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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Environmental assessment of spatial plan policies through land use scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method based on scenario analysis to compare the environmental effects of different spatial plan policies in a range of possible futures. The study aimed at contributing to overcome two limitations encountered in Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) for spatial planning: poor exploration of how the future might unfold, and poor consideration of alternative plan policies. Scenarios were developed through what-if functions and spatial modeling in a Geographical Information System (GIS), and consisted in maps that represent future land uses under different assumptions on key driving forces. The use of land use scenarios provided a representation of how the different policies will look like on the ground. This allowed gaining a better understanding of the policies' implications on the environment, which could be measured through a set of indicators. The research undertook a case-study approach by developing and assessing land use scenarios for the future growth of Caia, a strategically-located and fast-developing town in rural Mozambique. The effects of alternative spatial plan policies were assessed against a set of environmental performance indicators, including deforestation, loss of agricultural land, encroachment of flood-prone areas and wetlands and access to water sources. In this way, critical environmental effects related to the implementation of each policy were identified and discussed, suggesting possible strategies to address them. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method contributes to two critical issues in SEA: exploration of the future and consideration of alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future scenarios are used to test the environmental performance of different spatial plan policies in uncertainty conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatially-explicit land use scenarios provide a representation of how different policies will look like on the ground.

Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@ing.unitn.it

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Future land use plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate critical environmental impacts at a broader temporal or spatial scale. While many applications have been geared towards implementing project-level environmental assessments, comparatively little research has been done to determine how to incorporate strategically critical environmental impacts into local planning. Although the principles of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) are not yet required in local planning in the United States, these principles create a theoretical framework for local environmental assessment. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of local plans to integrate and implement the key SEA principles. This study focuses on increasing the understanding of how and where to integrate environmental impacts into the local planning and decision-making process by converting the principles of SEA into specific planning tools, policies, and implementation strategies. This study develops a protocol with 112 indicators to measure the strengths and weaknesses of integrating strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans. A random sample of 40 California local comprehensive land use plans and associated planning processes is evaluated based on this plan quality evaluation protocol. Statistical analysis and multiple regression models identify the factors affecting the quality of plans with respect to their ability to assess environmental impacts. The results identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of the ability of local jurisdictions to integrate the SEA principles. The results show that many strategically important environmental issues and tools are rarely adopted by current local plans. The regression analysis results further identify the effects of planning capacity, environmental assessment capacity, public participation and contextual variables on environmental assessment plan quality. The findings extend established planning theory and practice by incorporating strategic environmental considerations into the existing framework of what constitutes a high quality local land use comprehensive plan and suggest ways to improve plan quality.

Tang, Zhenghong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

N /A

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

DOE/EIS-0222-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22-SA-O1 22-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 June 2008 DOE/EIS-0222-SA-0 1 SUMMARY In September 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HCP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0222-F). The HCP EIS analyzed the impacts of alternatives for implementing a land-use plan for the DOE's Hanford Site for at least the next 50-year planning period and lasting for as long as DOE retains legal control of some portion of the real estate. In November 1999 DOE issued its Record of Decision (ROD), establishing the Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (CLUP), which consisted of four key elements:

6

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cover Sheet Cover Sheet Final HCP EIS | Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

7

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS EIS Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

8

DOE/EIS-0222 Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, April 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Draft Executive Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, 6 Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant 7 counties; and the City of Richland 8 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and 13 Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HRA-EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HRA-EIS Document Manager 18 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

9

Metropolitan Land Use Planning (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use Planning (Minnesota) Land Use Planning (Minnesota) Metropolitan Land Use Planning (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations This statute establishes the Metropolitan Land Use Advisory Committee within the Metropolitan Council to coordinate plans, programs, and controls

10

Land Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) Land Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources State agencies, local governments, and other public entities engaging in land use planning shall work to promote clean and renewable energy use, increased energy efficiency, and sustainable design and construction standards, while emphasizing the protection, preservation, and restoration of natural resources, agricultural land, and cultural and historic

11

INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report The Idaho National Laboratory announced recently that the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship...

12

Applying geographic information systems to support strategic environmental assessment: Opportunities and limitations in the context of Irish land-use plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strengthening of spatial database infrastructures, further promoted by the INSPIRE Directive adopted in 2007, has led to an increased use of spatial data in planning and decision-making. Given that land-use plans are intrinsically spatial, such evidence and approaches can significantly benefit plan-making. A spatial framework could especially support the specific Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) aspects of the plan-making process. Spatial tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are particularly well-placed to support the environmental integration sought in SEA by providing evidence through the spatial assessment of multiple environmental datasets. Moreover, GIS bring the opportunity to augment conventional assessment techniques (e.g. matrix-based assessments) by acting as visual mediators of spatial knowledge and by providing an effective tool for the spatial and temporal analysis of environmental impacts. This paper presents a GIS-based approach to SEA (GISEA), and analyses the above premise by evaluating the barriers, limitations, opportunities and benefits of its implementation. The GISEA approach has been applied to seven development plans of differing scales in the Republic of Ireland. The results of the case studies revealed that current issues in SEA (e.g. restricted time-frames and institutional arrangements) condition the implementation of a GIS-based approach. Moreover, GIS expertise, data accessibility and quality remain limiting factors to an effective GIS application in SEA. However, the results also confirmed that GIS have the potential to increase the objectivity and accuracy of the assessment, enhance both the understanding of environmental and planning considerations and the delivery of information, and, therefore, help to improve the effectiveness of SEA practice.

Gonzalez, Ainhoa, E-mail: ainhoag@yahoo.co [Department of Environment and Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology, Zhivago Building, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Gilmer, Alan, E-mail: alan.gilmer@dit.i [Department of Environment and Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology, Zhivago Building, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Foley, Ronan, E-mail: ronan.foley@nuim.i [National Centre for Geo-computation, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Sweeney, John, E-mail: john.sweeney@nuim.i [Department of Geography, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Fry, John, E-mail: john.fry@ucd.i [School of Biology and Environmental Science, UCD Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

No name listed on publication

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning  

SciTech Connect

Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan 22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan SUMMARY DOE has prepared the EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. DOE is expected to use this land-use plan in its decision-making process to establish what is the "highest and best use" of the land (41 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 101-47, "Federal Property Management Regulations"). The final selection of a land-use map, land-use policies, and implementing procedures would create the working CLUP when they are adopted through the ROD for the EIS. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

16

Multi-Criteria Spatial Decision Support System DECERNS: Application to Land Use Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use planning and environmental management often requires an implementation of both geoyspatial information analysis and value-driven criteria within the decision-making process. DECERNS Decision Evaluation in Complex Risk Network Systems is a web-based ... Keywords: DECERNS, GIS, Housing Development, Land-Use Planning, MCDA, Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, Spatial Decision Support System, WebSDSS

B. Yatsalo; V. Didenko; A. Tkachuk; G. Gritsyuk; O. Mirzeabasov; V. Slipenkaya; A. Babutski; I. Pichugina; T. Sullivan; I. Linkov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) Agency/Company /Organization: GIZ Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.sutp.org/component/phocadownload/category/25-2a?download=33:2a-lup Related Tools Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center Demonstrating Electric Vehicles in Canada Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Columbia ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS Which cities have succeeded in establishing land use patterns which support the more environmentally-friendly and efficient modes of transit, walking and cycling? What are the benefits of better land use planning for

18

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

19

GRR/Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process -FD-a - Land Use Planning Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process 01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Department of Energy Bureau of Indian Affairs United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976(FLPMA) CEQ CRF Regulations 40 C.F.R. 1501.7 Scoping 40 C.F.R. 1502.9 Draft, Final, and Supplemental Statements 40 C.F.R. 1502.14 Alternatives Including the Proposed Action 40 C.F.R. 1503.4 Response to Comments 40 C.F.R. 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During the NEPA Process

20

Director's Protest Resolution Report Programmatic Land Use Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Director's Protest Resolution Report Programmatic Land Use Plan Amendments for Solar Energy......................................................................................... 68 #12;Reader How do The Dire excerpts Land Ma Report How do 1. F al 2. In n Issue T NEPA Issue N Organi Protest Issue E Rather renewab Summa There i Respon Specific decision 's Guide I read the R ector

Argonne National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

GRR/Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process -FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process 01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act 40 CFR 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During NEPA Process 40 CFR 1501.4(e)(2) "No Significant Impact" 40 CFR 1501.7 Scoping 43 CFR 1610.3-1(d) Developing Guidance to Field Manager 43 CFR 1610.3-2(e) To the Governor 43 CFR 1610.7-2(b) Public Notice Triggers None specified A Plan amendment is a modification of one or more parts (e.g., decisions about geothermal leasing) of an existing Land Use Plan (LUP). A LUP can be

22

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Table of Contents 1.0 - Purpose p1 2.0 - Executive Summary p1 3.0 - SRS Land Use Overview p5 Assumptions Current Land Use Leases, Transfers and Other Land Use Actions Future Land Use Land Use Issues 4.0 - Land Use Planning and Control for Existing Missions p13 Cleanup, Production and Support Missions Natural and Cultural Resource Management 5.0 - Process for Future Land Use Changes p15 Introduction Process Overview Process Description 6.0 - Summary p19 7.0 - References p20 8.0 - Acronyms p21 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i

23

GRR/Section 1a - Land Use Planning Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1a - Land Use Planning Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGRRSection1a-LandUsePlanningProcess&oldid448257"...

24

GRR/Section 1-NV-a - State Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-NV-a - State Land Use Planning -NV-a - State Land Use Planning < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-NV-a - State Land Use Planning 01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of State Lands Regulations & Policies NRS 278: Planning and Zoning Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 1-NV-a.1 - Inventory Population Data, Land Use Survey, Housing, and Economic Data According to the Planner's Guide, a land use plan ought to consider:

25

Albro Planning Environmental APE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

specialising in the environmental assessment and land use planning implications of renewable energy projects, especially wind energy. Coordinates 51.856949, -4.90306 Loading...

26

Introducing a novel model of belief-desire-intention agent for urban land use planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use planning is a potentially demanding search and optimization task that has been challenged by numerous researchers in the field of spatial planning. Agent and multi-agent systems are examples of the modern concepts, which have been gaining more ... Keywords: Agent, BDI architecture, Commitment, Geospatial Information System (GIS), Interaction, Urban land use planning

Saeed Behzadi, Ali A. Alesheikh

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Conservation An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory alters the makeup and responsibilities of Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC). It took effect on August 29, 2012 and changed the Commission's name to the Land Use Planning Commission. Under the Act, permitting review for significant projects, such as

28

E:\Active Projects\Comprehensive Land Use Plan\fclup.prn.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FERMILAB FERMILAB COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN f FERMILAB TABLE OF CONTENTS Comprehensive Land Use Report Contents * PAGE i * Revision 0 * April 15, 1998 Contents f Table of Contents I. Regional Conditions............................................................................. .1 1. History ............................................................................................. 1 2. Regional Overview........................................................................ 7 3. Specific Local Conditions ........................................................... 10 4. Public Transportation.................................................................. 17 5. Geology/Seismic Risk/Topography/Hydrology ................. 25 6. Meteorology..................................................................................

29

Effects of planning and policy decisions on residential land use in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of current land use in Singapore shows that through effective long-term space planning, the island city-state has maintained an adequate stock of developable residential land to meet its most ambitious maximum ...

Davis, Noel R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

GRR/Section 1-CA-a - State Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Section 1-CA-a - State Land Use Planning < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-CA-a -...

31

Land use and environmental impacts of decentralized solar energy use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physical, spatial and land-use impacts of decentralized solar technologies applied at the community level by the year 2000 are examined. The results of the study are intended to provide a basis for evaluating the way in which a shift toward reliance on decentralized energy technologies may eventually alter community form. Six land-use types representative of those found in most US cities are analyzed according to solar penetration levels identified in the maximum solar scenario for the year 2000. The scenario is translated into shares of end use demand in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors. These proportions become the scenario goals to be met by the use of decentralized solar energy systems. The percentage of total energy demand is assumed to be 36.5 percent, 18.8 percent and 22.6 percent in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors respectively. The community level scenario stipulated that a certain percentage of the total demand be met by on-site solar collection, i.e. photovoltaic and thermal collectors, and by passive design. This on-site solar goal is 31.9 percent (residential), 16.8 percent (commercial) and 13.1 percent (industrial).

Twiss, R.H.; Smith, P.L.; Gatzke, A.E.; McCreary, S.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Integrated land use, transportation, and environmental simulation: UrbanSim project highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of planning and constructing a new light rail system or freeway, setting an urban growth boundary, changing tax policy, or modifying zoning and land use plans is often politically charged. Our goal in the UrbanSim project is to provide tools ...

Alan Borning; Paul Waddell

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Implementation of state solar incentives: land-use planning to ensure solar access  

SciTech Connect

State incentives in land-use planning to ensure solar access are examined to determine issues in program design and implementation. Available incentives are reviewed to indicate their structure and purpose. These incentives include broad legislative grants of solar rights, application of nuisance law to solar-collector shading, removal of restrictive covenants or establishment of covenants to protect solar access, provision for privately-negotiated solar easements, and land-use planning and regulation to include passive solar design and provision for active solar collection in land-use development. State initiatives in the period 1973 to 1978 are cataloged. Case studies in four states (Oregon, California, New Mexico, and Minnesota) are reported. Oregon is currently engaged in a statewide, mandated local comprehensive planning process which includes consideration of energy conservation and renewable energy sources. California has recently adopted two solar access related bills which address private solar easements, subdivision design, restrictive covenants, and shading by vegetation. New Mexico has established a broad legislative grant of solar rights based on water rights law. And Minnesota has authorized the inclusion of solar energy as a factor in local land use planning and established a private easement procedure.

Pollock, P.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Surface mine pollution abatement and land use impact investigation. Volume III. Considerations of post mining land use, mine inventory and abatement plan for the quicksand watershed. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five volume series primarily presents three general topics. The first of these is a discussion of considerations relating to post-mining land use. Following this discussion, an evaluation of factors relating to more important environmental and land use impacts of the surface mining industry in Eastern Kentucky is presented. The last topic presents a mine inventory of the 33 surface mines located in the Quicksand Watershed in Breathitt County, Kentucky. Surface mines have several environmental and land use impacts. Those considered in the discussion which are of special importance to Eastern Kentucky are hydrologic influence, sedimentation, spoil bank stability, the impact on the public road system and mine access roads, and haul road abandonment. A number of major conclusions of general applicability are given along with some conclusions specifically related to the Quicksand Watershed.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

36

File:01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:08, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:08, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 17:06, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:06, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (55 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

37

File:01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LandUsePlanning.pdf LandUsePlanning.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:06, 14 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:06, 14 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (124 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 14:52, 1 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:52, 1 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (85 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 15:58, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:58, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (85 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

38

File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf -FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:25, 18 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:25, 18 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (136 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 16:00, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:00, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (86 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

39

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

SciTech Connect

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

Brekke, D.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan serves as an aid to management and staff to implement new environmental programs in a timely manner.

Brekke, D.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A technical modeler's interface for urbansim, a system for integrated land use, transportation, and environmental modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Patterns of land use and available transportation systems play a critical role in determining the economic vitality, livability, and sustainability of urban areas. Transportation interacts strongly with land use. For example, automobile-oriented development ...

Alan Borning; Paul Waddell

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Planning for a Sustainable Nexus of Urban Land Use, Transport and Energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Land use, transport, and energy systems create demands that are transferred to ecosystems. Urban sprawl is increasing, open space and farmland are disappearing and climate (more)

Belaieff, Antoine; Moy, Gloria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

46

Environmental protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

R. C. Holland

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

Schiller, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site's environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex.

Not Available

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site`s environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy`s Nuclear Weapons Complex.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site's environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is a dynamic long-range environmental-protection plan for SRS. The EIP communicates the current and future (five year) environmental plans from individual organizations and divisions as well as site environmental initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed compliance with changing environmental/ regulatory requirements. Communication with all site organizations is essential for making the site environmental planning process work. Demonstrating environmental excellence is a high priority embodied in DOE and WSRC policy. Because of your support and participation in the three EIP initiatives; Reflections, Sectional Revision, and Integrated Planning, improvements are being made to the EIP and SRS environmental protection programs. I appreciate the ``Partnership in Environmental Excellence`` formed by the environmental coordinators and professionals who work daily toward our goal of compliance and environmental excellence. I look forward to seeing continued success and improvement in our environmental protection programs through combined efforts of all site organizations to protect our employees, the public health, and the environment. Together, we will achieve our site vision for SRS to be the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Health Equity in a New Urbanist Environment: Land Use Planning and Community Capacity Building in Fresno, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the links between land use, air pollution and health inlinks between land use and air pollution were simultaneouslyof land- use siting and cumulative air pollution impacts.

ZUK, MIRIAM ZOFITH

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Environmental protection implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. SNL is committed to operating in full compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental laws, regulations, and standards. Furthermore, SNL/California strives to go beyond compliance with legal requirements by making every effort practical to reduce impacts to the environment to levels as low as reasonably achievable.

Holland, R.C.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

An Integrated Computer Modeling Environment For Regional Land Use, Air Quality, And Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Land Use, Air Quality, and Transportation Integrated Modeling Environment (LATIME) represents an integrated approach to computer modeling and simulation of land use allocation, travel demand, and mobile source emissions for the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area. This environment provides predictive capability combined with a graphical and geographical interface. The graphical interface shows the causal relationships between data and policy scenarios and supports alternative model formulations. Scenarios are launched from within a Geographic Information System (GIS), and data produced by each model component at each time step within a simulation is stored in the GIS. A menudriven query system is utilized to review link-based results and regional and areawide results. These results can also be compared across time or between alternative land use scenarios. Using this environment, policies can be developed and implemented based on comparative analysis, rather than on single-step future pr...

Charles Hanley Renewable; Norman L. Marshall; Charles J. Hanley; Charles J. Hanley

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3) environmental management programs, (4) training, (5)Management Programs3-5 Structure and Responsibility.3-6 Training,Management System Plan Program Elements Additional information regarding EMS training

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Benton County: Rural Legacy, Innovative Economy, Informed Ecology Comprehensive Land Use Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future Development Impacts---------------------------------- 25 Recommended Transportation Plan----------------------------------------------- 17 Introduction to Transportation Planning--------------------- 18 Existing Transportation Facilities--------------------------- 25 Identification of Future Needs------------------------------------- 25 General Corridor

59

An integrated multi-criteria scenario evaluation web tool for participatory land-use planning in urbanized areas: The Ecosystem Portfolio Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use land-cover change is one of the most important and direct drivers of changes in ecosystem functions and services. Given the complexity of the decision-making, there is a need for Internet-based decision support systems with scenario evaluation ... Keywords: Decision support, Ecological value, Ecosystem restoration, Land-use planning, Quality of life, Sea level rise mitigation, Sustainability

W. B. Labiosa; W. M. Forney; A. -M. Esnard; D. Mitsova-Boneva; R. Bernknopf; P. Hearn; D. Hogan; L. Pearlstine; D. Strong; H. Gladwin; E. Swain

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Environmental information management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Information Management Plan provides an overview of the management of environmental information generation by Hanford Site programs. The long-term nature of environmental programs requires that electronic data, documents, and other materials be kept for extended periods in a secure, controlled, and retrievable manner. An important part of the program is the maintenance of administrative records under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989). The Environmental Information Management Plan introduces Westinghouse Hanford records management and engineering document control systems and their relationship to environmental programs. Specific information is provided about the operation of the Environmental Data Management Center, a central facility that receives, processes, and maintains information related to environmental program activities. The Environmental Data Management Center maintains a reference file, coordinates administrative record activities, and distributes administrative record indexes and administrative record documents to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and four information repositories. 43 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

Michael, L.E.; Main, G.C.; See, E.J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

JEWETT MA

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

62

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Environmental Management System Plan  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

64

Capturing the implications of land use change in Brazil through environmental assessment: Time for a strategic approach?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brazil is experiencing a surge in planting of sugar cane crops driven by internal markets and external policy drivers for biofuels. The current expectation is for the expansion of these crops to continue. This creates concern over the extent to which the full implications of large scale land use change are currently being considered by decision-makers. Using the State of Sao Paulo as a case study (as it accounts for the majority of sugar cane grown in Brazil), a comparison was made of the impacts identified in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) and Preliminary Environmental Reports (PERs), which have to be submitted for approval of most new sugar cane activities, with significant impacts known to be associated with sugar cane activities derived from literature review. The results from a review of 32 EISs and PERs (30% of the population) indicated that whilst some impacts were well covered by the sample (water and soil pollution, and air emissions) energy balance and Green House Gas emissions and food security had very limited consideration, and water resources, residues, labour conditions and social responsibility were only partially covered. Environmental Impact Assessment is constrained by its environmental advocacy role and its application to the project level only. This study highlights its limitations in the context of assessment of land use change which demands more strategic consideration.

Gallardo, Amarilis Lucia Casteli Figueiredo, E-mail: amacafi@ipt.b [Institute for Technological Research, Center of Environmental and Energetic Technologies, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo - SP, CEP 05508-901 (Brazil); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.u [InteREAM (Interdisciplinary Research in Environmental Assessment and Management), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) prepared this ''Environmental Monitoring Plan'' (EMP) to meet the requirements in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' (DOE 1991) and applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 (see WSS B93 and B94 in Appendix B). ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' is followed as a best management practice; under Work Smart Standards, LLNL complies with portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 as shown in Appendix B. This document is a revision of the May 1999 EMP (Tate et al. 1999) and is current as of March 1, 2002. LLNL is one of the nation's premier applied-science national security laboratories. Its primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable, and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. LLNL's programs in advanced technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science apply LLNL's unique capabilities and enhance the competencies needed for this national security mission. LLNL's mission also involves working with industrial and academic partners to increase national competitiveness and improve science education. LLNL's mission is dynamic and has changed over the years to meet new national needs. In keeping with the Laboratory's mission, the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) have top priority. LLNL's policy is to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage. The environment, safety, and health are to be priority considerations in the planning and execution of all work activities at the Laboratory (LLNL 2001). Furthermore, it is the policy of LLNL to comply with applicable ES&H laws, regulations, and requirements. Under Contract 48, Appendix F, the Laboratory commits to minimizing its waste streams and to avoiding adverse impacts to the environment from its operations (UC/DOE 2001).

Althouse, P E; Biermann, A; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Clark, L M; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Gouveia, F J; Grayson, A; Harrach, R J; Hoppes, W G; Jones, H; Mathews, S; Merrigan, J R; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, B; Williams, R

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Plan Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan, remediating the Nuclear Weapons Complex, August 1995, environmentalrestorationstrategicplan.pdf Environmental...

67

WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH FEBRUARY 1999 Final (Revision 0) Department of Energy Babcock & Wilcox of Ohio Mr. Daniel Bird AICP, Planning Manager Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation 720 Mound Road Miamisburg, Ohio 45342-6714 Dear Mr. Bird: The Core Team, consisting of the U.S. Department of Energy Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (DOE-MEMP), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA), appreciates your comments on the Work

68

Assessment of a multi-objective decision support system generated land use plan on forest fodder dependency in a Himalayan watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact of integrated watershed land use plans generated through multi-objective optimization techniques in a Central Himalayan watershed on forest fodder dependency for meeting fodder requirements of livestock in the watershed. ... Keywords: Forest fodder dependency, Himalayas, Integrated watershed development, Multi-objective decision support system

A. Raizada; Pradeep Dogra; B. L. Dhyani

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

timber producing land while sediment pollution is associatedin Rural Land Use, Nonpoint Source Pollution, and Evolvingto reduce sediment pollution from private lands within the

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health, and Safety Division Environmental Services Group March 2009 Revision 4 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offices, the EMS Program Program Elements Environmental ManagementOffice of Institutional Assurance as stated in the OQMP. 3-7 Environmental ManagementEnvironmental Management System Fiscal Year Improve (EMP classification) Integrated Safety Management System International Organization for Standardization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Office

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land use, the prevention and control of nonpoint source pollution,prevention and control of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution from rural private landspollution prevention, the protection and restoration of salmonid habitat, and/or land

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Annual Planning Summaries: Environmental Management (EM) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management (EM) Annual Planning Summaries: Environmental Management (EM) Document(s) Available For Download February 3, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary for...

74

Environmental Implementation Plan - EIP introduction  

SciTech Connect

Due to the commitment and participation of more than 100 professionals from site environmental coordinators, customer improvements and total quality are being incorporated into the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is now a living document that communicates an overview of site environmental programs and the facility plans that are designed to protect the environment and meet changing regulatory requirements. Continuous improvement of environmental programs is enhanced through planned quarterly self-assessments during the {open_quotes}Reflections{close_quotes} process. Through the sharing of noteworthy practices, lessons learned, and ideas for improvement, the EIP provides a framework for environmental professionals to promote cost effective solutions and program improvements through teamwork and communication. These efforts were initiated by the Central Environmental Committee Executive Committee (CECEC) and developed and coordinated by the EIP subcommittee. The EIP revision process is the baseline for a continuous improvement cycle. Although the EIP is a Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) document, the environmental-planning process involves and will benefit all site contractors. Together, we are committed to a {open_quotes}Partnership in Environmental Excellence.{close_quotes}

Peterson, G.L.

1993-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

Africa Land Use (1980)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Land Use (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

78

Oak Ridge Reservation site management plan for the environmental restoration program  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the overall approach for addressing environmental contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) National Priorities List site located in east Tennessee. The cleanup strategy reflected in this site management plan (SMP) has been developed to accelerate the transition of areas of concern (AOCs) from characterization to remediation by making decisions at the watershed scale based on recommended land uses. Project scoping involves the use of defined remedial action objectives, which are based in part on the land uses selected for the project sites. To provide a consistent land use approach that accommodates the needs of all stakeholders responsible for the remediation and reutilization of the ORR, a reservation-wide strategy has been developed. The Common Ground process is a stakeholder-driven process to determine preferred land use options for the ORR so that clean-up operations will be based on the most likely and acceptable land uses. DOE utilized the information gathered in the Common Ground process to recommend desired land uses for the ORR. The land uses recommended by DOE as a result of the Common Ground process are being used for planning land and facility use/reuse for the next 25 years. Land uses recommended for the ORR in conducting CERCLA remedial activities are conservation, industrial use, and waste management.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Land use and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

2010 Climate Action Plan Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by utilizing the energy conservation loan fund and Sustainable Campus Initiative Fund for exceeding typical occupants and facilities' staff to monitor and improve the energy usage of buildings. · Utilizingsub2010 Climate Action Plan Energy and Environmental Stewardship Initiative: Prepared by: The Office

Feschotte, Cedric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

82

Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Savannah River Site environmental implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Geothermal development and land use/energy planning by the State of California and its political subdivisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

California law contains several vehicles for the implementation of geothermal planning. These mechanisms and their impact are examined. First, at the State level upon the California Energy Commission and the Division of Oil and Gas in the Department of Conservation. After some background on county planning in California, the unique situation in the counties of greatest geothermal potential is presented: Imperial County and the four Geysers counties as well as their joint powers agency. Conclusions and recommendations are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Annual Planning Summaries: Environmental Management-Consolidated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management-Consolidated Business Service Center (EM-CBC) Annual Planning Summaries: Environmental Management-Consolidated Business Service Center (EM-CBC) Document(s)...

86

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HCP EIS HCP EIS Appendix A | A-1 Appendix A - Treaties 1 2 3 The US GenWeb Archives provide genealogical and historical data to the 4 general public without fee or charge of any kind. It is intended that 5 this material not be used in a commercial manner. 6 7 Submitted by Kevin Fraley from public records Jan. 21, 1997. 8 Both above notices must remain when copied or downloaded. 9 10 swimref@cmc.net 11 12 13 Blackfeet Treaty of Fort Benton, 1855 14 15 16 Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the council-ground on the Upper 17 Missouri, near the mouth of the Judith River, in the Territory of Nebraska, this seventeenth day of 18 October, in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, by and between A. Cumming and 19 Isaac I. Stevens, commissioners duly appointed and authorized, on the part of the United States,

87

Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Transportation Planning and Land Use Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) have launched the free, web-based Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). The TSDC (www.nrel.gov/tsdc) preserves respondent anonymity while making vital transportation data available to a broad group of users through secure, online access. The TSDC database provides free-of-charge web-based access to valuable transportation data that can be used for: Transit planning, Travel demand modeling, Homeland Security evacuation planning, Alternative fuel station planning, and Validating transportation data from other sources. The TSDC's two levels of access make composite data available with simple online registration, and allow researchers to use detailed spatial data after completing a straight forward application process.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Geothermal development and land use/energy planning by the State of California and its political subdivisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mechanisms in California law for the implementation of geothermal planning and their impacts are examined, first, at the State level upon the California Energy Commission and the Division of Oil and Gas in the Department of Conservation. Next, after some background on county planning in California, the unique situation in the counties of greatest geothermal potential is discussed. These include: Imperial County and the four Geysers Counties (Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino, and Lake), as well as their joint powers agency - G.R.I.P.S. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Land Use History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the cultural-historical environment of the 88,900-acre (35,560-ha) Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) over the past four centuries of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governance. It includes a review and synthesis of available published and unpublished historical, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic literature about the human occupation of the area now contained within the VCNP. Documents include historical maps, texts, letters, diaries, business records, photographs, land and mineral patents, and court testimony. This study presents a cultural-historical framework of VCNP land use that will be useful to land managers and researchers in assessing the historical ecology of the property. It provides VCNP administrators and agents the cultural-historical background needed to develop management plans that acknowledge traditional associations with the Preserve, and offers managers additional background for structuring and acting on consultations with affiliated communities.

United States; Forest Service; Kurt F. Anschuetz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a entral Environmental Restoration Division'' to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization's objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

Colley, J.S.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

River Protection Project (RPP) Environmental Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Program Plan was developed in support of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System Plan (ISMS) (RPP-MP-003), which establishes a single, defined environmental, safety, and health management system that integrates requirements into the work planning and execution processes to protect workers, the public, and the environment. The ISMS also provides mechanisms for increasing worker involvement in work planning, including hazard and environmental impact identification, analysis, and control; work execution; and feedback/improvement processes. The ISMS plan consists of six core functions. Each section of this plan describes the activities of the River Protection Project (RPP) (formerly known as the Tank Waste Remediation System) Environmental organization according to the following core functions: Establish Environmental Policy; Define the Scope of Work; Identify Hazards, Environmental Impacts, and Requirements; Analyze Hazards and Environmental Impacts and Implement Controls; Perform Work within Controls; and Provide Feedback and Continuous Improvement.

POWELL, P.A.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tank waste remediation system environmental program plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Program Plan has been developed in support of the Integrated Environmental, Safety and Health Management System and consistent with the goals of DOE/RL-96-50, Hanford Strategic Plan (RL 1996a), and the specifications and guidance for ANSI/ISO 14001-1996, Environmental Management Systems Specification with guidance for use (ANSI/ISO 1996).

Borneman, L.E.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

94

Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) is intended to document the quality assurance of the Environmental Monitoring Program. The Quality Assurance Project Plan has two parts and is written to become a chapter in the Environmental Monitoring Plan. Part A describes the management responsibilities and activities performed to assure the quality of the Environmental Monitoring Program. Part B covers the documentation requirements for changes in the Monitoring Program, and provides details on control of the design and implementation of quality assurance activities.

Holland, R.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Environmental Restoration Program Management Control Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Management Control Plan has been prepared to define the Energy Systems approach to managing its participation in the US DOE's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program in a manner consistent with DOE/ORO 931: Management Plan for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge, Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; and the Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Contract Management Plan (CMP). This plan discusses the systems, procedures, methodology, and controls to be used by the program management team to attain these objectives.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel-based land use data using Geographic Information System (GIS) technique and a correlation analysis method, which was employed to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use. The results of this study showed that every land use category has different temperature averages and those patterns were observed similarly in both 2000 and 2005. Parking, airport, commercial, industrial, and residential areas have relatively high temperatures. In contrast, water, undeveloped area and parks showed relatively low temperatures. Another major finding was ratio of land use composition affected the temperature of census tracts. Correlation analyses of land use and temperature in 2000 and 2005 indicate that various types of land use categories have significant relationships with temperature. Among them commercial, industrial, residential, parking, and infrastructure, are positively associated with temperature, while undeveloped, parks, water, and dedicated areas are negatively associated with temperature. Areas with a high ratio of commercial use showed the highest and undeveloped areas showed the lowest relationship. Furthermore, through the analysis of the relationship between land use and temperature change for five years (2000-2005), this study finds that temperature change depends on the ratio of each land use category change. The results of this study can help local planning and policy decisions which are related to urban land use planning concerning temperature change such as zoning, environmental regulations and open space preservation.

Kim, Hee Ju

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Environmental Restoration Information Resource Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Information Resources Management (ER IRM) Program Plan defines program requirements, organizational structures and responsibilities, and work breakdown structure and to establish an approved baseline against which overall progress of the program as well as the effectiveness of its management will be measured. This plan will guide ER IRM Program execution and define the program`s essential elements. This plan will be routinely updated to incorporate key decisions and programmatic changes and will serve as the project baseline document. Environmental Restoration Waste Management Program intersite procedures and work instructions will be developed to facilitate the implementation of this plan.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

103

DOE Plans Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for New...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plans Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for New Petroleum Reserve Site in Mississippi DOE Plans Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for New Petroleum Reserve Site...

104

EIS-0455: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Plan AmendmentFinal Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Solar Energy Project, California EIS-0455: Plan AmendmentFinal Environmental Impact Statement for the...

105

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Environmental Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Annual Planning Summary for the Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center...

106

Environmental development plan: geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure that environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) considerations are addressed adequately in the technology decision making process, the Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies and evaluates EH and S concerns; defines EH and S research and related assessments to examine or resolve the concerns; provides a coordinated schedule with the technology program for required EH and S research and developement; and indicates the timing for Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Readiness Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports. This EDP for geothermal energy systems covers all current and planned activities of the DOE Geothermal Energy Systems. Hydrothermal convection systems, geopressured systems, and hot-dry-rock systems are covered. Environmental concerns and requirements for resolution of these concerns are discussed at length. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

Bechtel Nevada

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Energy and land use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Environmental Restoration Program Records Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the plans, organization, and control systems to be used for management of the Hanford Site Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The Field Office Management Plan (FOMP), in conjunction with the Environmental Restoration Program Quality Assurance System Requireme ts for the Hanford Site (QASR [DOE-RL 1992a]), provides requirements governing ER Program work activities on the Hanford Site. The FOMP requires a records management plan be written. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) ER Program Office has developed this ER Program Records Management Plan to fulfill the requirements of the FOMP (DOE-RL 1989). This records management plan will enable the ER Program Office and other ER Program participants to identify, control, and maintain the records generated and used in support of the ER Program.

Montgomery, L.M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

112

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program Requirements (DOE, 1990a), requires each DOE facility to prepare an EMP. This document is prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (DOE, 1990b); Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (Draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1 (DOE, 1995), which is the driver for the Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Company, Waste Isolation Division (WID), for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of the WIPP's effluent and environmental monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses the WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE, 1991). This document references DOE orders and other federal and state regulations affecting environmental monitoring programs at the site. WIPP procedures, which implement the requirements of this program plan, are also referenced. The DOE regulates its own activities for radiation protection of the public under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2011). The effluent and environmental monitoring activities prescribed by DOE Order 5400.5 and the DOE/EH-0173T guidance manual are designed to ensure that DOE facilities implement standards and regulations to protect members of the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation. Effluent and environmental monitoring also provide 1999 Environmental Monitoring Plan DOE/WIPP 99-2194 the data necessary to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental protection regulations. Other federal agencies, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), are empowered through specific legislation to regulate certain aspects of DOE activities potentially affecting public health and safety or the environment. Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards (43 FR 47707), requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all necessary actions for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. Beyond statutory requirements, the DOE has established a general environmental protection policy. The Environmental Policy Statement (issued by then Secretary Herrington on January 8, 1986, and extended on January 7, 1987) describes the DOE's commitment to national environmental protection goals in that it conducts operations ''in an environmentally safe and sound manner . . . in compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards'' (DOE, 1986). This Environmental Policy Statement also states the DOE's commitment to ''good environmental management in all of its programs and at all of its facilities in order to correct existing environmental problems, to minimize risks to the environment or public health, and to anticipate and address pote

Westinghouse Electric Company Waste Isolation Division

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

Land-Use and Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use and Ecosystems Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses National Land Cover Data 1992 (2005), and 2001 (2008) Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use...

114

Land use and climate change in Miami-Dade County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miami-Dade County, Florida, was one of the earliest jurisdictions to adopt a climate change plan in 1993. Land use features prominently in this plan as a means to reduce greenhouse gases through development patterns that ...

Peckett, Haley Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

Noah, J.C.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

117

Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Assessment Toolkit Land Use Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

118

Savannah River Site environmental implementation plan. Volume 1, Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan. Volume 2, Protection programs  

SciTech Connect

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Master environmental plan for Fort Devens, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory has prepared a master environmental plan (MEP) for Fort Devens, Massachusetts, for the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency. The MEP is an assessment based on environmental laws and regulations of both the federal government and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MEP assess the physical and environmental status of 58 potential hazardous waste sites, including 54 study areas (SAs) that pose a potential for releasing contamination into the environment and 4 areas of concern (AOCs) that are known to have substantial contamination. For each SA or AOC, this MEP describes the known history and environment, identifies additional data needs, and proposes possible response actions. Most recommended response actions consist of environmental sampling and monitoring and other characterization studies. 74 refs., 63 figs., 50 tabs.

Biang, C.A.; Peters, R.W.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT PLANNING SUMMARY FOR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT PLANNING SUMMARY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2012 FOR THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX I. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) on-going activity. Site-Wide...

122

Mobility in environmental planning: an integrated multi-agent approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobility infrastructure planning is an increasingly crucial aspect of environmental planning, essential to boost regional economies and social relations, as well as critical for environmental impacts involved. Structuring inherently complex issues and ...

D. Borri; D. Camarda; A. De Liddo

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydrologic test plan for the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic tests are planned at seven wells that will be drilled at the proposed Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility (ERDF). These wells are supporting hydrologic, geologic, and hydrochemical characterization at this new facility. Hydrologic testing will consist of instantaneous slug tests, slug interference tests, step-drawdown tests, and constant rate discharge tests (generally single-well). These test results and later groundwater monitoring data will be used to determine groundwater flow directions, flow rates, and the chemical makeup of the groundwater below the proposed ERDF. The seven wells will be drilled in two phases. In Phase I four wells will be drilled and tested: Two to the top of the uppermost aquifer (water table) and two as characterization boreholes to the top of basalt. The Phase I wells are located in the northern portion of the proposed ERDF site (699-32-72, 699-SDF-6, -7 and -8) (Figure 1). If Phase II drilling proceeds, the remaining three wells will be installed and tested (two deep and one shallow). A phased approach to drilling is warranted because of current uncertainty in the land use requirements at the proposed ERDF.

Swanson, L.C.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1994--November 9, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan serves as an aid to management and staff to implement new environmental programs in a timely manner.

Brekke, D.D.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

land use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

126

An integrated approach to modelling land-use change on continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use and land-cover change are important drivers of global environmental change, affecting the state of biodiversity, the global carbon cycle, and other aspects of the earth system. In this article we describe the development of the land-use model ... Keywords: Continental and global scale land-use change modelling, Human-environment interaction, Land-use systems, Model framework

Rdiger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Jennifer Koch; Christina Klking; David M. Lapola; Jan Schngel; Jrg A. Priess

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a ``entral Environmental Restoration Division`` to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization`s objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

Colley, J.S.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Environmental Restoration Quality Program Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program requirements for implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C are identified in the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan, (QPP). Management systems necessary to implement the ER QPP consist of the necessary standards and procedures required to be developed to adequately control ER processes. To the extent possible, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., standards and procedures will be utilized at the ER Program level, and requirements will not be repeated. The quality management systems identified for enhancement or development are identified in the section on Procedure Development Strategy and directly relate to unique ER Program activities. Procedures and standards that currently exist in the ER Program will be validated for compliance with ER QPP requirements.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Planning For Wind Energy: Evaluating Municipal Wind Energy Land Use Planning Frameworks in Southwestern Ontario with a Focus on Developing Wind Energy Planning Policies for the City of Stratford.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind energy provides an environmentally friendly and renewable source of electricity, that can help meet Canada's Kyoto commitments, help safeguard against future blackouts, reduce air (more)

Longston, Kristopher, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Environmental Restoration Quality Program Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program requirements for implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C are identified in the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan, (QPP). Management systems necessary to implement the ER QPP consist of the necessary standards and procedures required to be developed to adequately control ER processes. To the extent possible, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., standards and procedures will be utilized at the ER Program level, and requirements will not be repeated. The quality management systems identified for enhancement or development are identified in the section on Procedure Development Strategy and directly relate to unique ER Program activities. Procedures and standards that currently exist in the ER Program will be validated for compliance with ER QPP requirements.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

2012 Annual Planning Summary for Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Environmental Management.

132

OpenEI - land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4160 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

133

Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Strategic plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) site is currently divided into five major areas, Operable Units (OUs), and several Areas of Concern (AOCs), which are the focus of investigation and clean-up. The primary environmental concern is groundwater contamination and a major emphasis of the restoration activities is focused on this medium. Each year, BNL generates 60 tons of hazardous waste and 7,000 to 8,000 cubic feet of radioactive waste that result from research activities. These wastes are collected at a central location, packaged and shipped off site for disposal. The operations for Hazardous and Radioactive Waste Management are conducted in compliance with EPA and DOE regulations. BNL has continued to actively pursue means by which these wastes may be minimized. Activities in both the remediation and waste management arenas are intimately connected with the future vision of BNL. The long-range goal for remediation in conjunction with vigorous monitoring of BNL`s activities is to restore the site and maintain strong environmental controls. The goals of the waste minimization program include activities to find environmentally safe alternatives to materials currently in use. By careful planning, BNL will minimize the amount of all waste, including sanitary, that is generated on site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental ImpactReport  

SciTech Connect

This environmental impact report (EIR) has been prepared pursuant to the applicable provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and its implementing guidelines (CEQA Guidelines), and the Amended University of California Procedures for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (UC CEQA Procedures). The University of California (UC or the University) is the lead agency for this EIR, which examines the overall effects of implementation of the proposed 2006 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP; also referred to herein as the 'project' for purposes of CEQA) for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL; also referred to as 'Berkeley Lab,' 'the Laboratory,' or 'the Lab' in this document). An LRDP is a land use plan that guides overall development of a site. The Lab serves as a special research campus operated by the University employees, but it is owned and financed by the federal government and as such it is distinct from the UC-owned Berkeley Campus. As a campus operated by the University of California, the Laboratory is required to prepare an EIR for an LRDP when one is prepared or updated pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21080.09. The adoption of an LRDP does not constitute a commitment to, or final decision to implement, any specific project, construction schedule, or funding priority. Rather, the proposed 2006 LRDP describes an entire development program of approximately 980,000 gross square feet of new research and support space construction and 320,000 gross square feet of demolition of existing facilities, for a total of approximately 660,000 gross square feet of net new occupiable space for the site through 2025. Specific projects will undergo CEQA review at the time proposed to determine what, if any, additional review is necessary prior to approval. As described in Section 1.4.2, below, and in Chapter 3 of this EIR (the Project Description), the size of the project has been reduced since the Notice of Preparation for this EIR was issued. This reduction was in response to consultation with the City of Berkeley as well as other factors. CEQA requires that, before a decision can be made by a state or local government agency to approve a project that may have significant environmental effects, an EIR must be prepared that fully describes the environmental effects of the project. The EIR is a public informational document for use by University decision-makers and the public. It is intended to identify and evaluate potential environmental consequences of the proposed project, to identify mitigation measures that would lessen or avoid significant adverse impacts, and to examine feasible alternatives to the project. The information contained in the EIR is reviewed and considered by the lead agency prior to its action to approve, disapprove, or modify the proposed project.

Philliber, Jeff

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

135

Southwest intertie project: Final environmental impact statement and proposed plan amendment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Intertie Project (SWIP) is a proposed 500kV electrical transmission line system between the Midpoint Substation near Shoshone, Idaho and a proposed substation in Dry Lake Valley, northeast of Las Vegas, Nevada (referred to as the Midpoint to Dry Lake segment), and between a proposed substation in the Ely, Nevada area and a proposed substation near Delta, Utah (referred to as the Ely to Delta segment). This SWIP Final Environmental Impact Statement/Proposed Plan Amendment (FEIS/PPA) assesses the environmental consequences of the federal approval for the project. Impacts of the proposed action would result from the access roads, tower sites, and staging areas required to construct the transmission lines and related facilities. Impacts are expected to soils, vegetation, wildlife, cultural resources, scenic resources, and land uses. Electric and magnetic field effects have also been studied for this project.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Program records management plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Environmental Restoration Field Office Management Plan ((FOMP) DOE-RL 1989) describes the plans, organization, and control systems to be used for management of the Hanford Site environmental restoration remedial action program. The FOMP, in conjunction with the Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Quality Assurance Requirements document ((QARD) DOE-RL 1991), provides all the environmental restoration remedial action program requirements governing environmental restoration work on the Hanford Site. The FOMP requires a records management plan be written. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) Environmental Restoration Remedial Action (ERRA) Program Office has developed this ERRA Records Management Plan to fulfill the requirements of the FOMP. This records management plan will enable the program office to identify, control, and maintain the quality assurance, decisional, or regulatory prescribed records generated and used in support of the ERRA Program. 8 refs., 1 fig.

Michael, L.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

csp land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

csp land use Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

138

Waste Feed Delivery Environmental Permits and Approvals Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes the environmental permits approvals, and other requirements that may affect establishment of a waste feed delivery system for the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This plan identifies and screens environmental standards for potential applicability, outlines alternatives for satisfying applicable standards, and describes preferred permitting and approval approaches.

TOLLEFSON, K.S.

2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Using neural networks and cellular automata for modelling intra-urban land-use dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Empirical models designed to simulate and predict urban land-use change in real situations are generally based on the utilization of statistical techniques to compute the land-use change probabilities. In contrast to these methods, artificial neural ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Fuzzy similarity measures, Land-use dynamics, Neural networks, Town planning, Urban modelling

C. M. Almeida; J. M. Gleriani; E. F. Castejon; B. S. Soares-Filho

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (NEJAC) Model Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (NEJAC) Model The National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (NEJAC) Model Plan for Public Participation The National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (NEJAC) Model Plan for Public Participation This report and recommendations have been written as a part of the activities of the NEJAC, a public advisory committee providing extramural policy information and advice to the Administrator and other officials of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Council is structured to provide balanced, expert assessment of matters related to environmental justice. This report has been reviewed by EPA. The National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (NEJAC) Model Plan for Public Participation More Documents & Publications National Environmental Justice Advisory Council Federal Facilities Working

142

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION SPRING 2013 Including.m. Sacramento: Sutter Square Galleria, 2901 K St. $575 ($625 if postmarked after 03/28/2013). Enroll in section and site designs, create and prepare site plans, and analyze and develop planning staff reports. Emphasis

California at Davis, University of

143

DOE Plans Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for New Petroleum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plans Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for New Plans Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for New Petroleum Reserve Site in Mississippi DOE Plans Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for New Petroleum Reserve Site in Mississippi March 5, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis Three Public Meetings Planned Next Month; Supplemental Study to Include Floodplain and Wetlands Assessments WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced plans to prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) for the nation's Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) expansion site in Richton, MS. This supplemental study will consider whether to select a new location for new petroleum reserve's raw water intake structure from the Leaf River to an alternate location with greater water availability. The SEIS will also

144

Environmental security planning : an application to the Longwood Medical Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis is a study of the security problems due to street crime in the Longwood Medical Area of Boston. The first part of the thesis defines the theories and practices of environmental security .planning, the urban ...

Garmaise, Miriam Gail

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

solar land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar land use solar land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

146

pv land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pv land use pv land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

147

Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site.

McKinney, S.M.

1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

Environmental Monitoring Plan for Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEA Baseline Exposure Assessment CPC Condensation Particle Counter CNT Carbon Nanotubes DOE Department of Energy EETD Environmental Energy Technologies Division EHS Environment,...

149

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT/PLAN...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTPLAN AMENDMENT Rice Solar Energy Project Riverside County, California Lead Agency Cooperating Agency U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power...

150

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Triennial update that describes the BNL Environmental Monitoring Program for all media (air, surface water, ground water, etc.) in accordance with DOE ORDER 5400.5

DAUM,M.; DORSCH,WM.; FRY,J.; GREEN,T.; LEE,R.; NAIDU,J.; PAQUETTE,D.; SCARPITTA,S.; SCHROEDER,G.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

GRR/Section 1 - Land Use Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 - Land Use Overview 1 - Land Use Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1 - Land Use Overview 01LandUseOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Environmental Protection Agency Fish and Wildlife Service United States Department of Defense Regulations & Policies Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Endangered Species Act Clean Water Act Clean Air Act Farmland Protection Policy Act Sikes Act National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) - specifically, Section 106 Native American Graves Protection Act Archaeological Resource Protection Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

152

Business Plan : Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2, Appendices.  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the appendices for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Business Plan: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Included are: BPA products and services; Rate design; Methodology and assumptions for numerical analysis; Retail utility operations; Comments and responses to the draft business plan EIS.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Savannah River Site Environmental Implentation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the organizational responsibilities for the Savannah River Site Environmental program. Operations, Engineering and projects, Environment, safety, and health, Quality assurance, and the Savannah River Laboratory are described.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

OpenEI Community - solar land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90 en Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogsolar-land-use-data-openei

155

EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington The DOE has prepared this HCP EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. The DOE is expected to use this land-use plan in its decision-making process to establish what is the "highest and best use" of the land (41 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 101-47, "Federal Property Management Regulations"). The final selection of a land-use map, land-use policies, and implementing procedures would create the working CLUP when they are adopted through the ROD for

156

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Environmental Responsibility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Environmental 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Environmental Responsibility 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Environmental Responsibility The scope of the Department's environmental cleanup includes stabilization and disposition of some of the earth's most hazardous materials generated from spent nuclear fuel and nuclear radioactive waste material. The cleanup program resulting from over five decades of nuclear weapons production and energy research is the largest active cleanup program in the world. In addition, after active cleanup, residual risks will remain for significant periods of time at most DOE cleanup sites. The Department will take appropriate action to protect human health and the environment from these residual risks. The Department continues its effort

157

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Nuclear Power Plant License Renewal Environmental Life Cycle Management Plan Manual: License Renewal Environmental Compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual focuses on preparing to meet NRC environmental requirements for license renewal. It describes a nuclear power plant's day-to-day environmental protection activities and the relationship between these activities and a plan for preparing a license renewal environmental report supplement.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references.

Vollmer, A.T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EG and G Idaho Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (1991)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the EG G Idaho, Inc. strategy for implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (a DOE-Headquarters directive establishing environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities). Preparation of this Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is a requirement of DOE Order 5400.1. Additionally, this report is intended to supplement the Department of Energy -- Field Office Idaho (DOE-ID) Environmental Protection Implementation Plan by detailing EG G Idaho Environmental Protection Program activities. This report describes the current status of the EG G Idaho Program, and the strategies for enhancing, as necessary, the current program to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. Aspects of the Environmental Protection Program included in this report are the assignment of responsibilities to specific EG G Idaho organizations, a schedule for completion of enhancements, if necessary, and requirements for documentation and reporting. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Graham, J.F.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EG and G Idaho Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (1990)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the EG G Idaho strategy for implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (a DOE-Headquarters directive establishing environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities). Preparation of this Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is a requirement of DOE Order 5400.1. Additionally, this report is intended to supplement the Department of Energy--Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Environmental Protection Implementation Plan by detailing EG G Idaho Environmental Protection Program activities. This report describes the current status of the EG G Idaho program, and the strategies for enhancing, as necessary, the current program to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. Aspects of the Environmental Protection Program included in this report are the assignment of responsibilities to specific EG G organizations, a schedule for completion of enhancements, if necessary, and requirements for documentation and reporting. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Wickham, L.E.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the Department of Energy`s National Environmental Policy Act implementing procedures in Volume 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1021,312, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation Plan has two primary purposes: to provide guidance for the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and to record the issues resulting from the scoping and the extended public participation process. The Implementation Plan identifies and discusses the following: background of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities, the purpose of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and the relationship of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement to other Departmental initiatives (Chapter 1); need and purposes for action (Chapter 2); scoping process and results of the public participation program in defining the scope of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, including a summary of the comments received and their disposition (Chapter 3); planned scope and content of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 4); consultations with other agencies and the role of cooperating agencies (Chapter 5); planned schedule of major Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement milestones (Chapter 6); and responsibilities for preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 7).

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Environmental development plan for transportation programs: FY80 update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second annual update of the environmental development plan (EDP) for transportation programs. It has been prepared as a cooperative effort of the Assistant Secretaries for Conservation and Solar Energy (ASCS) Office of Transportation Programs (CS/TP) and the Environment (ASEV) Office of Environmental Assessments. EDPs identify the ecosystem, resource, physical environment, health, safety, socioeconomic, and environmental control concerns associated with DOE programs. The programs include the research, development, demonstration, and assessment (RDD and A) of 14 transportation technologies and several strategy implementation projects. This EDP update presents a research and assessment plan for resolving any potentially adverse environmental concerns arising from these programs. The EDP process provides a framework for: incorporating environmental concerns into CS/TP planning and decision processes early to ensure they are assigned the same importance as technological, fiscal, and institutional concerns in decision making; resolving environmental concerns concurrently with energy technology and strategy development; and providing a research schedule that mitigates adverse environmental effects through sound technological design or policy analysis. This EDP also describes the status of each environmental concern and the plan for its resolution. Much of ongoing DOE reseirch and technology development is aimed at resolving concerns identified in this EDP. Each EDP is intended to be so comprehensive that no concerns escape notice. Care is taken to include any CS/TP action that may eventually require an Environmental Impact Statement. Because technology demonstration and commercialization tend to raise more environmental concerns than other portions of the transportation program, most of this EDP addresses these concerns.

Saricks, C.L.; Singh, M.K.; Bernard, M.J. III; Bevilacqua, O.M.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

On the Use of GOES Thermal Data to Study Effects of Land Use on Diurnal Temperature Fluctuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) infrared data were used to study the effect of land use on the diurnal surface temperature fluctuation. Five major land use types in southern Florida: the sandy soil agricultural area; the ...

S. F. Shih; E. Chen

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

167

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

168

land-use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land-use land-use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

169

Near Facility Environmental Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near-facility environmental monitoring directed by Waste Management Technical Services and supersedes HNF-EP-0538-4. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by Waste Management Technical Services in implementing near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.1 (DOE 1990) as a part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE-RL 1997) and is used to define: Environmental measurement and sampling locations used to monitor environmental contaminants near active and inactive facilities and waste storage and disposal sites; Procedures and equipment needed to perform the measurement and sampling; Frequency and analyses required for each measurement and sampling location; Minimum detection level and accuracy; Quality assurance components; and Investigation levels. Near-facility environmental monitoring for the Hanford Site is conducted in accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1990), 5400.5 (DOE 1993), 5484.1 (DOE 1990), and 435.1 (DOE 1999), and DOE/EH-O173T (DOE 1991). It is Waste Management Technical Services' objective to manage and conduct near-facility environmental monitoring activities at the Hanford Site in a cost-effective and environmentally responsible manner that is in compliance with the letter and spirit of these regulations and other environmental regulations, statutes, and standards.

MCKINNEY, S.M.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Environmental Development Plan (EDP). Geothermal energy systems, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Energy Systems Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the environmental, health, safety, social, and economic issues which are associated with the development, demonstration, and commercialization of geothermal resources and conversion technology. The EDP also describes the actions and implementation strategy required to resolve the issues identified. These actions may include the initiation of R and D activities, operations monitoring, baseline characterization studies, or activities leading to the development of standards and criteria in concert with other responsible agencies.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Environmental Protection Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Details Site Details EPD Home Staff List (pdf) Org Chart (pdf) Compliance / Permits Programs Other Information Land Use & Institutional Controls Mapping Site Environmental Reports Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Spill Response BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Developing Environmental Products and Services for Brookhaven Stakeholders The Environmental Protection Division (EPD) develops and delivers environmental products and services for all Brookhaven stakeholders. We manage environmental programs such as pollution prevention, groundwater protection, and natural resource management; provide technical assistance on environmental requirements; maintain the Laboratory's IS0 14001-registered Environmental Management System; prepare environmental permit applications; conduct environmental monitoring; manage data

173

Oak Ridge Reservation Site Management Plan for the Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This site management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) describes the overall approach for addressing environmental contamination problems at the ORR Superfund site located in eastern Tennessee. The ORR consists of three major US Department of Energy (DOE) installations constructed in the early to mid 1940s as research, development, and process facilities in support of the Manhattan Project. In addition to the three installations -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) -- the ORR Superfund Site also includes areas outside the installations, land used by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and waterways that have been contaminated by releases from the DOE installations. To date, {approximately} 400 areas (Appendix A) requiring evaluation have been identified. Cleanup of the ORR is expected to take two to three decades and cost several billion dollars. This site management plan provides a blueprint to guide this complex effort to ensure that the investigation and cleanup activities are carried out in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Land Use Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory report on solar land use in the United States.)[1] One concern regarding large-scale deployment of solar energy is its potentially significant land use. This article summarizes data and analysis of the land use associated with U.S. utility-scale ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities. This article presents total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and

175

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

176

Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 7, Groundwater protection  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) uses large quantities of groundwater for drinking, processing, and non-contact cooling. Continued industrial and residential growth along with additional agricultural irrigation in areas adjacent to SRS will increase the demand for groundwater. This increasing demand will require a comprehensive management system to ensure the needed quality and quantity of groundwater is available for all users. The Groundwater Protection Program and the Waste Management Program establish the overall framework for protecting this resource. Ground water under SRS is monitored extensively for radiological, hazardous, and water quality constituents. Groundwater quality is known to have been affected at 33 onsite locations, but none of the contaminant plumes have migrated offsite. Onsite and offsite drinking water supplies are monitored to ensure they are not impacted. The site has more than 1800 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are analyzed for radiological and non-radiological constituents. SRS is complying with all applicable regulations related to groundwater protection, waste treatment, and waste disposal. The existing waste storage facilities are permitted or are being permitted. Existing hazardous- and mixed-waste storage facilities are being included in the site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit. Part B permitting has been initiated for many of the planned hazardous- and mixed-waste treatment and disposal facilities.

Wells, D. [comp.

1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Y-12 Site environmental protection program implementation plan (EPPIP)  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 Plant Environmental Protection Program is conducted to: (1) protect public health and the environment from chemical and radiological releases occurring from current plant operations and past waste management and operational practices; (2) ensure compliance with federal, state, and local environmental regulations and DOE directives; (3) identify potential environmental problems; (4) evaluate existing environmental contamination and determine the need for remedial actions and mitigative measures; (5) monitor the progress of ongoing remedial actions and cleanup measures; and (6) inform the public of environmental issues relating to DOE operations. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, defines the general requirements for environmental protection programs at DOE facilities. This Environmental Protection Program Implementation Plan (EPPIP) defines the methods by which the Y-12 Plant staff will comply with the order by: (1) referencing environmental protection goals and objectives and identifying strategies and timetables for attaining them; (2) providing the overall framework for the design and implementation of the Y-12 Environmental Protection Program; and (3) assigning responsibilities for complying with the requirements of the order. The EPPIP is revised and updated annually.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State Interagency Missouri River Authority engages in comprehensive

180

IA-SDSS: A GIS-based land use decision support system with consideration of carbon sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, land use change and forestry (LULUCF) can play a positive role in mitigating global warming by sequestering carbon from the atmosphere into vegetation and soils. Local entities (e.g. local government, community, stockholders) have been making ... Keywords: Carbon models, Carbon sequestration, GIS, Integrated assessment, Land-use planning, RS, SDSS

Jun Wang; Jingming Chen; Weimin Ju; Manchun Li

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ORNL long-range environmental and waste management plan  

SciTech Connect

This report, the ORNL Long-Range Environmental and Waste Management Plan, is the annual update in a series begun in fiscal year 1985. Its primary purpose is to provide a thorough and systematic planning document to reflect the continuing process of site assessment, strategy development, and planning for the current and long-term control of environmental issues, waste management practices, and remedial action requirements. The document also provides an estimate of the resources required to implement the current plan. This document is not intended to be a budget document; it is, however, intended to provide guidance to both Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) management as to the near order of magnitude of the resources (primarily funding requirements) and the time frame required to execute the strategy in the present revision of the plan. As with any document of this nature, the near-term (one to three years) part of the plan is a pragmatic assessment of the current program and ongoing capital projects and reflects the efforts perceived to be necessary to comply with all current state and federal regulations and DOE orders. It also should be in general agreement with current budget (funding) requests and obligations for these immediate years. 55 figs., 72 tabs.

Baldwin, J.S.; Bates, L.D.; Brown, C.H.; Easterday, C.A.; Hill, L.G.; Kendrick, C.M.; McNeese, L.E.; Myrick, T.E.; Payne, T.L.; Pepper, C.E.; Robinson, S.M.; Rohwer, P.S.; Scanlan, T.F.; Smith, M.A.; Stratton, L.E.; Trabalka, J.R.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Planning for environmental constraints on the PJM system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter provides a snapshot of the existing PJM system and identifies the environmental constraints that form the parameters for the regional approaches analyzed in this study. The chapter begins with a description of the PJM system and the costs and emissions levels of the pollutants under study associated with the reference case (the PJM system configured to meet only Clean Air Act Amendment Phase I SO{sub 2} requirements and the March 1994 NO{sub x} requirements affecting Phase I units){sup 3}. Next, the pollution-reduction scenario assumed for the purpose of the study, which covers the period 1995--2010, is described. Finally, the impacts of this pollution reduction scenario -- emissions that would need to be avoided on the reference case PJM system -- are identified. Modeling methods are described alongside the study`s results. Other chapters discuss: environmental constraints, alternate plans to achieve environmental goals, and comparison of alternate plans.

Not Available

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

184

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography University of Maryland The following Data Management Plan was part of the NASA ROSES 2012 Proposal Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon- Climate Models (summary) submitted to the Terrestrial Ecology Program. It is presented as an example plan. Data Management Plan The proposed project will generate important new datasets of remote-sensing-based land-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessment, long-term archiving, and data sharing and dissemination (along with documentation

185

Strategic plan for Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Information Management  

SciTech Connect

This strategic plan addresses information management for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Hanford Site. This Program leads the cleanup of the Hanford Site`s soil, groundwater, buried waste, and the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities. The vision that drives this strategic plan is to ensure that quality information is available to the people who need it, when they need it, at a convenient location, in a usable form, and at an acceptable cost. Although investments are being made in managing the vast amounts of information, which include data, records and documents associated with the Hanford Site`s production history and new cleanup mission, it is widely recognized that efforts to date have not accomplished the vision. Effective information management involves more than the compilation of massive amounts of electronic and non-electronic information. It also involves integrating information management into business processes that support user`s needs and decisionmaking. Only then can information management complement and enable environmental restoration priorities and practices, help identify environmental restoration requirements, and enable communication within the Environmental Restoration Program and between the Program and its stakeholders. Successfully accomplishing the Hanford Site mission requires an integrated approach to information management that crosses organizational boundaries, streamlines existing systems, and builds new systems that support the needs of the future. This plan outlines that approach.

Cowley, P.J.; Beck, J.E.; Gephart, R.E. [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Greenhouse Gas Policy Development in the Land Use, Land-Use Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Development in the Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) Sector J. Kinsman (jkinsman@eei.org; 202-508-5711) Edison Electric Institute 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W....

187

GRR/Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Land Use Assessment Process - Land Use Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Preexisting land uses at and surrounding the site are critical considerations in the early planning stages of the project. Federal and state law may prohibit interference with certain preexisting uses. For instance, developers should consider impact on farmland, livestock, nearby

188

Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

Not Available

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

189

KBSLUA: A knowledge-based system applied in river land use assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of river land use is an important, but complex and time-consuming task that has to deal with a huge amount of data, domain regulations, legal aspects, and expert knowledge in terms of environmental protection, ecology, and water resource ... Keywords: Geographic information system, Knowledge-based system, River land use

Tzai-Zang Lee; Chien-Hsing Wu; Hsien-Hui Wei

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055) Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp055 data Data PDF PDF graphics Graphics Please note: these data have been updated for the year 2000 Contributors Sandra Brown1 Greg Gaston2 Work on this project was initiated while at the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois 61801, U.S.A. 1Present address: Winrock International, Arlington, Virgina. 2Present address: Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University. Prepared by T.W. Beaty, and L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

191

POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with land and labor inputs and pollution emissions as a by-isolating the role of land use in pollution control we: i)land and the composite good, and disutility from the pollution

Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

OpenEI - land-use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4170 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

193

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Verifying the Accuracy of Land Use Models Used in Transportation and Air Quality: A Case Study in the Sacramento, California Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations for a future transportation plan that uses fixedfuture regional land use projections and transportationFutures for Tansportation and Land UseIntegrated Models Contrasted with Trend Delphi Methods: The Portland Metro Results, Transportation

Rodier, Caroline J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARD REVIEW PLAN OFFICE OF NUCLEAR REACTOR REGULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This environmental standard review plan (ESRP) directs the staffs identification and evaluation of impacts to terrestrial ecosystems induced by the operation of heat dissipation systems, especially cooling towers and cooling ponds. The scope of the review directed by this plan will be limited to consideration of the operational aspects of heat dissipation systems in sufficient detail to form a basis for assessing potential operational impacts. Review Interfaces The reviewer for this ESRP should obtain input from or provide input to reviewers for the following ESRPs, as indicated: ` ESRP 2.4.1. Obtain descriptive material on the terrestrial ecology of the site and vicinity to support the analyses made in ESRP 5.3.3.2. ` ESRP 3.4.2. Obtain specific information about the cooling system necessary to assess impacts to the terrestrial environment. ` ESRP 5.3.3.1. Obtain information about heat dissipation to the atmosphere necessary to determine impacts to the terrestrial environment.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use  

SciTech Connect

Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

Corburn, Jason [Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and School of International and Public Affairs, 400 Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave. New York, NY 10027 (United States)]. E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT, NOTICE OF WETLAND INVOLVEMENT, AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A LIGNOCELLULOSIC U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 1.0 Introd uction 1 1.1 Purpose of the Mitigation Action Plan 1 1.2 Structure of the Mitigation Action Plan 2 2.0 Ambient Ai r Quality 3 2.1 Potential Impacts 3 2.2 Mitigation Measures 3 2.3 Metrics for Determining Success or Failure of the Mitigation Measures 4 2.4 Monitoring Techniques for Mitigation Measures 4 3.0 Truck Traffic 4 3.1 Potential Impacts 4 3.2 Mitigation Measures 4 3.3 Metrics for Determining Success or Failure of the Mitigation Measures 5 3.4 Monitoring Techniques for Mitigation Measures 5 4.0 Genetically Modified Yeasts 6 4.1 Potential Impacts 6 4.2 Mitigation Measures 6 4.3 Metrics for Determining

199

Motion planning for robotic spray cleaning with environmentally safe solvents  

SciTech Connect

Automatic motion planning of a spray cleaning robot with collision avoidance is presented in this paper. In manufacturing environments, electronic and mechanical components are traditionally cleaned by spraying or dipping them using chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents. As new scientific data show that such solvents are major causes for stratospheric ozone depletion, an alternate cleaning method is needed. Part cleaning with aqueous solvents is environmentally safe, but can require precision spraying at high pressures for extended time periods. Operator fatigue during manual spraying can decrease the quality of the cleaning process. By spraying with a robotic manipulator, the necessary spray accuracy and consistency to manufacture highreliability components can be obtained. Our motion planner was developed to automatically generate motions for spraying robots based on the part geometry and cleaning process parameters. For spraying paint and other coatings a geometric description of the parts and robot may be sufficient for motion planning, since coatings are usually done over the visible surfaces. For spray cleaning, the requirement to reach hidden surfaces necessitates the addition of a rule-based method to the geometric motion planning.

Hwang, Yong K.; Meirans, L.; Drotning, W.D.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1990 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Application for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease:...

202

Town of Chapel Hill - Land-Use Management Ordinance | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land-Use Management Ordinance Town of Chapel Hill - Land-Use Management Ordinance Eligibility Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial...

203

Employment and land-use impacts of resource program elements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated several power resource alternatives under consideration by the Bonneville Power Administration in its Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement (RPEIS). The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the potential impacts of each alternative in terms of land use and employment. We reviewed the literature that describes land-use and employment impacts to derive estimates of each type of effect. These estimates were scaled to a per-megawatt basis for use as multipliers in the RPEIS analysis. Multipliers for employment were taken from the literature and developed from power plant capital cost estimates. Land-use multipliers were taken from the literature or estimated from existing plants. In this report we compared information sources and estimates to develop the most applicable multipliers. Employment levels required (in terms of employee years per MW of plant capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternative analyzed are shown. The amounts of land required (in terms of acres per MW capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternatives analyzed are also shown.

Shankle, S A; Baechler, M C; Blondin, D W; Grover, S E

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1, Section 1000 Addendum: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document -- the Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (SRS EM Plan) -- has been prepared according to guidance contained in the DOE 5400 Series orders, in 10 CFR 834, and in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and environmental Surveillance [DOE, 1991]. The SRS EM Plan`s purpose is to define the criteria, regulations, and guideline requirements with which SRS will comply. These criteria and requirements are applicable to environmental monitoring activities performed in support of the SRS Environmental Monitoring Program (SRS EM Program), WSRC-3Q1-2, Volume 1, Section 1100. They are not applicable to monitoring activities utilized exclusively for process monitoring/control. The environmental monitoring program requirements documented in the SRS EM Plan incorporate all applicable should requirements of DOE/EH-0173T and expand upon them to include nonradiological environmental monitoring program requirements.

Jannik, G.T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Coastal Erosion 5: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation

207

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Environmental Management (EM)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Office of Environmental Management (EM).

208

A land-use systems approach to represent land-use dynamics at continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the current global land cover datasets and global scale land-use models use a classification of land cover based on the dominant land cover type within a distinct region or pixel. Such a classification disregards the diversity and intensity of ... Keywords: Global, IMAGE, Land-use change, Land-use intensification, Land-use systems

Aurlien Letourneau; Peter H. Verburg; Elke Stehfest

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining what future CCC/USDA actions may be necessary, with the ultimate goal of achieving classification of the Sylvan Grove site at no further action status. The proposed activities are to be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy. Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA concerning environmental site characterization and remediation at former grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. That document should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

GIS-based land-use suitability analysis: a critical overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are three main objectives of this monograph: (i) to provide an introduction to geographical information technology along with an historical perspective on the evolving role of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in planning, (ii) to overview relevant methods and techniques for GISbased land-use suitability mapping and modeling, and (iii) to identify the trends, challenges and prospects of GIS-based land-use suitability analysis. The monograph focuses on two perspectives of GIS-based land-use suitability analysis: the techno-positivist perspective and the socio-political, public participation perspectives. It is organized into six chapters. After an introductory setting chapter, which defines the scope of land-use suitability analysis, an overview of relevant GIS technology is provided in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 offers an historical account of the development of GIS. It also discusses the development of GIS in the context of evolving perspectives of planning. Chapter 4 gives an overview of the methods for GIS-based land-use suitability modeling. The overview provides a background against which selected case studies are discussed in Chapter 5. The concluding chapter summarized the main points of the monographs and discusses problems and prospects for GIS-based land-use suitability analysis.

Jacek Malczewski

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Towards sustainable settlement growth: A new multi-criteria assessment for implementing environmental targets into strategic urban planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For nearly one decade, the German political and research-agenda has been to a large extent determined by the ongoing question of how to limit the expansion of settlement areas around cities in order to preserve natural resources, make settlement growth more sustainable and to strengthen the re-use of existing inner-urban areas (see a.o. Koetter et al. 2009a, 2010; Schetke et al. 2009, 2010b). What is already under discussion within the international literature are the recommendations of the German Council for Sustainability to quantitatively reduce the daily greenfield consumption from the current rate of over 100 ha per day to a rate of 30 ha per day in 2020 and to bring urban infill development up to a ratio of 3:1 with greenfield development (German Council for Sustainability, 2004).). This paper addresses the added value beyond those abstract political targets and presents an innovative, multi-criteria assessment (MCA) of greenfield and infill sites to evaluate their sustainability and resource efficiency. MCA development and its incorporation into a Decision Support System (DSS) were accomplished by utilising a stakeholder-driven approach. The resulting tool can be applied in preparing and revising land-use plans. The paper presents the concept and the development process of the MCA-DSS. Test runs with planners prove that the evaluation of potential housing sites using individually weighted environmental indicators helps to identify those strategies of housing development that accord most closely with sustainability goals. The tests further show that the development of greenfield sites generally exhibits less sustainability than that of infill sites. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper presents an innovative, multi-criteria assessment (MCA) of greenfield and infill sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MCA evaluates sustainability and resource efficiency of potential housing sites in a stakeholder-driven approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Test runs with planners identified prominent environmental indicators and assigned individual weights. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The resulting tool can be applied in preparing and revising land-use plans according to sustainable housing development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Test runs also show that greenfield development generally exhibits less sustainability than infill development.

Schetke, Sophie, E-mail: schetke@uni-bonn.de [Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Dept. of Urban Planning and Real Estate Management, University of Bonn, Nussallee 1, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Haase, Dagmar, E-mail: dagmar.haase@ufz.de [Humboldt University of Berlin, Department of Geography, Rudower Chaussee 16, 10099 Berlin, Germany, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Computational Landscape Ecology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Koetter, Theo, E-mail: koetter@uni-bonn.de [Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Dept. of Urban Planning and Real Estate Management, University of Bonn, Nussallee 1, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

NONE

1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility 6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE's proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the

214

The land use climate change energy nexus  

SciTech Connect

Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 5, Chemical management, pollution prevention and other compliance programs. Draft revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compliance with environmental regulations and US Department of Energy Orders (DOE) relating to environmental protection is an important part of SRS`s program. Over the past few years, the number of environmental regulations has increased. The strategy to comply with new and existing environmental regulations and DOE orders is described in chapter two. In this chapter, the following environmental programs are described: Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA); and SPCC/BMP/Pollution Prevention Plans;The implementation section identifies issues and those responsible to achieve defined objectives.

Peterson, G.L. [comp.

1993-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

Environmental Planning and Policy in the Los Angeles Region: Openings and Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

same period, air pollution and land contamination problemsrelationship between air pollution and land use patterns,

FitzSimmons, Margaret; Gottlieb, Robert

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of an image data set from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme, a component of the LBA-ECO Large...

218

Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Land-Use Change Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential PDF file Full text Global Change Biology 6:317-327 (2000) Wilfred M. Post...

219

Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Compressed air energy storage (CAES) environmental control concerns and program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report assesses the required environmental research and recommends a program plan to assist DOD's Environmental Control Technology Division (ECT) in performing its mission of ensuring that the procedures, processes, systems, and strategies necessary to minimize any adverse environmental impacts of compressed air energy storage (CAES) are developed in a timely manner so as not to delay implementation of the technology. To do so, CAES technology and the expected major environmental concerns of the technology are described. Second, ongoing or planned research in related programs and the applicability of results from these programs to CAES environmental research are discussed. Third, the additional research and development required to provide the necessary environmental data base and resolve concerns in CAES are outlined. Finally, a program plan to carry out this research and development effort is presented.

Beckwith, M.A.; Boehm, D.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

Trippet, W.A. II (IT Corp., (United States)); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evolution trends of land use/land cover in a mediterranean forest landscape in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the evolution trends of landscape, in particular those linked to urban/rural relations, is crucial for a sustainable landscape planning. The main goal of this paper is to interpret the forest landscape dynamics occurred over the period ... Keywords: Calabria (Italy), GIS, Mediterranean forest landscape, aerial photographs, land use/land cover (LULC) changes, transition matrices

Salvatore Di Fazio; Giuseppe Modica; Paolo Zoccali

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Use of geothermal heat for sugar refining in Imperial County: environmental assessment and monitoring plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental monitoring and reporting plan is based on requirements set by the State of California, Water Quality Control Board, and the Division of Oil and Gas as well as special requirements by the County of Imperial, Air Pollution Control Board and other county offices. This plan addresses all of the applicable environmental impacts identified in the Final Environmental Report. Each item of the environmental monitoring and reporting requirements is addressed in terms of (a) impact; (b) mitigation measures and/or engineering practices; and (c) monitoring and reporting requirements. An overall summary of all of the reporting requirements is contained.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Strategic Plan for Sustainable Energy Management and Environmental Stewardship for Los Angeles Unified School District  

SciTech Connect

This Strategic Plan for Sustainable Energy Management and Environmental Stewardship states goals, measures progress toward goals and how actions are monitored to achieve continuous improvement for the Los Angeles Unified School District.

Walker, A.; Beattie, D.; Thomas, K.; Davis, K.; Sim, M.; Jhaveri, A.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 4 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

231

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

232

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

233

Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan. Remediating the nuclear weapons complex  

SciTech Connect

With the end of the cold war, the US has a reduced need for nuclear weapons production. In response, the Department of Energy has redirected resources from weapons production to weapons dismantlement and environmental remediation. To this end, in November 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (renamed the Office of Environmental Management in 1994). It was created to bring under a central authority the management of radioactive and hazardous wastes at DOE sites and inactive or shut down facilities. The Environmental Restoration Program, a major component of DOE`s Environmental Management Program, is responsible for the remediation and management of contaminated environmental media (e.g., soil, groundwater, sediments) and the decommissioning of facilities and structures at 130 sites in over 30 states and territories.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Strategic plan strategy of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information about the use of an integrated strategic plan, strategy, and life-cycle baseline in the long range planning and risk process employed by the environmental restoration program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Long-range planning is essential because the ER Program encompasses hundreds of sites; will last several decades; and requires complex technology, management, and policy. Long-range planning allows a focused, cost-effective approach to identify and meet Program objectives. This is accomplished through a strategic plan, a strategy, and a life-cycle baseline. This long-range methodology is illustrated below.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

DOE Nevada Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1993--November 9, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter III of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has prepared this fourth annual update of its Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Environment, Safety, Security, & Health (AMESSH), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions.

Elle, D.R. [USDOE Nevada Operations Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Townsend, Y.E. [ed.; Latham, A.R.; Black, S.C. [Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the Case for Land Use Compatitbility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mike Aimone, P.E. Mike Aimone, P.E. National Security Global Business Battelle Memorial Institute Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development near DOD Installations Making the Case for Land Use Compatibility Comments expressed are strictly those of the Briefer, and not necessarily the views or positions of the Battelle Memorial Institute or the Department of Defense 2 Sizing the Issue * Utility scale renewable energy development near DOD installations, ranges and Military Operational Areas/Special Use Airspace can affect mission operations and readiness * In the US, Land Use Planning is a "states-right" issue - tied to "Police Powers" - Goal: Acceptable zoning rules and consistent zoning

237

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan prepared under 1021.331 of this part: 7. Wetland impacts from the proposed natural gas pipeline construction by Northern Natural Gas Company (NNG). 1.1 Purpose of the...

239

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Hanford Reservation. Attention is focused on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. All Hanford contractors reviewed potential sources of contamination. A facility effluent monitoring plan was written for each facility with the potential to release significant quantities of hazardous materials, addressing both radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring. The environmental surveillance program assesses onsite and offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health exposures. The program monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife. In addition, independent onsite surveillance is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Hanford Site effluent controls in order to comply with applicable environmental standards and regulations.

Not Available

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Environmental Remediation Strategic Planning of Fukushima Nuclear Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmntal Remediation Assessment and other respons decision making on Environmental monitoring, experiments and assessment. Preliminary assessment to grasp the overall picture and determine critical locations, phenomena, people, etc. Using simple methods and models.

Onishi, Yasuo

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental Impact Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment are prescribed in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiationthe Atomic Energy Act and DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive WasteLaboratorys ISM processes. DOE Order 450.1, Environmental

Philliber, Jeff

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE`s preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public`s role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental planning and assessment for highway vehicle use of alcohol fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is assisting the Office of Transportation Programs of the U.S. DOE in performing the required environmental planning and assessment for highway vehicle alcohol fuel commercialization in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In this presentation the process for planning and assessment is given, specific documents resulting from the process are explained. NEPA requires an environmental impact statement (EIS) for every major federal action that may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Three types of environmental documents record this process: the Environmental Development Plan (EDP), the Environmental Assessment (EA) and the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The transportation EDP describes the energy conserving technologies; identifies and ranks environmental concerns; outlines strategies to resolve the concerns on a priority basis; and proposes a research program to implement the strategies. This is done annually for the division. In addition, environmental codumentation is scheduled for each technology as it reaches different stages of development. One major document is the EA, prepared when it is not clear whether an EIS is necessary. The information to make such a decision is collected in one detailed assessment of the technology or program. An EIS may then be written if impacts are expected to be significant. An EA is being performed for alcohol (neat and blends) fuels for highway vehicles by ANL.

Bernard, III, M J; Bevilaqua, O M

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Agency of Natural Resources The Act 250 program provides a public, quasi-judicial process for reviewing

246

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.lawlibrary.state.mt.us/ Montana State Legislative Site: http://leg.state.mt.us/css/default.asp Montana Code Annotated: http://data regularly change. Bring this schedule to each class session for regular updates and additional or subtracted (2006): 233-311. 4. Environmental Planning Bradley C. Karkkainen, "Toward a Smarter NEPA: Monitoring

California at Davis, University of

247

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction...

248

Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous Easement...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous EasementROW Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

249

Application for State Land Use Lease: Commercial/Multi-Family...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: CommercialMulti-Family Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

250

Land use siting considerations for hydrothermal energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal resources are described and discussion is focused on some of the land use and social considerations involved in siting hydrothermal power plants. (MHR)

Oakes, K.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This Numeric Data Package Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

252

Assess technical and economic potential for land-use initiatives...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for sector technologies Renewable Energy Technical Potential Toolkit Building Energy Assessment Toolkit Power System Screening and Design Toolkit Land Use Assessment...

253

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) environmental checklist forms for 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 304 Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 304 Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The 304 Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Best management practices plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan has been developed as part of the environmental monitoring program at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The BMP Plan describes the requirements for personnel training, spill prevention and control, environmental compliance, and sediment/erosion control as they relate to environmental monitoring activities and installation of Monitoring Station 4 at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Test and Quality Assurance Plan Environmental and Sustainable Technology Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA REVIEW NOTICE This report has been peer and administratively reviewed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. Final Version October 2006 EPA Contract No. EP-C-04-056 Work Assignment No. 1-8-101

Biomass Co-firing; Industrial Boilers

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Site specific plan. [Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs.

Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Accessibility, land use and transport. Accessibitliy evaluation of land-use and transport developments and policy strategies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How can accessibility be defined? How useful are different accessibility approaches in evaluating land-use and transport policy strategies? How can the economic benefits associated with (more)

Geurs, Karst Teunis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 (NDP-050/R1) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp050 data Data PDF PDF The PDF of NDP-050/R1 (body of report, plus appendices A through E) and tellus51b.pdf (Appendix F, reprint of Houghton paper in Tellus, Vol. 51B; copyright 1999 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and reprinted with kind permission from the publisher) Contributors Richard A. Houghton Joseph L. Hackler The Woods Hole Research Center Woods Hole, Massachusetts Please Note: Revised data through the year 2000 are available in CDIAC's Trends Online. Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 5054 Date Published: February 2001 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research

259

Environmental monitoring plan, July 1--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) under the terms of the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA) are providing annual reports: reporting of State`s monitoring and analysis, and findings of DOE`s quality and effectiveness of DOE`s monitoring and surveillance. This report blends some of both of the required annual reports as described in the TOA section A.7.2.2. The Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) integrates the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report presents the results of environmental monitoring in Tennessee in the following areas: surface waters; ground water; air; and fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Implementation plan: Executive summary. Environmental restoration and waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

In November 1989, the Secretary of Energy established the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This action consolidated the Department`s environmental restoration and waste management activities throughout the nation. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy decided that the Department would prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on the proposed integrated Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The principal focus of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement process will be the evaluation of strategies for conducting remediation of Department sites and facilities to ensure the protection of human health and the environment; and the evaluation of potential configurations for waste management capabilities.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Short communication: A generic framework for land-use modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the generic modelling system SITE (SImulation of Terrestrial Environments), a software package to develop and apply models simulating regional land-use dynamics. The modelling system includes (i) a framework managing the model ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Genetic algorithm, Integrated framework, Land-use model, Map comparison

Christian Schweitzer; Joerg A. Priess; Subhashree Das

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use and Climate Change California Leadership on Land Use and Climate Change Panama Bartholomy Advisor to the Chairman California Energy Commission New Partners for Smart GrowthNew Partners for Smart Growth Washington, DCWashington, DC February 8

263

EIS-0455: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

55: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement for 55: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Solar Energy Project, California EIS-0455: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Solar Energy Project, California Summary The BLM's purpose and need for the GSEP is to respond to Genesis Solar, LLC's application under Title V of FLPMA (43 U.S.C. 1761) for a ROW grant to construct, operate, maintain and decommission a solar thermal facility on public lands in compliance with FLPMA, BLM ROW regulations, and other applicable Federal laws. The BLM will decide whether to approve, approve with modification, or deny issuance of a ROW grant to Genesis Solar, LLC for the proposed GSEP. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

264

Plan for the long term environmental assessment of geopressured resource development in the Louisiana Gulf Coast Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of research to develop a plan for the long-term environmental assessment of geopressured/geothermal resource development in the Louisiana Gulf Coast region are reported. An overall view of the environmental issues facing decision-makers in the area of geopressured resource development is presented, along with a plan for monitoring potential environmental impacts. Separate assessments and plans are presented for geological effects, air and water quality, ecosystem quality, and socioeconomic and cultural considerations. (JGB)

Newchurch, E.J.; Bryan, C.F.; Harrison, D.P.; Muller, R.A.; Wilcox, R.E.; Bachman, A.L.; Newman, J.P.; Cunningham, K.J.; Hilding, R.K.; Rehage, J.A.

1978-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Environmental restoration and waste management Site-Specific Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. FY 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to achieving and maintaining environmental regulatory compliance while responding to public concerns and emphasizing waste minimization. DOE publishes the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) annually to document its progress towards these goals. The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe the activities undertaken to implement the FYP goals at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE/OR) installations and programs specifically for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding areas. This SSP addresses activities and goals to be accomplished during FY93 even through the FYP focuses on FY94.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

OPEC production: Capital limitations, environmental movements may interfere with expansion plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining capital is a critical element in the production expansion plans of OPEC member countries. Another issue that may impact the plans is the environmental taxes that may reduce the call on OPEC oil by 5 million b/d in 2000 and about 16 million b/d in the year 2010. This concluding part of a two-part series discusses the expansion possibilities of non-Middle East OPEC members, OPEC's capital requirements, and environmental concerns. Non-Middle East OPEC includes Algeria, Gabon, Indonesia, Libya, Nigeria, and Venezuela.

Ismail, I.A.H. (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria))

1994-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Name Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Agency/Company /Organization HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation, Libélula Consulting Company of Peru Partner Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

268

Guidance document for the preparation of waste management plans for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

A project waste management (WM) plan is required for all Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program remedial investigation, decommission and decontamination (D&D), and remedial action (RA) activities. The project WM plan describes the strategy for handling, packaging, treating, transporting, characterizing, storing, and/or disposing of waste produced as part of ORNL ER Program activities. The project WM plan also contains a strategy for ensuring worker and environmental protection during WM activities.

Clark, C. Jr.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This Programmatic Health and Safety plan (PHASP) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This plan follows the format recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for remedial investigations and feasibility studies and that recommended by the EM40 Health and Safety Plan (HASP) Guidelines (DOE February 1994). This plan complies with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements found in 29 CFR 1910.120 and EM-40 guidelines for any activities dealing with hazardous waste operations and emergency response efforts and with OSHA requirements found in 29 CFR 1926.65. The policies and procedures in this plan apply to all Environmental Restoration sites and activities including employees of Energy Systems, subcontractors, and prime contractors performing work for the DOE ORNL ER Program. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health and safety and to the environment from event such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water.

Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Cipriano, D.J. Jr.; Uziel, M.S.; Kleinhans, K.R.; Tiner, P.F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 14, Environmental compliance tracking and data management. Revision  

SciTech Connect

Environmental projects, issues, and programs have become increasingly important to the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) management and the Department of Energy (DOE). A compliance-tracking system has been developed to monitor environmental requirements and commitments because they have become increasingly complex and numerous. An Environmental Data Management (EDM) steering committee was formed in October 1987 to develop computer system solutions to environmental needs. The committee`s main objective is to coordinate, within SRS divisions, the separate efforts that have been or are being developed to meet regulatory requirements and specific programmatic goals. The Environmental and Graphical Information Systems (E&GIS) Program was recently developed to establish a more formal organizational structure and enhance the coordination of geographical information systems (GIS) and environmental data management (EDM) activities at SRS. The general strategy of the program is to establish a coordination focal point for GIS and EDM activities, to provide for the integration of the several environmental and graphical information systems which exist mostly in stand-alone arrangements, and to guide the development of data management and geographical information applications in order to achieve alignment with Site computing architecture and standards. The E&GIS Program will enhance the Site`s ability to respond to data requirements in support of new missions, changing directives, and increasing regulatory requirements.

Story, C.H. [comp.

1993-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

271

Using participatory modelling to compensate for data scarcity in environmental planning: A case study from India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Participatory modelling has provided a new approach to overcome the problem of data scarcity which formerly interfered with the environmental planning for the restoration of the Kolleru-Upputeru wetland ecosystem on the east coast of Andhra Pradesh in ... Keywords: Delta system, Duflow, Environment, Estuary, Integrated water resources management, Salt-water intrusion, Stakeholder participation

Henk Ritzema; Jochen Froebrich; Ramakrishna Raju; Ch. Sreenivas; Rob Kselik

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

ORNL long-range environmental and waste management plan: Program overview and summary  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this report is to provide a thorough and systematic planning document to reflect the continuing process of site assessment, strategy development, and planning for the current and long-term control of environmental issues, waste management practices, and remedial action requirements. The docuemnt also provides an estimate of the resources required to implement the current plan. This document is not intended to be a budget document: it is, however, intended to provide guidance to both Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) Management as to the near order of magnitude of the resources (primarily funding requirements) and the time frame required to execute the strategy in the present revision of the plan. The near-term (one to three years) part of the plan is a realistic assessment of the current program and ongoing capital projects and reflects the efforts preceived to be necessary to comply with all current state and federal regulations and DOE orders. It also should be in general agreement with current budget (funding) requests and obligations for these immediate years. Beyond the immediate time frame, the document reflects the strategy and the project and funding estimates as a snapshot at the time of publication. Annual revision will reflect the continuing evoltuion and development of environmental and waste management processes, characterizations, remedial actions, regulations, an strategies for the establishment and conduct of a comprehensive environmental and waste management program. 15 figs., 10 tabs.

Bates, L.D.; Berry, J.B.; Butterworth, G.E.; du Mont, S.P.; Easterday, C.A.; Geisler, A.H.; Hill, L.G.; Kendrick, C.M.; McNeese, L.E.; Myrick, T.E.; Pudelek, R.E.; Rohwer, P.S.; Scanlan, T.F.; Stratton, L.E.; Trabalka, J.R.; Youngblood, E.L.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan. Draft for Peer Review: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

275

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

276

An interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize progress achieved on an interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist. The purpose of this application is to enable one to take a virtual land area and add buildings, roadways, landscaping and other features. The application ...

Lee A. Belfore, II; Suresh Chitithoti

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

278

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

279

Database Development of Land Use Characteristics along Major...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with TIGER files so that land use data can be collected at a more detailed level. D. Aerial photos and satellite images: Digital aerial photos and satellite images, panchromatic...

280

Micro-level land use impacts of bioconversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy crisis has prompted research and development of renewable energy sources, among which are the bioconversion technologies. Crops, crop residues, manure and other organic wastes are potential sources of liquid, solid and gaseous fuels. These feedstocks originate on the farm or in the forest and therefore are land intensive. Implementation of the bioconversion technologies will involve actions which will impact existing land use patterns. Because of differences in crop type, yield per acre, existing land use conditions and agricultural practices, an aggregated national approach to the assessment of land use is not sufficient. If energy policy regarding bioconversion is to be successful, then it must be sensitive to micro-level information. This paper demonstrates the land use assessment work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in support of the Department of Energy's Technical Assessment of Solar Energy Program, (TASE). Local Biomass potential, existing and use and potential land use impacts from bio-energy implementation for three of the fifteen counties selected for the TASE study will be presented. The methodology creased for the evaluation is useful in determining the biomass potential for any community or county, and in identifying regional differences inherent in the trade-offs between existing land use and energy production.

Parsons, V.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fiscal year 1990 Rocky Flats Plant Environmental Restoration program Current-Year Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is a nuclear weapons manufacturing facility currently operated by EG G for the US Department of Energy (DOE). RFP is located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains in Jefferson Country, Colorado. The Fiscal Year 1990 (FY90) Current-Year Work Plan (CYWP) is intended to serve as a guidance document for the Environmental Restoration (ER) and RCRA Compliance programs that will be implemented at RFP. The CYWP provides in one document any cross-references necessary to understand the interrelationships between the CYWP and the DOE Five-Year Plan (FYP), Site-Specific Plan (SSP), and other related documents. The scope of this plan includes comparison of planned FY90 ER activities to those actually achieved. The CYWP has been updated to include Colorado Department of Health (CDH), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and DOE Inter-Agency Agreement ER activities. It addresses hazardous wastes, radioactive wastes, mixed wastes (radioactive and hazardous), and sanitary wastes. The CYWP also addresses facilities and sites contaminated with or used in management of those wastes.

Nielsen, T. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (USA)); Waage, E.; Miller, D. (Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

EIS-0474: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact 4: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0474: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Southline Transmission Line Project in New Mexico and Arizona and Possible Land Use Plan Amendments The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration as joint lead agencies announce their intent to prepare an EIS to analyze the potential impacts of a proposed 345-kilovolt (kV) and 230-kV transmission line and address associated potential land use plan amendments. EIS-0474-NOI-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Western Area Power Administration Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart

283

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

David Strand

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan: November 9, 1993, to November 9, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The hub of today`s programs at the Hanford Site are activities dedicated to managing stored and new wastes and cleanup of waste sites. To ensure focused planning and implementing efforts for these programs, management of the site is assigned to DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This report describes policies and procedures in the following areas: Compliance activities; Environmental restoration; Waste management; and Technology development. Procedures for notification of environmental occurrences, long-range environmental protection planning and reporting, waste management programs; environmental monitoring programs, and quality assurance and data verification are also described and discussed.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Environmental management 1994. Progress and plans of the environmental restoration and waste management program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy currently faces one of the largest environmental challenges in the world. The Department`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program is responsible for identifying and reducing risks and managing waste at 137 sites in 34 States and territories where nuclear energy or weapons research and production resulted in radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination. The number of sites continues to grow as facilities are transferred to be cleaned up and closed down. The program`s main challenge is to balance technical and financial realities with the public`s expectations and develop a strategy that enables the Department to meet its commitments to the American people. This document provides a closer look at what is being done around the country. Included are detailed discussions of the largest sites in the region, followed by site activities organized by state, and a summary of activities at FUSRAP and UMTRA sites in the region.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Environmental Management 1995: Progress and plans of the Environmental Management Program  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Management 1995 is the second report prepared in response to the requirements of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year l994. The first report, Environmental Management 1994, was published in February 1994. This report is intended to provide a broad overview of the Environmental Management program`s activities in 1994, 1995, and 1996. The first section of this report describes the Department of Energy`s Environmental Management program. This is followed by a closer look at what the program is doing across the country, organized by region to help the reader identify and locate sites of interest. Within each region, details of the largest sites are followed by site summaries reported by State and a summary of activities under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). For the purposes of this report, a ``site`` is a Department of Energy installation; a ``facility`` is a building located on a Department of Energy site; and an ``area`` is a geographical area, operable unit, or waste area group of unspecified dimension within a site. Throughout this report, ``year`` refers to the Federal Government`s Fiscal Year, which begins on October 1. For example, Fiscal Year 1995 began on October 1, 1994 and will end on September 30, 1995. Budget totals for Hanford include the Hanford Site and Richland Operations Office. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory includes the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and the Idaho Operations Office. The Oak Ridge Reservation budget includes Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, Oak Ridge Associated Laboratories, the Oak Ridge Operations Office, and funding for the FUSRAP program.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

An environmental pressure index proposal for urban development planning based on the analytic network process  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a new approach to prioritize urban planning projects according to their environmental pressure in an efficient and reliable way. It is based on the combination of three procedures: (i) the use of environmental pressure indicators, (ii) the aggregation of the indicators in an Environmental Pressure Index by means of the Analytic Network Process method (ANP) and (iii) the interpretation of the information obtained from the experts during the decision-making process. The method has been applied to a proposal for urban development of La Carlota airport in Caracas (Venezuela). There are three options which are currently under evaluation. They include a Health Club, a Residential Area and a Theme Park. After a selection process the experts chose the following environmental pressure indicators as ANP criteria for the project life cycle: used land area, population density, energy consumption, water consumption and waste generation. By using goal-oriented questionnaires designed by the authors, the experts determined the importance of the criteria, the relationships among criteria, and the relationships between the criteria and the urban development alternatives. The resulting data showed that water consumption is the most important environmental pressure factor, and the Theme Park project is by far the urban development alternative which exerts the least environmental pressure on the area. The participating experts coincided in appreciating the technique proposed in this paper is useful and, for ranking ordering these alternatives, an improvement from traditional techniques such as environmental impact studies, life-cycle analysis, etc.

Gomez-Navarro, Tomas, E-mail: tgomez@dpi.upv.e [Departamento de Proyectos de Ingenieria, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n. 46022, Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Melon, Monica, E-mail: mgarciam@dpi.upv.e [Departamento de Proyectos de Ingenieria, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n. 46022, Valencia (Spain); Acuna-Dutra, Silvia, E-mail: sacuna@unimet.edu.v [Departamento de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad Metropolitana, Autopista Guarenas, Sector La Urbina, Distribuidor Metropolitano, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Diaz-Martin, Diego, E-mail: ddiaz@unimet.edu.v [Departamento de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad Metropolitana, Autopista Guarenas, Sector La Urbina, Distribuidor Metropolitano, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Issues and methods in incorporating environmental externalities into the integrated resource planning process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a review of current practices and policies in considering environmental externalities in the integrated resource planning and performance based regulation (IRP/PBR) process. The following issues are presented and examined: What are the pros and cons of treating environmental externalities in the IRP process? How are potential future environmental regulations being treated? Are externalities being qualitatively or quantitatively considered, or monetized? Are offsets being allowed? How are externality policies being coordinated among different levels and branches of governments? Should environmental externalities be considered in dispatching a utility`s existing resources? What are the procedures for addressing uncertainty in incorporating environmental externalities into IRP? How are externalities valued? What are other approaches to addressing environmental externalities. This report describes seven major approaches for addressing environmental externalities in the IRP process: qualitative treatment, weighting and ranking, cost of control, damage function, percentage adders, monetization by emission, and multiattribute trade-off analysis. The discussion includes a taxonomy of the full range of alternative methods for addressing environmental externalities, a summary of state PUC actions, the role of state laws, the debate on environmental adders, and the choice of methodologies. In addition, this report characterizes the interests of stakeholders such as the electric industry, fuel suppliers, energy consumers, governmental agencies, public interest groups, consultants, and others. It appears that the views, positions, and interests of these stakeholders are affected by their perceptions of the potential impacts on their economic interests or the viability of their position on environmental policy, by the societal perspective they take, and by the orientation of the analysts toward market competition and their respective accumulated expertise.

Fang, J.M.; Galen, P.S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel, Sullivan Environmental Consultants Review of Mirant Unit 1 Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sent: Monday, December 19, 2005 11:56 AM To: Mansueti, Lawrence Subject: Sullivan Environmental Consultants Review of Mirant Unit 1 Plan Mr. Mansueti, Would you please enter the attached review of the Mirant Unit One Plan in your records for DOE Docket #EO-05-01? Sullivan Environmental Consultants completed this review which Poul Hertel and I commissioned re: ENSR Corp. "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Plant; Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode" (9/20/05). As of this date, we have received no response to the questions in the Sullivan analysis. We ask the Department of Energy to consider the issues raised in the Sullivan Review in deciding the plant's future operation.

290

Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Amend Relevant Agency Land Use Plans, Conduct Public Scoping Meetings, and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement (DOE/EIS-0386)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Federal Register 7 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 187 / Wednesday, September 28, 2005 / Notices SAFEGUARDS: Computerized records are maintained in a controlled area accessible only to authorized personnel. Entry to these areas is restricted to those personnel with a valid requirement and authorization to enter. Physical entry is restricted by the use of lock, guards, and administrative procedures. Access to any specific record is based on the need- to-know and the specific level of authorization granted to the user. Physical and electronic access is restricted to designated individuals having a need-to-know in the performance of official duties. Access to personal information is further restricted by the use of the Army Knowledge Online database (AKO) single sign-on and password

292

One common way - The strategic and methodological influence on environmental planning across Europe  

SciTech Connect

In the last decades the European Union exerted influence on precautionary environmental planning by the establishment of several Directives. The most relevant were the Habitat-Directive, the EIA-Directive, the SEA-Directive and the Water Framework Directive. Comparing these EU policies in the area of environmental precaution it becomes obvious that there is a lot of common ground. Thus, the conclusion seems likely that the European Union, in doing so, has intended to establish general planning concepts through introducing several methodological steps indicated by the regulations. The goal of this article is firstly to point out, which are the common planning principles, converted by methodological elements and secondly examine the consideration of these planning concepts by the implementation and application in the member states. In this context it is analysed whether the connections and divergences between the directives lead to significant differences in the implementation process. To this aim the directives are shortly introduced and significant steps of the processes regulated by them are outlined. In the second steps the national legal implementation in the Alpine states and its consequences for the practical application are discussed. The results show a heterogeneous application of the EU principles. Within the comparative view on the four directives influence and causalities between the national implementation and the practical application were identified, which can be simplified as four types. Since a coherent strategic and methodological concept for improving environmental precaution planning from part of the EU is noticeable, more unity and comparability within the implementation is desirable, particularly in areas with comparable habitats such as the alpine space. Beyond this the trade-off between the directives poses an important task for the future.

Jiricka, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.jiricka@boku.ac.a [Institute of Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning (ILEN), Department of Spatial, Landscape and Infrastructure Science, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna (Austria); Proebstl, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.proebstl@boku.ac.a [Institute of Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning (ILEN), Department of Spatial, Landscape and Infrastructure Science, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Change (PlanCC) Peru Change (PlanCC) Peru Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Name Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Agency/Company /Organization HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation, Libélula Consulting Company of Peru Partner Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

294

EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement

295

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Marine Resources Commission The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches, and other shores. A permit from the Commission is required to dredge, fill, or otherwise disturb these

296

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two image data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme (LC-15 team), a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model Data, Amazon Basin: 2000 . Data set prepared by S. Saatchi. This data set provides a subset of the SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation and standard deviation data (STD of the data points used in the averaging) for the Amazon Basin. SRTM30 is a near-global digital elevation model (DEM) comprising a combination of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February, 2000, and the earlier U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30 data set.

297

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory institutional plan -- FY 2000--2004  

SciTech Connect

In this first institutional plan prepared by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the INEEL will focus its efforts on three strategic thrusts: (1) Environmental Management stewardship for DOE-EM, (2) Nuclear reactor technology for DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE), and (3) Energy R and D, demonstration, and deployment (initial focus on biofuels and chemicals from biomass). The first strategic thrust focuses on meeting DOE-EMs environmental cleanup and long-term stewardship needs in a manner that is safe, cost-effective, science-based, and approved by key stakeholders. The science base at the INEEL will be further used to address a grand challenge for the INEEL and the DOE complex--the development of a fundamental scientific understanding of the migration of subsurface contaminants. The second strategic thrust is directed at DOE-NEs needs for safe, economical, waste-minimized, and proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. As NE lead laboratories, the INEEL and ANL will pursue specific priorities. The third strategic thrust focuses on DOE's needs for clean, efficient, and renewable energy technology. As an initial effort, the INEEL will enhance its capability in biofuels, bioprocessing, and biochemicals. The content of this institutional plan is designed to meet basic DOE requirements for content and structure and reflect the key INEEL strategic thrusts. Updates to this institutional plan will offer additional content and resource refinements.

Enge, R.S.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Institutional Design for Strategic Environmental Assessment on Urban Economic and Social Development Planning in China  

SciTech Connect

The National Economic and Social Development Plans (NESDPs) of cities in China, given their comprehensive, integrated and strategic nature, have significant and profound impacts on the development of cities and their embedded ecological environments. Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEAs) on city NESDPs have the potential to improve environmental policy integration at strategic level and to safeguard the sustainable development of cities. However, these plans are normally exempted from the current SEA requirement in China. We argue that it is more feasible to apply SEAs on city NESDPs before SEAs are expanded to higher level NESDPs in China. This article attempts to propose a China-specific institutional design for SEAs on city NESDPs based on experiments in selected cities and within the current legal framework. To obtain a holistic view about the long-term development of cities, more qualitative and descriptive analysis-based assessment methods should be adopted to broaden participation, to encourage the exchange of information and to reach consensus. - Highlights: > National Economic and Social Development Plans for Cities (NESDPs) in China is a very popular and significant decision made by municipal government. > We propose a institutional framework to conduct strategic environmental assessment to NESDPs. > The key features of the institutional framework are the independent SEA approval committee and a professional consulting agency.

Song Guojun, E-mail: Songguojun@vip.sohu.com; Zhou Li; Zhang Lei

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory institutional plan -- FY 2000--2004  

SciTech Connect

In this first institutional plan prepared by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the INEEL will focus its efforts on three strategic thrusts: (1) Environmental Management stewardship for DOE-EM, (2) Nuclear reactor technology for DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE), and (3) Energy R and D, demonstration, and deployment (initial focus on biofuels and chemicals from biomass). The first strategic thrust focuses on meeting DOE-EMs environmental cleanup and long-term stewardship needs in a manner that is safe, cost-effective, science-based, and approved by key stakeholders. The science base at the INEEL will be further used to address a grand challenge for the INEEL and the DOE complex--the development of a fundamental scientific understanding of the migration of subsurface contaminants. The second strategic thrust is directed at DOE-NEs needs for safe, economical, waste-minimized, and proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. As NE lead laboratories, the INEEL and ANL will pursue specific priorities. The third strategic thrust focuses on DOE's needs for clean, efficient, and renewable energy technology. As an initial effort, the INEEL will enhance its capability in biofuels, bioprocessing, and biochemicals. The content of this institutional plan is designed to meet basic DOE requirements for content and structure and reflect the key INEEL strategic thrusts. Updates to this institutional plan will offer additional content and resource refinements.

Enge, R.S.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Waste management/waste certification plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Waste Management/Waste Certification (C) Plan, written for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), outlines the criteria and methodologies to be used in the management of waste generated during ORNL ER field activities. Other agreed upon methods may be used in the management of waste with consultation with ER and Waste Management Organization. The intent of this plan is to provide information for the minimization, handling, and disposal of waste generated by ER activities. This plan contains provisions for the safe and effective management of waste consistent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) guidance. Components of this plan have been designed to protect the environment and the health and safety of workers and the public. It, therefore, stresses that investigation derived waste (IDW) and other waste be managed to ensure that (1) all efforts be made to minimize the amount of waste generated; (2) costs associated with sampling storage, analysis, transportation, and disposal are minimized; (3) the potential for public and worker exposure is not increased; and (4) additional contaminated areas are not created.

Clark, C. Jr.; Hunt-Davenport, L.D.; Cofer, G.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Environmental Checklist Form 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan (Revision 1) consists of a Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. The 216-B-3 Pond System consists of a series of four earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. These four ponds, collectively. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the 216-B-3-3 Ditch. Water discharged to the 216-8-3-3 Ditch flows directly into the 216-B-3 Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to B Pond and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the nonradioactive dangerous portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA. Mixed waste also may be considered a hazardous substance under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) when considering remediation of waste sites.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Overview of Strategies for Making Connections Between Transportation, Land Use and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Regulation : Designing Parking Policies to Reduce Automotive PollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection deals with the mobile monitoring of pollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection The Comprehensive Behavior Alternative approach views air pollution

Shirazi, Elham; Taylor, Brian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Workshop proceedings: Developing the scientific basis for long-term land management of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Responses to a survey on the INEEL Comprehensive Facility and Land Use Plan (US DOE 1996a) indicated the need for additional discussion on environmental resources, disturbance, and land use issues on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result, in September 1997, a workshop evaluated the existing scientific basis and determined future data needs for long-term land management on the INEEL. This INEEL Long-Term Land Management Workshop examined existing data on biotic, abiotic, and heritage resources and how these resources have been impacted by disturbance activities of the INEEL. Information gained from this workshop will help guide land and facility use decisions, identify data gaps, and focus future research efforts. This report summarizes background information on the INEEL and its long-term land use planning efforts, presentations and discussions at the workshop, and the existing data available at the INEEL. In this document, recommendations for future INEEL land use planning, research efforts, and future workshops are presented. The authors emphasize these are not policy statements, but comments and suggestions made by scientists and others participating in the workshop. Several appendices covering land use disturbance, legal drivers, land use assumptions and workshop participant comments, workshop participants and contributors, and the workshop agenda are also included.

Sperber, T.D.; Reynolds, T.D. [eds.] [Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Breckenridge, R.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Environmental planning in Florida: Floridas environmental screening tool: laying the technology foundation for efficient transportation decision making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Transportation. Environmental Management Office, Interimof Transportation, Environmental Management Office, with

Roaza, Ruth

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's Budget Allocation Plan, OAS-L-12-03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's Office The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's Budget Allocation Plan OAS-L-12-03 March 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 15, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Daniel M. Weeber, Director Eastern Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's Budget Allocation Plan" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is tasked with managing the technically challenging risks posed by the world's largest nuclear cleanup effort. At the end of Fiscal Year 2010, EM had responsibility for nuclear cleanup activities at 18 sites covering more

306

A California Statewide Exploratory Analysis Correlating Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behaviorof employment and infrastructure supply are used togetherCalifonia. Land use and infrastructure have a significant,

Yoon, Seo Youn; Golob, Thomas F.; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Environmental quality  

SciTech Connect

Major emphasis is placed on man environment interactions and environment management. Topics include: ecology and living resources; the global environment; water and air quality; toxic substances and environmental health; energy; natural resources; NEPA regulations; and land use.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

short of the expected targets as laid forward by biofuel mandates. Cellulosic crops tend to be heavy of cellulosic biofuels yet exists. Such an ambitious target relies on the assumption from the DepartmentThe Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National

310

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings Hongwei Dong, Ph.D. Candidate John D. Hunt, Professor John Gliebe, Assistant Professor #12;Framework Oil-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

Bertini, Robert L.

311

Asking the Right Questions About Transportation and Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2007 CTS 07-03 Asking the Right Questions About Transportation and Land Use Access to Destinations Study Research Summary No. 1 Getting There: Access and the Future of the Twin Cities Region #12;Published by the Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota March 2007 This research summary

Minnesota, University of

312

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical of Brazil on "good" versus "bad" lands is investigated. It is shown that the value of the higher yields) lands. The focus of the analysis is on the Northeast of Brazil (NE), where the prospects for dedicated

313

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake. CAU 496 consists of one site located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Sustainable Urbanism : an examination of environmentally responsible neighborhood developments in Europe and lessons for sustainable urban planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of the sustainable development concept at the end of the 1980s triggered the intensification of the environmental sustainability discourse in urban design and planning. The vision of sustainable urbanism ...

Kasioumi, Eirini

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management Public Involvement Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This document was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements for writing community relations plans. It includes information on how the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office prepares and executes Environmental Management Community relations activities. It is divided into three sections: the public involvement plan, public involvement in Oak Ridge, and public involvement in 1995. Four appendices are also included: environmental management in Oak Ridge; community and regional overview; key laws, agreements, and policy; and principal contacts.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 540: Spill Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with Errata  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 540, Spill Sites, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 540 consists of the nine following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 12 and 19 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 12-44-01, ER 12-1, Well Site Release; (2) 12-99-01, Oil Stained Dirt; (3) 19-25-02, Oil Spill; (4) 19-25-04, Oil Spill; (5) 19-25-05, Oil Spill; (6) 19-25-06, Oil Spill; (7) 19-25-07, Oil Spill; (8) 19-25-08, Oil Spills (3); and (9) 19-44-03, U-19bf Drill Site Release. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 540 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels (FALs), leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern (COPC), future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to define an approach necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be resolved for closure. Decision I is to conduct an investigation to determine whether COPCs are present in concentrations exceeding the FALs. If COPCs are found to be present above FALs, excavation of the contaminated material will occur with the collection of confirmation samples to ensure removal of contaminants below FALs.

Pastor, Laura

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Environmental screening tools for assessment of infrastructure plans based on biodiversity preservation and global warming (PEIT, Spain)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research has been concerned with SEA as a procedure, and there have been relatively few developments and tests of analytical methodologies. The first stage of the SEA is the 'screening', which is the process whereby a decision is taken on whether or not SEA is required for a particular programme or plan. The effectiveness of screening and SEA procedures will depend on how well the assessment fits into the planning from the early stages of the decision-making process. However, it is difficult to prepare the environmental screening for an infrastructure plan involving a whole country. To be useful, such methodologies must be fast and simple. We have developed two screening tools which would make it possible to estimate promptly the overall impact an infrastructure plan might have on biodiversity and global warming for a whole country, in order to generate planning alternatives, and to determine whether or not SEA is required for a particular infrastructure plan.

Garcia-Montero, Luis G., E-mail: luisgonzaga.garcia@upm.e [Dept. Forest Engineering, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Montes, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Lopez, Elena, E-mail: elopez@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Monzon, Andres, E-mail: amonzon@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Otero Pastor, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.otero@upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2013 18, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR KAREN L. BOARDM AN CHAIRP ERSON rROM: SU BJ ECT: REFERENCE: FEDE RAL TECHN ICA L CAPABILITIES PANEL MARK WI IITNEY It J I MAN AG ER VV"-c.--'\<.- OAK RIDGE OFFICE or ENV IRONMENT/\L M~ OAK RIDG E OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENT/\ L M/\NAGEMENT ANNUAL WORKFORCE ANAL YSJS AND STAFFING REPORT Memorandum from Karen L. Boardman to Distribution, Annual Workfhrce Analysis and Stqfftng Plan Report f(Jr Calendar Year 20 12, dated October 24, 20 12 As requested, attached is the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Manage ment (OREM) Calendar Year 2012 annual workforce anal ys is and staffing plan th at identifi es the technica l capabil iti es and pos itions ORe:M needs to ensure safe operations of OREM assigned nuc lear faci liti es. This report is submitted for incorporation into the Federa

319

Comments from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality on PEPCO's Intention to Commence Planned Transmission Outages  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMONWEALTH of VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH of VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Street address: 629 East Main Street, Richmond, Virginia 23219 Mailing address: P.O. Box 10009, Richmond, Virginia 23240 Fax (804) 698-4500 TDD (804) 698-4021 www.deq.virginia.gov W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. Secretary of Natural Resources Robert G. Burnley Director (804) 698-4000 1-800-592-5482 January 5, 2006 The Honorable Samuel W. Bodman Secretary of Energy United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01 Dear Secretary Bodman: The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) strongly opposes the Potomac Electric Power Company's (PEPCO) intention to commence planned maintenance outages of the

320

Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan for Fiscal Year 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) multiprogram laboratory whose primary mission has been to research nuclear technologies. Working with these technologies and conducting other types of research generates waste, including radioactive and/or hazardous wastes. While most of the waste treatment, storage, and disposal practices have been effective, some practices have led to the release of contaminants to the environment. As a result, DOE has developed (1) an Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to identify and, where necessary, cleanup releases from inactive waste sites and (2) a Waste Management (WM) Program to safely treat, store, and dispose of DOE wastes generated from current and future activities in an environmentally sound manner. This document describes the plans for FY 1993 for the INEL`s ER and WM programs as managed by DOE`s Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID).

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore Environmental Protection Implementation Plan for the period November 9, 1991--November 9, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, as part of the DOE complex, is committed to full compliance with all applicable environmental laws and regulations. This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL, Livermore. The EPIP will serve as an aid to management and staff to implement these new programs in a timely manner. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Memorandum on Land Use Change and the Global Food System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LUC (Land Use Change) term in an LCA assessment of a biofuels global warming effect (GW), while superposable for small excursions, is not independent of other events in the global food system. In particular, the GW effect of biofuel use resulting from remote land use change mediated by global grain markets is probably larger to the extent that food supplies are under pressure from whatever other causes. Fuel use of any inputs to food production, especially land, unambiguously causes an increase in food prices relative to what they would otherwise be as long as the demand curve for food slopes upward to the left. Limited opportunities do exist for what are termed pro-poor land use strategies; namely positve, synergestic, interactions of biofuel production and food availability. An example from Africa is included in this memo. Past experience with the Green Revolution of agricultural intensification suggests, however, that the chance to improve the sitation of the global poor can be exceedingly difficult to implement. Discussion Current analysis of the global warming (GW) effect resulting from the substitution of biofuels for petroleum recognizes that land use change (LUC) remote in space (and possibly time) induced by competition with food consumption for biofeedstocks may be large, and that the carbon releases from these changes may not only reduce the GW advantage of [some] biofuels over petroleum but actually reverse it. The discussion has been especially influenced by two recent journal articles (Fargione, Hill, Tilman, Polasky, & Hawthorne, 2008; Searchinger et al., 2007). Because LUC is caused directly by price changes for food crops, discussion of policy implications, including especially discussion in the popular press (for example, (Garber, 2008)), has noted the rapid worldwide increase in food prices, especially grains, over the past two or three years. A good part of that discussion comprises contradictory assertions about whether the increase in US corn ethanol production is responsible for the increases, part of them, or very little. Other

Richard Rhoda; Daniel Kammen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

File:01LandUseOverview.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LandUseOverview.pdf LandUseOverview.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:01LandUseOverview.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:54, 28 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 09:54, 28 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (42 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 14:23, 30 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:23, 30 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (41 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 15:55, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:55, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (34 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

325

DOE/EA-1083; Environmental Assessment and Plan for New Silt/Clay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 83 April 1997 Environmental Assessment and Plan for New Silt/Clay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR A NEW SILT/CLAY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND USE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing its current silt/clay source and opening as many as three new sources with volumes sufficient to support potential Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) projects through 2005. The current source, Spreading Area B

326

Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary of the results at the Solar+Land+Use page on OpenEI. As solar power becomes more popular, a big question that people have is "how much land does solar energy use?" This dataset and report provides answers to the solar land use question while also doing an in-depth analysis and evaluation of various factors related to solar land use. Both photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities were

327

Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Multi-Year R&D Program Plan NATIONAL METHANE HYDRATE MULTI-YEAR R&D PROGRAM PLAN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Federal Energy Technology Center...

328

Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements are detailed written statements that are required by section 102(2)(C) of NEPA for a proposed major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 1, 1999 EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 1, 1999 EIS-0285: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program (August 1999) August 1, 1999 EIS-0289: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

329

Data management plan for the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System, Version 1. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Data Management Plan (DMP) describes the data management objectives, system components, data base structure and contents, system maintenance, data processing, and user interface for the prototype phase of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS). The major goals of OREIS data management are to compile data of known quality, to maintain the integrity of the data base, and to provide data to users. The DMP defines the requirements, describes the responsibilities, and references the procedures for meeting the data management objectives. Emphasis is on management of measurement data and the associated metadata used to support its proper interpretation and legal defensibility. The DMP covers transmittal, processing, storage, and data access activities associated with OREIS. The OREIS data dictionary is provided as an appendix.

Not Available

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

TSD capacity model interface with waste reduction planning in the Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a picture of how the integration of waste generation forecasting with treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) capacity modeling interfaces with waste reduction planning in the Environmental Restoration Program. Background information is given for the major activities at the seven Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., sites: (1) Oak Ridge National Laboratory; (2) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; (3) Oak Ridge K-25 Site; (4) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; (5) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; (6) Oak Ridge Associated Universities; and (7) the off-site contaminated areas near DOE facilities. A perspective is provided for strategies to achieve waste reduction, how waste generation forecasts rates were developed, and how those forecasted waste generation rates will be used in TSD capacity modeling. The generation forecasting in combination with TSD modeling allows development of quantifiable goals and subsequent waste reduction. 2 figs.

Phifer, B.E. Jr.; Grumski, J.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Demonstration of the Environmental Data Corporation Spectral Fuel Conservation System program plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program is to demonstrate and quantify the amount of fuel that can be saved if the Spectral Fuel Conservation System (SFCS) developed by the Environmental Data Corporation (EDC) is installed in coal-fired industrial boilers. Of central importance to the program are the selection of an appropriate test site and the preparation and methodical application of a comprehensive test strategy. Consequently, the sections dealing with these topics in the proposal have been considerably expanded in this program plan to include as much preparatory thinking as is possible at this early stage. The remainder of this document is essentially an update version of the technical portion of the proposal. No change in the schedule is anticipated.

1979-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Department of Energy Office of Science Pacific Northwest Site Office Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE-SC PNNL Site  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) manages the contract for operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site in Richland, Washington. Radiological operations at the DOE-SC PNNL Site expanded in 2010 with the completion of facilities at the Physical Sciences Facility. As a result of the expanded radiological work at the site, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has required that offsite environmental surveillance be conducted as part of the PNNL Site Radioactive Air Emissions License. The environmental monitoring and surveillance requirements of various orders, regulations, and guidance documents consider emission levels and subsequent risk of negative human and environmental impacts. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes air surveillance activities at the DOE-SC PNNL Site. The determination of offsite environmental surveillance needs evolved out of a Data Quality Objectives process (Barnett et al. 2010) and Implementation Plan (Snyder et al. 2010). The entire EMP is a compilation of several documents, which include the Main Document (this text), Attachment 1: Sampling and Analysis Plan, Attachment 2: Data Management Plan, and Attachment 3: Dose Assessment Guidance.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

333

Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Data Sets Released from Two LBA Land Use-Land Change Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two land Use-Land Change Teams The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale...

335

GRR/Section 13-NV-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NV-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-NV-a - Land Use...

336

GRR/Section 13-MT-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-MT-a - Land Use...

337

GRR/Section 13-ID-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ID-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-ID-a - Land Use...

338

GRR/Section 13-OR-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-OR-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-OR-a - Land Use...

339

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenarios were developed with GIS modeling. Current land use0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversityGeographic information systems (GIS) are adept at modeling

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Final master work plan : environmental investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, 2002 revision.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under which Argonne National Laboratory provides technical assistance for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation for the CCC/USDA. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites in Kansas where former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were located. Argonne applies its QuickSite(reg sign) Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) approach to these former facilities. The QuickSite environmental site characterization methodology is Argonne's proprietary implementation of the ESC process (ASTM 1998). Argonne has used this approach at several former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, including Agenda, Agra, Everest, and Frankfort. The Argonne ESC approach revolves around a multidisciplinary, team-oriented approach to problem solving. The basic features and steps of the QuickSite methodology are as follows: (1) A team of scientists with diverse expertise and strong field experience is required to make the process work. The Argonne team is composed of geologists, geochemists, geophysicists, hydrogeologists, chemists, biologists, engineers, computer scientists, health and safety personnel, and regulatory staff, as well as technical support staff. Most of the staff scientists are at the Ph.D. level; each has on average, more than 15 years of experience. The technical team works together throughout the process. In other words, the team that plans the program also implements the program in the field and writes the reports. More experienced scientists do not remain in the office while individuals with lesser degrees or experience carry out the field work. (2) The technical team reviews, evaluates, and interprets existing data for the site and the contaminants there to determine which data sets are technically valid and can be used in initially designing the field program. A basic mistake sometimes made in the site characterization process is failure to use technically sound available data to form working hypotheses on hydrogeology, contaminant distribution, etc. for initial testing. (3) After assembling and interpreting existing data for the site, the entire technical team visits the site to identify as a group the site characteristics that might prohibit or enhance any particular technological approach. Logistic and community constraints are also identified at this point. (4) After the field visit, the team selects a suite of technologies appropriate to the problem and completes the design of the field program. No one technique works well at all sites, and a suite of techniques is necessary to delineate site features fully. In addition, multiple technologies are employed to increase confidence in conclusions about site features. Noninvasive and minimally invasive technologies are emphasized to minimize risk to the environment, the community, and the staff. In no case is the traditional approach of installing a massive number of monitoring wells followed. A dynamic work plan that outlines the program is produced for the sponsoring and regulatory agencies. The word ''dynamic'' is emphasized because the work plan is viewed as a guide, subject to modification, for the site characterization activity, rather than a document that is absolute and unchangeable. Therefore, the health and safety plan and the quality assurance/quality control plan must be broad and encompass all possible alterations to the plan. The cooperation of the regulating agency is essential in successful implementation of this process. The sponsoring and regulatory agencies are notified if significant changes to the site-specific work plan are necessary. (5) The entire team participates in the technical field program. Several technical activities are undertaken simultaneously. These may range from different surface geophysics investigations to vegetation sampling. Data from the various activities are reduced and interpreted each day by the technical staff. Various computer prog

Burton, J. C.; Environmental Research

2003-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Study on the Bioenergy Crop Production Function of Land Use in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of the bioenergy crop production function of land use, combined with the current situation of Chinese land use, this paper analyzes and discusses the cultivation of energy plants and the bioenergy crop production function of land ... Keywords: Land use, Bioenergy crop production function, farmers income

Zhang Kun; Duan Jiannan; Yang Jun; Li Ping

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Land use suitability screening for power plant sites in Maryland  

SciTech Connect

Since 1974 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been engaged in developing an automated procedure for land use suitability screening. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has funded the project to aid in the selection of power plant sites in Maryland. Its purpose is to identify candidate areas from which specific candidate sites can be chosen for detailed analyses. The ORNL approach assures that certain key variables are examined empirically for every cell in the study region before candidate sites are selected. Each variable is assigned an importance weight and compatibility score based upon its effect on the economic, social, or ecologic costs associated with construction in a given cell. The weighted scores for each variable are aggregated and output as a suitability score for each cell. (auth)

Dobson, J.E.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 489: WWII UXO Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada; May 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan provides the details for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 489: WWII UXO Sites, Tonopah Test Range. CAU 489 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996.

Bechtel Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Perceived effectiveness of environmental decision support systems in participatory planning: Evidence from small groups of end-users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges associated with evaluating the effectiveness of environmental decision support systems (EDSS) based on the perceptions of only a small sample of end-users are well understood. Although methods adopted from Management Information Systems ... Keywords: DST evaluation, Decision support, Participatory planning

David Inman; Michiel Blind; Irina Ribarova; Arno Krause; Onno Roosenschoon; Ayalew Kassahun; Huub Scholten; George Arampatzis; Geraldine Abrami; Brian McIntosh; Paul Jeffrey

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Project Management Plan for the Hawaii Geothermal Project Environmental Impact Statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990, Congress appropriated $5 million (Pu 101-514) for the State of Hawaii to use in Phase 3 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP). As defined by the State in its 1990 proposal to Congress, the HGP would consist of four phases: (1) exploration and testing of the geothermal resource associated with the Kilauea Volcano on the Island of Hawaii (the Big Island), (2) demonstration of deep-water power transmission cable technology in the Alenuihaha Channel between the Big Island and Maui, (3) verification and characterization of the geothermal resource on the Big Island, and (4) construction and operation of commercial geothermal power production facilities on the Big Island, with overland and submarine transmission of electricity from the Big Island to Oahu and possibly other islands (DBED 1990). Because it considered Phase 3 to be research and not project development or construction, Congress indicated that allocation of this funding would not be considered a major federal action under NEPA and would not require an EIS. However, because the project is highly visible, somewhat controversial, and involves a particularly sensitive environment in Hawaii, Congress directed in 1991 (House Resolution 1281) that ''...the Secretary of Energy shall use such sums as are necessary from amounts previously provided to the State of Hawaii for geothermal resource verification and characterization to conduct the necessary environmental assessments and/or environmental impact statement (EIS) for the geothermal initiative to proceed''. In addition, the U.S. District Court of Hawaii (Civil No. 90-00407, June 25, 1991) ruled that the federal government must prepare an EIS for Phases 3 and 4 before any further disbursement of funds was made to the State for the HGP. This Project Management Plan (PMP) briefly summarizes the background information on the HGP and describes the project management structure, work breakdown structure, baseline budget and schedule, and reporting procedures that have been established for the project. The PMP does not address in detail the work that has been completed during the scoping process and preparation of the IP. The PMP has been developed to address the tasks required in preparing the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS), the public comment period, and the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS).

Reed, R.M.; Saulsbury, J.W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Environmental assessment for geothermal loan guarantee: South Brawley geothermal exploration project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The foregoing analysis indicates that the proposed geothermal field experiment could result in several adverse environmental effects. Such effects would lie primarily in the areas of air quality, noise, aesthetics, land use, and water consumption. However, for the most part, mitigating measures have been, or easily could be, included in project plans to reduce these adverse effects to insignificant levels. Those aspects of the project which are not completely amenable to mitigation by any reasonable means include air quality, noise, aesthetics, land use and water use.

Not Available

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

349

EIS-0386: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Amend Relevant Agency Land Use Plans, and Conduct Public Scoping Meetings, and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0386: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Amend Relevant Agency Land Use Plans, and Conduct Public Scoping Meetings, and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (the Act), Public Law 109-58 (H.R. 6), enacted August 8, 2005, directs the Secretaries of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Energy, and the Interior (the Agencies) to designate under their respective authorities corridors on Federal land in the 11 Western States for oil, gas and hydrogen pipelines and electricity

350

Optimizing Patterns of Land Use to Reduce Peak Runoff Flow and Nonpoint Source Pollution with an Integrated Hydrological and Land-Use Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to develop and apply a methodology for delineating optimal land-use patterns that minimize peak runoff flow at watershed outlets by coupling a hydrological model and a land-use model. Under the assumption supported in ...

In-Young Yeo; Steven I. Gordon; Jean-Michel Guldmann

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hydrothermal electric and direct heat. Commercialization Phase III planning  

SciTech Connect

Nine environmental concerns have been identified: airborne effluents, waterborne effluents, noise, subsidence, enhanced seismicity, water use conflicts, land use, socioeconomic impacts, and system safety and occupational health. Resolution of these issues is expected to occur at staggered intervals over the next 8 to 10 years. Of these concerns, airborne emissions and water use conflicts are judged to have a medium likelihood of having research findings adverse to commercialization. Waterborne effluents and subsidence are also judged to have a medium likelihood. The other concerns--noise, enhanced seismicity, land use, socioeconomic impacts and system safety and occupational health--are judged to have a low likelihood of adverse findings. The overall environmental research and development plan related to hydrothermal electric and direct heat includes funds to assess the adequacy of candidate control technology options. However, it does not include the resource requirements to fully develop and demonstrate commercial control hardware, process modifications, and for strategies. The conclusions, stated as probabilities, are given.

Clusen, R.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

354

GRR/Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use Permit d - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Lands Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Lands issues Land Use Permits for non-invasive exploration on a case by case basis. 3-ID-d.1 to 3-ID-d.2 - Will Non-Invasive Exploration Be Preformed on State Lands? A Land Use Permit is required to preform non-invasive exploration on state

355

Performance-Based Environmental Restoration Management Assessment (PERMA): Applying Decision Analysis to Implement Achievable Response-Action Completion Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide is being issued by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) to clarify the requirements for implementing the Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) at DLA installations. This Guide reflects DLAs continuing commitment to demonstrate and achieve protectiveness and to meet necessary, feasible, and reasonable environmental response-action obligations in the most effective and efficient manner possible. This Performance-Based Environmental Restoration Management Assessment (PERMA) Guide is designed to assist DLA environmental project teams to achieve response complete in a reasonable timeframe, while maintaining protectiveness of human health and the environment. DLA issues this Guide also to clarify and stress the importance of remedy planning and optimization activities in establishing, reducing, and validating the annual environmental liability statement. The Guide reviews how to establish realistic and achievable performance objectives by taking advantage of the flexibility inherent in the DERP Guidance and the iterative nature of the cleanup program (i.e., fiveyear review process), as directed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (as amended). Improving scientific and technical knowledge can and should be routinely integrated into the response-action planning and implementation process to ensure that the best responses are used to feasibly and reasonably achieve and efficiently sustain necessary protection.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

CURRENT PROGRESS AND FUTURE PLANS FOR THE DOE OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has collaborated with various international institutes for many years on radioactive waste management challenges of mutual concern. Currently, DOE-EM is performing collaborative work with researchers at the Khlopin Radium Institute and the SIA Radon Institute in Russia and the Ukraine's International Radioecology Laboratory to explore issues related to high-level waste and to investigate experience and technologies that could support DOE-EM site cleanup needs. Specific initiatives include: (1) Application of the Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter to DOE Wastes--SIA Radon and Savannah River National Laboratory; (2) Improved Solubility and Retention of Troublesome Components in SRS and Hanford Waste Glasses--Khlopin Radium Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory; and (3) Long-term Impacts from Radiation/Contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone--International Radioecology Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper provides an overview of the status of the current International Program task activities. The paper will also provide insight into the future direction for the program. Specific ties to the current DOE-EM technology development multi-year planning effort will be highlighted as well as opportunities for future international collaborations.

Marra, J; Kurt D Gerdes, K; David Peeler, D; John Harbour, J; Kevin Fox, K

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

Current Progress and Future Plans for the DOE Office of Environmental Management International Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has collaborated with various international institutes for many years on radioactive waste management challenges of mutual concern. Currently, DOE-EM is performing collaborative work with researchers at the Khlopin Radium Institute and the SIA Radon Institute in Russia and the Ukraine's International Radioecology Laboratory to explore issues related to high-level waste and to investigate experience and technologies that could support DOE-EM site cleanup needs. Specific initiatives include: - Application of the Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter to DOE Wastes - SIA Radon and Savannah River National Laboratory; - Improved Solubility and Retention of Troublesome Components in SRS and Hanford Waste Glasses - Khlopin Radium Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory; - Long-term Impacts from Radiation/Contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, International Radioecology Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper provides an overview of the status of the current International Program task activities. The paper will also provide insight into the future direction for the program. Specific ties to the current DOE-EM technology development multi-year planning effort will be highlighted as well as opportunities for future international collaborations. (authors)

Gerdes, K.D. [Office of Engineering and Technology, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Marra, J. C.; Peeler, D.K.; Harbour, M.J.J.R.; Fox, K.M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Vienna, J.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Aloy, A.S. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stefanovsky, S.V. [SIA Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarkov, M.D. [International Radioecology Laboratory, Slavutych (Ukraine)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Sampling and analysis plan for the preoperational environmental survey of the spent nuclear fuel project facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan will support the preoperational environmental monitoring for construction, development, and operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities, which have been designed for the conditioning and storage of spent nuclear fuels; particularly the fuel elements associated with the operation of N-Reactor. The SNF consists principally of irradiated metallic uranium, and therefore includes plutonium and mixed fission products. The primary effort will consist of removing the SNF from the storage basins in K East and K West Areas, placing in multicanister overpacks, vacuum drying, conditioning, and subsequent dry vault storage in the 200 East Area. The primary purpose and need for this action is to reduce the risks to public health and safety and to the environment. Specifically these include prevention of the release of radioactive materials into the air or to the soil surrounding the K Basins, prevention of the potential migration of radionuclides through the soil column to the nearby Columbia River, reduction of occupational radiation exposure, and elimination of the risks to the public and to workers from the deterioration of SNF in the K Basins.

MITCHELL, R.M.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Program Management Plan for the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program management plan describes the scope, objectives, and method of accomplishment for the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The ORNL ER Program is one of five site program, receiving guidance from and reporting to the Energy Systems ER Division. Therefore, all ORNL ER policies and procedures are consistent with ER Division policies and procedures. This plan covers all ORNL ER activities, the participants involved in these activities (and their roles and responsibilities), and all phases of the remediation process. This plan will also serve as a template that may be supplemented as necessary to produce individual project management plans for specific projects. This document explains how the Energy Systems ORNL ER Program does business, so the ORNL ER Program`s management structure is illustrated in detail. Personnel are matrixed to the ER Program from other organizations to assist with specific projects. This plan identifies positions at the program level and discusses responsibilities and interactions with positions at the project level. This plan includes sections that describe requirements for project plans, work breakdown structures, schedules, project management and cost control systems, and information and reporting. Project management plans will utilize the work breakdown structure and dictionary pages in the appropriate life cycle baseline report This plan describes the information that should be contained in ORNL ER project management plans. The most important milestones are primary documents relating to the management and remediation of contaminated sites. Primary document milestones are subject to stipulated penalties and receive paramount attention.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the Colonie site, Colonie, New York  

SciTech Connect

This work plan has been prepared to document the scoping and planning process performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support remedial action activities at the Colonie site. The site is located in eastern New York State in the town of Colonie near the city of Albany. Remedial action of the Colonie site is being planned as part of DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The DOE is responsible for controlling the release of all radioactive and chemical contaminants from the site. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) must be prepared to support the decision-making process for evaluating remedial action alternatives. This work plan contains a summary of information known about the site as of January 1988, presents a conceptual site model that identifies potential routes of human exposure to site containments, identifies data gaps, and summarizes the process and proposed studies that will be used to fill the data gaps. In addition, DOE activities must be conducted in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires consideration of the environmental consequences of a proposed action as part of its decision-making process. This work also describes the approach that will be used to evaluate potential remedial action alternatives and includes a description of the organization, project controls, and task schedules that will be employed to fulfill the requirements of both CERCLA and NEPA. 48 refs., 18 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Surveillance Plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Surveillance Plan has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12--18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring phase. This Surveillance Plan presents the technical and quality assurance surveillance activities for the various WAG 6 environmental monitoring and data evaluation plans and implementing procedures.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nathaniel E. Roth Urban Land Use and Transportation Center (ULTRANS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Customization of ArcGIS for specific applications o End user support and training o Geodatabase design o@ucdavis.edu Education: · Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Environmental Biology and Management with emphasis Research Interest: · Spatial analysis of environmental impacts caused by past and future urban

California at Davis, University of

363

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report Oak Ridge National Laboratory December 2010 Publication: Dale, VH, R and Environmental Change, pages 52-55, published by the Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment

364

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upgrade and Outage A planned 5-minute outage for systems upgrades turned into a 1 hour outage of the DAAC web site on Thursday morning 822 at 8:30am. Some driver software for the...

365

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 177: Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 177, Mud Pits and Cellars, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 177 consists of the 12 following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 9, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 08-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (2) 09-09-41, Unknown No.3 Mud Pit/Disposal Area; (3) 09-09-45, U-9bz PS No.1A Mud Pit (1) and Cellar; (4) 09-23-05, Mud Pit and Cellar; (5) 09-23-08, Mud Pit and Cellar; (6) 09-23-09, U-9itsx20 PS No.1A Cellar; (7) 10-23-02, Mud Pit and Cellar; (8) 10-23-03, Mud Pit and Cellar; (9) 19-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (10) 19-23-02, Cellar and Waste Storage Area; (11) 19-23-03, Cellar with Casing; and (12) 20-23-07, Cellar. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 177 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the preliminary action levels (PALs), leading to a no further action declaration, or (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to outline the collection of data necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine whether contaminants of potential concern are present in concentrations exceeding the PALs. If contaminants of potential concern are found to be present above PALs, Decision II will be to determine the extent of contamination and generate the information necessary to close the site in place and implement the appropriate administrative controls (i.e., use restrictions). The following text summarizes the types of activities that will support the closure of CAU 177: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., boundary setup, utility clearances, vegetation removal, movement/removal of fencing and debris). (2) Remove non-hazardous debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples of residual drilling mud and soil using probabilistic (mud pits) and judgmental (cellars) sampling to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) (i.e., nature of contamination) if these data do not already exist. Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil if COCs exist) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. (4) Establish no further action as the corrective action if no contaminants are detected above final action levels. (5) If COCs are present at a CAS, establish the corrective action and implement appropriate use restrictions. (6) Confirm the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. (7) Document all closure activities for CAU 177 in a Closure Report.

Alfred Wickline

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

An economic analysis of land use alternatives on CRP land trees after the CRP contracts expire in east Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landowners who have planted trees on CRP land must decide whether to retain the trees or divert land to others uses after the contracts expire. An economic tool is developed to assist landowners in making the most profitable choice between retaining trees to produce sawlogs or pulpwood and reverting land to crops, corn, cotton, sorghum and wheat. A generic theoretical framework is formulated to compare various land use alternatives. Several scenarios are formulated to incorporate the changing patterns of variables and to examine the sensitivity of the outcome to these changes. The influence of implementing the conservation compliance plan (CCP) is also examined. The time frame of the analysis is determined by the financially optimal. single rotation length of the tree stand. The real discounted revenues of the land use alternatives, based in 1993, are compared on a per-acre basis. The results indicate that retaining trees on post-CRP land is a better option than reverting land to corn, cotton without a CCP, sorghum, or wheat under all scenarios. However, when compared with reverting land to cotton with a CCP, retaining trees does not seem to be a profitable land use alternative under several of the scenarios. Given that a large proportion of the land going into CRP in east Texas is wheat acres, it seems likely that majority of the CRP land in trees is going to be retained in trees upon expiration of contracts.

Arekere, Marigowda Dhananjaya

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

"Annual NEPA Planning Summary Status of Ongoing NEPA Compliance Activities - Environmental Impact Statements"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status of Ongoing NEPA Compliance Activities - Environmental Impact Statements" "Bonneville Power Administration Annual NEPA Planning Summary Status of Ongoing NEPA Compliance Activities Environmental Impact Statements" "application/vnd.ms-excel" "#","*Title, Location","Estimated Cost","Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones)",,"Description" ,"I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project Cowlitz and Clark Counties, WA and Multnomah County, OR",5000000,"Determination Date:","application/vnd.ms-excel"," Construct about 70 miles of new 500-kV line between a new proposed substation near Castle Rock, WA and an exsting BPA substation in Troutdale, OR"

368

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline The Department of Energy hereby adopts final Departmental guidelines implementing Executive Order 12114-Environmental Effecrs Abroad of Major Federal Actions, whic was issued on January 4, 1979. G-DOE-effects_abroad.pdf More Documents & Publications Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions EIS-0386: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Amend Relevant Agency Land Use Plans, and Conduct Public Scoping Meetings, and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement

370

Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline The Department of Energy hereby adopts final Departmental guidelines implementing Executive Order 12114-Environmental Effecrs Abroad of Major Federal Actions, whic was issued on January 4, 1979. G-DOE-effects_abroad.pdf More Documents & Publications Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions EIS-0386: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Amend Relevant Agency Land Use Plans, and Conduct Public Scoping Meetings, and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact

371

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision No. 0, August 2001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; CAS 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; CAS 03-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 20-16-01, Landfill; CAS 20-22-21, Drums. Sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations are the basis for the development of the phased approach chosen to address the data collection activities prior to implementing the preferred closure alternative for each CAS. The Phase I investigation will determine through collection of environmental samples from targeted populations (i.e., mud/soil cuttings above textural discontinuity) if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels (PALs) at each of the CASs. If COPCs are present above PALs, a Phase II investigation will be implemented to determine the extent of contamination to support the appropriate corrective action alternative to complete closure of the site. Groundwater impacts from potentially migrating contaminants are not expected due to the depths to groundwater and limiting hydrologic drivers of low precipitation and high evaporation rates. Future land-use scenarios limit future uses to industrial activities; therefore, future residential uses are not considered. Potential exposure routes to site workers from contaminants of concern in septage and soils include oral ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact (absorption) through in-advertent disturbance of contaminated structures and/or soils. Diesel within drilling muds is expected to be the primary COPC based on process knowledge. Recirculation processes within the mud pits enhance volatilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thereby reducing the potential concentrations of any VOCs that may be present. A secondary source of contaminants from random truck dumping activities and leaking vehicle discharge may have released fuels, grease, motor oil, and hydraulic fluids into the mud pit effluent stream. Radionuclide contamination is not expected at these CASs based on historical information. The primary radioisotopes that could be expected, if present, are cesium-137, tritium, and strontium-90. The SAFER process ends with closure of the site based on the laboratory analytical results of the environmental samples. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 356 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/climate_change_mitigation_land_use.pdf References: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors[1] Overview "This paper reviews the status of the post-2012 negotiations on climate change mitigation through land-use measures in the agriculture and forestry

373

Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan, CAU No. 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points landfill Tonopah test range  

SciTech Connect

This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept. The SAFER process is employed at Corrective Action Units (CAUs) where enough information exists about the nature and extent of contamination to propose an appropriate corrective action prior to the implementation of a Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the process. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty and planning decision-making. The purpose of the investigation in the SAFER process is to document and verify the adequacy of existing information (such as process knowledge); to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or to take no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) planning process, communicates ER/WM`s philosophy and overall strategy for achieving its compliance and cleanup goals, summarizes multi-year program plans and assesses progress made during the previous year. The FYP goal is to ensure that risks to human health and safety and to the environment posed by the Department`s past, present, and future operations are either eliminated to reduced to safer levels by the year 2019. The SSP applies the overall strategic goals and commitments of the FYP, incorporating site-specific and local public considerations. It will address accomplishments since the FY 1990 plan, document planned activities focused on the upcoming fiscal year (FY 1992) and discuss milestones and objectives based on restricted and nonrestricted budget conditions for FY 1993--1997. The SSP is the primary means of demonstrating the relationship of local cleanup and compliance activities to broad environmental goals set forth in the FYP. The SSP provides an important channel for conveying information to regulators, the public, special interest groups, and other DOE organizations. This summary will briefly review the site`s facilities and missions, current and future program objectives, major accomplishments, funding levels, and major milestones for the five-year period.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Snake River Basin environmental program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Snake River Basin Environmental Program was designed to evaluate existing environmental data with respect to potential geothermal development in eight Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRAs) in Idaho. State and federal agencies, public interest groups, consulting groups, and universities participated in the DOE program. Final reports for the program are intended to be utilized as reference documents and planning tools for future environmental studies. Evaluation of the data indicated that the majority of the existing data base is adequate for small-scale direct-use developments. The potential impacts of development on water quality and water supply are the primary environmental concern. Preliminary data suggest that subsidence and induced seismicity may be a problem in several of the KGRAs. Sensitive animal species and habitats have been identified in each area; development in the Castle Creek KGRA may be restricted due to the Birds of Prey Natural Area. Two workshops provided public input on concerns and land use planning for geothermal development in Idaho. Based on the data evaluation and public input, a plan for supplementing the existing environmental data base was prepared.

Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Expanding the Role of "Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry" Projects and the Carbon Market in Addressing Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) sector is highly significant in any consideration of global climate change, the fact remains that the scale of LULUCF market activity currently is very small, particularly compared with its overall potential for carbon sequestration and importance as both a source and sink of carbon emissions. The underlying problem seems to be finding a workable policy framework. A flexible market-based policy at both international and domestic levels will score ...

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

CALIFORNIA ENERGY EFFECT OF LAND USE CHOICES ON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement Plans (STIP). STIPs are the aggregate of all of the individual RTIPs, along with projects Improvement Program (ITIP). Projects within the STIP nominated by RTIPs receive 75 percent of the STIP funds.iii Caltrans controls only 25 percent of the STIP funds through ITIP projects. · State Air Quality Management

378

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastruc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land...

379

GRR/Section 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon GRRSection 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY...

380

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evenness . Geographic information systems (GIS) .GIS-based inventory modeling . Habitats . Hemeroby . Land0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity

Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MC (2007) California biofuel goals and production potential.Many LCA studies of biofuel production and use have appearedand downstream of biofuel crop production that have land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through...

383

Land use and land cover, 1978 Hot Springs, South Dakota, Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Land use and land cover of the area surrounding Hot Springs, South Dakota in 1978 is presented in map form. (ACR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON AGRICULTURAL LAND USE AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project examines the influence that climate change and biofuel production could have on agricultural land use decisions in Pennsylvania. The first chapter develops a (more)

Yenerall, Jacqueline

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program. Task, OU 1-03 and OU 4-10 Track 2 investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG&G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

Trippet, W.A. II [IT Corp., (United States); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Quartzsite Solar Energy Project and Proposed Yuma Field Office Resource Management Plan Amendment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Quartzsite Solar Energy Project and Proposed Yuma Field Office Resource Management Plan Amendment DOE/EIS - 0440 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Yuma Field Office U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Army Garrison Yuma Proving Ground Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Arizona Game and Fish Department December 2012 COVER SHEET Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Army Garrison-Yuma Proving Ground Arizona Department of Environmental Quality

387

Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES&H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing).

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Treatment Plan Compliance Order, October 3, 1995 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Requiring Compliance with Site Treatment Plan Order Requiring Compliance with Site Treatment Plan No. 95-10-03-01 State Colorado Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Approve with modifications the Proposed Site Treatment Plan for RFETS (MLLW); establish a Mixed Transuranic waste Agreement Parties DOE; Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) Date 10/3/1995 SCOPE * In regard to Mixed Low-Level waste, approve with modifications the Proposed Site Treatment Plan for RFETS and require compliance by DOE with the modified and approved Site Treatment Plan. * In regard to Mixed Transuranic waste, establish and ensure compliance with an Agreement addressing compliance with the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 to RCRA. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES

389

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTEGRATED NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and Finding Of No Significant Impacts for ROCK CREEK RESERVE 2001-Closure DOE/EA - 1371 Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service May, 2001 Dear Stakeholder: Enclosed is the Final Rock Creek Reserve Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (Plan), Environmental Assessment (EA), and Finding Of No Significant Impacts (FONSI). The Rock Creek Reserve was dedicated on May 17, 1999, to be jointly managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Department of Energy. This Plan/EA was developed in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Through cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for joint

390

Land-use implications of wind-energy-conversion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An estimated 20 utilities in the United States are now investigating potential wind machine sites in their areas. Identifying sites for wind machine clusters (wind farms) involves more than just finding a location with a suitable wind resource. Consideration must also be given to the proximity of sites to existing transmission lines, environmental impacts, aesthetics, and legal concerns as well as the availability of and alternative uses for the land. These issues have made it increasingly difficult for utilities to bring conventional power plants on-line quickly. Utilities are now required, however, to give careful consideration to specific legal, social, and environmental questions raised by the siting of wind energy conversion systems (WECS).

Noun, R.J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

Gilbes, Fernando

392

Biofuel Policy & Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) Dr. Julie Witcover, Dr. Sonia Yeh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Policy & Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) Dr. Julie Witcover, Dr. Sonia Yeh Institute(jwitcover@ucdavis.edu), Sonia Yeh(slyeh@ucdavis.edu) Project Description Indirect land use change (ILUC) occurs when biofuel with a risk of substantial GHG emissions. Controversy over ILUCs inclusion in biofuel policies is due

California at Davis, University of

393

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

394

Simulation of land use spatial pattern of towns and villages based on CA-Markov model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Firstly, this paper analyzes the basic principles and processes of the spatial pattern changes of land use in towns and villages, and the result shows that the land resource demands of urban development and population growth lead to the spatial pattern ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Fangshan district in Beijing, Land use change, Markov, Spatial pattern

Lingling Sang; Chao Zhang; Jianyu Yang; Dehai Zhu; Wenju Yun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions The purpose of this Executive Order is to enable responsible officials of Federal Agencies having ultimate responsibility for authorizing and approving actions encompassed by this Order to be informed of pertinent environmental considerations and to take such considerations into account, with other pertinent considerations of national policy, in making decisions regarding such actions EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions More Documents & Publications EIS-0386: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Amend Relevant Agency Land Use Plans, and Conduct Public Scoping

396

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project. Appendix A, Environmental and regulatory planning and documentation: Draft  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report, Appendix A, Environmental & Regulatory Planning & Documentation, identifies the regulatory requirements that would be imposed on the operation or construction of a facility designed to process the INEL`s waste streams. These requirements are contained in five reports that discuss the following topics: (1) an environmental compliance plan and schedule, (2) National Environmental Policy Act requirements, (3) preliminary siting requirements, (4) regulatory justification for the project, and (5) health and safety criteria.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

398

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas General Land Office Regulations & Policies Open Beaches Act Dune Protection Act Beach Dune Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Texas General Land Office (GLO) is in charge of making sure construction on the Texas coast that affects the beach and dunes is

399

NREL: News - NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar Study shows solar for 1,000 homes would require 32 acres July 30, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has published a report on the land use requirements of solar power plants based on actual land-use practices from existing solar facilities. "Having real data from a majority of the solar plants in the United States will help people make proper comparisons and informed decisions," lead author Sean Ong said. The report, "Land-use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States," was written with NREL colleagues Clinton Campbell, Robert Margolis, Paul Denholm and Garvin Heath. Ong gathered data from 72% of the solar power plants installed or under

400

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Coastal Commission California State Lands Commission Regulations & Policies California Coastal Act California PRC § 6826 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Under the California Coastal Act, projects in California Coastal Zones may

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIS-0403: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0403: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States The Agencies have determined that a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq.) is appropriate for the establishment of specific agency-wide solar energy programs and additional related policy. Notice of Intent To Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement To Evaluate Solar Energy Development, Develop and Implement Agency-Specific Programs, Conduct Public Scoping Meetings, Amend Relevant Agency Land Use Plans, and Provide Notice of Proposed Planning Criteria, DOE/EIS-0402 (May

402

Record of Decision for the Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (11/12/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 218 / Friday, November 12, 1999 / Notices proactive approach in evaluating the status of the nation's schools after January 1st through a random sample survey of 1,200 elementary/secondary school districts and 1,950 postsecondary institutions located in the 50 states, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia. Information obtained from this survey will help assess the status of the nation's schools after the year 2000 transition. Survey results will be reported not only to ED's management, but also to The President's Council on Year 2000 Conversion's Information Coordination Center, Office of Management and Budget, major education associations, and other Year 2000 oversight authorities, as well as the public. Additional Information: This survey

403

GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

www.sutp.orgcomponentphocadownloadcategory25-2a?download33:2a-lup Related Tools Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure...

404

Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste into Resource Anaerobic biogas tank Anaerobic pondsor tanks can capture biogas resulting from the degradationprocess. Biogas is produced in many countries for cook-

Timothy Duane

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Opportunity for All: Growth, Equity, and Land Use Planning for California's Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. Landis, John, with Ted Bradshaw, PeterLincoln Institute of Land Policy. Pastor, Manuel Jr. , Dreier, Peter,

Snyder, Mary Gail

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Metropolitan governance and local land use planning in Boston, Denver, and Portland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metropolitan areas across the U.S. are characterized by sprawling development which uses larger amounts of open space than necessary, leads to the inefficient use of energy and water, increases social inequality, and causes ...

Rosan, Christina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

material, creat- ing rich compost that can be used forcrops. Manage Solids Compost: Pig waste and carcasses can bematerials such as mats. Compost Solid waste from the solid

Timothy Duane

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Smart Beijing: Correlation of Urban Electrical Energy Consumption with Urban Environmental Sensing for Optimizing Distribution Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Beijing: Correlation of Urban Electrical Energy Consumption with Urban Environmental Sensing and investigates the environmental impact of the electrical energy consumer (transportation, buildings, street will be trained to recognize important city events and dynamics which will affect electrical power consumption

Beigl, Michael

409

Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

Environmental guidelines for development of Cultural Resource Management plans. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to the DOE field managements with responsibility for the development of an individual Cultural Resource Management Plan for each DOE facility and program.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Savannah River Site Environmental Implentation Plan. Volume 3, Management and support programs  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the organizational responsibilities for the Savannah River Site Environmental program. Operations, Engineering and projects, Environment, safety, and health, Quality assurance, and the Savannah River Laboratory are described.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Solvent Refined Coal-II (SRC-II) detailed environmental plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes environmental research which will: aid in the development of an environmentally acceptable SRC-II process; and provide data for environmental assessment of the process. The SRC-II process is described, criteria for selection of samples to undergo environmental analyses are given, and approximate timelines are presented for obtaining pertinent samples. At this time, the SRC-II process is at the pilot-plant stage of development and a demonstration facility is scheduled to begin operation in 1984. Since design criteria may change, the environmental research described in this document is organized in four phases which correlate with and will provide information early in process development. Phase I research (screening) evaluates samples from existing SRC-II facilities (pilot, process demonstration unit (PDU), bench) which may bracket potential demonstration/commercial practice in terms of physical and chemical criteria. The samples are being subjected to a battery of short-term biomedical and ecological assays. Chemical fractionation and analysis are being performed to determine compounds and compound classes of potential concern. Phase II (baseline) research will evaluate SRC-II materials which are considered most representative of potential demonstration/commercial practice. These materials will be subjected to longer-term, more-extensive biological and ecological analyses relative to effects and environmental fate. Phase III research will examine effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential environmental properties of SRC-II materials. Phase IV research (onsite monitoring) will develop methods and initiate environmental monitoring for effects at the SRC-II demonstration facility and potential commercial sites. This document also describes industrial hygiene programs which must occur throughout SRC-II process development.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institutes Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 574: Neptune, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 574, Neptune. CAU 574 is included in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 [as amended March 2010]) and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune); (2) CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). This plan provides the methodology for the field activities that will be performed to gather the necessary information for closure of the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 574 using the SAFER process. Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, field screening, analytical results, the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process (Section 3.0), and an evaluation of corrective action alternatives (Appendix B), closure in place with administrative controls is the expected closure strategy for CAU 574. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation to verify and support the expected closure strategy and provide a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

The New Environmental Drivers: Challenges to Fossil Generation Planning and Investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry faces emission requirements of unprecedented scope and stringency over the next decade. This report introduces and summarizes different existing and potential requirements collectively and describes the special challenges they pose, in combination, for fossil generation planning and investment. The report also examines Phase 1 compliance experience, a sharp contrast from possible developments during Phase 2.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Conforth Ranch (Wanaket) Wildlife Mitigation Project : Draft Management Plan and Draft Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to mitigate for loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects, including McNary dam. The proposed wildlife mitigation project involves wildlife conservation on 1140 hectares (ha)(2817 acres) of land (including water rights) in Umatilla County, Oregon. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA)(DOE/EA- 1016) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

"Annual NEPA Planning Summary Status of Ongoing NEPA Compliance Activities: Environmental Assessments"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status of Ongoing NEPA Compliance Activities: Environmental Assessments" Status of Ongoing NEPA Compliance Activities: Environmental Assessments" "NNSA NA-21" "January 2012" "#","*Title, Location","Estimated Cost","Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones)",,"Description" ,"U.S.-origin Spent Nuclear Fuel Returned to the United States from Austria in 2025",250000,"Determination Date:","February 2012","NA-21 seeks to analyze the impacts of U.S.-origin spent nuclear fuel returned to the United States from Austria in 2025 since current NEPA documentation for the U.S.-Origin Remove Program does not address this scenario." ,,,"Transmittal to State:","March 2012"

418

Waste minimization and the goal of an environmentally benign plutonium processing facility: A strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

To maintain capabilities in nuclear weapons technologies, the Department of Energy (DOE) has to maintain a plutonium processing facility that meets all the current and emerging standards of environmental regulations. A strategic goal to transform the Plutonium Processing Facility at Los Alamos into an environmentally benign operation is identified. A variety of technologies and systems necessary to meet this goal are identified. Two initiatives now in early stages of implementation are described in some detail. A highly motivated and trained work force and a systems approach to waste minimization and pollution prevention are necessary to maintain technical capabilities, to comply with regulations, and to meet the strategic goal.

Pillay, K.K.S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.  

SciTech Connect

This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

Brent Sohngen

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use plan environmental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Climate change mitigation and adaptation in strategic environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Countries are implementing CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets in order to meet a globally agreed global warming limit of +2 Degree-Sign C. However, it was hypothesised that these national reduction targets are not translated to regional or state level planning, and are not considered through Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) in order to meet emission reduction obligations falling on the transport, energy, housing, agriculture, and forestry sectors. SEAs of land use plans in the German state of Saxony, and the English region of the East of England were examined for their consideration of climate change impacts based on a set of criteria drawn from the literature. It was found that SEAs in both cases failed to consider climate change impacts at scales larger than the boundary of the spatial plan, and that CO{sub 2} reduction targets were not considered. This suggests a need for more clarity in the legal obligations for climate change consideration within the text of the SEA Directive, a requirement for monitoring of carbon emissions, a need for methodological guidance to devolve global climate change targets down to regional and local levels, and a need for guidance on properly implementing climate change protection in SEA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEA) of 12 land use plans from Germany and England have been examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA failed to consider climate change impacts at scales larger than the boundary of the land use plans. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA should be an important instrument for climate protection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete steps for climate protection mainstreaming into SEA at the European Union and national levels have been suggested.

Wende, Wolfgang, E-mail: W.Wende@ioer.de [Head of Research Area on Landscape Change and Management, Leibniz Institute of Ecological and Regional Development, Weberplatz 1, D-01217 Dresden (Germany); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [InteREAM, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Bobylev, Nikolai, E-mail: nikolaibobylev@gmail.com [School of Innovation Science, Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251, Politechnicheskaya, 29, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg Research Centre for Ecological Safety of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 197110, Korpusnaya, 18, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stratmann, Lars, E-mail: l.stratmann@ioer.de [Leibniz Institute of Ecological and Regional Development, Weberplatz 1, D-01217 Dresden (Germany)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

FY 1991 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office: Work plan and quarterly reports, first and second quarter reports  

SciTech Connect

The work carried out on behalf of the DOE by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies, site mitigation plans, compliance activities, and historical research; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to stat and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design, laboratory, field, and administrative activities. In addition to these, archaeological site characterization, flood hazards for rail transportation, and paleofaunal investigations will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, review and classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports, e.g., quarterly reports, not included in the requirements of the individual projects. A new set of programs funded by the Office of Technology Development will be in place by the third quarter of FY 1991. These projects will address environmental restoration and waste management concerns, among other related topics. This document contains the Work Plan, including project descriptions, tasks, deliverables and quarterly progress reports on each project for FY 1991.

NONE

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Influence of Land Use/Land Cover on Climatological Values of the Diurnal Temperature Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal temperature range (DTR) at weather observation stations that make up the U.S. Historical Climatology Network was evaluated with respect to the predominant land use/land cover associated with the stations within three radii intervals (...

Kevin P. Gallo; David R. Easterling; Thomas C. Peterson

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product of

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Land Use Change in Central Florida and Sensitivity Analysis Based on Agriculture to Urban Extreme Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explored recent land use and land cover change in western central Florida, examining both socioeconomic and biophysical influences on land transformation and the impacts of that change. Between 1995 and 2006, a growth in population ...

Jos L. Hernndez; Syewoon Hwang; Francisco Escobedo; April H. Davis; James W. Jones

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-ID-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685536" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

427

GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations 01HIALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01HIALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-HI-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685535" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

428

GRR/Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use License Process d - Land Use License Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Surface Management Rule 36.25.103 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The land use license is intended to be used for short-term use of state-owned lands. This license may be used for casual use of the lands

429

GRR/Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A land use permit in Alaska covers a number of uses of state land