywell Parallon 75-kW MTGs. All tests were conducted at the Southern California Edison /University of California, Irvine (UCI) test facility. In the grid-connected mode, several test runs were conducted with different set-point changes both up and down and a start up and shutdown were recorded for each MTG. For the stand-alone mode, load changes were initiated by changing load-bank values (both watts and VARs). For the parallel mode, tests involved changes in the load-bank settings as well as changes in the power set point of the MTG running in grid-connect mode. Detailed graphs of the test results are presented. It should be noted that these tests were done using a specific hardware and software configuration. Use of different software and hardware could result in different performance characteristics for the same units.

Yinger, Robert J.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

An alternative methodology for the analysis of electrical resistivity data from a soil gas study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......causes a problem, especially in landfill gas models. The uncertainties originate...the gas in the soil pores. In landfill gas models, several authors (e...Lamborn J. , 2007. Developing a landfill gas model, inTenth International Waste......

Sara Johansson; Hĺkan Rosqvist; Mats Svensson; Torleif Dahlin; Virginie Leroux

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Carbonates and oxalates in sediments and landfill: monitors of death and decay in natural and artificial systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...intermediate stage in the production of landfill gas and as a sink for ammonia as ammonium...waste are monitored by analysis of landfill gas and leachate. Gas compositional...years. Fig. 3. Evolution in landfill gas composition with time, showing...

DAVID A. C. MANNING

214

LANDFILL GAS CONVERSION TO LNG AND LCO{sub 2}. PHASE 1, FINAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 1998-FEBRUARY 1999  

SciTech Connect

Process designs and economics were developed to produce LNG and liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from landfill gas (LFG) using the Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process. The patented Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process uses liquid CO{sub 2} to absorb contaminants from the LFG. The process steps are compression, drying, CO{sub 2} wash contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery, residual CO{sub 2} removal and methane liquefaction. Three flowsheets were developed using different residual CO{sub 2} removal schemes. These included physical solvent absorption (methanol), membranes and molecular sieves. The capital and operating costs of the flowsheets were very similar. The LNG production cost was around ten cents per gallon. In parallel with process flowsheet development, the business aspects of an eventual commercial project have been explored. The process was found to have significant potential commercial application. The business plan effort investigated the economics of LNG transportation, fueling, vehicle conversion, and markets. The commercial value of liquid CO{sub 2} was also investigated. This Phase 1 work, March 1998 through February 1999, was funded under Brookhaven National laboratory contract 725089 under the research program entitled ``Liquefied Natural Gas as a Heavy Vehicle Fuel.'' The Phase 2 effort will develop flowsheets for the following: (1) CO{sub 2} and pipeline gas production, with the pipeline methane being liquefied at a peak shaving site, (2) sewage digester gas as an alternate feedstock to LFG and (3) the use of mixed refrigerants for process cooling. Phase 2 will also study the modification of Acrion's process demonstration unit for the production of LNG and a market site for LNG production.

COOK,W.J.; NEYMAN,M.; SIWAJEK,L.A.; BROWN,W.R.; VAN HAUWAERT,P.M.; CURREN,E.D.

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Landfill Leachate Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Leachate refers to the liquid, contaminated water, that results from the interaction between any water in a landfill, e.g., as the result of rainwater infiltration, and the waste emplaced in the landfill. Lea...

Dr. Haluk Akgün; Jaak J. K. Daemen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Landfill Methane Oxidation Across Climate Types in the U.S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane oxidation in landfill covers was determined by stable isotope analyses over 37 seasonal sampling events at 20 landfills with intermediate covers over four years. Values were calculated two ways: by assuming no isotopic fractionation during gas ...

Jeffrey Chanton; Tarek Abichou; Claire Langford; Gary Hater; Roger Green; Doug Goldsmith; Nathan Swan

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

217

Landfill site selection and landfill liner design for Ankara, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Considering the high population growth rate of Ankara, it is inevitable that landfill(s) will be required in the area ... scope of this study is to select alternative landfill sites for Ankara based on the growin...

Gözde P?nar Yal; Haluk Akgün

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Technical Note Methane gas migration through geomembranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Fick's law. This chart can be used by landfill designers to evaluate the methane gas transmission rate for a selected geomembrane type and thickness and expected methane gas pressure in the landfill. KEYWORDS landfill usually consists, from bottom to top, of: graded landfill surface; a gas-venting layer; a low

219

Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash September 28, 2010 - 5:35pm Addthis Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the

220

Landfill Bioreactor Financial Analysis—Monterey Peninsula Landfill, Marina, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Monterey Peninsula Landfill, owned and operated by the Monterey Regional ... that is permitted under the State of California landfill regulations. In order to evaluate the potential...

S. Purdy; R. Shedden

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

University of Washington Montlake Landfill Oversight Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Washington Montlake Landfill Oversight Committee Montlake Landfill Project Guide Department with the review and approval of the Montlake Landfill Oversight Committee. #12;Montlake Landfill ...................................................................................................................................3 Figure 1 ­ Approximate Boundaries of the Montlake Landfill

Wilcock, William

222

Aerobic landfill bioreactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Aerobic landfill bioreactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John C (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Leachate Free Hazardous Waste Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiences of the past few decades have shown that controlling leachate cannot be done by sealing only the landfill bed, but rather by sealing landfill top cover.

Dipl.Ing. Karl Rohrhofer; Dr.Techn. Fariar Kohzad

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing landfill performance Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and WTE waste management options... Transfer Stations (MTS); Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Landfill Gas (LFG): Geographic Wormation Systems (GIS... . Care has been taken to...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - areas treating landfill Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference COMPARISON OF AIR EMISSIONS FROM WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Summary: .K. dioxins emissions have been reported in the fugitive gas emissions from landfills as well as...

227

Sorption model of trichloroethylene (TCE) and benezene in municipal landfill materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research is intended to establish a mathematical model describing the mass transfer of trace gas in landfill. Experimental data used for calibration were reported… (more)

Chuang, Yuh-Lin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

I 95 Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name I 95 Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility Facility I 95 Landfill Phase II Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Fairfax County, Virginia Coordinates 38.9085472°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9085472,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Prima Desheha Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prima Desheha Landfill Biomass Facility Prima Desheha Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prima Desheha Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Prima Desheha Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Four Hills Nashua Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Four Hills Nashua Landfill Biomass Facility Four Hills Nashua Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Four Hills Nashua Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Four Hills Nashua Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates 42.8334794°, -71.6673352° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8334794,"lon":-71.6673352,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Landfill Biomass Facility County Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Ocean County Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Ocean County, New Jersey Coordinates 39.9652553°, -74.3118212° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9652553,"lon":-74.3118212,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

Cuyahoga Regional Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cuyahoga Regional Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Cuyahoga Regional Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cuyahoga County, Ohio Coordinates 41.7048247°, -81.7787021° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7048247,"lon":-81.7787021,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Biomass Facility Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Biomass Facility Facility Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809°, -116.6081653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

Mid Valley Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mid Valley Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Mid Valley Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Facility Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Catawba County, North Carolina Coordinates 35.6840748°, -81.2518833° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.6840748,"lon":-81.2518833,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Facility Pearl Hollow Landfil Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hardin County, Kentucky Coordinates 37.6565708°, -86.0121573° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6565708,"lon":-86.0121573,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

237

Unusual calcite stromatolites and pisoids from a landfill leachate collection system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with leachate. The remaining void space is filled with landfill gas, which is composed mainly of methane and carbon dioxide...with leachate. The remaining void space is filled with landfill gas, which is composed mainly of methane and carbon dioxide...

238

5341 sanitary landfill [n] (1)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

envir....(Process of controlled dumping [US]/tipping [UK] of industrial or domestic waste material on a landfill site by dumping/tipping in layers, each... sanitary landfill [US] 2 ...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance (HELP) modeling in bioreactor landfill design and permitting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The practice of operating municipal solid waste landfills as bioreactor landfills has become more common over the past ... balance and flow is more critical in such landfills than in dry landfills, researchers ha...

Qiyong Xu; Hwidong Kim; Pradeep Jain…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Update on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate Treatment Studyreatment Studyreatment Studyreatment Studyreatment Study continued on p  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Update on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate Treatment Studyreatment, the County of Hawaii is considering an expansion of the South Hilo Sanitary Landfill (SHSL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

GEOSYNTHETIC REINFORCEMENT IN LANDFILL DESIGN: US PERSPECTIVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOSYNTHETIC REINFORCEMENT IN LANDFILL DESIGN: US PERSPECTIVES Jorge G. Zornberg1 , M. ASCE Abstract: Geosynthetic reinforcement in landfill applications in the US has involved conventional reinforced soil structures and veneer stabilization with reinforcements placed along the landfill slope

Zornberg, Jorge G.

242

Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering Emissions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuels and thereby reduce their natural gas consumption. Opportunity gas fuels include biogas from animal and agri- cultural wastes, wastewater plants, and landfills, as well as...

243

Notes 15. Gas Bearings for oil-free MTM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kWatt 4 Micro Gas Turbines 100 Turbec, ABB & Volvo 70, 250 Ingersoll Rand 175 General Electric 35, 60, 80, 150 Elliott Energy Systems 30, 60, 200 Capstone 25, 80 Bowman OUTPUT POWER (kW) MANUFACTURER Microturbine Power Conversion Technology Review..., ORNL/TM-2003/74. Cogeneration systems with high efficiency ? Multiple fuels (best if free) ? 99.99X% Reliability ? Low emissions ? Reduced maintenance ? Lower lifecycle cost 60kW MGT www.microturbine.com Hybrid System : MGT with Fuel Cell can reach...

San Andres, Luis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

7.4 Landfill Methane Utilization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A chapter on Landfill Methane Utilization from the Clean Energy Strategies for Local Governments publication.

245

IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE OLD QUESNEL LANDFILL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE OLD QUESNEL LANDFILL FINAL REPORT DOE FRAP 1995-05 Prepared for List of Figures Site Location/Legal Boundary Old Quesnel Landfill .....................................2 Schematic of Source Pathway Receptor Model at Old Quesnel Landfill .......4 Landfill Extent

246

An impact analysis of landfill for waste disposal on climate change: Case study of ‘Sudokwon Landfill Site 2nd Landfill’ in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of waste landfill on climate change was analyzed by comparing...4 emission from landfill with the potential energy conversion. For this...4 were used against Sudokwon Landfill Site 2nd Landfill, which ...

Seung Kyu Chun; Young Shin Bae

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Livingston Parish Landfill Methane Recovery Project (Feasibility Study)  

SciTech Connect

The Woodside Landfill is owned by Livingston Parish, Louisiana and is operated under contract by Waste Management of Louisiana LLC. This public owner/private operator partnership is commonplace in the solid waste industry today. The landfill has been in operation since approximately 1988 and has a permitted capacity of approximately 41 million cubic yards. Based on an assumed in-place waste density of 0.94 ton per cubic yard, the landfill could have an expected design capacity of 39.3 million tons. The landfill does have an active landfill gas collection and control system (LFGCCS) in place because it meets the minimum thresholds for the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). The initial LFGCS was installed prior to 2006 and subsequent phases were installed in 2007 and 2010. The Parish received a grant from the United States Department of Energy in 2009 to evaluate the potential for landfill gas recovery and utilization at the Woodside Landfill. This includes a technical and economic feasibility study of a project to install a landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) plant and to compare alternative technologies. The LFGTE plant can take the form of on-site electrical generation, a direct use/medium Btu option, or a high-Btu upgrade technology. The technical evaluation in Section 2 of this report concludes that landfill gas from the Woodside landfill is suitable for recovery and utilization. The financial evaluations in sections 3, 4, and 5 of this report provide financial estimates of the returns for various utilization technologies. The report concludes that the most economically viable project is the Electricity Generation option, subject to the Parish’s ability and willingness to allocate adequate cash for initial capital and/or to obtain debt financing. However, even this option does not present a solid return: by our estimates, there is a 19 year simple payback on the electricity generation option. All of the energy recovery options discussed in this report economically stressed. The primary reason for this is the recent fundamental shift in the US energy landscape. Abundant supplies of natural gas have put downward pressure on any project that displaces natural gas or natural gas substitutes. Moreover, this shift appears long-term as domestic supplies for natural gas may have been increased for several hundred years. While electricity prices are less affected by natural gas prices than other thermal projects, they are still significantly affected since much of the power in the Entergy cost structure is driven by natural gas-fired generation. Consequently, rates reimbursed by the power company based on their avoided cost structure also face downward pressure over the near and intermediate term. In addition, there has been decreasing emphasis on environmental concerns regarding the production of thermal energy, and as a result both the voluntary and mandatory markets that drive green attribute prices have softened significantly over the past couple of years. Please note that energy markets are constantly changing due to fundamental supply and demand forces, as well as from external forces such as regulations and environmental concerns. At any point in the future, the outlook for energy prices may change and could deem either the electricity generation or pipeline injection project more feasible. This report is intended to serve as the primary background document for subsequent decisions made at Parish staff and governing board levels.

White, Steven

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Microsoft Word - Final TTR Landfill Extension EA--December 2006...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

continue until the landfill is closed. Once the landfill reaches capacity, sources of air pollution associated with the landfill would no longer be present. Waste transport...

249

Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover...

250

HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility Facility HMDC Kingsland Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type...

251

Risk assessment of gaseous emissions from municipal solid waste landfill: case study Rafah landfill, Palestine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the risk assessment of gaseous emissions from the municipal solid waste at Rafah landfill, Palestine. In this study, Gas-Sim model was used to quantify the gaseous emissions from the landfill and the Land-Gem model was used to verify the results. Risk assessment of both carcinogens and non-carcinogens were performed. Two scenarios were conducted namely with plant uptake and without plant uptake. The scenario with plant uptake revealed that the risk to residents is acceptable for non-carcinogens (risk value 0.45 > 1.0), while the risk to residents is not acceptable for carcinogens (risk value 2.69 × 10?6 risk to residents is acceptable for non-carcinogens (risk value 0.42 > 1.0), while the risk to residents is acceptable for carcinogens (risk value 2.855 × 10?7 > 10?6).

Ahmad A. Foul; Mazen Abualtayef; Basel Qrenawi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Facility I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Fairfax County, Virginia Coordinates 38.9085472°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9085472,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

Environmental Impacts of Landfill Bioreactorcells in Comparison to Former Landfill Techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Former and present landfill techniques at the Filbornaplant in Helsingborg, South ... the waste residue. The results showthat optimised landfill bioreactor-cells have a higherturn-over rate...

Michael Binder; Torleif Bramryd

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Recirculation of municipal landfill leachate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECIRCULATION OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE A Thesis by BRIAN JUDE PINKO4ISKI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering RECIRCULATION OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE A Thesis by BRIAN JUDE PINKOWSKI Approved as to style and content by: Charles P. Giammona (Chair of Committee) Roy . Harm, (Member) Kirk W. Brown (Member) Donald A. Maxwel...

Pinkowski, Brian Jude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Alternative Fuels Data Center: DeKalb County Turns Trash to Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

reductions Related Links Natural Gas Fuel Basics Natural Gas Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions Landfills Convert Biogas into RNG (video) DeKalb County Clean Cities Georgia...

258

Environmental factors influencing methanogenesis from refuse in landfill samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental factors influencing methanogenesis from refuse in landfill samples ... Biodegradability of Municipal Solid Waste Components in Laboratory-Scale Landfills ...

K. Rao Gurijala; Joseph M. Suflita

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An assessment of remediation measures and effects on groundwater quality at the Oneida County Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect

The Oneida County Sanitary Landfill has operated from 1979 to the present. The four existing landfill cells were constructed based on standards that existed at their time of development from 1979 to 1995. The landfill was initially permitted as a natural attenuation landfill with a silt soil base liner and top cover. Groundwater sampling at the site showed that many constituents exceeded Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter NR 140 (NR 140) standards throughout the 1980s. Measures that were implemented to remediate landfill impacts on groundwater quality included installation of a leachate/gas extraction system in 1990 and construction of a composite final cover over completed cells in 1994. In 1994, an Environmental Contamination Assessment (ECA) was conducted in accordance with NR 140 to evaluate landfill performance, groundwater quality trends, and future monitoring/remediation measures. Since implementation of the gas/leachate extraction system, there has been a reduction in detected volatile organic compounds in leachate, gas, gas condensate, and groundwater quality samples. Continued monitoring is necessary to evaluate remediation measures.

McGuire, P.; Otterson, S. [Rust Environment & Infrastructure, Sheboygan, WI (United States); Welhouse, G. [Environmental Compliance Consultants, Oshkosh, WI (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are important issues to consider when selecting a CHP technology, such as size, emissions, location of maintenance personnel, and efficiency. This document summarizes the following CHP technologies: Reciprocating Engine, Microturbine, Combustion Turbines, Stirling Engine, and Fuel Cell.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities ArunArun PurandarePurandare Eco Designs India Pvt. Ltd.Eco Designs India Pvt. Ltd. #12;What is a Landfill? A sanitary landfill refers to an engineered facility for the disposal of MSW designed and operated

Columbia University

262

Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock. As each facility has different guidelines and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock Adair Cherokee Nation Landfill 918-696-5342 Canadian OEMA Landfill 405-262-0161 Call ahead Carter Southern Okla. Regional Disposal Landfill 580-226-1276 Comanche City of Lawton Landfill 580

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

263

T2LBM Version 1.0: Landfill bioreactor model for TOUGH2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 2. LANDFILL BIODEGRADATIONof methanogenic activities in a landfill bioreactor treatingmethane production from landfill bioreactor, J. Env. Eng. ,

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Cleanup Agreed on for Niagara Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cleanup Agreed on for Niagara Landfill ... The U.S., New York state, and Occidental Chemical finally have reached agreement on how to clean up toxic liquid wastes at the Hyde Park landfill in Niagara, N.Y. ... The cleanup program is a multifaceted scheme designed to remove and destroy the most concentrated of the hazardous liquids buried in the landfill. ...

LOIS EMBER

1985-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

New instruments for measuring landfill gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New instruments for measuring landfill gases ... The legislation mandates that landfill operators monitor more than 1200 active sites for specific pollution products. ... According to Varian, the instrumentation systems can be adapted easily to meet landfill testing requirements that might be enacted in states other than California. ...

RUDY BAUM

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Municipal Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Municipal Landfill ... Due to the small area of landfills as compared to other land-use classes, the total N2O emissions from landfills are estimated to be of minor importance for the total emissions from Finland. ...

Janne Rinne; Mari Pihlatie; Annalea Lohila; Tea Thum; Mika Aurela; Juha-Pekka Tuovinen; Tuomas Laurila; Timo Vesala

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

Microgrid modeling using the stochastic Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engines, micro-turbines, gas turbines, fuel cells, heatengines, micro-turbines / gas turbines, fuel cells, heat

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

credit for renewable energy, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas combustion. Wastewater treatment, including both domestic wastewater (about two-thirds) and industrial...

269

Performance evaluation of synthetically lined landfills  

SciTech Connect

Landfill design and performance standards for new facilities frequently require the use of geomembrane composite and double liners. Performance data from synthetically lined landfill sites have not been widely available. This report presents data obtained by monitoring three recently constructed synthetically lined landfill sites. Quantities of leachate removed by the primary and secondary collection systems from these landfills were tabulated. The data show that properly designed and constructed synthetic landfill liners provide effective containment of leachate. The environmental protection provided by synthetic liners is equivalent or superior to that of typical clay-lined facilities.

Maule, J. [Champion International Corp., Norway, MI (United States); Lowe, R.K. [STS Consultants Ltd., Green Bay, WI (United States); McCulloch, J.L. [Cross Pointe Paper Co., Park Falls, WI (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fluxes of methane between landfills and the atmosphere: Natural and engineered controls  

SciTech Connect

Field measurement of landfill methane emissions indicates natural variability spanning more than 2 seven orders of magnitude, from approximately 0.0004 to more than 4000 g m{sub -2} day{sup -1}. This wide range reflects net emissions resulting from production (methanogenesis), consumption (methanotrophic oxidation), and gaseous transport processes. The determination of an {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} emission rate for a given field site requires sampling designs and statistical techniques which consider spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, particularly at sites with pumped gas recovery systems, it is possible for methanotrophic microorganisms in aerated cover soils to oxidize all of the methane from landfill sources below and, additionally, to oxidize methane diffusing into cover soils from atmospheric sources above. In such cases, a reversed soil gas concentration gradient is observed in shallow cover soils, indicating bidirectional diffusional transport to the depth of optimum methane oxidation. Rates of landfill methane oxidation from field and laboratory incubation studies range up to 166 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} among the highest for any natural setting, providing an effective natural control on net emissions. Estimates of worldwide landfill methane emissions to the atmosphere have ranged from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup -1}, differing mainly in assumed methane yields from estimated quantities of landfilled refuse. At highly controlled landfill sites in developed countries, landfill methane is often collected via vertical wells or horizontal collectors. Recovery of landfill methane through engineered systems can provide both environmental and energy benefits by mitigating subsurface migration, reducing surface emissions, and providing an alternative energy resource for industrial boiler use, on-site electrical generation, or upgrading to a substitute natural gas.

Bogner, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Meadows, M. [ETSU, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Czepiel, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Short Mountain Landfill gas recovery project  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a Federal power marketing agency, has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. BPA's latest load/resource balance forecast, projects the capability of existing resources to satisfy projected Federal system loads. The forecast indicates a potential resource deficit. The underlying need for action is to satisfy BPA customers' demand for electrical power.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupled to an induction generator, this HCCI genset allowspowered by the induction generator acting as a motor. OnceGenerator Size Weight Specification 6 (In-line) 6.6 L 21 Quart Air-Liquid (DEAC) 1.5 ATM 1800 RPM 35 kW Induction

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemical- kinetic model of propane HCCI combustion,” SAEof a four-cylinder 1.9 l propane- fueled homogeneous chargethe fuel line can use propane from a tank and NG from the

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Landfill reduction experience in The Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Modern waste legislation aims at resource efficiency and landfill reduction. This paper analyses more than 20 years of landfill reduction in the Netherlands. The combination of landfill regulations, landfill tax and landfill bans resulted in the desired landfill reduction, but also had negative effects. A fierce competition developed over the remaining waste to be landfilled. In 2013 the Dutch landfill industry generated €40 million of annual revenue, had €58 million annual costs and therefore incurred an annual loss of €18 million. It is not an attractive option to prematurely end business. There is a risk that Dutch landfill operators will not be able to fulfil the financial obligations for closure and aftercare. Contrary to the polluter pays principle the burden may end up with society. EU regulations prohibiting export of waste for disposal are in place. Strong differentials in landfill tax rate between nations have nevertheless resulted in transboundary shipment of waste and in non-compliance with the self-sufficiency and proximity principles. During the transformation from a disposal society to a recycling society, it is important to carefully plan required capacity and to guide the reorganisation of the landfill sector. At some point, it is no longer profitable to provide landfill services. It may be necessary for public organisations or the state to take responsibility for the continued operation of a ‘safety net’ in waste management. Regulations have created a financial incentive to pass on the burden of monitoring and controlling the impact of waste to future generations. To prevent this, it is necessary to revise regulations on aftercare and create incentives to actively stabilise landfills.

Heijo Scharff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA.

276

Indicating landfill stabilization state by using leachate property from Laogang Refuse Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variation and evolution process of leachate can be applied as a reference for landfill stabilization phase. In this work, leachates ... with different ages were collected from Laogang Refuse Landfill, and charact...

Ziyang Lou; Xiaoli Chai; Youcai Zhao…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Electrochemical treatment of landfill leachate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrochemical methods can offer an elegant contribution towards environmental control as electrons provide a means of removing pollutants by redox reactions. In the process of electrochemical oxidation the main aim has been to convert oxidisable species into carbon dioxide. Leachate originating in landfills is complex wastewater that could exert high environmental impact. This study aims to treat the landfill leachate in order to meet the inland disposal standards. The removal of pollutants was studied with different anode materials in electrochemical process. The treatment of leachate by electrochemical oxidation was carried out in a batch electrolytic parallel plate reactor. The electrochemical process was carried out separately with stainless steel as cathode and anode materials aluminium and titanium/platinum electrodes. The effects of the operating factors such as current density, reaction time, chloride ion concentration, additional electrolyte such as sulphuric acid that influence the removal of pollutant from leachate electrochemically were studied.

C. Ramprasad; A. Navaneetha Gopalakrishnan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Long-term behavior of municipal solid waste landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is presented to predict the long-term behavior of element concentrations (non-metals and metals) in the leachate of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. It is based on water flux and concentration measurements in leachates over one year, analysis of drilled cores from MSW landfills and leaching experiments with these samples. A mathematical model is developed to predict the further evolution of annual flux-weighted mean element concentrations in leachates after the “intensive reactor phase”, i.e. after the gas production has dropped to a very low level. The results show that the organic components are the most important substances to control until the leachate is compatible with the environment. This state of low emissions, the so-called “final storage quality”, will take many centuries to be achieved in a moderate climate.

H. Belevi; P. Baccini

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Gravity data as a tool for landfill study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper shows the potential of gravity data to map a buried landfill bottom topography. To this end, a ... gravity inversion method is presented for estimating the landfill’s bottom depths at discrete points a...

Joăo B. C. Silva; Wlamir A. Teixeira; Valéria C. F. Barbosa

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Acute and Genetic Toxicity of Municipal Landfill Leachate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have been found to contain many of the same hazardous constituents as found in hazardous waste landfills. Because of the large number of MSW landfills, these sites pose a serious environmental threat...

Brown, K.W.; Schrab, G.E.; Donnelly, K.C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI  

SciTech Connect

A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 – 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hydrogeological studies on the mechanical behavior of landfill gases and leachate of the Nanjido Landfill in Seoul, Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?The Nanjido Landfill is the largest uncontrolled landfill in Korea and it causes various kinds of environmental problems. Landfill gases and leachate are recognized as the most serious environmental problems ass...

K. K. Lee; Y. Y. Kim; H. W. Chang; S. Y. Chung

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- West Lake Landfill - MO...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Lake Landfill - MO 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: West Lake Landfill (MO.05) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition:...

284

Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover...

285

CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants There are important issues to consider when selecting...

286

CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores...

287

Models for Hydrologic Design of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Models for Hydrologic Design of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers ... The focus of the HELP model is on the man-made features of landfills. ...

Victor L. Hauser; Dianna M. Gimon; James V. Bonta; Terry A. Howell; Robert W. Malone; Jimmy R. Williams

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Briefing: DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Workshop & Path Forward Briefing: DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward By: Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Where: SSAB Teleconference 2 Subject: DOE EM...

289

Briefing: Summary and Recommendations of EM Landfill Workshop...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Briefing: Summary and Recommendations of EM Landfill Workshop Briefing: Summary and Recommendations of EM Landfill Workshop The briefing is an independent technical review report...

290

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Woburn Landfill - MA 07  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Woburn Landfill - MA 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Woburn Landfill (MA.07) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name:...

291

Leaching of cadmium from pigmented plastics in a landfill site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Leaching of cadmium from pigmented plastics in a landfill site ... Plastics ending up in soil or landfill environment will eventually be degraded. ...

David C. Wilson; Peter J. Young; Brinley C. Hudson; Grant. Baldwin

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Data Summary of Municipal Solid Waste Management Alternatives. Volume VIII: Appendix F - Landfills  

SciTech Connect

While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community's solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a transition'' document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

None

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 8, Appendix F, Landfills  

SciTech Connect

While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community`s solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a ``transition`` document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

State bans dumping of chemicals in landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

State bans dumping of chemicals in landfill ... California governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. has begun a program aimed at eliminating most hazardous-waste chemicals from landfills in that state—a goal that will be difficult and costly to achieve. ...

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

295

The dependence of the methylation of mercury on the landfill stabilization process and implications for the landfill management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mercury species and other chemical characteristics of the leachate from anaerobic and semi-aerobic landfills were analyzed to investigate the factors that control mercury methylation during the landfill stabilization process. At the early landfill stage, the total mercury (THg) and the monomethyl mercury (MMHg) released rapidly and significantly, the \\{THg\\} concentration of the semi-aerobic landfill leachate was obviously higher than that of the anaerobic landfill leachate, while compared with the semi-aerobic landfill, the \\{MMHg\\} concentration in the anaerobic landfill was higher. As the landfill time increased, both of \\{THg\\} and \\{MMHg\\} concentration decreased quickly, the \\{THg\\} concentration in the anaerobic landfill was much higher than that in semi-aerobic landfill, while the \\{MMHg\\} concentration in the anaerobic landfill was lower than that in the semi-aerobic landfill. Generally, the concentrations of dimethyl mercury (DMHg) in the anaerobic landfill leachate were slightly higher than in the semi-aerobic landfill leachate during the stabilization process. A significant positive correlation was found between the \\{DMHg\\} concentrations and the pH value in anaerobic landfill leachate, but this correlation was opposite in the semi-aerobic landfill. The oxidative–reductive potential (ORP) condition was found to be the controlling factor of the methylation process during the early stage. However, the chemical characteristics, especially the TOC concentration, appeared to be the dominant factor affecting the methylation process as the landfill time increased.

Xiaoli Chai; Yongxia Hao; Zhonggen Li; Wei Zhu; Wentao Zhao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Landfill Instability and Its Implications Operation, Construction, and Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landfill Instability and Its Implications for Operation, Construction, and Design By: W. Douglas landfill waste slide, a 300,000 cubic yard landfill failure involving a geosynthetic clay liner, and a 100,000 cubic yard landfill failure involving leachate recirculation. Other failures of lesser magnitude also

297

Metal speciation in landfill leachates with a focus on the influence of organic matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed. hal-00605888

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

298

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

299

Public health assessment for Seattle Municipal Landfill/Kent Highlands, Kent, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD980639462. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle Municipal Landfill, better known as the Kent Highlands Landfill, is located in the City of Kent, approximately 14 miles south of the City of Seattle, Washington, at 23076 Military Road South. Surface water settling ponds, a leachate collection system, and gas collection system have been constructed. Only one completed pathway exists, which is the use of Midway Creek by recreationists. However, worst case scenarios were evaluated and there did not appear to be a human health threat. Two potential pathways were analyzed, for landfill gas and ground water. Again the worst case scenarios did not reveal any imminent human health threat.

Not Available

1994-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

Reverse osmosis module successfully treats landfill leachate  

SciTech Connect

By law, modern landfills are to be constructed with double liners to prevent contaminants from leaching into surface and ground water. Despite this design feature, however, both hazardous and non-hazardous compounds do leach from the waste disposed in landfills. The resulting contaminated water, or leachate, must be collected and treated. Rochem Environmental, Inc. (Houston, Texas) has developed a new membrane process, known as the Disc Tube{trademark} system, to remove a variety of contaminants from landfill leachate. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy  

SciTech Connect

An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Geohydrology and groundwater geochemistry at a sub-arctic landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough, Alaska, landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperature, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of groundwater flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water supply wells. 11 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Landfill Leachate Treatment by Reverse Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Leachate from landfill sites represents a highly polluted waste water. It containes biodegradable compounds but also inorganic salts and trace recalcitrant pollutants. The reverse osmosis process with or without ...

B. Weber; F. Holz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Landfill Closure and Reuse of Land  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This section examines the sustainable reuse of existing landfill sites . Sustainability is examined in the context of the existing regulatory authority of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US...

Dr. Joseph J. Lifrieri Ph.D; PE; CPG…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Chapter 4 - Natural Gas–fired Gas Turbines and Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas turbines can burn a range of liquid and gaseous fuels but most burn natural gas. Power plants based on gas turbines are one of the cheapest types of plant to build, but the cost of their electricity depends heavily on the cost of their fuel. Two types of gas turbine are used for power generation: aero-derivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines. The former are used to provide power to the grid at times of peak demand. The latter are most often found in combined cycle power stations. These are capable of more than 60% efficiency. There are a number of ways of modifying the gas turbine cycle to improve efficiency, including reheating and intercooling. Micro-turbines have been developed for very small-scale generation of both electricity and heat. The main atmospheric emissions from gas turbines are carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

If current capacity were to be expanded so that all of the non-recycled municipal solid waste that is currently sent to U.S. landfills each year could instead be converted to energy, we could generate enough electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so that we could convert our non-recycled waste to alternative energy instead of landfilling it, we-recycled waste into energy instead of landfilling it, we could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by nearly our roads. The Power of Waste GARBAGE ENERGY REDUCES 123M TONS CO2 = 23M LESS CARS PLASTICS 5.7B

307

Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily  

SciTech Connect

Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

FRASER BASIN LANDFILL INVENTORY DOE FRAP 1997-19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-term sustainability of the Fraser River Basin. Inventories of point and non-point sources of pollution from both's WASTE database, Federal Indian Band Landfill investigations, and BC Environment's Municipal Landfill

309

Wasting Time : a leisure infrastructure for mega-landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landfills are consolidating into fewer, taller, and more massive singular objects in the exurban landscape.This thesis looks at one instance in Virginia, the first regional landfill in the state to accept trash from New ...

Nguyen, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Margaret)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned By: Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE Where: EM SSAB...

311

1 INTRODUCTION The use of geosynthetics in modern landfills involves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INTRODUCTION The use of geosynthetics in modern landfills involves important roles because systems for landfills typically include both geosynthetics and earthen material components, (e-established components of the landfill industry. The state of the art on the use of geosynthetics in waste containment

Zornberg, Jorge G.

312

Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume E T H A N L . G R O S S M A N , * , L U I Landfill, OK, provides an excellent natural laboratory for the study of anaerobicprocessesimpactinglandfill enrichment indicated that 80-90% of the original landfill methane was oxidized over the 210-m transect. First

Grossman, Ethan L.

313

ORIGINAL PAPER The conservation value of restored landfill sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER The conservation value of restored landfill sites in the East Midlands, UK landfill sites. However, this potential largely remains unexplored. In this study, birds were counted using point sampling on nine restored landfill sites in the East Midlands region of the UK during 2007

Northampton, University of

314

LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING GEOSYTNTHETICS Virginia L. Wilson.L. Soderman and G.P. Raymond November 12, 1998 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING slopes at waste containment facilities. The Geneva Landfill is located near Geneva, Ohio which

315

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum, may react with liquid in a landfill and cause uncontrolled temperature increases, significant changes

316

Geosynthetics in Landfills Prepared by M. Bouazza and J. Zornberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geosynthetics in Landfills Prepared by M. Bouazza and J. Zornberg Geosynthetics are extensively used in the design of both base and cover liner systems of landfill facilities. This includes that can be used as an infiltration/hydraulic barrier; · geopipes, which can be used in landfill

Zornberg, Jorge G.

317

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills G. Vincent Calder, Ph.D.1 ; and Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE2 Abstract: Aluminum enters municipal solid waste MSW landfills from problematic for landfill operations by generating undesirable heat, liquid leachate, and gases

318

Review Paper/ Biogeochemical Evolution of a Landfill Leachate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Paper/ Biogeochemical Evolution of a Landfill Leachate Plume, Norman, Oklahoma by I Abstract Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade

319

Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill Jorge G. Zornberg, M, Inc. OII Superfund landfill in southern California. This cover system constitutes the first ET cover:6 427 CE Database subject headings: Evapotranspiration; Coating; Landfills; Hazardous waste; Design

Zornberg, Jorge G.

320

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have released a planning document that specifies how DOE will continue to remediate a landfill containing hazardous and transuranic waste at DOE's Idaho Site located in eastern Idaho. The Phase 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 document was issued after the September 2008 Record of Decision (ROD) and implements the retrieval of targeted waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The SDA began receiving waste in 1952 and contains radioactive and chemical waste in approximately 35 acres of disposal pits, trenches and soil vaults.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Suitability of Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model of the US Environmental Protection Agency for the simulation of the water balance of landfill cover systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Cover systems are widely used to safeguard landfills and contaminated sites. The evaluation of the ... water balance is crucial for the design of landfill covers. The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performanc...

K. Berger; S. Melchior; G. Miehlich

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Life cycle assessment (LCA) of solid waste management strategies in Tehran: landfill and composting plus landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As circumstances of operating and maintenance activities for landfilling and composting in Tehran metropolis differ from those of cities in developed countries, it was concluded to have an environmental impact co...

M. A. Abduli; Abolghasem Naghib; Mansoor Yonesi…

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Full Scale Bioreactor Landfill for Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Emission Control  

SciTech Connect

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works constructed a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective was to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entailed the construction of a 12-acre module that contained a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells were highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Kathy Sananikone; Don Augenstein

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

Turning waste into energy beats landfilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, not incineration. Miller and others also refer to incineration as a source of dioxins, and they're right. But let's put things in perspective. In Sweden, which has 30 incineration plants, the total amount of dioxins that the landfills throughout Ontario and Michigan release fewer dioxins than that, he needs to hire better advisers

Columbia University

327

Behavior of Engineered Nanoparticles in Landfill Leachate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research sought to understand the behavior of engineered nanoparticles in landfill leachate by examining the interactions between nanoparticles and leachate components. The primary foci of this paper are the effects of ZnO, TiO2, and Ag nanoparticles ...

Stephanie C. Bolyard; Debra R. Reinhart; Swadeshmukul Santra

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

328

Evaluation of battery/microturbine hybrid energy storage technologies at the University of Maryland :a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect

This study describes the technical and economic benefits derived from adding an energy storage component to an existing building cooling, heating, and power system that uses microturbine generation to augment utility-provided power. Three different types of battery energy storage were evaluated: flooded lead-acid, valve-regulated lead-acid, and zinc/bromine. Additionally, the economic advantages of hybrid generation/storage systems were evaluated for a representative range of utility tariffs. The analysis was done using the Distributed Energy Technology Simulator developed for the Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories by Energetics, Inc. The study was sponsored by the U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program through Sandia National Laboratories and was performed in coordination with the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Energy Engineering.

De Anda, Mindi Farber (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC); Fall, Ndeye K. (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

BACK-ANALYSES OF LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURES Nejan Huvaj-Sarihan Timothy D. Stark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BACK-ANALYSES OF LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURES Nejan Huvaj-Sarihan Timothy D. Stark University strength of MSW. The back-analysis of failed waste slopes in the Gnojna Grora landfill in Poland, Istanbul Landfill in Turkey, Hiriya Landfill in Israel, and Payatas Landfill in Philippines are presented

330

Geohydrology and ground-water geochemistry at a sub-Arctic Landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska. Water resources investigation  

SciTech Connect

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water-supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperatures, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of ground-water flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water-supply wells.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shpack Landfill - MA 06  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shpack Landfill - MA 06 Shpack Landfill - MA 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shpack Landfill, NY Alternate Name(s): Attleboro, MA Metals and Controls Site Norton Landfill area MA.06-2 MA.06-3 Location: 68 Union Road, Norton, Massachusetts MA.06-2 Historical Operations: No AEC activities were conducted on site. Contamination was suspected from disposal of materials containing uranium and zirconium ash. MA.06-2 MA.06-3 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MA.06-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MA.06-4 MA.06-5 MA.06-6 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. MA.06-7 MA.06-8 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Shpack Landfill, NY MA.06-1 - DOE Memorandum; Meyers to Hart; Subject: Shpack Landfill,

332

Request for Qualifications for Sacramento Landfill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Request for Qualifications (RFQ) solicits experienced companies to design, permit, finance, build, and operate a solar photovoltaic farm (SPV Farm) on the City of Sacramento’s 28th Street Landfill. Respondents to this RFQ must demonstrate experience and capacity to design, permit, finance, build, and operate a SPV Farm that generates electricity that can be sold for electrical use through a power-purchase agreement. Submittals must be prepared and delivered in accordance with the requirements set forth in this document.

333

Hydrogeological Environmental Assessment of Sanitary Landfill Project at Jammu City, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRASTIC Method The prepared landfill project is supposed toAssessment of Sanitary Landfill Project at Jammu City, Indiaimpact of a proposed landfill facility for the city of Jammu

Nagar, Bharat Bhushan; Mirza, Umar Karim

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Multiphase Modeling of Flow, Transport, and Biodegradation in a Mesoscale Landfill Bioreactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1179. Popov, V. ; Power, H. Landfill emission of gases intoC.M. T2LBM Version 1.0: Landfill bioreactor model forand recovery from landfills, Ann Arbor Science Publishers,

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hazen, Terry C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Enhanced Landfill Mining Symposium EEC/WTERT Participation at ELFM Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced Landfill Mining Symposium EEC/WTERT Participation at ELFM Conference of Enhanced Landfill Mining. Held at the Greenville (Center of Cleantech of old landfills, each containing valuable resources that are untapped

336

Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial community profile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial from groundwater monitoring wells located within and around an aquifer contaminated with landfill. In this landfill leachate application, the weighted SOM assembles the microbial community data from monitoring

Vermont, University of

337

GeoChip-based Analysis of Groundwater Microbial Diversity in Norman Landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diversity in Norman Landfill Zhenmei Lu 1,2 , Zhili He 2,4 ,projects/norlan / ABSTRACT The Norman Landfill is a closedmunicipal solid waste landfill located on an alluvium

Lu, Zhenmei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The UK landfill tax and the landfill tax credit scheme: operational weaknesses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The UK Landfill Tax and the related Landfill Tax Credit Scheme have now been in operation since October 1996. There have been a number of reviews to assess its operation and effectiveness that have led to some minor amendments. However, there continue to be concerns about operational weaknesses of the tax and the credit scheme. In particular, there is the risk that the tax may be evaded and there are fears that a lack of transparency and independence may undermine the fundamental principles of the Landfill Tax Credit Scheme. Following a recent report, the Secretary of State for the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions has set up an inquiry. This paper looks at some of the specific concerns that have been raised and the implications for waste management.

John R. Morris; Adam D. Read

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - ardeer landfill scotland Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

...28 Are there risks associated with landfilling of air pollution control residues... . 79% went to landfill sites, 21% to ash processors to make into...

340

"Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in "Recycling". "Waste-to-Energy" is now defined as Recycling, when energy efficiency is > 0,65 Prevention Reuse Recycling and Waste-to Energy? #12;6 European Policies on Landfill Ban The EU Landfill Directive The amount Ban decided upon in 2000, in force in 2005. A very strong effect, with a strong increase of Waste-to-Energy

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Seismic Response Analysis of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to the engineering practice of municipal solid waste landfill, the dynamic response of landfill based on the finite element method is implemented. The equivalent linearization method is used to consider the non-linear dynamic response characteristics. ... Keywords: Dynamic response, Ground motion input, Finite element method

Zhang Guodong; Li Yong; Jin Xing; Li Rongbin; Chen Fei

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and Demolition (C&D) Debris: Arsenic phased out of many residential uses in the United States, the disposal of CCA-treated wood remains. Catastrophic events have also led to the concentrated disposal of CCA-treated wood, often in unlined landfills

Florida, University of

343

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pfohl Brothers Landfill - NY 66  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pfohl Brothers Landfill - NY 66 Pfohl Brothers Landfill - NY 66 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pfohl Brothers Landfill (NY.66 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Five-Year Review Report Pfohl Brothers Landfill Superfund Site Erie County Town of Cheektowaga, New York EPA REGION 2 Congressional District(s): 30 Erie Cheektowaga NPL LISTING HISTORY Documents Related to Pfohl Brothers Landfill Historical documents may contain links which are no longer valid or to outside sources. LM can not attest to the accuracy of information provided by these links. Please see the Leaving LM Website page for more details.

344

Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No More Green Waste in the Landfill No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2) has teamed with the Facilities' Grounds and Roads team and the Solid Waste Transfer Facility to implement green waste composting. Previously, branches and logs were being diverted and mulched by Kirtland Air Force Base at their Construction & Demolition Landfill that is on base and utilized under contract by Sandia. The mulch is available to the Air Force and Sandia for landscaping uses. However, grass clippings, leaves, and other green waste were being disposed in the landfill. In an initiative to save time and trips by small trucks with trailers to the landfill carrying organic debris, two 30 cubic yard rolloffs were

345

Municipal landfill leachate treatment by SBBGR technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper reports the results of a laboratory-scale investigation aimed at evaluating the performance of a periodic biofilter with granular biomass (SBBGR) for treating leachate coming from a mature municipal landfill. The results show that the SBBGR was able to remove roughly 80% of COD in leachate. The remaining 20% of COD were, therefore, presumably owing to the presence in the leachate of recalcitrant compounds. Ammonia removal efficiency was low because of the presence of high salinity and inhibitory compounds in the investigated leachate. The process was characterised by very low sludge production (lower than 0.02 kg TSS/kg CODremoved).

Claudio Di Iaconi; Guido Del Moro; Michele Pagano; Roberto Ramadori

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Short Mountain Landfill Gas Recovery Project : Stage 1 Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a Federal power marketing agency, has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. BPA`s latest load/resource balance forecast, projects the capability of existing resources to satisfy projected Federal system loads. The forecast indicates a potential resource deficit. The underlying need for action is to satisfy BPA customers` demand for electrical power.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

In-situ Removal of Hydrogen Sulphide from Landfill Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This project was compiled in co-operation with the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm and Veolia Environmental Services (Australia) at the Woodlawn Bioreactor in NSW,… (more)

Lazarevic, David Andrew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fordonsgas frĺn deponier; Vehicle fuel from landfill gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The demand for biogas as vehicle fuel has risen sharply and there is a great need for increased production. A possible addition of vehicle… (more)

Willén, Jessica

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Simulation of Landfill Gas Performance in a Spark Ignited Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Computer simulations were performed using KIVA-4 code to determine performance of a spark ignited engine fueled by methane diluted with carbon dioxide to approximate… (more)

Swain, Daniel P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview of market opportunities for CHP and bioenergy for landfills and wastewater treatment plants

351

The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol-restricted Halocarbons in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol-restricted Halocarbons of Geophysics #12;2 #12;The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. With several hundred MSW landfills in both the US and UK, estimating

352

Micrometeorological Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes at a Municipal Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micrometeorological Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes at a Municipal Landfill ... Of the global anthropogenic CH4 emissions, more than 10% originates from landfills (1). ... Landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic CH4 emissions to the atm. in the US; however, few measurements of whole landfill CH4 emissions have been reported. ...

Annalea Lohila; Tuomas Laurila; Juha-Pekka Tuovinen; Mika Aurela; Juha Hatakka; Tea Thum; Mari Pihlatie; Janne Rinne; Timo Vesala

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

PREFERENTIAL FLOW THROUGH EARTHEN LANDFILL COVERS: FIELD EVALUATION OF ROOT ZONE WATER QUALITY MODEL (RZWQM) AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract PREFERENTIAL FLOW THROUGH EARTHEN LANDFILL COVERS: FIELD EVALUATION OF ROOT ZONE WATER into the waste, earthen landfill covers are constructed once a landfill reaches its capacity. Formation earthen landfill covers during service. Most commonly used water balance models that are used

354

Development of a Wireless Sensor Network for Monitoring a Bioreactor Landfill Asis Nasipuri,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Development of a Wireless Sensor Network for Monitoring a Bioreactor Landfill Asis Nasipuri,1 treatment and disposal costs of leachate, and increasing landfill capacity. Such aerobic decomposition engineered containment structures i.e. landfilling. The goal of a conventional landfill (typically referred

Nasipuri, Asis

355

Bulletin of Entomological Research (1999) 89, 493498 493 Fly populations associated with landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulletin of Entomological Research (1999) 89, 493­498 493 Fly populations associated with landfill at the following sites in Hampshire, UK during August to November 1998: a landfill and composting site (Paulsgrove), a site adjacent to this landfill (Port Solent), a site with no landfill nearby (Gosport

356

Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium 1 Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions From Landfills, 2000-2030 E. MATTHEWS1 , N. J. THEMELIS2 1 NASA Goddard ~1200 Tg/yr (1 Tg = 1012 g), >70% of which is landfilled. Landfilling of waste contributes ~30-35 Tg

Columbia University

357

Microsoft Word - Roosevelt-HW-Hill_Landfill-G0335-I0019-CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2009 1, 2009 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Hall Customer Service Engineer - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: H.W. Hill / Roosevelt Landfill Gas Generation Expansion Project (#I0019 and #G0335) Budget Information: Work Order # 244620, Task # 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7: "Acquisition, installation, operation, and removal of communication systems..." B4.6: "Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area..." Location: Klickitat County, Washington Proposed by: Klickitat County Public Utility District No.1 (KPUD) and Bonneville Power

358

Biomass gasification project gets funding to solve black liquor safety and landfill problems  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on biomass gasifications. The main by-product in pulp making is black liquor from virgin fiber; the main by-product in paper recycling is fiber residue. Although the black liquor is recycled for chemical and energy recovery, safety problems plague the boilers currently used to do this. The fiber residue is usually transported to a landfill. The system being developed by MTCI will convert black liquor and fiber residue into a combustible gas, which can then be used for a wide variety of thermal or power generation applications.

Black, N.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Appendix B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

B B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank Original Landfill January 2012 Monthly Inspection-Attachment 1 The monthly inspection of the OLF was completed on January 30. The Rocky Flats Site only received .15 inches of precipitation during the month of January. The cover was dry at the time of the inspection. The slump in the East Perimeter Channel (EPC) remained unchanged. Berm locations that were re-graded during the OLF Maintenance 2011 Project remained in good condition. Vegetation on the landfill cover including the seep areas remains dormant. OLF Cover Lower OLF Cover Facing East Upper OLF Cover Facing East

360

US EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Methane Outreach Program Landfill Methane Outreach Program Jump to: navigation, search Name US EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program Agency/Company /Organization United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Biomass Topics Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Workshop Website http://www.epa.gov/lmop/intern Country China, Ecuador, Mexico, Philippines, Thailand, Ukraine, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama Eastern Asia, South America, Central America, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Europe, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America References LMOP[1]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimizations. Technologies assessed include photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal, gas turbines, microturbines, fuel cells,

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Full-Scale Practice of Ecologically Based Landfill of Municipal Solid Waste: to Accecelerate The Biological Conversion Inside Landfill and Cover Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The application of bioreactor landfill with leachate recirculation was usually confronted with ... leachate. A modified operation called “ecologically based landfill” was induced by recycling the pre-treated fres...

Pin-Jing He

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)  

SciTech Connect

The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2)...

365

http://ndep.nv.gov/bwm/landfill.htm  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Story County Ely Landfill City of Ely Operating - Class I & III Permitted City of Ely White Pine County White Pine Energy Station (WPES) Class III disposal site White Pine County...

366

Modeling of leachate generation in municipal solid waste landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters specified by the user. Ultimately, this model will strive to replace the time the user requires to generate and fill a given landfill geometry with time spent running and evaluating trials to yield the best design....

Beck, James Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and 07: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 26, 2011 EA-1707: Revised Draft Environmental Assessment Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 13, 2010 EA-1707: Draft Environmental Assessment

368

How does landfill leachate affect the chemical processes in a lake system downgradient from a landfill site?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A field study on the geochemical properties of a chemically-stressed limnic environment was performed in Lake Silbersee, which receives leachate water of high inorganic loading from an upgradient landfill site. T...

Thomas Striebel; Wolfgang Schäfer; Stefan Peiffer

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Metal speciation in landfill leachates with a focus on the influence of organic matter  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. > Most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while Pb, Cu and Cd are associated with larger particles. > Metal complexation with OM is not sufficient to explain apparent supersaturation of metals with sulphide minerals. - Abstract: This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

Claret, Francis, E-mail: f.claret@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Tournassat, Christophe; Crouzet, Catherine; Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Schaefer, Thorsten [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Hydrogeology Group, D-12249 Berlin (Germany); Braibant, Gilles; Guyonnet, Dominique [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS) for Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Methane is an important contributor to global warming with a total climate forcing estimated to be close to 20% that of carbon dioxide (CO2) over the past two decades. The largest anthropogenic source of methane in the US is 'conventional' landfills, which account for over 30% of anthropogenic emissions. While controlling greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily focus on large CO2 sources, attention to reducing CH4 emissions from landfills can result in significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions at low cost. For example, the use of 'controlled' or bioreactor landfilling has been estimated to reduce annual US greenhouse emissions by about 15-30 million tons of CO2 carbon (equivalent) at costs between $3-13/ton carbon. In this project we developed or advanced new management approaches, landfill designs, and landfill operating procedures for bioreactor landfills. These advances are needed to address lingering concerns about bioreactor landfills (e.g., efficient collection of increased CH4 generation) in the waste management industry, concerns that hamper bioreactor implementation and the consequent reductions in CH4 emissions. Collectively, the advances described in this report should result in better control of bioreactor landfills and reductions in CH4 emissions. Several advances are important components of an Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS).

Paul Imhoff; Ramin Yazdani; Don Augenstein; Harold Bentley; Pei Chiu

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Methane production during the anaerobic decomposition of composted and raw organic refuse in simulated landfill cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production from landfills if organic waste is composted prior to. The quantities and rates of methane production were measured from simulated landfill cells containing composted and raw simulated refuse. The refuse was composted in an open pile...

West, Margrit Evelyn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - air force landfill Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving Forces towards Materials... lack of Waste-to-Energy capacity. 12;9 Austria As Germany, but Ban in force already in 2002. Landfill... Landfill Ban in force already in...

373

11. GEOELECTRICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF COVERED LANDFILL SITES: A PROCESS-ORIENTED MODEL AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in disused quarries or special purpose-built structures but not all past landfill operations were adequately

Meju, Max

374

Results of Hazardous and Mixed Waste Excavation from the Chemical Waste Landfill  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the excavation of a 1.9-acre hazardous and mixed waste landfill operated for 23 years at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Excavation of the landfill was completed in 2 1/2 years without a single serious accident or injury. Approximately 50,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organics, metals, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and radioactive constituents was removed. In addition, over 400 cubic yards of buried debris was removed, including bulk debris, unknown chemicals, compressed gas cylinders, thermal and chemical batteries, explosive and ordnance debris, pyrophoric materials and biohazardous waste. Removal of these wastes included negotiation of multiple regulations and guidances encompassed in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and risk assessment methodology. RCRA concepts that were addressed include the area of contamination, permit modification, emergency treatment provision, and listed waste designation. These regulatory decisions enabled the project to overcome logistical and programmatic needs such as increased operational area, the ability to implement process improvements while maintaining a record of decisions and approvals.

Young, S. G.; Schofield, D. P.; Kwiecinski, D.; Edgmon, C. L.; Methvin, R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

Metal Speciation in Landfill Leachates with a Focus on the Influence of Organic Matter  

SciTech Connect

This study characterizes the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

F Claret; C Tournassat; C Crouzet; E Gaucher; T Schäfer; G Braibant; D Guyonnet

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Review of state of the art methods for measuring water in landfills  

SciTech Connect

In recent years several types of sensors and measurement techniques have been developed for measuring the moisture content, water saturation, or the volumetric water content of landfilled wastes. In this work, we review several of the most promising techniques. The basic principles behind each technique are discussed and field applications of the techniques are presented, including cost estimates. For several sensors, previously unpublished data are given. Neutron probes, electrical resistivity (impedance) sensors, time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensors, and the partitioning gas tracer technique (PGTT) were field tested with results compared to gravimetric measurements or estimates of the volumetric water content or moisture content. Neutron probes were not able to accurately measure the volumetric water content, but could track changes in moisture conditions. Electrical resistivity and TDR sensors tended to provide biased estimates, with instrument-determined moisture contents larger than independent estimates. While the PGTT resulted in relatively accurate measurements, electrical resistivity and TDR sensors provide more rapid results and are better suited for tracking infiltration fronts. Fiber optic sensors and electrical resistivity tomography hold promise for measuring water distributions in situ, particularly during infiltration events, but have not been tested with independent measurements to quantify their accuracy. Additional work is recommended to advance the development of some of these instruments and to acquire an improved understanding of liquid movement in landfills by application of the most promising techniques in the field.

Imhoff, Paul T. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)], E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu; Reinhart, Debra R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Englund, Marja [Fortum Service Ltd., P.O. Box 10, FIN-00048, Fortum (Finland); Guerin, Roger [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR 7619 Sisyphe, case courrier 105, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Gawande, Nitin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Han, Byunghyun [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Jonnalagadda, Sreeram; Townsend, Timothy G. [Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences Department, Gainesville, FL 32609 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Planning, Resources, and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, 292 West Beamer Street, Woodland, CA 95695 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

REACTION AND COMBUSTION INDICATORS IN MSW LANDFILLS Jeffrey W. Martin1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REACTION AND COMBUSTION INDICATORS IN MSW LANDFILLS Jeffrey W. Martin1 ,P.G., R.S., Timothy D, Ohio. ABSTRACT Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills may contain aluminum from residential, particularly aluminum production wastes, may react exothermically with liquid within a landfill and cause

378

Nitrogen removal via nitrite in a sequencing batch reactor treating sanitary landfill leachate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen removal via nitrite in a sequencing batch reactor treating sanitary landfill leachate, for the automation of a bench-scale SBR treating leachate generated in old landfills. Attention was given 20­30% due to the low biodegradability of organic matter in the leach- ate from old landfills

379

Beneficial Use of Shredded Tires as Drainage Material in Cover Systems for Abandoned Landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beneficial Use of Shredded Tires as Drainage Material in Cover Systems for Abandoned Landfills in cover systems for abandoned landfills. The research study included extensive laboratory testing and field demonstration at an abandoned landfill in Carlinville, Ill. Laboratory testing was conducted using

380

Geosynthetics International, 2010, 17, No.3 Design of a landfill final cover system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geosynthetics International, 2010, 17, No.3 Design of a landfill final cover system T. D. Stark containment, Strength, Stability, Shearbox test, Failure, Final cover system, Landfill REFERENCE: Stark, T. D. & Newman, E. J. (20 I0). Design of a landfill final cover systcm. Geosynthetics [ntemational17, No.3, 124

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sepiolite as an Alternative Liner Material in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sepiolite as an Alternative Liner Material in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Yucel Guney1 ; Savas in municipal solid waste landfills. However, natural clays may not always provide good contaminant sorption necessitates addition of kaolinite before being used as a landfill material. The valence of the salt solutions

Aydilek, Ahmet

382

Application of Bayesian inference methods to inverse modeling for contaminant source identification at Gloucester Landfill, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identification at Gloucester Landfill, Canada Anna M. Michalak and Peter K. Kitanidis Department of Civil plume at the Gloucester landfill site in Ontario, Canada. This work constitutes the first application]. In this paper, we infer the 1,4-dioxane release history from the Gloucester landfill in Ontario, Canada, based

Michalak, Anna M.

383

Clogging Potential of Tire Shred-Drainage Layer in Landfill Cover Systems Krishna R. Reddy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Clogging Potential of Tire Shred-Drainage Layer in Landfill Cover Systems Krishna R. Reddy of shredded scrap tire drainage layers in landfill covers. Laboratory clogging tests were conducted using soil to 50 cm. The soil layer consisted of silty clay that is commonly used as cover soil in landfill cover

384

Comparison of four composite landfill liner systems considering leakage rate and mass flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of four composite landfill liner systems considering leakage rate and mass flux T, Seoul, Republic of Korea ABSTRACT: Performance of four different municipal solid waste landfill liner to evaluate the performance of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill liner systems. A liner system that allows

385

Stability Analysis for a Landfill Experiencing Elevated Temperatures Timothy D. Stark1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stability Analysis for a Landfill Experiencing Elevated Temperatures Timothy D. Stark1 , F. ASCE, P and stability analyses for a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill experiencing elevated temperatures due wastes can be disposed of in MSW landfills because this waste is not categorized as hazardous under 40

386

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

387

Radioactive material in the West Lake Landfill: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The West Lake Landfill is located near the city of St. Louis in Bridgeton, St. Louis County, Missouri. The site has been used since 1962 for disposing of municipal refuse, industrial solid and liquid wastes, and construction demolition debris. This report summarizes the circumstances of the radioactive material in the West Lake Landfill. The radioactive material resulted from the processing of uranium ores and the subsequent by the AEC of processing residues. Primary emphasis is on the radiological environmental aspects as they relate to potential disposition of the material. It is concluded that remedial action is called for. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

none,

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Sanitary Landfill groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report contains analytical data for samples taken during first quarter 1993 from wells of the LFW series located at the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site. The data are submitted in reference to the Sanitary Landfill Operating Permit (DWP-087A). The report presents monitoring results that equaled or exceeded the Safe Drinking Water Act final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or screening levels, established by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina final Primary Drinking Water Standards for lead or the SRS flagging criteria.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Parameters for landfill-liner leak-rate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PARAMETERS FOR LANDFILL-LINER LEAK-RATE MODEL A Thesis by STEVEN CARLTON BAHRT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University i n partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering PARAMETERS FOR LANDFILL-LINER LEAK-RATE MODEL A Thesis by STEVEN CARLTON BAHRT Approved as to style and content by: Rob nt Lytto (Co-Cha' man of C mmittee) ayne Dunl p (Member) Kink W. Brown (Co-Chairman of Committee...

Bahrt, Steven Carlton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Model to aid the design of composite landfill liners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODEL TO AID THE DESI(iN OF COMPOSITE LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by KIFAYATHULLA MOHAMMED Submitted to the School of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1993... Major Subject: Safety Engineering MODEL TO AID THE DESIGN OF COMPOSITE LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by Kifayathulla Mohammed Approved as to style and content by: Kevin J. Mclnnes (Co-chairman of Committee) Richard P. Kon n (Member John P. Wagner...

Mohammed, Kifayathulla

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

DOE EM Landfill Workshop and Path Forward - July 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Teleconference: Teleconference: 2. DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation US Department of Energy July 2009 Slides prepared by CRESP DOE EM Landfill Workshop 2 Objective: - Discuss findings & recommendations from ITR visits to DOE facilities - Identify technology gaps and needs to advance EM disposal practice of the future. - Obtain input from experts within and outside of DOE. Panels: Waste subsidence: prediction and impacts Waste forecasting: predicting volumes and WACs Final covers: long-term performance and monitoring Liners: role and need Workshop Approach and Structure * Objective: - Discuss each issue - Evaluate the merits of each issue - Create a prioritized list of technologies needs for Office of

392

Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Cost Reductions for Municipal Recycling Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Cost Reductions for Municipal Recycling Systems ... An evaluation of the energy, greenhouse gas, and costs savings associated with logistics and infrastructure improvements to a curbside recycling program is presented. ... MSW recycling has been found to be costly for most municipalities compared to landfill disposal. ...

Mikhail Chester; Elliot Martin; Nakul Sathaye

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Biological Removal of Siloxanes from Landfill and Digester Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volatilize from waste at landfills and wastewater treatment plants (1). As a result, biogas produced, as well as an increase in maintenance costs (6, 7). The presence of VMSs in biogas is thus a challenge recommended by most equipment manufacturers for un- hindered use (6). Of all VMSs in biogas

394

Story Road Landfill Solar Site Evaluation: San Jose  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report describes the findings of a solar site evaluation conducted at the Story Road Landfill (Site) in the City of San Jose, California (City). This evaluation was conducted as part of a larger study to assess solar potential at multiple public facilities within the City.

395

Attenuation of Fluorocarbons Released from Foam Insulation in Landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lyngby, Denmark, and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Miyazaki University, 1-1 Gakuen Kibanadai Nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan ... The investigation was performed using organic household waste or refuse excavated from a landfill. ... A:? Organic waste collected from Danish households. ...

Charlotte Scheutz; Yutaka Dote; Anders M. Fredenslund; Hans Mosbćk; Peter Kjeldsen

2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hydrologic studies of multilayered landfill covers for closure of waste landfills at Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory examined water balance relationships for four different landfill cover designs containing engineered barriers. These field experiments were performed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15 and 25%. Field measurements of seepage, precipitation, interflow, runoff, and soil water content were collected in each of the 16 plots representing four slopes each with four cover designs: Conventional, EPA, Loam Capillary Barrier and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier. A seepage collection system was installed beneath each cover design to evaluate the influence of slope length on seepage using a series of four metal pans filled with medium gravel that were placed end-to-end in the bottom of each field plot. An automated waterflow datalogging system was used to collect hourly seepage, interflow and runoff data and consisted of 100 100-liter tanks, each of which was equipped with an ultrasonic liquid-level sensor and a motor-operated ball valve used to drain the tank. Soil water content was routinely monitored every six hours at each of 212 locations throughout the 16 plots with time domain reflectrometry (TDR) techniques using an automated and multiplexed measurement system.

Nyhan, J.W.; Langhorst, G.J.; Martin, C.E.; Martinez, J.L.; Schofield, T.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The energy consumption throughout the world has increased substantially over the past few years and the trend is projected to continue indefinitely. The primary sources… (more)

Gokhale, Bhushan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Distributed Generation Study/Modern Landfill | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Landfill < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Model City, New York Site Description Other Utility Study Type Long-term Monitoring Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Caterpillar G3516 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Biogas System Installer Innovative Energy Systems System Enclosure Dedicated Shelter System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 7 Stand-alone Capability Seamless Power Rating 5600 kW5.6 MW 5,600,000 W 5,600,000,000 mW 0.0056 GW 5.6e-6 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 28000000 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller 3rd Party Off-the-Shelf Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2004/12/31 Monitoring Termination Date 1969/12/31

399

Emissions inventories for MSW landfills under Title V  

SciTech Connect

In the past, many states were either not concerned with, or unaware that, municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs) were potential sources of regulated air pollutants. This philosophy is rapidly changing, in part due to US EPA policy documents concerning (and defining) fugitive and non-fugitive emissions from MSWLFs, the attention given to the newly released New Source Performance Standards and a recent lawsuit that gained national notoriety involving landfill air emissions and air permitting applicability issues. Most states now recognize that MSWLFs are sources of regulated air pollutants and are subject to permitting requirements (and pollutant emission fees) as other industries; i.e., state-level minor- and major-source operating permit programs, and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments Title V Operating Permits Program (Title V).

Vogt, W.G. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Peyser, T.R. [SCS Engineers, Birmingham, AL (United States); Hamilton, S.M. [SCS Engineers, Tampa, FL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The use of kaolinite/zeolite mixtures for landfill liners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of kaolinite/zeolite mixtures as alternative landfill materials has been studied. The ratios of kaolinite/zeolite used were K/Z = 0.1, K/Z = 0.2 and K/Z = 0.3. To determine the geotechnical and physicochemical properties of the mixtures, their optimum moisture content, which provides the best compression out in the field, was determined by a compaction test. Also, tests for unconfined compression strength, hydraulic conductivity and consolidation were carried out. As a result, the optimum mixture was found to be K/Z = 0.2. To test the effect of contaminants, this optimum mixture was contaminated with Na, Ca, Pb, and Cu, and tests of the specific gravity, liquid and plastic limits, unconfined compression strength, consolidation, pH, and electrical conductivity were performed. It is concluded that the K/Z = 0.20 mixture has high absorption capacity and can be used in the landfill liner materials.

Yucel Guney; Savas Koparel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Zero landfill, zero waste: the greening of industry in Singapore  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews how a land-scarce city-state is trying to achieve its goals of zero landfill and zero waste through the greening of industry. The main challenges Singapore confronts in its solid waste management are an increasing volume of industrial waste generated, a shortage of land for landfills, and escalating costs of incineration plants. To green its industries, there has been a coordinated effort to develop a recycling industry and to initiate public-private partnerships that will advance environmental technologies. Case studies on the steel, construction, waste incineration, and the food retail industry illustrate the environmental progress that has been made. These cases show also the crucial role played by the government in accelerating the greening of industry by facilitating the formation of strategic collaborations among organisations, and by reconciling the twin objectives of sustainability and profitability.

Josephine Chinying Lang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Evaluation of three geophysical methods to locate undocumented landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is to investigate the ability of these two techniques and ground penetrating radar to define undocumented landfill boundaries. Terrain conductivity senses the contrast in the electrical conductivity between filled and undisturbed areas. A proton precession... operating continuously for 20 years determined that electrical conductivity techniques work well in thick deposits of area fill and poorly or not at all on thin trench fill areas. Furthermore, length of burial time does not correlate with strength...

Brand, Stephen Gardner

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

403

Scaling methane oxidation: From laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions  

SciTech Connect

Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, K{sub m}, to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

Abichou, Tarek, E-mail: abichou@eng.fsu.edu [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32311 (United States); Mahieu, Koenraad; Chanton, Jeff [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32311 (United States); Romdhane, Mehrez; Mansouri, Imane [Unite de Recherche M.A.C.S., Ecole Nationale d'Ingenieurs de Gabes, Route de Medenine, 6029 Gabes (Tunisia)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

488-4D ASH LANDFILL CLOSURE CAP HELP MODELING  

SciTech Connect

At the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP) in support of the 488-4D Landfill closure, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) modeling of the planned 488-4D Ash Landfill closure cap to ensure that the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) limit of no more than 12 inches of head on top of the barrier layer (saturated hydraulic conductivity of no more than 1.0E-05 cm/s) in association with a 25-year, 24-hour storm event is not projected to be exceeded. Based upon Weber 1998 a 25-year, 24-hour storm event at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is 6.1 inches. The results of the HELP modeling indicate that the greatest peak daily head on top of the barrier layer (i.e. geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) or high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane) for any of the runs made was 0.079 inches associated with a peak daily precipitation of 6.16 inches. This is well below the SCDHEC limit of 12 inches.

Phifer, M.

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

405

SERVICE LIFE OF A LANDFILL LINER SYSTEM SUBJECTED TO ELEVATED TEMPERATURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICE LIFE OF A LANDFILL LINER SYSTEM SUBJECTED TO ELEVATED TEMPERATURES Timothy D. Stark, Ph and possible publication in the ASCE Journal of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste Management April 14-Engineered-Components-ServiceLife-Submission_2.pdf #12;2 SERVICE LIFE OF LANDFILL LINER SYSTEMS SUBJECTED TO ELEVATED1 TEMPERATURES2 Timothy D

406

Monitoring of Landfill Leachate Dispersion Using Reflectance Spectroscopy and Ground-Penetrating Radar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monitoring of Landfill Leachate Dispersion Using Reflectance Spectroscopy and Ground-Penetrating Radar ... The generation and dispersion of leachate from landfills are slow, unsteady, nonuniform, and sometimes discontinuous depending on the degree of compaction of the fill, seasonal changes in the water supply to the system, and changes in the capping and contaminant walls (2). ...

T. Splajt; G. Ferrier; L. E. Frostick

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

407

Microgrid modeling using the stochastic Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies internal combustion engines, micro-turbines, gas turbines, fuel cells, heat exchangers, PV, solartechnologies reciprocating engines, micro-turbines / gas turbines, fuel cells, heat exchanger / CHP, PV, solar

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Landfill Disamenities And Better Utilization of Waste Resources Presented to the Wisconsin Governor's Task Force on Waste Materials Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Landfill Disamenities And Better Utilization of Waste Resources Presented to the Wisconsin on Waste Materials Recovery and Disposal who have invited me to address you today on landfill disamenities in New York State in the 1960's. We had many problems with polluting solid waste dumps, landfill fires

Columbia University

409

DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E. Sherry'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE 1 ~) ~ ~ By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E solid waste landfill in which lateral displacements of up to 900 ft (275 m) and vertical settlements municipal solid waste landfill occupies 135 acres (546 km 2 ) approximately 9 miles (15.3 km) n

410

Migration barrier covers for radioactive and mixed waste landfills  

SciTech Connect

Migration barrier cover technology will likely serve as the remediation alternative of choice for most of DOE's radioactive and mixed waste landfills simply because human and ecological risks can be effectively managed without the use of more expensive alternatives. However, very little testing and evaluation has been done, either before or after installation, to monitor how effective they are in isolating waste or to develop data that can be used to evaluate model predictions of long term performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory has investigated the performance of a variety of landfill capping alternatives since 1981 using large field lysimeters to monitor the fate of precipitation falling on the cap surface. The objective of these studies is to provide the risk manager with a variety of field tested capping designs, of various complexities and costs, so that design alternatives can be matched to the need for hydrologic control at the site. Four different landfill cap designs, representing different complexities and costs, were constructed at Hill Air Force Base (AFB) in October and November, 1989. The designs were constructed in large lysimeters and instrumented to provide estimates of all components of water balance including precipitation, runoff (and soil erosion), infiltration, leachate production, evapotranspiration, and capillary/hydraulic barrier flow. The designs consisted of a typical soil cover to serve as a baseline, a modified EPA RCRA cover, and two versions of a Los Alamos design that contained erosion control measures, an improved vegetation cover to enhance evapotranspiration, and a capillary barrier to divert downward flow of soil water. A comprehensive summary of the Hill AFB demonstration will be available in October 1993, when the project is scheduled to terminate.

Hakonson, T.E.; Manies, K.L.; Warren, R.W.; Bostick, K.V.; Trujillo, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Kent, J.S. (Air Force Academy, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology); Lane, L.J. (Department of Agriculture, Tucson, AZ (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Migration barrier covers for radioactive and mixed waste landfills  

SciTech Connect

Migration barrier cover technology will likely serve as the remediation alternative of choice for most of DOE`s radioactive and mixed waste landfills simply because human and ecological risks can be effectively managed without the use of more expensive alternatives. However, very little testing and evaluation has been done, either before or after installation, to monitor how effective they are in isolating waste or to develop data that can be used to evaluate model predictions of long term performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory has investigated the performance of a variety of landfill capping alternatives since 1981 using large field lysimeters to monitor the fate of precipitation falling on the cap surface. The objective of these studies is to provide the risk manager with a variety of field tested capping designs, of various complexities and costs, so that design alternatives can be matched to the need for hydrologic control at the site. Four different landfill cap designs, representing different complexities and costs, were constructed at Hill Air Force Base (AFB) in October and November, 1989. The designs were constructed in large lysimeters and instrumented to provide estimates of all components of water balance including precipitation, runoff (and soil erosion), infiltration, leachate production, evapotranspiration, and capillary/hydraulic barrier flow. The designs consisted of a typical soil cover to serve as a baseline, a modified EPA RCRA cover, and two versions of a Los Alamos design that contained erosion control measures, an improved vegetation cover to enhance evapotranspiration, and a capillary barrier to divert downward flow of soil water. A comprehensive summary of the Hill AFB demonstration will be available in October 1993, when the project is scheduled to terminate.

Hakonson, T.E.; Manies, K.L.; Warren, R.W.; Bostick, K.V.; Trujillo, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kent, J.S. [Air Force Academy, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology; Lane, L.J. [Department of Agriculture, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

TECHNICAL REPORTS The greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of composting a range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TECHNICAL REPORTS 1396 The greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of composting a range of potential by composting and GHG emissions during composting. The primary carbon credits associated with composting storage lagoons and landfills with no gas collection mechanisms. The composting process is a source of GHG

Brown, Sally

413

Short mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste allows landfill impact reduction saving waste energy content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of full scale MBT process (28 d) in removing inhibition condition for successive biogas (ABP) production in landfill and in reducing total waste impact. For this purpose the organic fraction of MSW was treated in a full-scale MBT plant and successively incubated vs. untreated waste, in simulated landfills for one year. Results showed that untreated landfilled-waste gave a total ABP reduction that was null. On the contrary MBT process reduced ABP of 44%, but successive incubation for one year in landfill gave a total ABP reduction of 86%. This ABP reduction corresponded to a MBT process of 22 weeks length, according to the predictive regression developed for ABP reduction vs. MBT-time. Therefore short MBT allowed reducing landfill impact, preserving energy content (ABP) to be produced successively by bioreactor technology since pre-treatment avoided process inhibition because of partial waste biostabilization.

Barbara Scaglia; Silvia Salati; Alessandra Di Gregorio; Alberto Carrera; Fulvia Tambone; Fabrizio Adani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Low Carbon Development Guide for Local Government Actions in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial); percentage of landfill gas (methane) that islevel. ? Percentage of landfill gas (methane) that iscarbon emissions: landfill gas capture. Landfill gas is

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Last spring, an Ohio waste slope collapsed, displacing 1.5 million cu yd of waste. Remedial measures can prevent similar failures at ~~grandfathered" landfills.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measures can prevent similar failures at ~~grandfathered" landfills. r I n the early morning hours of March of "grandfathered" landfill slopes. (Grandfathered landfills do not have an engineered liner system.) Because following case history are ap- plicable to the design, operation and expan- sion of many landfills. BEFORE

416

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on a brownfield site at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin. The site currently has a PV system in place and was assessed for further PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.1333/kWh and incentives offered by the State of Wisconsin and by the serving utility, Madison Gas and Electric. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Landfill CH sub 4 : Rates, fates, and role in global carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect

Published estimates for worldwide landfill methane emissions range from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup {minus}1}. Field and laboratory studies suggest that maximum methane yields from lanfilled refuse are about 0.06 to 0.09 m{sup 3} (dry Kg){sup {minus}1} refuse, depending on moisture content and other variables, such as organic loading, buffering capacity, and nutrients in landfill microevnironments. Methane yields may vary by more than an order of magnitude within a given site. Fates for landfill methane include (1) direct or delayed emission to the atmosphere through landfill cover materials or surface soils; (2) oxidation by methanotrophs in cover soils, with resulting emission of carbon dioxide; or (3) recovery of methane followed by combustion to produce carbon dioxide. The percent methane assigned to each pathway will vary among field sites and, for individual sites, through time. Nevertheless, a general framework for a landfill methane balance can be developed by consideration of landfill age, engineering and management practices, cover soil characteristics, and water balance. Direct measurements of landfill methane emissions are sparse, with rates between 10{sup {minus}6} and 10{sup {minus}8} g cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}; very high rates of 400 kg m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} have been measured at a semiarid unvegetated site. The proportion of landfill carbon that is ultimately converted to methane and carbon dioxide is problematical; the literature suggests that, at best, 25% to 40% of refuse carbon can be converted to biogas carbon. Cellulose contributes the major portion of the methane potential. Routine excavation of nondecomposed cellulosic materials after one or two decades of landfill burial suggests that uniformly high conversion rates are rarely attained at field sites.

Bogner, J.; Spokas, K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Landfill CH{sub 4}: Rates, fates, and role in global carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect

Published estimates for worldwide landfill methane emissions range from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup {minus}1}. Field and laboratory studies suggest that maximum methane yields from lanfilled refuse are about 0.06 to 0.09 m{sup 3} (dry Kg){sup {minus}1} refuse, depending on moisture content and other variables, such as organic loading, buffering capacity, and nutrients in landfill microevnironments. Methane yields may vary by more than an order of magnitude within a given site. Fates for landfill methane include (1) direct or delayed emission to the atmosphere through landfill cover materials or surface soils; (2) oxidation by methanotrophs in cover soils, with resulting emission of carbon dioxide; or (3) recovery of methane followed by combustion to produce carbon dioxide. The percent methane assigned to each pathway will vary among field sites and, for individual sites, through time. Nevertheless, a general framework for a landfill methane balance can be developed by consideration of landfill age, engineering and management practices, cover soil characteristics, and water balance. Direct measurements of landfill methane emissions are sparse, with rates between 10{sup {minus}6} and 10{sup {minus}8} g cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}; very high rates of 400 kg m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} have been measured at a semiarid unvegetated site. The proportion of landfill carbon that is ultimately converted to methane and carbon dioxide is problematical; the literature suggests that, at best, 25% to 40% of refuse carbon can be converted to biogas carbon. Cellulose contributes the major portion of the methane potential. Routine excavation of nondecomposed cellulosic materials after one or two decades of landfill burial suggests that uniformly high conversion rates are rarely attained at field sites.

Bogner, J.; Spokas, K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Corrective action investigation plan for CAU Number 453: Area 9 Landfill, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 9 Landfill, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 453/Corrective Action (CAS) 09-55-001-0952, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Area 9 Landfill is located northwest of Area 9 on the TTR. The landfill cells associated with CAU 453 were excavated to receive waste generated from the daily operations conducted at Area 9 and from range cleanup which occurred after test activities.

NONE

1997-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Impact of Siloxane Impurities on the Performance of an Engine Operating on Renewable Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of Siloxane Impurities on the Performance of an Engine Operating on Renewable Natural Gas ... Biogas from sludge biodegradation in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) and landfill gas (LFG) generated from the decomposition of solid waste in landfills are both promising renewable fuels, as they contain a large fraction of methane, 40–70% by volume, the rest being CO2, together with smaller amounts of other gases like O2, N2, and Ar. ... In these studies two Honda EU2000i gasoline electric generators were utilized. ...

Nitin Nair; Xianwei Zhang; Jorge Gutierrez; Jack Chen; Fokion Egolfopoulos; Theodore Tsotsis

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Recovery Act milestone: Excavation begins at Manhattan Project landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act milestone Recovery Act milestone Recovery Act milestone: Excavation begins at Manhattan Project landfill The six-acre site contains a series of trenches used from 1944 to 1948 to dispose of hazardous and non-hazardous trash from Manhattan Project labs and buildings. July 1, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

422

Sanitary landfill local-scale flow and transport modeling in support of alternative concentrations limit demonstrations, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located near Aiken, South Carolina which is currently operated and managed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Sanitary Landfill (Sanitary Landfill) at the SRS is located approximately 2,000 feet Northwest of Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) on an approximately 70 acre site located south of Road C between the SRS B-Area and UTRC. The Sanitary Landfill has been receiving wastes since 1974 and operates as an unlined trench and fill operation. The original landfill site was 32 acres. This area reached its capacity around 1987 and a Northern Expansion of 16 acres and a Southern Expansion of 22 acres were added in 1987. The Northern Expansion has not been used for waste disposal to date and the Southern Expansion is expected to reach capacity in 1992 or 1993. The waste received at the Sanitary Landfill is predominantly paper, plastics, rubber, wood, metal, cardboard, rags saturated with degreasing solvents, pesticide bags, empty cans, and asbestos in bags. The landfill is not supposed to receive any radioactive wastes. However, tritium has been detected in the groundwater at the site. Gross alpha and gross beta are also evaluated at the landfill. The objectives of this modeling study are twofold: (1) to create a local scale Sanitary Landfill flow model to study hydraulic effects resulting from capping the Sanitary Landfill; and (2) to create a Sanitary Landfill local scale transport model to support ACL Demonstrations for a RCRA Part B Permit Renewal.

Kelly, V.A.; Beach, J.A.; Statham, W.H.; Pickens, J.F. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1993-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Environmental Environmental Science Enviro Express Kenworth LNG tractor. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's broad effort to develop cleaner transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, this study examines advanced 2011 natural gas fueled trucks using liquefied natural gas (LNG) replacing older diesel fueled trucks. The trucks are used 6 days per week in regional city-to-landfill long hauls of incinerator waste with two fills per day. This is a workable fit for the limited range LNG trucks. Reduction of fuel costs and harmful emissions relative to the replaced trucks are significant. Introduction The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act legislation

424

EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste 767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary at the U.S. Department of Energy's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plant in Piketon, Ohio. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 25, 1995 EA-0767: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant October 25, 1995 EA-0767: Final Environmental Assessment

425

Removal of organic and inorganic compounds from landfill leachate using reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of this work was to evaluate an effectiveness of removing organic and inorganic pollutants from landfill leachate in a long-term reverse osmosis (RO) study. Investigations were carried out...4 ...

I. A. Talalaj

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

One?dimensional Seismic Analysis of a Solid?Waste Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of the seismic performance of solid waste landfill follows generally the same procedures for the design of embankment dams even if the methods and safety requirements should be different. The characterization of waste properties for seismic design is difficult due the heterogeneity of the material requiring the procurement of large samples. The dynamic characteristics of solid waste materials play an important role on the seismic response of landfill and it also is important to assess the dynamic shear strengths of liner materials due the effect of inertial forces in the refuse mass. In the paper the numerical results of a dynamic analysis are reported and analysed to determine the reliability of the common practice of using 1D analysis to evaluate the seismic response of a municipal solid?waste landfill. Numerical results indicate that the seismic response of a landfill can vary significantly due to reasonable variations of waste properties fill heights site conditions and design rock motions.

Francesco Castelli; Valentina Lentini; Michele Maugeri

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Development of a landfill model to prioritize design and operating objectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The application of scientifically based decision making tools to help address solid waste management issues dates back to the early 1960s. Researchers continue to use operations research tools to help optimize landfill

K. V. H. Ohman; J. P. A Hettiaratchi…

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Overburden effects on waste compaction and leachate generation in municipal landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a model to predict the effects of overburden pressure on the formation of leachate within municipal solid waste landfills. In addition, it estimates the compaction and subsequent settlement that the waste will undergo due...

Mehevec, Adam Wade

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

role of hydrogen in landfill gas utilization. Sacramento,landfills (yielding “landfill gas”) and livestock-manure-Diverted Methane in landfill gas Methane in biogas from

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

role of hydrogen in landfill gas utilization. Sacramento,landfills (yielding “landfill gas”) and livestock-manure-Diverted Methane in landfill gas Methane in biogas from

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

110 Table 26. Landfill gas GHG reductionlandfills to utilize the landfill gas generally includes acollection system. Landfill gas from throughout landfills

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill  

SciTech Connect

Washington state regulations required that solid waste landfill facilities have ground-water monitoring programs in place by May 27, 1987. This document describes the well locations, installation, characterization studies and sampling and analysis plan to be followed in implementing the ground-water monitoring program at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). It is based on Washington Administrative Code WAC 173-304-490. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Field versus laboratory characterization of clay deposits for use as in situ municipal landfill liners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIELD VERSUS LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DEPOSITS FOR USE AS IN SITU MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by SHARON ELIZABETH WECHSLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas Aa? University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of . KASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1990 Major Subject: Geology FIELD VERSUS LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DEPOSITS FOR USE AS IN SITU MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by SHARON ELIZABETH WECHSLER Approved as to style...

Wechsler, Sharon Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

A new technique to monitor ground-water quality at municipal solid waste landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NEW TECHNIQUE TO MONITOR GROUND-WATER EQUALITY AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS A Thesis by STEVEN CHARLES HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology A NEW TECHNIIIUE TO MONITOR GROUND-WATER IIUALITY AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS A Thesis by STEVEN CHARLES HART Approved as to style and content by: Christo her C. Mathewson (Chair...

Hart, Steven Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at Johnson County Landfill  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, Kansas, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. Citizens of Shawnee, city planners, and site managers are interested in redevelopment uses for landfills in Kansas that are particularly well suited for grid-tied solar photovoltaic (PV) installation. This report assesses the Johnson County Landfill for possible grid-tied PV installations and estimates the cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed tilt). Each option represents a standalone system that can be sized to use an entire available site area. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. The feasibility of PV systems installed on landfills is highly impacted by the available area for an array, solar resource, operating status, landfill cap status, distance to transmission lines, and distance to major roads. The report findings are applicable to other landfills in the surrounding area.

Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Growth and biomass of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resource managers are challenged with waste disposal and leachate produced from its degradation. Poplar (Populus spp.) trees offer an opportunity for ecological leachate disposal as an irrigation source for managed tree systems. Our objective was to irrigate Populus trees with municipal solid waste landfill leachate or fertilized well water (control) (N, P, K) during the 2005 and 2006 growing seasons and test for differences in tree height, diameter, volume, and biomass of leaves, stems, branches, and roots. The trees were grown at the Oneida County Landfill located 6 km west of Rhinelander, Wisconsin, USA (45.6°N, 89.4°W). Eight clones belonging to four genomic groups were tested: NC13460, NC14018 [(Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray × Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh) × P. deltoides ‘BC1’]; NC14104, NC14106, DM115 (P. deltoides × Populus maximowiczii A. Henry ‘DM’); DN5 (P. deltoides × Populus nigra L. ‘DN’); NM2, NM6 (P. nigra × P. maximowiczii ‘NM’). The survival rate for each of the irrigation treatments was 78%. The total aboveground biomass ranged from 0.51 to 2.50 Mg ha?1, with a mean of 1.57 Mg ha?1. The treatment × clone interaction was not significant for tree diameter, total volume, dry mass of the stump or basal roots, or root mass fraction (P > 0.05). However, the treatment × clone interaction was significant for height, total tree dry mass, aboveground dry mass, belowground dry mass, and dry mass of the leaves, stems + branches (woody), and lateral roots (P < 0.05). There was broad clonal variation within the BC1 and DM genomic groups, with genotypes performing differently for treatments. In contrast, the performance of the NM and DN genomic groups was relatively stable across treatments, with clonal response to irrigation being similar regardless of treatment. Nevertheless, selection at the clone level also was important. For example, NC14104 consistently performed better when irrigated with leachate compared with water, while NC14018 responded better to water than leachate. Overall, these data will serve as a basis for researchers and resource managers making decisions about future leachate remediation projects.

Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S. Zalesny Jr.; David R. Coyle; Richard B. Hall

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood, others have not, and the product continues to enter the waste stream from construction, demolition

Florida, University of

438

Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect

This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

Paul KT Liu

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

439

Appendix B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank Rocky Flats Site Original Landfill - Settlement Plates Monitoring Quarterly Survey March 26, 2010 Comparison to Previous Survey December 15, 2009 03-26-10 OBSERVATIONS DELTA DELTA DELTA 12-15-09 OBSERVATIONS POINT NUMBER NORTHING EASTING ELEVATION DESCRIPTION NORTHING EASTING ELEVATION POINT NUMBER NORTHING EASTING ELEVATION DESCRIPTION 15053 747913.6883 2082233.082 6005.91 N-RIM-PIPE-AA 0.00 -0.02 -0.02 76527 747913.6913 2082233.064 6005.88 PIPE-N-RIM-AA 15052 747644.9257 2081851.191 5975.35 N-RIM-PIPE-BB -0.02 -0.01 -0.03 76528 747644.9087 2081851.179 5975.32 PIPE-N-RIM-BB 15059 747883.3477 2081666.073 6019.61 N-RIM-PIPE-CC 0.01 0.00 -0.01 76515 747883.3557 2081666.077 6019.59 PIPE-N-RIM-CC 15058 747803.4731 2081642.34 6006.10 N-RIM-PIPE-DD

440

Field Performance of Three Compacted Clay Landfill Covers  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted at sites in subtropical Georgia, seasonal and humid Iowa, and arid southeastern California to evaluate the field hydrology of compacted clay covers for final closure of landfills.Water balance of the covers was monitored with large (10 by 20 m), instrumented drainage lysimeters for 2 to 4 yr. Initial drainage at the Iowa and California sites was ,32 mm yr21 (i.e., unit gradient flow for a hydraulic conductivity of 1027 cm s21, the regulatory standard for the clay barriers in this study); initial drainage rate at the Georgia site was about 80 mm yr21. The drainage rate at all sites increased by factors ranging from 100 to 750 during the monitoring periods and in each case the drainage rate exceeded 32 mm yr21 by the end of the monitoring period. The drainage rates developed a rapid response to precipitation events, suggesting that increases in drainage rate were the result of preferential flow. Although no direct observations of preferential flow paths were made, field measurements of water content and temperature at all three sites suggested that desiccation or freeze–thaw cycling probably resulted in formation of preferential flow paths through the barrier layers. Data from all three sites showed the effectiveness of all three covers as hydraulic barriers diminished during the 2 to 4 yr monitoring period, which was short compared with the required design life (often 30 yr) of most waste containment facilities.

Albright, William H.; Benson, Craig H.; Gee, Glendon W.; Abichou, Tarek; Tyler, Scott W.; Rock, Steven

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Landfill cover performance monitoring using time domain reflectometry  

SciTech Connect

Time domain reflectometry (TDR) systems were installed to monitor soil moisture in two newly constructed landfill covers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Each TDR system includes four vertical arrays with each array consisting of four TDR probes located at depths of 15, 30, 45, and 60 cm. The deepest probes at 60 cm were installed beneath a compacted soil layer to analyze infiltration through the compacted layer. Based on the TDR data, infiltration through the two covers between March and October, 1997 ranged from less than measurable to 1.5 cm. However, due to a prohibition on penetrating the buried waste and resulting limits on probe placement depths, deeper percolation was not evaluated. Some of the advantages found in the application of TDR for infiltration monitoring at this site are the relative low cost and rugged nature of the equipment. Also, of particular importance, the ability to collect frequent moisture measurements allows the capture and evaluation of soil moisture changes resulting from episodic precipitation events. Disadvantages include the inability to install the probes into the waste, difficulties in interpretation of infiltration during freeze/thaw periods, and some excessive noise in the data.

Neher, E.R.; Cotten, G.B. [Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McElroy, D. [Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar, wind, biomass. landfill gas, ocean (including tidal,electric, photovoltaics, landfill gas, wind, biomass,

Lunt, Robin J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Environmental geophysics at Kings Creek Disposal Site and 30th Street Landfill, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical studies on the Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, delineate landfill areas and provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low seal levels resulted in a complex pattern of shallow channel-fill deposits in the Kings Creek area. Ground-penetrating radar studies reveal a paleochannel greater than 50 ft deep, with a thalweg trending offshore in a southwest direction into Kings Creek. Onshore, the ground-penetrating radar data indicate a 35-ft-deep branch to the main channel, trending to the north-northwest directly beneath the 30th Street Landfill. Other branches are suspected to meet the offshore paleochannel in the wetlands south and east of the 30th Street Landfill. This paleochannel depositional system is environmentally significant because it may control the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Electromagnetic surveys have delineated the pre-fill lowland area currently occupied by the 30th Street Landfill. Magnetic and conductive anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the study area. On the basis of geophysical data, large-scale dumping has not occurred north of the Kings Creek Disposal Site or east of the 30th Street Landfill.

Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Stefanov, J.E.; Benson, M.A.; Padar, C.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Methane Production Quantification and Energy Estimation for Bangalore Municipal Solid Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfills are considered as cornerstone of solid waste management. Landfill gas (LFG) and leachate are principal outputs ... from landfills. Methane, occupying significant volume of landfill gas, has considerable...

A. Kumar; R. Dand; P. Lakshmikanthan…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Landfill Gas-to-Hydrogen - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Shannon Baxter-Clemmons (Primary Contact), Russ Keller 1 South Carolina Hydrogen Fuel Cell Alliance P.O. Box 12302 Columbia, SC 29211 Phone: (803) 727-2897 Emails: baxterclemmons@schydrogen.org; russ.keller@ati.org DOE Managers HQ: Pete Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18113 Subcontractor: 1 Advanced Technology International, Charleston, SC Project Start Date: March 1, 2011 Project End Date: January 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Validate that a financially viable business case * exists for a full-scale deployment of commercially

447

Porous Materials Prepared from Clays for the Upgrade of Landfill Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Portuguese clay from soil deposits in Porto Santo (Madeira archipelago), previously characterized,(47) was used in the preparation of the porous PCH and PILC. ... For comparison purposes, MCM-41, a solid with well-defined mesopores, and a PILC material were used. ... (48) PILC was obtained from the natural clay. ...

Moisés L. Pinto; Joăo Pires; Joăo Rocha

2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

448

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Grassland Restoration on Landfill Sites in the East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Grassland Restoration on Landfill Sites in the East Midlands, United landfill sites are comparable to reference sites of exist- ing wildlife value. Floral characteristics nine pairs of restored landfill sites and reference sites in the East Mid- lands of the United Kingdom

Northampton, University of

449

List of Hydrogen Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

List of Hydrogen Incentives List of Hydrogen Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 59 Hydrogen Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 59) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction (New Mexico) Sales Tax Incentive New Mexico Commercial Industrial Anaerobic Digestion Biodiesel Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Ethanol Hydrogen Landfill Gas Methanol Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Yes Business Energy Tax Credit (Oregon) Corporate Tax Credit Oregon Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Multi-Family Residential Building Insulation Caulking/Weather-stripping Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Duct/Air sealing Heat recovery Lighting Biodiesel Biomass CHP/Cogeneration

450

List of Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 192 Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 192) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program (Alabama) State Loan Program Alabama Commercial Industrial Institutional Building Insulation Doors Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls

451

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

452

List of CHP/Cogeneration Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP/Cogeneration Incentives CHP/Cogeneration Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 279 CHP/Cogeneration Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 279) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction (New Mexico) Sales Tax Incentive New Mexico Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier CHP/Cogeneration Geothermal Electric Photovoltaics

453

List of Solar Pool Heating Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating Incentives Heating Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 118 Solar Pool Heating Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 118) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Personal Property Tax Exemption (Michigan) Property Tax Incentive Michigan Commercial Industrial Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Microturbines Photovoltaics

454

Feasibility Study of Solar Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico (Second Study)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a solar photovoltaics (PV) system on landfill sites in Puerto Rico. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed tilt). The report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system. The landfills and sites considered in this report were all determined feasible areas in which to implement solar PV systems.

Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels, including oil, landfill gas, and diesel. For most ofopportunity fuels" such as landfill gas) and fuel cells withconsumed (natural gas, landfill gas, digester gas, diesel

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogen Cogen Natural Gas Landfill Gas Tulare Tulare Woodwasteas agricultural and wood waste, landfill gas, and mlmicipalscf digester gas, or Btu/ scf landfill gas. HVs are given in

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Public health assessment for Kentwood Landfill, Kentwood, Kent County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID000260281. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Kentwood Landfill site encompasses approximately 72 acres and was operated as a licensed landfill prior to 1976. It accepted domestic and industrial waste including unidentified hazardous wastes from heavy manufacturing and refining. Shallow ground water and leachate from the landfill are contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds. On numerous occasions, leachate has been observed seeping out of the landfill and entering Plaster Creek. While significant exposure does not appear to have occurred or to be presently occurring, the Kentwood Landfill poses a public health hazard because of possible future exposures to contaminants. Nearby residents' ground water supplies could become contaminated should the contaminant plume shift or new wells be drilled into the plume. A lesser hazard is that trespassers could come into direct contact with contaminated surface materials on the site.

Not Available

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

458

Landfill; leachates, landfill gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

is a method of refuse disposal on land without creating nuisance to public health or safety by using the principles of engineering to confine refuse to the smallest practicable area, to reduce it to the sma...

Ming H. Wong

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Microturbine Power Conversion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http:www.osti.govbridge Not available...

460

EM SSAB ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Presentation - July 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Teleconference: Teleconference: 1. DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project: Lessons Learned Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE CRESP July 2009 1 Independent Technical Review Team * Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE - University of Wisconsin-Madison: waste containment systems, civil engineering, geotechnical engineering. * William H. Albright, PhD - Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada: waste containment systems, hydrology, regulatory interactions. * David P. Ray, PE - US Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, NB: waste containment systems, civil engineering, geotechnical engineering. * John Smegal - Legin Group, Washington, DC: economics, management. 2 * Mixed-waste landfill authorized by EPA and Washington State DoE for disposal of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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461

Capping as an alternative for remediating radioactive and mixed waste landfills  

SciTech Connect

This report describes some of the regulatory and technical issues concerning the use of capping as a containment strategy for radioactive and hazardous waste. Capping alternatives for closure of landfills is not just an engineering problem, but rather involves complex physical, biological, and chemical processes requiring a multidisciplinary approach to develop designs that will work over the long haul and are cost-effective. Much of the information has been distilled from regulatory and guidance documents and a compilation of research activities on waste disposal, contaminant transport processes, and technology development for landfills that has been conducted over the last 21 years.

Hakonson, T.E. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Study of colloidal content and associated heavy metals in landfill leachate: a case study of El-Akader landfill site: Jordan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill leachate samples were collected anaerobically at six locations at the El-Akader landfill site in North Jordan. The collected leachate samples were separated into size fractions with special attention to the distribution of colloids and associated heavy metals. The fraction sizes were 1.2 µm. The maximum concentrations of heavy metals in the analysed leachate samples were Cd 0.6 µg/l, Ni 25 µg/l, Zn 245 µg/l, Cu 15 µg/l and Pb 2.50 µg/l. In the dissolved particular matter the heavy metals concentration ranges were Cd 0.1â??1.1 µg/l, Ni 0.35â??1.5 µg/l, Zn 85â??105 µg/l, Cu 0â??0.95 µg/l and Pb 0.5â??2.5 µg/l.

Y. Abu-Rukah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Economic Feasibility of Converting Landfill Gas to Natural Gas for Use as a Transportation Fuel in Refuse Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximately 136,000 refuse trucks were in operation in the United States in 2007. These trucks burn approximately 1.2 billion gallons of diesel fuel a year, releasing almost 27 billion pounds of greenhouse gases. In addition to contributing...

Sprague, Stephen M.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

464

Washington Closure Hanford Report of Settlement Monitoring of the ERDF Landfill  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the ERDF Settlement Monitoring Program conducted between August 9, 2007, and April 29, 2008, on the 35-foot and 70-foot levels of the ERDF landfill. The purpose of this monitoring program was to verify that the materials already placed under the 35-foot and 70-foot levels satisfy the settlement criteria of the conceptual cap design.

J. T. Cameron

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

WESTLAKE LANDFILL EPA Region 7 03/29/2012 City: Bridgeton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was quarried on the site. Beginning in 1962, portions of the property were used for landfilling of municipal solid waste and construction debris. Two areas became radiologically contaminated in 1973 when soils. An adjacent property has also been impacted by erosional migration of radiologically-contaminated material

466

Landfills a thing of the past in Germany where advanced waste management By Evridiki Bersi -Kathimerini  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landfills a thing of the past in Germany where advanced waste management rules By Evridiki Bersi but that day has already come in Germany. On June 1, 2005, Germany imposed a ban on traditional garbage dumps, replacing them with one of the most advanced waste-management systems in the world. In the 1970s, Germany

Columbia University

467

Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report - Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary  

SciTech Connect

A maximum of fifty-three wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water permit and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

468

Results of the radiological survey at the Town of Tonawanda Landfill, Tonawanda, New York (TNY001)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the Town of Tonawanda Landfill, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in September 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been deposited in the landfill. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey suggest that material originating at the Linde plant may have been deposited in the landfill. Soil samples S54 and B12 contained technologically enhanced levels of [sup 238]U not unlike the product formerly produced by the Linde plant. In contrast, samples B4A, B5A and B7B, containing elevated concentrations of [sup 226]Ra and [sup 230]Th with much lower concentrations of [sup 238]U, were similar to the residue or byproduct of the refinery operation conducted at the Linde plant. In 24 instances, soil samples from the Town of Tonawanda Landfill exceeded DOE guideline values for [sup 238]U, [sup 226]Ra, and/or [sup 230]Th in surface or subsurface soil. Nine of these samples contained radionuclide concentrations more than 30 times the guideline value.

Rodriguez, R.E.; Murray, M.E.; Uziel, M.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Results of the radiological survey at the Town of Tonawanda Landfill, Tonawanda, New York (TNY001)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the Town of Tonawanda Landfill, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in September 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been deposited in the landfill. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey suggest that material originating at the Linde plant may have been deposited in the landfill. Soil samples S54 and B12 contained technologically enhanced levels of {sup 238}U not unlike the product formerly produced by the Linde plant. In contrast, samples B4A, B5A and B7B, containing elevated concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 230}Th with much lower concentrations of {sup 238}U, were similar to the residue or byproduct of the refinery operation conducted at the Linde plant. In 24 instances, soil samples from the Town of Tonawanda Landfill exceeded DOE guideline values for {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, and/or {sup 230}Th in surface or subsurface soil. Nine of these samples contained radionuclide concentrations more than 30 times the guideline value.

Rodriguez, R.E.; Murray, M.E.; Uziel, M.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Evaluation of the hazardous waste landfill cap system design and clay layer thickness criteria of the Turkish Regulation on the Control of Hazardous Waste (RCHW) using the Hydrological Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hazardous waste landfill design criteria of the Turkish Regulation on the Control of Hazardous Waste (RCHW) was evaluated in this study. In the first part of the study, Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model was used to determine the significance of different components of the hazardous waste landfill cap system as required by the Turkish RCHW. In the second part of the study, the top and bottom clay layer thickness requirement of the Turkish RCHW was evaluated by running the HELP model for different top/bottom clay different layer thicknesses and comparing the corresponding leachate amounts produced.

F. Yalcin Piskin; G.N. Demirer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nitrogen management in landfill leachate: Application of SHARON, ANAMMOX and combined SHARON-ANAMMOX process  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant research on ammonia removal from leachate by SHARON and ANAMMOX process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Operational parameters, microbiology, biochemistry and application of the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHARON-ANAMMOX process for leachate a new research and this paper gives wide facts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cost-effective process, alternative to existing technologies for leachate treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Address the issues and operational conditions for application in leachate treatment. - Abstract: In today's context of waste management, landfilling of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is considered to be one of the standard practices worldwide. Leachate generated from municipal landfills has become a great threat to the surroundings as it contains high concentration of organics, ammonia and other toxic pollutants. Emphasis has to be placed on the removal of ammonia nitrogen in particular, derived from the nitrogen content of the MSW and it is a long term pollution problem in landfills which determines when the landfill can be considered stable. Several biological processes are available for the removal of ammonia but novel processes such as the Single Reactor System for High Activity Ammonia Removal over Nitrite (SHARON) and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) process have great potential and several advantages over conventional processes. The combined SHARON-ANAMMOX process for municipal landfill leachate treatment is a new, innovative and significant approach that requires more research to identify and solve critical issues. This review addresses the operational parameters, microbiology, biochemistry and application of both the processes to remove ammonia from leachate.

Sri Shalini, S., E-mail: srishalini10@gmail.com [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India); Joseph, Kurian, E-mail: kuttiani@gmail.com [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

A Seven-Year Water Balance Study of an Evapotranspiration Landfill Cover Varying in Slope for Semiarid Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...determinations of saturated hydraulic conductivity and pressure...tanks housed in instrument trailers. This involved hourly measurements...landfill covers containing hydraulic barriers to limit seepage...of hydrating liquid on the hydraulic properties of geosynthetic...

J. W. Nyhan

473

Effects of adding wash tower effluent to Ano Liossia landfill to enhance bioreaction c by Olympia Galenianou.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical study was performed on the effects of adding sulfate-rich wash tower effluent from the Athens hospital waste incinerator to the Ano Liossia landfill of Athens. The method of mass balance was used to examine ...

Galenianou, Olympia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Quantification of multiple methane emission sources at landfills using a double tracer technique  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > Precise and reliable measurements of emissions from landfills are needed. > A tracer technique involving simultaneous release of two tracers was proven successful. > Measurements to be performed at times with low changing trends in barometric pressure. - Abstract: A double tracer technique was used successfully to quantify whole-site methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions from Fakse Landfill. Emissions from different sections of the landfill were quantified by using two different tracers. A scaled-down version of the tracer technique measuring close-by to localized sources having limited areal extent was also used to quantify emissions from on-site sources at the landfill facility, including a composting area and a sewage sludge storage pit. Three field campaigns were performed. At all three field campaigns an overall leak search showed that the CH{sub 4} emissions from the old landfill section were localized to the leachate collection wells and slope areas. The average CH{sub 4} emissions from the old landfill section were quantified to be 32.6 {+-} 7.4 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}, whereas the source at the new section was quantified to be 10.3 {+-} 5.3 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}. The CH{sub 4} emission from the compost area was 0.5 {+-} 0.25 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}, whereas the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) flux was quantified to be in the order of 332 {+-} 166 kg CO{sub 2} h{sup -1} and 0.06 {+-} 0.03 kg N{sub 2}O h{sup -1}, respectively. The sludge pit located west of the compost material was quantified to have an emission of 2.4 {+-} 0.63 kg h{sup -1} CH{sub 4}, and 0.03 {+-} 0.01 kg h{sup -1} N{sub 2}O.

Scheutz, C., E-mail: chs@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Samuelsson, J., E-mail: jerker.samuelsson@fluxsense.se [Chalmers University of Technology/FluxSense AB, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Fredenslund, A.M., E-mail: amf@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kjeldsen, P., E-mail: pk@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892°, -121.7195459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6016892,"lon":-121.7195459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

476

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CSL Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

477

Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Lake Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

478

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Energy Website: www.gtz.de/en/themen/umwelt-infrastruktur/abfall/30026.htm References: GHG Calculator for Waste Management[1] Waste Management - GTZ Website[2] Logo: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management The necessity to reduce greenhouse gases and thus mitigate climate change is accepted worldwide. Especially in low- and middle-income countries, waste management causes a great part of the national greenhouse gas production, because landfills produce methane which has a particularly strong effect on climate change. Therefore, it is essential to minimize

479

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CID Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

480

Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Anderson County, Tennessee Coordinates 36.0809574°, -84.2278796° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0809574,"lon":-84.2278796,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "landfill gas microturbines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Palos Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Palos Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Facility Palos Verdes Gas to Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

482

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility BJ Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Gwinnett County, Georgia Coordinates 33.9190653°, -84.0167423° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9190653,"lon":-84.0167423,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

483

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

484

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Du Page County, Illinois Coordinates 41.8243831°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8243831,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

485

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location St. Joseph County, Indiana Coordinates 41.6228085°, -86.3376761° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6228085,"lon":-86.3376761,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

486

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility DFW Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Denton County, Texas Coordinates 33.1418611°, -97.179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.1418611,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

487

Chemical pollution and toxicity of water samples from stream receiving leachate from controlled municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study was aimed to determine the impact of municipal waste landfill on the pollution level of surface waters, and to investigate whether the choice and number of physical and chemical parameters monitored are sufficient for determining the actual risk related to bioavailability and mobility of contaminants. In 2007–2012, water samples were collected from the stream flowing through the site at two sampling locations, i.e. before the stream?s entry to the landfill, and at the stream outlet from the landfill. The impact of leachate on the quality of stream water was observed in all samples. In 2007–2010, high values of TOC and conductivity in samples collected down the stream from the landfill were observed; the toxicity of these samples was much greater than that of samples collected up the stream from the landfill. In 2010–2012, a significant decrease of conductivity and TOC was observed, which may be related to the modernization of the landfill. Three tests were used to evaluate the toxicity of sampled water. As a novelty the application of Phytotoxkit F™ for determining water toxicity should be considered. Microtox® showed the lowest sensitivity of evaluating the toxicity of water samples, while Phytotoxkit F™ showed the highest. High mortality rates of Thamnocephalus platyurus in Thamnotoxkit F™ test can be caused by high conductivity, high concentration of TOC or the presence of compounds which are not accounted for in the water quality monitoring program.

A. Melnyk; K. Kukli?ska; L. Wolska; J. Namie?nik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at Johnson County Landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Johnson Johnson County Landfill James Salasovich and Gail Mosey Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53186 January 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at Johnson County Landfill James Salasovich and Gail Mosey Prepared under Task No. IGST.1100 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53186 January 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

489

Development of risk-assessment methodology for municipal-sludge landfilling. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This is one of a series of reports that present methodologies for assessing the potential risks to humans or other organisms from the disposal or reuse of municipal sludge. The sludge management practices addressed by this series include land application practices, distribution and marketing programs, landfilling, incineration and ocean disposal. These reports provide methods for evaluating potential health and environmental risks from toxic chemicals that may be present in sludge. The document addresses risks from chemicals associated with landfilling of municipal sludge. These proposed risk assessment procedures are designed as tools to assist in the development of regulations for sludge management practices. The criteria may address management practices (such as site design or process control specifications), limits on sludge disposal rates or limits on toxic chemical concentrations in the sludge.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Title I conceptual design for Pit 6 landfill closure at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this design project is to evaluate and prepare design and construction documents for a closure cover cap for the Pit 6 Landfill located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300. This submittal constitutes the Title I Design (Conceptual Design) for the closure cover of the Pit 6 Landfill. A Title I Design is generally 30 percent of the design effort. Title H Design takes the design to 100 percent complete. Comments and edits to this Title I Design will be addressed in the Title II design submittal. Contents of this report are as follows: project background; design issues and engineering approach; design drawings; calculation packages; construction specifications outline; and construction quality assurance plan outline.

MacDonnell, B.A.; Obenauf, K.S. [Golder Associates, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

The landfill leachate evapotranspiration in soilâ??plant system with reed Phragmites australis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using of the reed – Phragmites australis – is an effective method of landfill leachate disposal. In presented two years' study the effectiveness of leachate evapotranspiration from systems with reed was investigated. Daily evapotranspiration was in the range from 1.01 mm/d to 3.15 mm/d in the first year of research and from 2.68 mm/d to 4.94 mm/d in the second year. The research showed that the application of sewage sludge into the soil caused the increase in the vapourisation efficiency. Preliminary results of implemented soil-plant system with reed on landfill in Zakurzewo, Poland, showed that about 1100 mł of leachate were evapotranspirated.

Andrzej Bialowiec; Irena Wojnowska-Baryla

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

SciTech Connect

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Industrial landfill affects on fish communities at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (INDU)  

SciTech Connect

INDU, an urban park near the third largest metropolitan area in the US, provides access to over two million visitors per year. The Grand Calumet River/Indiana Harbor Ship Canal is the only Area of Concern (AOC) with all 14 designated uses impaired. The Grand Calumet Lagoons are the former mouth of the Grand Calumet River and form part of the western boundary of INDU, adjacent to Gary, IN. An industrial landfill (slag and other industrial waste) forms the westernmost boundary of the lagoon and a dunal pond. A least-impacted lagoon and a pond lying across a dune ridge were compared to sites adjacent to the landfill. Fish communities censused from twelve sites during the summer of 1994 were analyzed for several community metrics including species richness and composition, trophic structure, and community and individual health. A modified headwater Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) was utilized to evaluate lacustrine community health. Results include the first record of the Iowa darter (Etheostoma exile) found in northwest Indiana. Examination of the fish community found the least impacted lagoon to contain Erimyzon sucetta, Esox americanus, and Lepomis gulosus. The landfill lagoon lacked these species, with the exception of fewer L. gulosus, while Pimephales notatus was found at all sites in the impacted lake but not at all in the least impacted lagoon. Statistically significant differences in species diversity and IBI can be attributed to landfill proximity. Whole fish analyses of a benthic omnivore (Cyprinus carpio) revealed PAH levels near 1 mg/kg of total PAH in several fish analyzed.

Stewart, P.M. [National Biological Service, Porter, IN (United States); Simon, T.P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

Stabilisation of biodried municipal solid waste fine fraction in landfill bioreactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biodrying process of solid waste is a pre-treatment for the bio-stabilisation of the municipal solid waste. This study aims to investigate the fate of the municipal solid waste fine fraction (MSWFF) resulting from a biodrying treatment when disposed in landfills that are operated as bioreactors. Biodried MSWFF was apparently stable due to its low moisture content that slows down the microbial activity. The lab-scale anaerobic bioreactors demonstrated that a proper moisture content leads to a complete biodegradation of the organic matter contained in the biodried MSWFF. Using a pilot-scale landfill bioreactor (LBR), MSWFF stabilisation was achieved, suggesting that the leachate recirculation could be an effective approach to accomplish the anaerobic biodegradation and biostabilisation of biodried MSWFF after landfilling. The biostabilisation of the material resulting from the LBR treatment was confirmed using anaerobic and aerobic stability indices. All anaerobic and aerobic indices showed a stability increase of approximately 80% of the MSWFF after treatment in the LBR. The similar values of OD7 and BMP stability indices well agree with the relationship between the aerobic and anaerobic indices reported in literature.

Selene Grilli; Andrea Giordano; Alessandro Spagni

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

The crucial role of Waste-to-Energy technologies in enhanced landfill mining: a technology review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The novel concepts Enhanced Waste Management (EWM) and Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM) intend to place landfilling of waste in a sustainable context. The state of the technology is an important factor in determining the most suitable moment to valorize – either as materials (Waste-to-Product, WtP) or as energy (Waste-to-Energy, WtE) – certain landfill waste streams. The present paper reviews thermochemical technologies (incineration, gasification, pyrolysis, plasma technologies, combinations) for energetic valorization of calorific waste streams, with focus on municipal solid waste (MSW), possibly processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF). The potential and suitability of these thermochemical technologies for ELFM applications are discussed. From this review it is clear that process and waste have to be closely matched, and that some thermochemical processes succeed in recovering both materials and energy from waste. Plasma gasification/vitrification is a viable candidate for combined energy and material valorization, its technical feasibility for MSW/RDF applications (including excavated waste) has been proven on installations ranging from pilot to full scale. The continued advances that are being made in process control and process efficiency are expected to improve the commercial viability of these advanced thermochemical conversion technologies in the near future.

A. Bosmans; I. Vanderreydt; D. Geysen; L. Helsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Construction quality assurance for Pit 6 landfill closure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300  

SciTech Connect

Golder Construction Services, Inc. (GCS), under contract to the Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provided the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and testing during the construction of the Site 300, Pit 6 landfill closure cover. The cap construction was performed as a CERCLA non-time-critical removal action from June 2 to August 29, 1997. the project site is located 18 miles east of Livermore on Tesla Road and approximately 10 miles southwest of Tracy on Corral Hollow Road in San Joaquin County, California. This report certifies that the LLNL, Site 300, Pit 6, Landfill Closure was constructed in accordance with the construction specifications and design drawings. This report documents construction activities and CQA monitoring and testing for construction of the Pit 6 Landfill Closure. Golder Associates, Inc. of Oakland, California was the design engineering firm responsible for preparation of the drawings and specifications. CQA services were provided by GCS, of Roseville, California, under supervision of a California registered civil Engineer.

NONE

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

497

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hill Air Force Base Landfill Gas to Energy Biogas Caseoperators control leachate, landfill gas emissions, odors,USDepartmentofState 2006). Landfill gas (LFG) is created by

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006. * Does not include landfill gas from municipal wastemegawatts from solid-fuel, landfill gas and digester gasother fuels. Both landfill gas and digester ecological and

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10: GHG emission sensitivity to landfill gas collectionfollowed by incineration, then landfill gas combustion), andthrough increased landfill gas collection; and avoided GHG

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landfill Gas.paper.htm. April 2004. 20. Landfill Gas The decomposition ofgas. Therefore, the landfill gas is often collected and

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z